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Full text of "Illinois state gazetteer and business directory for 1858 and 1859"

ILLINOIS' STATE 




1C58 

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III' , 

fHE INDIANA STATE GA, 

K|tH WILt BE READY FOR DISTRIBUTION IN SEPTEMBER. 

DRESS G. W. HAWES, - INDIA NAPOLI8, IND. 



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WESTERN 

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ENGINE, FIRE AND GARDEN HOSE, 
STEAM PACKING, LACE LEATBER AND BELT CUSPS, 

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COR. DEARBORN & SOUTH WATER ST3., CHICAGO. 



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JOHNSON, CLARKE & THOMAS, 

(KucccMiOM to ( larkc Jc Thomas.,) 



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LOAN & LA.W Ol^PICE. 



76 - DEARHORX STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, - 76. 

(UP STAIRS.) 
15. !•'. .'Johnson, Oooi ■•_;<• 11. Clarko, Fosse B.'ThomM 



Oub advantages over any other Real Estate Agency most be apparent We have 
nveral hundred Agents in different localities in the Western States, for the purpose 
of procuring and forwarding to vis an accurate description of Farms, which are, or 
may be, fin 

\W have nan] Agents, also, at the East, besides, are in communication with 
thousands of persons, in order to induce those coming West to purchase property of 
us. In addition to which., we have as; large and desirable a list of City and Suburban 
Property for sale, on as favorable terms, as can be found at any office in the West. 

Momnr Invested kor Capitalists, on commissioner share of profits. 
Government Lands Entered, and Loans Negotiated. 

Collecting and (Ienekai. Law BcBTJOSSj in tliis and adjoining States, promptly 
attended to. 



HESLER'S PALACE OE APiT, 

\os. 48 and 50 La Salic Street, and 161. cor. Randolph. 

Tlic BCoflri Extensive Grullery in this Country. 
An! im-ludrs ever) - Btjle of Miniature and Portrait Art 

DAGUERREOTYPES, IN EVERY STYLE AND VARIETY. 

A H IIKOT V PC I A > D PIIOTOGIt APUS, 

of all stvlvs and nr.es. 

POUT RAITS IN OIL, II Y THE BEST ARTISTS IN THE COUNTRY. 

Paguerreotypcs of Deceased Person*. 
CopM from Miniature I I . and Painted In Oil. Perfect Likeness Guaranteed. 

HALI.O'l'Yl'KS. DIAI'IIANKHTYI'KS. 

These last, when taken from life, nre the most delicate and benutiful pictures ever made, and most 

be seen In order to conceive of their exquisite beauty. 

ENTRANCE TO GALLERY, NO. 22 METROS 'LIT AN Dili. DINGS. 

A . IIESLER. 



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NO, 31 !■ A- 



MUNSON & BEADLEY, 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



LANK BOOKS, 

AXD ETERY VARIETY OF 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC STATIONERY. 



County Offices, Bankers, Insurance, Hailroad and all Business Men, 

SUPPLIED WITH EVERY ARTICLE USED IN THE OFFICE AND COUNTING-ROOM. 

BLANK BOOKS MADE TO OBDER 
Of any Required. Style of Printing, Ruling and Binding. 

Bonds, Notes, Checks,' Drafts, Ceetificates of Deposit, Bill 

Heads, Business Cards, etc., etc., Engraved and Printed 

in any desired style or color, at short notice. 

$W OUR MOTTO— "WE TRY TO GIVE SATISFACTION IN BOTH QUALITY AND PRICE." 



-^-> ♦ »-;&— 



TWO SILVER MEDALS 

Have been awarded to us for the best blank books, by the 



AND BY THE 



MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, IN CHICAGO. 



MUNSON & BBADLEY, 

81 Lake Street, wider Tremont House, Chicago. 



L K 



ILLINOIS STATE GAZETTEER 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



18 5 8 ^ WD 18 5 9. 



COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME 



GEORGE W. HAWES, 

PUBLISHER AND COMPILER. 



Price, Three Dollars. 




CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



MAILED POSTAGE FREE TO ANY PART OF THE UNITED STATES OR CANADAS. 
ON RECEIPT OF THREE DOLLARS. 



Post Office Box, 1378. 




♦fit®-/ ' ^sUsf 



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PUBLISHER'S REMARKS. 



A full and complete Gazetteer and Business Directory of this 
State has never yet been published, although such a work has long been 
felt to be a desideratum with every professional and business man. To 
supply this desideratum is the object of the present work. The Pub- 
lisher has spared no labor or expense in compiling, and every effort has 
been made to procure full and accurate information from all parts of the 
state, by sending agents to canvass each city, town and village, to 
obtain names and get all the statistics. The result is now before the 
public, while the Publisher indulges the hope that they will overlook 
imperfections (as it would be claiming an impracticable degree of perfec- 
tion, to say that the work now submitted is entirely free from errors and 
omissions), and give him credit for the large amount of valuable informa- 
tion herein embodied. How far he has gained his object in producing a 
■useful book, it remains for the public to decide. It is, however, believed 
that an impartial examination will satisfy any one as to its general cor- 
rectness and utility. 

The typography and press work were executed by Messrs. Scripps, 
Bross & Spears, whose facilities, in this department, are not excelled by 
any other establishment in the United States. (For card see " Chicago 
Advertisements," page 4.) 

Messrs. Muxson & Bradley executed the binding, and are gentlemen 
well and widely known for a thorough knowledge and skill in their line 
of business. (See card on page fronting title.) 

The Publisher would avail himself of this opportunity of thanking all 
those who have manifested an interest in the present publication, and 
hope they may be partially compensated for then* liberality. 

With these brief remarks, the " Illinois Gazetteer and Business 
Directory " is confidently committed to the current of popular favor, 
by the 

PUBLISHER. 



^v^C\\ ^ V*^*^ 



T *> 



INDEX TO COUNTIES. 



Page. 

Adams 2 

Alexander 3 

Bond 21 

Boone 21 

Brown 23 

Bureau 24 

Calhoun 27 

Carroll 30 

Cass 31 

Champaign 32 

Christian 62 

Clark 62 

Coles 64 

Cook 65 

De Kalb 70 

De Witt 72 

Du Page 75 

Edgar 77 

Edwards 77 

Effingham 78 

Payette 83 

Franklin 85 

Pulton 89 

Gallatin 96 

Greene 102 

Grundy 104 

Hamilton 105 

Hancock 105 

Hardin 105 

Henderson 106 

Henry 107 

Iroquois 110 

Jackson Ill 

Jasper 114 

Jefferson 114 

Jersey 114 

Jo Daviess 115 

Johnson 115 

Kane 117 

Kankakee 118 

Kendall 119 

Knox 121 

Lake 124 

La Salle 125 

Lawrence 128 

Lee 128 

Livingston 1 30 

Logan 132 



Page. 

McDonough 133 

McHenry 133 

McLean 133 

Macon 135 

Macoupin 136 

Madison 136 

Marion 138 

Marshall 138 

Mason 139 

Massac 139 

Menard 140 

Mercer 142 

Monroe 146 

Montgomery 146 

Morgan 147 

Moultrie 149 

Ogle 157 

Peoria 164 

Perry 168 

Piatt 170 

Pike 171 

Pope 175 

Pulaski 177 

Putnam 177 

Randolph 184 

Richland 185 

Rock Island 189 

Saint Clair 197 

Saline 199 

Sangamon 201 

Schuyler 202 

Scott 202 

Shelby 204 

Stark 209 

Stephenson 209 

Tazewell 213 

Union 215 

Vermilion 220 

Wabash 221 

Warren 222 

Washington 223 

Wayne 225 

White 227 

Whiteside 227 

Will 227 

Winnebago 229 

Woodford 230 



INDEX 



CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES OF .THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



Page. 

Abington 1 

Adams 2 

Addison • 2 

Adeline 3 

Albany 3 

Albion 3 

Alden 3 

Alexandria 3 

Algonquin ." 3 

Alhambra 3 

Alma 4 

Alton 4 

Alton Upper 5 

Altona 5 

Amboy 5 

America 6 

Anderson 6 

Andover. 6 

Angold 6 

Anna 6 

Annawan 6 

Antioch 6 

Apple River 6 

Apple, Tree 6 

Arcadia 6 

Arensville 6 

Argyle 6 

Arispee 6 

Arlington 7 

Armington 7 

Armstrong 7 

Arnon 7 

Aroma 7 

Arrow 7 

Asbury 7 

Ashbv 7 

Ashford 7 

Ashkum 7 

Ashley 7 

Ashmore' 7 

Astoria 7 

Ashridge 7 



Page. 

Athens 7 

Athensville 7 

Atkinson 8 

Atlanta 8 

Atlas 8 

Attilla 8 

Auburn 8 

Audubon 8 

Augusta 8 

Aurora 9 

Au Sable 10 

Avery 10 

Aviston 10 

Avoca 10 

Avon 10 

Babcock's Grove 1 

Bainbridge 1 

Baldwinville 1 

Banner 1 

Barclay 1 

Barnett 1 

Barreville 1 

Barrington 1 

Barrmgton Station 1 

Barr's Store 1 

Barry 1 

Basco 1 

Batavia 1 

Batchelder's Grove 12 

Bath 12 

Bay 12 

Bear Creek 12 

Bear Creek 12 

Beaverto wn „ 13 

Beardstown 12 

Beaver Creek 13 

Bedford 13 

Belden 13 

Bell Air 13 

BellPlain 13 

Belleview 13 

Belleville 13 



INDEX. 



IX 



Page. 

Bellefame 13 

Belvidere 13 

Bement 15 

Benton 15 

Benton • • • ■ 15 

Berkshire 15 

Berlin 15 

Berlin 15 

Bernadotte 15 

Berrytown 15 

Berwick 15 

Bethalto 15 

Bethel 16 

Beverly 1*3 

Bible Grove 16 

Big Neck 16 

Big Prairie 16 

Big Rock 16 

Big Spring 16 

Biggsville Station 16 

Big Woods 16 

Birmingham 16 

Bishop Hill 16 

Bistoe 16 

Blackberry Station 16 

Black Oak 16 

Blairsville 16 

Blandensville 17 

Blissville 17 

Blivens' Mills 17 

Blood's Point 17 

Bloom 17 

Blackberry 17 

Bloomfield 17 

Bloomfield 17 

Bloomfield 17 

Bloomingdale 17 

Bloomington 17 

Bloomville 21 

Blue Grass 21 

Blue Point 21 

Blueville 21 

Bluffdale ■ 21 

Bluffville 21 

Bolton 21 

Bonaparte 21 

Bond's Point 21 

Bon Pas 21 

Bonus 21 

Bonwell 21 

Boone , 21 

Booneboro 22 

Bourbon 22 

Bowling Green 22 

Braceville 22 

Bradley 22 

Bradford 22 

Bradford 22 

Breese 22 

Bremen 22 

Bremen 22 

Brickton 22 

Bridgeport 22 

Brighton 22 

Brimfield 23 

Bristol 23 



Page. 

Bristol Station 23 

Broad Oak 23 

Brookdale 23 

Brookfield 23 

Brooklyn 23 

Brooklyn 23 

Brookville 23 

Broomsburg 23 

Browning 23 

Bruce 23 

Bruce 24 

Brunswick 24 

Brush Hill 24 

Brushy Fork . . . . , 24 

Buck Creek 24 

Buckeye 24 

Buckhorn 24 

Buda 24 

Buena Vista 24 

Buffalo Prairie 24 

Bullbonas Grove 24 

Bunker Hill 24 

Bureau Junction 24 

Burlington 24 

Burns 24 

Burnsville > 24 

Burnt Prairie 25 

Burritt 25 

Burton 25 

Burton's Corners 25 

Bushnell 25 

Butler 25 

Butler 25 

Butler's Point. 25 

Bvron 25 

Cairo 25 

Caledonia 27 

Caledonia Station 27 

Calhoun 28 

Calumet 28 

Cambridge 28 

Camden :. 28 

Camden Mills 2S 

Cameron 28 

Carmi 28 

Campbell 28 

Camp Point 28 

Campton 29 

Canton 29 

Carbondale 29 

Carlinville 29 

Carlyle 30 

Carnent Prairie 30 

Carpenterville 30 

Carrollton 30 

Carter 31 

Carthage 31 

Cary Station 31 

Casey 31 

Caseyville 31 

Cass 31 

Castlefin 31 

Cave 31 

Cave-in-Rock 31 

Cedar Bluff 31 

Cedarville 31 



INDEX. 



Cedron 31 

Centre Ridge 32 

Central City 32 

Centraiia 32 

Cerro Gordo 32 

Charnbersburg 32 

Channalion 32 

Charleston 32 

Chatham 33 

Chebance 33 

Chelsea 33 

Chemung 34 

Cheney's Grove 34 

Chenoa 34 

Cherry Grove 34 

Cherry Valley 34 

Chester .' 34 

Chesterfield 34 

Chenning 35 

Chicago 35 

Chili 61 

Chillicothe 61 

Chittenden 61 

Christmasville 62 

Circleville 62 

Clay 62 

Clayton 62 

Cliola 62 

Clear Creek Landing 62 

Clermont 62 

Clinton 62 

Clintonville 63 

Clyde 64 

Clyde 64 

Coatsburg. ... 64 

Cochran's Grove 64 

Cogswell 64 

Colchester 64 

Cold Spring 64 

Collins Station 64 

Collinsville 64 

Colona 64 

Colona Station 64 

Columbus 64 

Conio 64 

Comorn 65 

Concord '. 65 

Concord 65 

Concord 65 

Cooperstown 65 

Conkey's Store 65 

Copperas Creek 65 

Copper Creek 66 

Coral 66 

Cordova 66 

Cornton 66 

Cornville 66 

Cottage Hill 66 

Cottonwood 66 

Cottonwood Grove 66 

Coultersville 66 

Council Hill 66 

Courtland Station 66 

Courtright Mill 66 

Crab Orchard 66 

Crane Creek 66 



Crane's Grove 66 

Crawford 66 

Crete 66 

Crittenden 66 

Cross Roads 66 

Cretty 66 

Crow Meadow 66 

Crystal Lake 67 

Cuba 67 

Cumberland 67 

Cummington 67 

Cypress Creek 67 

Dallas City 67 

Damascus 67 

Danby 67 

Danville 67 

Darwin 67 

Dawson 67 

Daysville 67 

Dayton 68 

Decatur , 68 

Deer Creek 69 

Deerfield 69 

Deer Grove 70 

Deer Park 70 

Deer Plain 70 

DeKalb 70 

Delavan 71 

Delhi 71 

Del Ray 71 

Delta 71 

Dement Station 71 

Democrat 71 

Denny 71 

Derinda 71 

De Soto 71 

Detroit 71 

Detroit 72 

De Witt 72 

Diamond Lake 72 

Dillon 72 

Dimmick 72 

Dixon 72 

Doddsville 74 

Dogtooth 74 

Dogwood 74 

Dolson 74 

Dooky's Farm 74 

Doi ranee 74 

Dorset 74 

Douglasville 74 

Dover 74 

Dowling 74 

Downer's Grove 74 

Drummond 74 

Drury 75 

Dudley 7 5 

Dug Out 7 5 

Duncanton 7 5 

Dundee 7 5 

Dunham 7 5 

Dunleith 7 5 

Du Page 7 6 

Du Quoin 7 6 

Durham 7 6 

Dwight 7 6 



INDEX. 



XI 



Page. 

Eagle 76 

Eagle Cliff 76 

Eagle Point 76 

Earl 76 

East Cambridge 77 

East Concord 77 

East Paw Paw 77 

East Wheatland 77 

Eaton 77 

Edge wood 77 

Edgington 77 

Edward's Station 77 

Edwardsville 77 

Effingham 78 

Ela 78 

Elbridge 78 

Eldara 78 

Eleroyj 78 

Elgin 78 

Elida 79 

Eliza 79 

Elizabeth 79 

Elizabethtown 79 

Elk Grove 79 

Elkhart City 80 

Elkhorn 80 

Elkhorn Grove SO 

Elkton 80 

Elliottstown 80 

Ellis Grove 80 

Ellison 80 

Ellisville 80 

Elm Grove 80 

Elmira 80 

Elmore 80 

Elm Point 80 

Elm Tree 80 

Elmwood 80 

Elpaso 80 

Elvino 80 

Elwood 80 

Elysium 80 

Embarras River Station 81 

Emerald Point SI 

Eminence 81 

Emma 81 

Emmett 81 

Empire 81 

Endor 81 

English Prairie 81 

Enon 81 

Ensenada 81 

Enterprise 81 

Equality 81 

Erie 81 

Erin 81 

Erin 81 

Essex 81 

Eureka 81 

Evan's Mill 82 

Evanston 82 

Evansville 82 

Ewing 82 

Ewington 82 

Exeter 82 

Fairfield 82 



Page. 

Fairview 82 

Fairville 83 

Farina 83 

Fairweather 83 

Farlow's Grove 83 

Farmer's Farm 83 

Farmer's Hall 83 

Farmington 83 

Farm Ridge 83 

Fayette 83 

Fayettsville 83 

Ferdinand 83 

Fiatt 84 

Fidelity 84 

Fieldon 84 

Fillmore 84 

Fincastle 84 

Fitz Henry 84 

Flat Rock 84 

Flint 84 

Flora 84 

Florence 84 

Florida 84 

Foreston 84 

Forksville 84 

Foster 84 

Fort Hill 84 

Fountain Green 85 

Four Mile Grove 85 

Four Mile Prairie 85 

Fox Lake 85 

Franconia 85 

Frankfort 85 

Frankfort 85 

Franklin 85 

Franklin 85 

Franklin 85 

Franklin 85 

Franklin Grove S5 

Fredericksville 85 

Fredonia 85 

Freedom 85 

Freeland S6- 

Freemanton 86 

Freeport 86 

Fremont Centre 88 

French Creek 88 

French Village 88 

Friends' Grove 89 

Friendship 89 

Friendsville 89 

Fruit Hill 89 

Fuller's Point 89 

Fulton 89 

Fulton City 89 

Gage's Lake 90 

Galena 90 

Galesburg 93 

Gallatia 96 

Galloway , 96 

Galum 96 

Galva 96 

Gap Grove 98 

Garden Plain 98 

Garden Prairie 98 

Gardner 98 



Xll 



INDEX. 



Gard's Point 98 

Genesee Grove 98 

Geneseo 98 

Geneva 99 

Genoa 100 

George's Creek 100 

Georgetown 100 

Germantown 100 

Gilead 100 

Gillespie 100 

Gilman 100 

Gilmer 101 

Girard 101 

Glasgow 101 

Glenwood 101 

Godfrey 101 

Golconda 101 

Golden's Point 101 

Gooding's Grove 101 

Grafton 102 

Grand Cote Prairie 102 

Grand Detour 102 

Grand Pier 102 

Grand Prairie 102 

Grand Tower 102 

Grandview 102 

Grandville 102 

Grayville 102 

Greenbush 102 

Greendale 103 

Greenfield 103 

Green Garden 103 

Green Eidge 103 

GreenRiver 103 

Greenup 103 

Greenvale 103 

Greenville 103 

Greenwood 103 

Griggsville 104 

Giindstone 104 

Griswold 104 

Grouse , 104 

Groveland 104 

Guilford 104 

Guilford 104 

Hadley 104 

Hadley Station 104 

Hagley 104 

Hainesville 104 

Hale 104 

Halfday 104 

Hall 104 

Hamburg 105 

Hamilton 105 

Hamlet 105 

Hampshire 105 

Hampton 105 

Hanover 105 

Hardin 105 

Hardinsville 105 

Harlem 105 

Harlem 105 

Harmony 105 

Harrisburg 106 

Harris' Grove 106 

Harrison 106 



Page. 

Harrisonville . • • 106 

Hartland 106 

Havana 106 

Hawthorn 106 

Hazel Dell 106 

Heathland 106 

Hebron 106 

Hecker 106 

Helena 106 

Hemlo 106 

Henderson 106 

Hennepin 106 

Henry 107 

Hermitage 107 

Hermon 108 

Hershey's Mill 108 

Hickory 108 

Hickory Creek 108 

Hickory Grove 108 

Hickorv Hill 108 

Hickor'v Point 108 

Hick's Mills 108 

Hidalgo 108 

Higginsville 108 

Highland 10S 

Highland Prairie 108 

High Point 108 

High Prairie 108 

Hillsboro' 108 

Hillsgrove 109 

Hitesville 109 

Holderman's Grove 109 

Hollowayville 109 

Homer 109 

Hoover's Point 109 

Hope 109 

Hopedale 109 

Hopewell 109 

Hopkin's Grove 109 

Hopper's Mills 109 

Hornsby 109 

Horse Creek • 109 

Houston 109 

Houston 109 

Howard 109 

Howard's Point 109 

Howardville 109 

Hudson 109 

Hullsford 109 

Hunter 109 

Huntlev's Grove „ * 109 

Huntsv'ille HO 

Hurricane HO 

Hutsonville HO 

Illinois City HO 

Illinoistown HO 

Illiopolis HO 

Independence HO 

Indian Grove HO 

Indianola HO 

Indian Prairie HO 

Industry HO 

Ingraham Prairie HO 

lone HO 

Ionia HO 

Iowa HO 



INDEX. 



Xll. 



Page. 

Ipava 7 110 

Ira 110 

Iroquois Ill 

Irving Ill 

Island Creek Ill 

Ivesdale Ill 

Jackson Ill 

Jacksonville Ill 

Jamestown 113 

Jasper 114 

Jefferson 114 

Jefferson's Corner 114 

Jericho 114 

Jersey Landing 114 

Jersey Prairie 114 

Jerseyville 114 

Johnson 115 

Johnson's Hills 115 

Johnston 115 

Joliet 115 

Jonesbury 117 

Jones' Creek 117 

Jordon 117 

Jordan's Grove 117 

Kane 117 

Kanesville 117 

Kankakee City 118 

Kansas 119 

Kappa 119 

Kaskaskia 119 

Keenville 119 

Keithsburg 119 

Kendall 119 

Kent 120 

Kentuckey 120 

Kewanee 120 

Keysburg 120 

Keysport 120 

Kickapoo 121 

Killbuck 121 

Kinderhook 121 

Kingsbui'y 121 

Kings' Mills. 121 

Kingston 121 

Kingston 121 

Kingston 121 

Kingston Mines 121 

Kishwaukee 121 

Knoxville 121 

Kossuth 122 

Kyte River 123 

Lacev 123 

Laclair 123 

Lacon 123 

Laenna 124 

Lafayette 124 

La Grange Bluff 124 

La Harpe 124 

Lake 124 

Lake Creek 124 

Lake Zurich 124 

Lamb's Point 124 

Larnburgh 124 

Lamoille 124 

Lancaster 124 

Lane Depot 1 24 



Page. 

Lane's Cross Roads 125 

Laona 125 

La Prairie (a station) 125 

La Prairie Centre 125 

Larkinsburg 125 

La Salle 125 

Lawndale 127 

Lawn Ridge 128 

Lawrenceville 128 

Lebanon 128 

Lee 128 

Lee Centre 128 

Leesville 128 

Lemont 128 

Lena 128 

Lenox 128 

Lensburg 128 

L'Erable 128 

Le Roy 12S 

Lewiston 129 

Lexington 129 

Leyden 129 

Leyden Centre 129 

Liberty 129 

Libertyville 129 

Lilleeash 129 

Lima 129 

Limestone 129 

Lincoln 129 

Lindenwood 129 

Lisbon 129 

Lisle 130 

Litchfield 130 

Little Detroit 130 

Little Muddv 130 

Little Rock 130 

Littleton 130 

Little York 130 

Liverpool 130 

Livingston 130 

Loammi 130 

Lockhart 130 

Lockport 130 

Lodi 131 

Lodi Station 131 

Logan 131 

London City 131 

Loda .'... 131 

Locust Grove 132 

Long Branch 132 

Long Grove 132 

Long John 132 

Long Point 132 

Long Point Grove 132 

Looking Glass 132 

Loran 132 

Louisa 132 

Louisville 132 

Lovington 132 

Lowell 133 

Low Point 133 

Lyndon 133 

Lynsville 133 

Lynville 133 

Lyons 133 

Lyttlesville 133 



XIV 



INDEX. 



McCleary's Bluff 133 

McConnell's Grove 133 

McGary 133 

McHenry 133 

McLeansboro 134 

Mackinaw 134 

Macomb. 134 

Macon 136 

Magnolia 136 

Mahomet 136 

Maine 136 

Mainville 13*7 

Malugin Grove 137 

Manchester 137 

Mansfield 137 

Manteno 137 

Maple Grove 137 

Maguon 137 

Marcellion 137 

Marcy , 137 

Marengo 137 

Margaretta 138 

Marietta 138 

Marine 138 

Marion 138 

Marissa 138 

Maroa 138 

Marseilles 138 

Marshall 138 

Martha Furnace 139 

Martinsburg 139 

Martinsburg 139 

Martinsville 139 

Mascouteh 139 

Mattoon 139 

Mauldings Mills 140 

May Hill .-. 140 

Maysville 140 

Mazon 140 

Mechanicsburg 140 

Medina 140 

Melrose 140 

Mendon 140 

Mendota 140 

Mercia 142 

Meredosia 142 

Merona 142 

Metamore 142 

Metropolis City 142 

Middle Fork 142 

Middle Grove 142 

Middle Fort 142 

Middletown 143 

Middletown 143 

Midway 143 

Mier 143 

Mile Station 143 

Milford 143 

Millburn 143 

Mill Creek 143 

Millegeville 143 

Millersburg 143 

Mill Grove 143 

Mill's Prairie 143 

Millstadt 143 

Millville 143 



Page. 

Milo 143 

Milroy 143 

Milton 143 

Milton 143 

Minouk 143 

Minouka 144 

Mission Point 144 

Mode 144 

Mokena 144 

Moline 144 

Momence 145 

Monee 145 

Monmouth - 145 

Monroe City 146 

Monterey 146 

Montezuma 146 

Montgomery 146 

Monticello 147 

Monticello 147 

Monument 147 

Moore's Prairie 147 

Morlan's Grove 148 

Morris 148 

Morristown 148 

Massville 148 

Moultonville 148 

Mound City 149 

Mount Auburn 149 

Mount Carmel 149 

Mount Carroll 149 

Mount Erie 150 

Mount Hawkins , 150 

Mount Hawley 150 

Mount Hope 150 

Mount Kingston 150 

Mount Lebanon 150 

Mount Liberty 150 

Mount Meacham 150 

Mount Morris 151 

Mount Palatine 151 

Mount Pleasant 151 

Mount Prospect 151 

Mount Pulaski 151 

Mount Steling * 151 

Mount Sumner 152 

Mount Vernon 152 

Mount Zion 152 

Moawequa 152 

Mud Creek 152 

Mulberry Grove 152 

Murphysborough 152 

Myer's Mills 152 

Naausay 152 

Nachusa 152 

Naperville 152 

Naples 153 

Nashville 153 

Nauvoo. 153 

Neapolis 154 

Nelson Hill 154 

Neponset. . , 154 

Nerada 154 

Newark 154 

New Baltimore 154 

New Bedford 154 

Ngwbern , 154 



INDEX. 



XV 



Page. 

New Boston 154 

New Bremen 154 

New Clyde 154 

Newell 154 

New Erin 154 

New Franklin 154 

New Genesee 154 

New Hartford 154 

New Haven 154 

New Hebron 154 

New Hope 154 

New Lancaster 154 

New Lebanon 154 

New Liberty 155 

Newman 155 

New Masillon 155 

New Maysville 155 

New Michigan 155 

New Milford 155 

New Plato 155 

News 155 

New Salem 155 

Newton 155 

New Friar 155 

New Virgil 155 

Ney 155 

Niles 155 

Nilwood 155 

Noble , 155 

No Grove 155 

Nokomis , 155 

Nora 156 

Northfield -. 156 

North Fork 156 

North Hampton 156 

North Henderson 156 

North Kingston 156 

North Plato 156 

North Prairie 156 

Northville 156 

Norton 156 

Norway 156 

Noysville , 156 

OokHill 156 

Oakland 156 

Oak Villa 156 

Oblong , 156 

Oconee Station 156 

Oceola 156 

Odell 156 

O'Fallon Depot 156 

Ogle 158 

Ogle Station 158 

Ohio 15S 

Ohio Farm , 158 

Ohio Grove 158 

Okaw 158 

Old Farm 158 

Olena 158 

Olive 158 

Olney 158 

Onega 159 

Omphgent 159 

Onarga 159 

Onego 159 

Onieda 159 



Page. 

Ontario 159 

Ophir 159 

Oquawka 159 

Orange Prairie 160 

Orangeville 160 

Oregon City 160 

Orion 160 

Orland 160 

Orleans 161 

Osage 161 

Ostend 161 

Oswego 161 

Otsego 161 

Ottawa 161 

Ottor Creek 163 

Otto 163 

Owaneco 163 

Oxbow 163 

Oxford 163 

Padua 163 

Paine's Depot 163 

Palatine 163 

Palestine 163 

Palo Alto 163 

Paloma 163 

Palos 163 

Pana 163 

Panola Station 163 

Panther Creek 163 

Paradise 163 

Paris 164 

Parkersburg 164 

Park's Corners 164 

Petoka 164 

Pavilion 164 

Paw Paw Grove 164 

Payson 164 

Pearl. . , 164 

Pecatonica 164 

Pekin 164 

Pellonia 164 

Pennsylvania 164 

Peoria 165 

Pera Station 168 

Perkins' Station, 168 

Perry 168 

Perrvtown 168 

Persifer 168 

Peru 168 

Pesotum 170 

Petersburg 170 

Petty's 170 

Phillipstown 170 

Piasa 170 

Picayune 171 

Pierce 171 

Piercevhle ■ 171 

Pilot 171 

Pilot Grove 171 

Pilot Hill 171 

Pinkneyville 171 

Pingree Grove 171 

Pink Prairie 171 

Pin Oak 171 

Pisgat 171 

Pitman 171 



XVI 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Pittsfield - 171 

Plainfield 172 

Plainview 17 2 

Piano 172 

Plato 172 

Plattevffle 172 

Pleasant Hill 172 

Pleasant Plains 173 

Pleasant Ridge 173 

Pleasant Shade 173 

Pleasant Yale 173 

Pleasant Valley 173 

Pleasant View 173 

Plum 173 

Plum Hill 173 

Plum River 173 

Plymouth 173 

Pocohontas 174 

Point Pleasant 174 

Polo 174 

Pontiac 175 

Pontoosuc 175 

Pope Creek 175 

Poplar Grove 175 

PortBvron 175 

Port Clinton 176 

Portland 176 

Prairie Bird 176 

Prairie City 176 

Prairie Creek 176 

Prairie De Long 176 

Prairie Du Rocher 176 

Prairie Hill 176 

Prairie Mound 176 

Prairieville 176 

Precmpton 176 

Preston 176 

Princeton 176 

Princeville 177 

Prophetstown 177 

Prospect 177 

Providence 177 

Proviso 177 

Pulaski 177 

Quinc)^ 178 

Quiver 184 

Racoon 184 

Raleigh 184 

Ramsey 184 

Randolph's Grove 184 

Raneysburg 184 

Rantoul 184 

Ratelesnake 184 

Reading 184 

Rector 185 

Red Bud 185 

Renault 185 

Rhoade's Point IS 5 

Rich 185 

Richardson 185 

Richfield 185 

Richland 185 

Richland Grove 185 

Richmond 185 

Richview 185 

Ridge Farm 185 



Page. 

Ridgeley 185 

Ridotts 185 

Riley 185 

Ringgold 185 

Ringwood 185 

Rinosa 185 

Ripley 186 

Risdon 186 

Rising Sun 186 

Robin's Nest 186 

Robinson 186 

Robinson's Mills 186 

Rochester 186 

Rochester Mills 186 

Rock 186 

Rockbridge 186 

Rock Creek 186 

Rockford 186 

Rockgrove 189 

Rock Island 190 

Rockport 192 

Rock Run 192 

Rockton 192 

Rockville 193 

Rockwell 193 

Roland 193 

Rome 193 

Rome Farms 193 

Romeo 193 

Rooks Creek 193 

Roscoe 193 

Roscoe Station 193 

Rosebud 194 

Rosefield ! 194 

Rose Hill 194 

Rosemond 194 

Roseville 194 

Rosiclaire 194 

Ross Grove 194 

Rough and Ready 194 

Round Grove 194 

Ruark 194 

Runia 194 

Rural Retreat 194 

Rush 194 

Rushaway 194 

Rushville 194 

Russellville 195 

Ruthsville 195 

Rutland 195 

Sacton 195 

Sagone 195 

St. Albans 195 

St. Augustin 195 

St. Anne 195 

St. Charles 195 

St. Francisville 197 

St. Johns 197 

St. Jacob 197 

St. Joseph 197 

St. Marie 198 

S. Mary's 198 

Salem 198 

Saline 199 

Salisbury 199 

Salisbury 199 



INDEX. 



XV11 



Page. 

Saline Mills 199 

Sammons Point 199 

Sand Creek 199 

Sandoval 199 

Sandwich 199 

Sandy Ridge 201 

Sangamon 201 

Santa Anna 201 

Santa Fe 201 

Sarahville 201 

Savanna 201 

Saxon 201 

Scales Mound 202 

Scott 202 

Scottville 202 

Selfridgeville 202 

Shawneetown 202 

SeliDa 202 

Serena 202 

Senex 202 

Seward 203 

Seward's Point 203 

Shabonais Grove, 203 

Sharon 203 

Shaumburgh 203 

Shaw's Point ' 203 

Sheffield 203 

Shelburn 204 

Sheldon's Grove 204 

Shelby Station 204 

Shelby ville 204 

Shelburnville 204 

Shipman 204 

Shokokon 204 

Sidney 204 

Silver Creek 204 

Simoda 204 

Slackwater 205 

Smithton 205 

Smithville 205 

Smoot's Point 205 

Sodon 205 

Soderus 205 

Solen Mills 205 

Somei set 205 

Somonauk 205 

South America 205 

South Grove 205 

South Hampton 205 

Southampton 205 

South Northfield 205 

Southport 205 

Sparta 205 

Spencer 205 

Spring Bay 205 

Spring Creek 205 

Springfield 205 

Spring Garden 208 

Spring Grove 208 

Spring Hill 208 

Spring Lake 208 

Spring Valley 209 

Spingville 209 

Squaw Grove 209 

Starfield 209 

Staunton 209 

B 



Page. 

Steele's Mills 209 

Sterling 210 

Steuben 211 

Stiflesville 211 

Stockton 211 

Stone's Prairie 211 

Stonington 211 

Stout's Grove 211 

Strasburgh 211 

StriDgtown 212 

Sublette 212 

Sugar Creek 212 

Sugar Grove 212 

Sullivan 212 

Sulphur Springs 212 

Summerfield 212 

Summer Hill 212 

Summerville 212 

Summum 212 

Sumner 212 

Sunbeam 212 

Sunbury 212 

Sutten's Point 212 

Swan Creek 212 

Sweet Water 212 

Sycamore 212 

Sylva 212 

Sylvan Dale 212 

Table Grove 212 

Tacusha 212 

Talcott's Ferry 212 

Tamaroa .' 212 

Taylor 213 

Taylorsville 213 

Ten Mile Grove 213 

Tennessee 213 

Tentapolis 213 

Texas 213 

Thebes 213 

Thornton 213 

Thornton Station 213 

Timber 213 

Time 213 

Tiskilwa 213 

Tivola 214 

Toledo 214 

Tolono 214 

Toluca 214 

Tonica 214 

Toulon 214 

Towanda 214 

Towertown 214 

Tremont 214 

Trenton 214 

Troy 215 

Troy Grove 215 

Troy Mills 215 

Truro 215 

Truxton 215 

Tunbridge 215 

Turner 215 

Tyler. 215 

TJba 215 

Udina 215 

Ullin 215 

Union 215 



XV111 



ITSTDEX. 



Page. 

Union Grove 215 

Union Town 216 

Unity 216 

Upper Embarras 216 

Urbana (West) 216 

Urbana 217 

Urbane 218 

Ursa 218 

Utica 218 

Ustick 21S 

Utah 218 

Valley Forge 218 

Van Buren 219 

Vandalia 219 

Vanceburg 219 

Venice 219 

Verden 219 

Vergennes 220 

Vermilionville 220 

Vermont 220 

Vernon 220 

Versailles 220 

Victoria 220 

Vienna 220 

Vietta 220 

Virdin 220 

Virgil 220 

Virginia 220 

Wabash 221 

Wabash Valley 221 

Waddam's Grove 221 

Wakefield 221 

Walden 221 

Wales 221 

Walker's Grove 221 

Wallingford 221 

Wallridge 221 

Walnut 221 

Walnut Grove 221 

Walnut Hill 221 

Walnut Shade 221 

Walshville 221 

Waltham 221 

Wapansee 221 

Wapella 222 

Ward's Grove 222 

Warren 222 

Warrensville 222 

Warrentown 222 

Warsaw 222 

Washburn 222 

AVashington 223 

Wataga 223 

Waterford 223 

Waterloo 223 

Waukegan 223 

Waulonda 225 

Waverley 225 

Waverley Station 225 

Way Land 225 

Wayne 225 

Wayne Centre 225 

Waynesville 226 

Webb's Prairie 226 

Webster 226 

Wellington 226 

Wenona Station 226 



Wentwortb 226 

Wesley City 226 

Western Saratoga 226 

Westfield 226 

West Hebron 226 

West Hennepin 226 

West Jersey 226 

Westminster 226 

West Northfield 226 

Weston 226 

West Salem 226 

West Point 226 

West Wheeling 226 

West Wood 226 

Wethersfield 226 

Wet weather 226 

Wheatland 227 

Wheaton 227 

Wheeling 227 

Whitefield 227 

White Hall 227 

White Oak Grove 227 

White Oak Springs 227 

White Rock 227 

Whitely Point 227 

Wickliffe 227 

Wilcoxville 228 

Wilksborough 228 

Williamsburg 228 

Williamsville 228 

Willmin^ton 228 

Willow Creek 229 

Willow Hill 229 

Winchester 229 

Winfield 229 

Wenneshick 229 

Winnebago 230 

Winslow 230 

Winthrop 230 

Wiona 230 

Woodsborough 230 

Woodbury 230 

Woodbury 230 

Woodford 230 

Woodland 230 

Woodside 230 

Woosung 230 

Woodstock 230 

Woodville 231 

Worth 231 

Worthington 232 

Wyonet 332 

Wyoming 232 

Wythe 232 

Wysot 232 

Xenia 232 

Yellow Creek 232 

Yellowhead Grove 232 

York 232 

York Centre 232 

York Town 232 

Young 232 

Young America 232 

Zabriskie 232 

Zanesville 232 

Zif. 232 

Zion 232 



CLASSIFIED INDEX, 



CHICAGO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Acid Works, 

Sears John, Jr 25 

Advertising Agents, 

ScrivenC. H 6 

Agents, 

LambT. C 10 

O'Sullivan H 29 

Sutherland James 29 

TivisethB. A 25 

Agricultural Warehouses. 

Chapman F. M. & Co 36 

Emery Henry D. & Co 10 

Bag Makers, 

Ashard G. W. (Part I.) 41 

Chase & Co 25 

Bankers, 

Adams F. Granger, inside right cover. 

Church & Co 12 

Officer & Brother 21 

Sherman A. T. & Co., inside left cover. 

Whitney G. C. & Son 25 

Willard, Alexander & Co 36 

Belting, Leather and Rubber, 

Ideson John B. & Co., outside left cover. 

Blank Book Manufacturers, 

Burley A. H. & Co 19 

Culver, Page & Hoyne 14 

Munson & Bradley, opposite title. 

Book and Job Printers, 

Barnet & Clarke 8 

Dunlop, Sewell & Spalding 23 

Band William H 5 

Scripps, Bross & Spears 4 

Bookbinders, 

Burley A. H. & Co 19 

Culver, Page & Hoyne 14 

Munson & Bradley, opposite title. 

Booksellers, 

KeenW. B 24 

Boots and Shoes, 

Miller & Brown 36 

Rawson, Bartlett & Co., in. right cover. 

Brewers, 

Huck John A 29 

Sands J. J 13 

Builders and Contractors. 

Goss & Phililps 18 



Cabinet Makers, 

Kimbel & Frediu 6 

Morgan C 28 

Shearer, Paine & Co 17 

Tobey Charles 26 

West John 16 

Candle Molds, 

Reese William 6 

Carpet Dealers, 

Hollister & Wilkins 15 

Carriage Mnfrs. and Dealers, 

De Forest D. B 29 

Shelton, Tuttle & Co., H. B. Hill, agt. 20 

Cement Roofing, Patent, 

Butler Wm. H 27 

Meriweather H. C. & Co 21 

Cloths, Wholesale, 

Field, Benedict & Co., inside right cover. 

Clothiers, 

Barrett, King & Co 20 

Foreman Brothers 24 

Huntington, Wadsworth & Parks. . . 23 

HuntH.W. &Co 25 

Coal Dealers, 

Price, Morris & Co 27 

Collecting Agency, 

Johnson, Clarke & Thomas, face. ft. cov. 

Commercial Colleges, 

Bell's College xxiii 

Bryant & Stratton's, inside left cover. 

Commission Merchants, 

Clarke & Dater 10 

Griswold & Shores 28 

Harmon C. L. & Co 12 

Hempstead Edward 10 

Howes Allen 27 

Hunter E. S 10 

Little William & Co 21 

Raymond B. W 26 

Rogers&Wood 27 

Corn Planters, 

Green P. B. & Wm. C 15 

Crockery, China, Glass, etc., 

Burley A. G. & Co 26 

Jaeper A. & Co 28 

Runyon D. M 27 



XX 



INDEX. 



Cutlery, 

Johnson, Spencer & Co 23 

Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, etc. 

Hesler Alexander, opp. inside ft. cover. 

Druggists, 

Bockee, Innis & Co 25 

Fuller D. F. & Co 16 

Lord Thomas 24 

Reed A. H. & Co U 

Sargent & Ilsley 13 

Sawyer, Paige & Co 12 

Dry Goods, 

Bowen Brothers 13 

Harmon, Aiken & Gale 24 

Peake, Marsh & De Long 7 

Boss W. M. & Co 15 

Savage, Keith & Co 14 

Stacy & Thomas 21 

Engravers, 

Gemmell J 29 

Mendell Edward 12 

Express Companies, 

American, outside right cover. 
Uniled States, " " " 

Fancy Goods, 

Atkinson C. T 25 

Barnum R. S 24 

Furniture Dealers, 

Kimbel & Fredin 6 

Morgan C 28 

Shearer, Paine & Co 17 

Tobey Charles 26 

West John 16 

Gas and Steam Fitters, 

Gerould J. H 28 

McFarlaue R. D 15 

Walworth, Hubbard & Co 16 

Gilt Frames, 

Grass Joseph A 23 

Gold Pen Manufacturers, 

Treleaven Walter 20 

Grates and Fenders, 

Pricket George W 23 

Grocers, 

Clarke & Dater 10 

Grav, Phelps & Co 26 

Gilman M. D. & Co 21 

Gould & Brother 21 

Harmon C. L. & Co 12 

Hempstead Edward 10 

Lanman, Burt & Co 20 

Reynolds, Ely & Co 10 

Sayrs Henry 13 

Smith, Pollard & Co 20 

Stearns, Briggs & Forsyth 20 

Whittaker Brothers. .'. 13 

Williams & Thompson 29 

Guns, Pistols, 

Abbey George T 28 

Uhrlaub, Sattler & Co 14 



Hardware. 

Clagett & Anderson 19 

Crawford & Sackett 15 

Edson & White 16 

Fish Joseph 29 

Garfield A. G 25 

HallE. G. &Co .". . 27 

Johnson R. & Son 27 

Kennedy J. M. & W. W 28 

Lake, Brown & Co 26 

Larrabee & North 12 

Marvin D. & Co 26 

Rubel & Brother 28 

Stanton, Woolley & Fulton 19 

White A. H 14 

Harness Makers, 

Ortmayer A 14 

Hats, Caps, and Furs, 

Benedict, Mallory & Farnum 25 

Smith J. A. & Co 29 

Hosiery, 

Bolton William H 27 

Hotels, 

Watkins House 7 

India Rubber Goods, 

Ideson John B. & Co., outside left cover. 

Insurance Companies & Agencies, 

Mason & Co 8 

Western Yalley Insurance Co., page 3 of 
advertisements, and p. 411 of Gaz. 

Intelligence Offices, 

Cook Chas 16 

Land Dealers, Agencies, etc., 

Galloway A. J. & Co 9 

Hale Sandford, inside left cover. 

Iglehart N. P. & Co 24 

Kerfoot S. H. & Co 12 

Sim Thomas 35 

Tavler Reuben 12 

Whitney A. M. & Co 19 

Lawyers, 

Johnson, Clarke & Thomas, face. ft. cov. 

Leather Dealers, 

Blackburn R. T. & Brother 28 

Grey, Marshall & Co 28 

Kelly James 28 

Lightning Rods, 

Reese Wm 6 

Lithographers, 

Gemmell J 29 

MendellEd 12 

Loan Agencies, 

Johnson, Clarke & Thomas, opp. inside 

left cover. 
Sim Thomas 35 

Machinery Depots, 

Fay & Co 28 

Higgins, Mowry & Co 13 

Map Publishers, 

Blanchard Rufus $0 and 31 

Medicines, 

Gilbert Dr. G. S 16 



INDEX. 



XXI 



Newspapers, 

Commercial Express 19 

Oils and Lamps, 

CatlinS. & Co 26 

Oysters, 

Cooke H., agent 19 

Paper Dealers, 

Bradner, Smith & Co 7 

Paper Hangings, 

Short J. S 28 

Paints and Varnishes, 

Heath & Hurd 23 

Lewis & Paige 13 

Shipman & Goodridge 10 

Short J. S 28 

Piano Dealers, 

Higgins Brothers 27 

Kimbel & Fredin 7 

Planing Mills, 

Hall & Winch 23 

Publishers, 

Hawes G. W., (outside left cover.) 
Scrips, Bross & Spears 4 

Real Est. Dealers & Brokers, 

Davidson William 12 

Johnson, Clarke & Thomas (opposite 
inside left cover.) 

Kerfoot S. H. & Co '. 12 

Pearce M. L. & J. 1 26 

Sim Thomas 35 

Saddlery Hardware, 

Stanton, Woolley & Fulton 19 

Sash and Blind Factories, 

Hall & Winch 83 

Goss & Phillips IS 



Seed Stores, 

Emery Henry D. & Co 10 

Sewing Machines, 

Ricksford & Dimicks 11 

Wheeler & Wilson (Part I.) 68 

Ship Chandlers, 

Gilbert, Hubbard & Co 20 

Stationers, 

Blanchard Rufus 30 & 31 

Burley A. H. & Co 19 

Culver, Page & Hoyne 14 

Munson & Bradley, (page facing 
title.) 

Stoves, 

Newberry, Filley & Co 15 

Kennedy J. M. & N. W 28 

Edson & White 16 

Rubel & Brother 28 

George Thomas & Co 25 

Vincent, Himrod & Co 28 

Jewett & Root 29 

Tanners, 

Perrottet & Sauvain 20 

Theatres, 

North Levi J 22 

"Watches and Jewelry, 

Stevens Geo. W. & Co 29 

Wines and Liquors, 

Fuller & Myers 27 

Gilbert, Dimond & Co 21 

Haven, Turrill & Co. . . *. 27 

Miles J. B. & Co (Part I.) 61 

Monks & Johnson 14 

Post & Thompson 15 



INDEX TO MISCELLANEOUS MATTER IN PART II. 



Alloys and Compositions 376 

Articles free of duty 349 

Bills of Lading, forms of 368 

Consuls, foreign 358 

Conversation 405 

Laws of Trade 345 

Law Register 334 

List of counties, with county seats. . . . 319 

Militia 358 

Names too late for insertion 313 

Newspaper Record of Illinois 331 

Postage, domestic 358 

" foreign 350 

Post office directory 320 

Protests, forms of 360 

Bills of Exchange 360 

Ship 861 

Railroads, Chicago and Rock Island and 

Peoria 380 

Chicago and Milwaukee 398 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy.. . 383 
Chicago, St. Paul and Fond du Lac 395 



Fox River Valley 390 

Fulton and Iowa 387 

Galena and Chicago Union 887 

Great Western 388 

Illinois Central 377 

Michigan Central 391 

Michigan Southern and Northern 

Indiana 394 

Ohio and Mississippi 404 

Peoria and Oquawka 390 

Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne and Chicago 401 

Quincy and Chicago 386 

St. Louis, Alton and Chicago 396 

Terre Haute, Alton and St. Louis. . 400 
Rules for detecting spurious bank notes 347 

Solders 376 

Table for facilitating calculations 375 

Table of gold coins 870 

Transportation companies 349 

Value of silver coin 372 

Weights and measures 373 



XX11 



INDEX. 



INDEX TO SPECIAL LAWS OF ILLINOIS. 



Advertisements 256 

Aliens 256 

Births and deaths 257 

Chattel mortgages, (see " Personal 

Property ") 306 

Cities and Towns 258 

Constitution 233 

Contracts 262 

Sealed Instruments 262 

Joint Obligations 262 

Negotiable Instruments 262 

Sale of Public Lands 265 

Gaming, Securities, etc 265 

Divorces 266 

Druggists 268 

Education 268 

Fees of Officers 271 

Coroners 271 

Justices, in criminal cases 271 

Civil cases 271 

Constables, in criminal cases 272 

Civil cases 272 

Jurors 273 

Arbitrators 273 

Notaries Public 273 

County Surveyors 273 

Guarding Jail 273 



Secretary of State 276 

Clerk of Circuit Court 276 

County Court 278 

Sheriffs 279 

Clerk of Supreme Court 283 

Forcible Entry and Detainer 284 

Government of United States 253 

State of Illinois 253 

Homestead Exemption 2S6 

Husband and Wife 287 

Interest 289 

Landlord and Tenant 291 

Licenses 294 

Limited Partnerships 298 

Marks and Brands 300 

Marriages, (see " Husband and Wife "j 287 

Mechanics' Lien 301 

Names of Persons 304 

Notaries Public 305 

Personal Property 306 

Public Property.". 307 

Public Buildings 307 

Rewards 308 

Wills 309 

Who may make. , 309 

Mode of executing 309 

Record of 310 



BELL'S 

PORTLAND BLOCK, 

Comer of Dearborn and Washington Streets, Chicago, Illinois. 
Bell & Sloan, Proprietors. 



FACULTY: 

HON. DIGBY V. BELL, President. THOMAS J. SLOAN, A.M., Principal, 

And Lecturer on the Laws of Trade, Exchange and Accounts. 

PROFESSORS OF BOOK-KEEPING: 

ELIAS B. ROCKWELL. H. D. BACON. 

PROFESSORS OF COMMERCIAL LAW : 

K. S. BLACKWELL. ELLIOTT ANTHONY. 



PROFESSORS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY : 

W. F. NOBLE. J. S. NORTON. 

PROFESSOR OF LAWS OF NATION'S : 

ANDREW HARVIE. 

PROFESSORS OF PENMANSHIP : 

ALBERT KIDDER. S. F. BROWN. 

ART OF DETECTING COUNTERFEIT MONET AND ALTERRD BANK NOTES : 

GEORGE T. KLINE. SAMUEL MUNROE. 



PROFESSORS OV MATHEMATICS : 

J. D. SLOAN. H. ORVILLE SNOW. 

LECTURER ON MORAL PHILOSOPHY ; 

REV. SAMUEL HENRY. 

TUTORS OF BOOK-KEEPING : 

JOHN D. SINCLAIR, R. G. ANNON, JAS. P. COOPER, 

A. R. BROWN, HIRAM N. GREEN, JAS. R. BUCHANAN, 

GEO. H. EMERY, JOS. B. GRIFFITH, M. E. WALSH. 

(SEE NEXT PAGE.) 



BELL'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 



The extraordinary patronage bestowed upon this popular institution, affords gratifying 
evidence that the superior advantages and facilities it offers for the acquisition of a thorough 
knowledge of the various branches of a commercial education, are favorably appreciated by 
a discerning and intelligent community. Over seven hundred and fifty full course studenta 
attended during the last year. 

The Collegiate Course. — This course of study is the most extensive, complete and 
thorough ever introduced into any Commercial College in this country, and comprises prac- 
tical instruction in Double Entry Book-keeping and accounts, adapted to the business of 
wholesale or retail forwarding and commission merchants, bankers and brokers, manufac- 
turers, farmers, merchants and professional men, railroading, steamboating, and all other 
kinds of business, by individuals, partnerships, and corporations, with compound company 
accounts, mercantile forms in general, and an appropriate style of business correspondence, 
a complete course of commercial calculations, embracing every variety of computations per- 
taining to business operations, and of practical use in the counting room. Practical pen- 
manship, being a systematic style of business writing ; the art of detecting counterfeit and 
altered bank notes ; the subject of commercial law, as connected with commercial usages and 
customs, together with incidental exercises, embracing much other knowledge indispensable 
to correct business action. 

The design of the Institution being to qualify its students for the practical and intelligent 
discharge of an accountant's duties, no text books are used, the memory merely is not taxed, 
but the understanding is addressed, and the school, therefore, considered a counting room, 
and the student at once introduced to the workings and routine of business. 

An experience of over twenty years in actual business by the President, of twenty-five 
years by the Principal, the acknowledged talent and superior qualifications of the associate 
professors, are deemed an ample guaranty of the ability of this school to impart, in the most 
thorough, comprehensive and practical manner, instruction in the wide range of useful 
study pursued in its various departments, and the practical value of the education it affords 
is sufficiently demonstrated by the fact that the many hundreds of young men who have 
entered from all parts of the State of Illinois, and from the states of New York, Ohio, 
Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Canada and the New England states, occupy some of 
the most lucrative and responsible business stations in this city and other places, and are 
receiving the very highest salaries. 

The College possesses one of the best libraries in the country, in all the departments of 
useful knowledge and general literature, for the gratuitous use and benefit of its students. 
The school is in continual session, and the students being instructed individually, and not in 
classes, may enter whenever they please. 

Evening Lessons. — The College Rooms will be open for instruction every evening, from 
the 12th of October to the 12th of April, from 7 o'clock to 9-J-. A catalogue of eighty pages, 
giving full particulars, will be furnished gratis on application at the College, or by letter. 

The College Buildings are the largest and most elegant in the world, being tastefully 
chased marble externally, and the internal finish surpassingly beautiful. 

No College in the world possesses similar advantages, nor has any one enjoyed the same 
extended patronage. 

Students who desire it, are furnished with splendid lodging rooms in the college building. 



THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, 

HER SITUATION, EXTENT, TOPOGEAPHICAL CHARACTER, RIVERS, RAILROADS, 
AGRICULTURAL AND MINERAL RESOURCES, ETC., 

BY WILLIAM BROSS, ESQ., 

EDITOR OF THE CHICAGO DAILY PRESS. 



POSITION. 

The United States may be divided, naturally, into three grand divisions. The_ Atlantic 
slope, or those states which lie east of the Alleghany mountains ; the Pacific slope, including 
California and the territories west of the Rocky mountains ; and the Mississippi valley. The 
latter division is by far the largest and most fertile, and hence it must soon contain the 
most wealthy and powerful states in the confederacy. In the latitude of the middle states, 
and east of the Mississippi river, centrally situated in the great central valley of the con- 
tinent, is the State of Illinois. It stretches from a little north of the north line of Pennsyl- 
vania, down nearly to the southern boundary of Virginia and Kentucky, and hence it 
embraces a greater variety of climate and a wider range of productions than any other 
state in the Union. It extends from the wheat to vine the growing districts, and its climate 
corresponds to those districts in Europe. 

BOUNDARIES AND EXTENT. 

This state is bounded north by Wisconsin, east by Indiana, south by Kentucky, and west 
by Missouri and Iowa. The boundary line of the state is about 1,200 miles long. From 
the point where it joins Wisconsin on the north, lake Michigan bounds it on the east for 
some 50 miles, to the north-west corner of Indiana, about 18 miles south of Chicago. 
Thence a line is drawn due south 168 miles to the Wabash river, about 12 miles south of 
Terre Haute. The Wabash and the Ohio make the remainder of the eastern and southern 
boundary of the state, and the majestic Mississippi sweeps down by its entire western 
border. It will be seen that about two-thirds of its entire boundary is made by navigable 
rivers. 

The greatest length of Illinois is on the meridian of Cairo, being 378 miles. Its average 
width is about 150 miles, the greatest width being 210 miles, near the latitude of Urbana 
and Rushville. The area of the state is 55,500 square miles, being in size the eighth in the 
Union. Virginia, Georgia, Missouri, Florida, Texas, Michigan and California have a greater 
number of square miles, but when California and Texas are divided, as they doubtless will 
be, Illinois will be capable of sustaining a larger population than any other state in the 
Union. To compare her with other states, Illinois is nearly as large as all the six New 
England states put together, and it is safe to say, that her agricultural resources are twice 
as great as the whole of them. She has nearly 10,000 more square miles of territory than 
the great State of New York, is larger than the State of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, 
and is nearly eight times as large as Massachusetts. Illinois is larger than England by 
6,000 square miles, and nearly half as large as England, Ireland and Scotland ; and our 
information is sadly at fault, if, with her resources as well developed, she could not sustain 
much more than half as large a population, say 15,000,000. She is more than twice as 
large as Belgium and Holland, and is nearly one-fourth as large as the entire empire of 
Austria. With her great superficial area, and, as will appear in the sequel of this article, 
fertile soil, and unequaled commercial facilities, her population must, in a few generations, 
be told by millions. 



XXVlii G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. 



RIVERS AND COMMERCIAL FACILITIES. 

A glance at the map will convince any one that Illinois is a well watered state. Form- 
ing a third of its eastern boundary we have the Wabash, navigable for a considerable portion 
of the year. On the south flows the beautiful Ohio, and on the west the Mississippi, the 
largest river on the continent, forms its boundary from Dunleith to Cairo. The Illinois 
runs a little west of south nearly through the middle of the state, and with the Illinois and 
Michigan Canal, forms a water communication between the lakes and the Mississippi. On 
the north-east we have lake Michigan, and with our extensive system of railroads, most of 
which are now completed and in operation, it is found that there is not a place or a farm in 
the whole state that is more than fifty miles from a navigable stream or a railroad. It is 
safe to say, therefore, that no state in the Union has so many and so important commercial 
facilities, and in none have the farmers and the people generally so convenient a market. 

Beside the rivers above named, we have Rock river, the valley of which is one of the 
finest portions of the state ; Fox river, which flows down from Wisconsin and enters the 
Illinois at Ottawa; the Des Plaines from Wisconsin, and the Kankakee from Indiana, unite 
in Grundy county to form the Illinois. We have also the Vermilion, Spoon river, the 
Sangamon, the Kaskaskia, the Big Muddy, and the Little Wabash, all very considerable 
streams. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL CHARACTER 

For so large a state, the surface of Illinois is more nearly level than any of her sisters. 
The highest point of land in the state, if we mistake not, is less than a thousand feet above 
the ocean, and the average height of the land is probably about six hundred feet. And 
yet there is comparatively little of the country that is really level. The whole state slopes 
gently to the south, as all the streams, with a few unimportant exceptions, flow into the 
Mississippi or its tributaries. Several of the " divides" as the sections of country between 
the rivers are called, incline gently east or west, but the state, as a whole, has a slight 
southern inclination. 

In the vicinity of Galena, the country is rough and broken, and the ravines for the water 
courses seem to have been cut deep down from the average level of the country, in order, 
as it would appear, to make the rich lead mines which abound in that region the more 
accessible, and thence the more valuable. Several of the southern counties are also quite 
broken and hilly, and some along the Mississippi are equally so ; but there is nothing like 
a mountain in the entire state. 

That which especially distinguishes Illinois, and which has furnished her "nommeelc 
plume" is her magnificent prairies. She is appropriately called the "Prairie State." And 
what is a prairie ? The best way, and in fact the only way, for strangers to form any cor- 
rect idea of the prairies, is to come and see them. Perhaps a person of a distinct and vivid 
imagination may gain some notion of a prairie, by what follows. Suppose, while riding 
leasurly along in an open space, you observe a small elevation, which, though rising gradu- 
ally at every step, appears scarcely higher than any of the beautiful swells that greet the 
eye on every side. You reach the summit and look south. Far away as the eye can reach, 
not a tree or a shrub of any kind meets the view. For the first few miles the land lies in 
gentle undulations, like the waves of the ocean, the swells becoming less and less distinct, 
till far down on the southern horizon, it meets and mingles with the deep blue sky. You 
look north, and precisely the same general features form the landscape. On either side, to 
the east and west, at the distance perhaps of a score of miles, is a dark fringe bordering the 
landscape, and lying in graceful folds along the horizon, and by carefully scanning some of 
those nearest the eye, you may say at once, " that is a forest." And now, if it were the 
month of June, and you could imagine spread all over these magnificent " unshorn fields " 
a carpet of richest green, embroidered with flowers of every possible form and hue — the 
rarest and the brightest gems in the vegetable kingdom — waving and sparkling in the sun- 
beams, you would have the best idea we can give you, in language, of a prairie, just as it 
came from the hand of Him whose wisdom and whose power can alone create a scene com- 
bining so many elements of the beautiful and the sublime. 

Bryant, in our judgment, America's greatest poet, when first he saw the prairies, 
exclaimed, 

" My heart swells, while the dilated sight 

Takes in the encircling vastness. Lo! they stretch 

In airy undulations far away, 

As if the ocean, in his gentlest swell, 

Stood still, with all his rounded billows fixed 

And motionless forever." 



G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER—HISTORICAL. Xxix 

And after contemplating the sublime scene, in the true spirit of a Christian, he continues: 

"Man hath no part in all this glorious work; 

The hand that built the firmament hath heaved 

And smoothed these verdant swells, and sown their slope3 

With herbage, planted them with island groves, 

And hedged them round with forestsi Fitting floor 

For his magnificent temple of the sky — 

With flowers whose glory and whose multitude 

Rival the constellations'." 

CLIMATE, SOIL, ETC. 

Extending over five degrees of latitude, Illinois has a wide range of climate. The south- 
ern point of the State is about in latitude 37-J, and the northern line is in latitude 42$. 
The middle of the State is in the same latitude with the centre of Spain and southern Italv 
though the climate of that section of the State will compare better with that of Normandy 
and southern Germany. The nothern parts of the State have about the same range of the 
thermometer as northern Pennsylvania and southern New York, while the climate of the 
southern portions is to be classed with that of Kentucky and Virginia. South of Joliet, 
and especially of Ottawa, where the country begins to escape from the effects of the cold 
north-east winds from the lake, the climate is delightful, and all the finer fruits flourish in 
the greatest perfection. Near lake Michigan the springs are late and unpleasant, the 
summers are warm — some of the time they may be said to be hot — and the autumns are 
generally long and delightful. Winter commences in the northern part of the state from the 
first to the fifteenth of December, and ends about the first of March, though now and then a 
" hard winter " will reach the first and even sometimes to the fifteenth of April. A series of 
observations taken for three successive years near the centre of the state, gave the mean temper- 
ature at 56$ degrees (Fahrenheit) for the first, 57 for the second, and 56 for the third, making 
the mean for the three years about 56$ degrees. In the central parts of the state the ther- 
mometer seldom sinks more than six degrees below zero, and for the months of June, July 
and August, the average will range from 72 to 79 degrees. 

With such a temperature, combining the excellencies of the climate of Pennsylvania and 
Virginia, and similar in a majority of the State to southern Germany, it would be naturally 
supposed that its effects upon the general health of the people would be salutary. Such it 
is now, and we have no doubt it will become more so as the people learn to avoid the local 
causes of desease Heretofore it has been generally believed that the fever and ague, and 
various kinds of bilious diseases, were specially virulent in Illinois, and it must be confessed 
there was some foundation for the charge. It should be known, however, that in order to 
secure a market for their produce, the early inhabitants settled near the navigable rivers, 
on or near the bottom lands, which, when they are first settled, are always prolific in such 
diseases. After they are brought under cultivation they become more healthy. Several of 
our most important railroads run through the more elevated sections of the state, and the 
high rolling prairies are now settling very rapidly. There can scarcely be a doubt that they will 
all prove to be exceedingly healthy. While on the subject of health, we may as well say, 
that many of the diseases from which emigrants suffer are induced by drinking surface water. 
Water in most places is found only a few feet below the surface ; but in such case the well 
is filled with the leachings of the rich vegetable mould contained in the soil, and of course 
such water must generate dsease. The wells should be dug deep, and for the first few 
feet below the surface packed with blue clay to keep out the surface water; or, what would 
be still better, cisterns should be provided. Water from them well filtered can never be 
otherwise but healthy, and when persons become accustomed to it they like it as well as 
any other. Springs abound in many parts of the state, and they are always to be preferred ; 
but small streams flowing from sloughs are especially to be avoided. Though water from 
them in winter may be used with comparative safety, in the summer they are sure to pro- 
duce disease. 

The soil of Illinois may be described under three heads. On the prairies it is a dark 
loam, with a large admixture of vegetable mould. They are generally free from stone, and 
are ready for the plow and the labors of the husbandman. The prairies form more than 
half, perhaps three-fourths of the state, and most of them are exceedingly fertile, and with 
proper culture produce all the coarser grains and fruits in abundance. The wild grass which 
grows upon them is very nutritious, and hence the excellent quality of the Illinois beef. 

The bottom lands along the streams are generally as rich as it is possible for lands to be. 
As the inclination of the country is very slight, the streams generally overflow their banks 
often to a considerable distance. These " bottoms'''' are covered with very large forest trees, 
and when cleared they produce astonishingly. The soil is from three to a dozen feet deep, 
and arthe streams come down from the prairies saturated with the richest mould, the sediment 



XXX 



G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. 



which, in high water, they leave upon these bottoms, must ever render them as fertile as 
the gardens along the banks of the Nile. 

The soil of "the openings" which are strips of country covered with scattering timber, 
mostly of the different kinds of oak, is not so good as that of the prairies ; but it produces 
well, and will yield without manure, crops equal at least to those of the ordinary farms of 
the eastern states. The "openings" however, form but a small part, comparatively of the 
whole state. 

PRODUCTIONS. 

It may be said in general that Illinois produces all the coarser grains in great abundance. 
The latest statistics we have, are derived from the census of 1850; but the progress of the 
state for the past seven years has been rapid beyond all former precedent, and these figures 
must now be taken as falling far below the mark. They are the best, however, within our 
reach, and will furnish some idea of the productions of the state. 

In that year there were grown : 



Wheat 9,414,975 bushels, 

Cora 57,648,074 " 

Oats 10,087,240 " 



Rye 83,360 bushels, 

Barley 140,890 " 

Buckwheat 183,500 " 



Although but a small portion of the northern half of the state has been settled more than 
thirtv, and, perhaps, nine-tenths of it not over twenty years, there were but two states in 
1850* Ohio and Kentucky, which produced more Indian corn than Illinois, and in the raising 
of wheat she was the fifth state in the Union. Her sister states must look well to their laurels 
or Blinois, in 1860, will exceed them in all these important staples. 

"With a population of only 851,469 in 1850, it may be asked how so much grain could be 
harvested and prepared for market aud use, allowing a reasonable proportion of the people to 
have been engaged in mechanical and other pursuits ? The answer is simply that on our 
smooth and beautiful prairies, the most laborious and expensive part of the farmers' toil is 
done by machinery. We have the harvester or reaper which, when the grain is ripe, lays it 
low at the rate of 15 acres per day, and not content with simply cutting the grain, the genius 
of an Atkin has perfected a machine to rake and deliver it in handsome bundles for the 
binder. When the grain is "in, shock" and even that formality is often dispensed with, the 
threshing machine, capable of threshing 4 and cleaning 200 to 300 bushels per day, is brought 
into the°field, and in a week's time perhaps a crop of 1,500 bushels is harvested and in the 
sacks ready for market. 

That the productions of the state have largely increased within the past few years may be 
inferred from the receipts and shipments from the single port of Chicago during the past year. 
They were as follows: 



Flour reduced to wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Rye 

Barley 

Total 



12,524,831 

7,409,130 

1,707,245 

87,911 

127,206 

21,856,206 



SHIPMENTS. 



10,783,292 

6,814,615 

416,778 

17,933 

18,032,678 



From these figures we learn that nearly one-fourth more of wheat, and nearly one-seventh 
as much corn were received in the city of Chicago during the year 1857 as were raised in 
the whole state in 1850. A comparison of these figures with those of other cities has also 
established the important fact that Chicago, a city which twenty years ago imported both its 
breadstuffs and other provisions, is now, and for the last five years has been, the largest 
primary grain port in the world. She also leads all others in the quantity and quality 
of her beef, and in less than five, perhaps in three, she will equally outstrip them in the 
number of swine she will send forward alive or packed for the markets of the world. 

Strangers will be anxious to know how large a crop the ordinary prairie lands of the state 
will be likely to produce. We have at hand an authority which will not be questioned. 
Chas. M. Dupuy, Jr., Esq., land agent of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, addressed a 



G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. XXXI 



letter to Mr. Wight, formerly the well known editor of the Prairie Farmer on this subject 
and received the following reply : 

Dear Sir At your request, I would state that, from an acquaiutance with Illinois lands 

and Illinois farmers, of eighteen years, thirteen of which I have been engaged as the editor 
of the Prairie Farmer, I am prepared to give the following as the rates of produce which 
may be had per acre, with ordinary culture. 

Winter wheat •• 15 to 25 bushels. 

Spring wheat 10 to 20 || 

Indian corn 40 to 70 

Oats 40 to 80 " 

Potatoes 100 to 200 J« 

Grass (timoDby and clover) 1+ to 3 

" Ordinary culture " on prairie land is not what is meant by the term in eastern or middle 
states It means here, no manure, and commonly but once, or at most twice plowing, on 
perfectly smooth land, with long furrows, and no stones or obstructions; when two acres per 
day is no hard job for one team. It is often but very poor culture, with shallow plowing, and 
without attention to weeds. 

I have known crops not unfrequently far greater than these, but with little variation in 
their treatment — say forty to fifty bushels of winter wheat, sixty to eighty of oats, three 
hundred of potatoes, and one hundred of Indian corn. " Good culture," which means 
rotation, deep plowing farms well stocked, and some manure, applied at intervals of from 
three to five years, would, in good seasons, very often approach these latter figures. 

Yours truly, 

J. AMBROSE WIGHT. 
January 9th, 1855. 

No man in the state is better qualified to give an opinion in relation to this important 
subject, and the readers of the Prairie Farmer know that Mr. Wight is as much distin- 
guished for his care in not overstating a matter, as he is for his strong native sense and 
varied learning. 

One of the oldest journals in the state, gave the following account of a crop of com grown 
in Sangamon county, by J. N. Brown, Esq. : 

"Mr. Brown broke up a field of forty acres which had been in grass eighteen years, 
and planted it in corn. The corn might have been put in hills a little thicker than usual, 
and the after culture was tolerably thorough. Some three or four weeks ago nine acres of 
the land were measured off, being the poorest part of the field, the corn gathered and 
husked, when it was found that nine acres averaged ninety-five bushels an acre, which was 
satisfactory evidence (the poorest part of the field had been measured) that the whole forty 
acres would average full one hundred bushels to the acre. 

" In a conversation we had with Mr. Brown, he assured us that the land had never been 
manured, and that, if it had received as much attention as is usual in the older states, the 
crop would have been much larger." 

With " good culture " the high figures given by Mr. Wight, will more frequently be 
excelled than otherwise. It will be seen, when the price of lands, which will be found in 
another place, is compared with the produce of the farm, that with good cultivation it will 
not take long to pay for it. 

Let us now turn your attention to the capability of Illinois for raising stock. It will take 
years of progress and improvement before her capacity in this direction is taxed to its 
fullest extent. 

In 1850 the census returns gave 912,036 cattle in the state. The number of cattle 
packed in Chicago during the past year was 23,691, being more than one forty-eighth of 
the cattle of all kinds that were in the state in 1850. The state fairs held during the past 
two years, have shown some of the finest stock it was ever our good fortune to examine. 
Judges of cattle from other states assured us they were equal to any that could be produced 
on this side of the Atlantic. 

The state of Illinois is well adapted to the rearing of horses. Till within a few years, 
little attention has been paid here to the improvement of the horse. A laudable spirit in 
this regard has been awakened within the last half dozen years, and its effect upon the 
prosperity of our farmers will be salutary. Hay is abundant, and oats and corn can always 
be raised at a trifling cost. The climate is suited to the most perfect development of the 
carriage, the draft and the dray horse, and hence a very few years only will be neccessary to 
enable Illinois to compete successfully with any of her sister states in the rearing of this 
noble animal. 



XXXU G. W. H AWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. 

Sheep grow finely in Illinois, and are found to be profitable stock. Prairie wolves in the 
early history of the state made sad havoc with the farmers' flocks, but in some sections of 
the state they are entirely exterminated, and they will all soon be driven from our territory. 

It may be well here to notice how a man can become an extensive herdsman or shepherd 
on a very small amount of capital invested in land. It has been seen from the above that 
only a small proportion of our fertile prairies are as yet within an inclosure. Suppose a 
man buys only forty acres on the borders of some large prairie, providing inclosures and 
proper though cheap shelter for his stock. All the cattle and sheep he can purchase can 
have the best of pasture free of charge. He needs only a single man and horse to herd them 
on the prairie. And more ; he is at perfect liberty to cut all the hay he pleases. Nor is he 
left to the slow, laborious process of cutting it with a scythe ; Danforth's or McCormick's 
mower, a man and a span of horses will cut from ten to fifteen acres per day. Need it be 
wondered at, that stock growing is exceedingly profitable in the state of Illinois ? 

Illinois is a very paradise for swine. The ease and the abundance with which corn, his 
favorite food, is produced, and the hardness and other excellent qualities it adds to his flesh, 
have already made Illinois pork scarcely less sought after than her world renowned beef. 
The census of 1850, gave a fraction less than 2,000,000 of swine in the entire state. The 
number of hogs received in this market during the packing season of 1853-4, was *73,980, 
and if we add the number of hogs that doubtless came to this city during the other months 
of the year, a large proportion of which are shipped east alive, the total number received 
here cannot have fallen much short of 100,000, being one-twentieth of the entire number 
there were in the state at the time of the last census. When it is remembered how prolific 
swine are, and that they are reared and fattened with so little care and expense, and the 
additional fact is stated that for the last two years dressed hogs have borne a price ranging 
from three to five dollars per hundred, it will easily be seen why our farmers have been so 
prosperous. 

The north half of the state has been settled so recently, that fruit trees have only fairly 
commenced bearing. Thus far, the results have proved very satisfactory. Enough has been 
accomplished to satisfy pomologists that all the larger and smaller fruits adapted to this lati- 
tude will flourish in the greatest perfection. In the middle and southern portions of the 
state, the apple, peach, pear, plum, cherry, quince, grape, gooseberry and currant have been 
grown for many years, and produce an abundance of the finest fruits. Iu the northern part 
of the state, within 20 or 30 miles of Lake Michigan, the early flowering fruits will always be 
liable to be cut off by the cold north-east winds which prevail till the last of May ; but as far 
west as the valley of Fox river and south of Joliet, all the common fruits flourish admirably, 
and as might be expected from the richness of the soil, the trees are more thrifty and bear 
larger, fairer and better fruit, than is found in most of the eastern states. Let the citizens 
of Illinois, if they have not done so already, and every immigrant, plant an orchard among 
the first things they do, and surround their homes with the pear, quince, cherry, peach, cur- 
rant and grape, and a rich return, both in profit and comfort, will be their sure reward. 

There is much more timber in Illinois than a stranger, in traveling over some portions of 
the state, might at first suppose. Along the streams and in other favorable locations, the 
country is heavily wooded. The trees grow very large, and the timber is excellent. We 
have the different varieties of the oak, hickory, ash, maple, birch, poplar, elm and beech, 
growing in the greatest perfection. Also the black walnut, butternut, hornbeam, and all 
other different kinds of smaller trees and shrubs which are common in northern and middle 
states. There is enough timber in the greater part of the state for ordinary purposes. Pine 
lumber is supplied from the upper Mississippi and . through Chicago from Michigan and 
northern Wisconsin. 

When the fires are kept out of the prairies, several kinds of timber, and the oak especially, 
with the hazel bush, at once take possession of the soil. For fencing, where timber is 
scarce, Illinois can rely confidently on the osage orange for an excellent hedge, and, for fuel, 
on her exhaustless coal fields, as will more fully appear subsequently in this article. 

EXTENT OF THE STATE UNDER CULTIVATION, PRICE OF LANDS, ETC. 
Illinois contains about 35,520,000 acres of land. Although in size she is the eighth state, 
yet, with the exception perhaps of Texas, which is rather more than four times as large as 
Illinois, no one has so many acres of rich productive soil. There is scarcely any waste 
land in the state. Most of the swamp lands can be drained and produce the finest grass, 
and richly repay the expense necessary to bring them under cultivation. As there are no 
mountains, the truth of the statement can readily be appreciated, that there is more waste 
land in three counties that might be selected in'New York, Pennsylvania or Virginia, than 
there is in the whole State of Illinois. Many competent judges coincide with us in the 
opinion, that there is not in the state of Illinois one acre in a thousand, and probably not 
one in ten thousand, which is not capable of cultivation. Taking the entire state together, 
the land is of a better average quality, and will produce more largely, than the gardens of 
the eastern States. 



G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. XXXlii 



Of the 35,520,000 acres of land in the state, the census of 1850 shows that there were 
then about 5,000,000 of acres, only one-seventh of the whole, under cultivation. More 
than 20,000,000 of acres, or four-sevenths of the entire state, were put down as wild lands. 
Hence, with so rich a soil, Illinois offers a most inviting field for the farmer and for enterprise 
and capital in almost every departmeut of business. 

To those wishing to emigrate to Illinois, the price of land is a paramount consideration. 
It may be stated at from $1.25 to 850 per acre. These, however, are outside figures. There 
is now comparatively but little land at government price, |1.25 per acre; but in some of 
the counties there is quite a large amount yet to enter. The higher figures are for improved 
farms in the vicinity of towns and villages. A fair average for unimproved farms would be 
from three to eight dollars per acre, for improved farms from five to twenty-five dollars, 
depending upon their location with reference to a village and the value of the improvements 
upon them. 

There are now in the market over a million and a-half of acres of land belonging to the 
Illinois Central Railroad. These lands were originally granted by Congress to the State of 
Illinois, to aid in the building of a railroad from Cairo to a point opposite to Dubuque, Iowa, 
with a branch to Chicago. They were subsequently granted to the railroad company, and 
are now all offered on very favorable terms to settlers. The prices range from five to twenty- 
five dollars per acre, according to location and quality, on seven years time, with two per cent, 
interest. The interest for two years is required in advance, and after that, the land is to be 
paid for in five equal annual instalments. "With prudence and industry, farmers and emigrants 
can support themselves and pay every dollar for their land from its proceeds by the time it 
is due, and make a very handsome amount of money besides. But in seven years they will 
be worth from twice to four times what they originally cost. The lands are among the best 
in the state. They are mostly high rolling prairie, with some timber lands, and so good an 
opportunity will not be likely again to occur for many years for poor men " to vote themselves 
a farm." It should be remembered also, that all these lands lie in the vicinity of one of the 
be'st railroads in the country, and hence those who settle upon them will always have a 
ready market for their produce, and easy access to all parts of the Union. 

Perhaps we may as well give a sketch of the manner in which thousands have made them- 
selves independent farmers in Illinois, and there is room enough for tens of thousands more 
to follow their example. We will suppose a blacksmith, a carpenter, or some one who has 
been supporting his family and saving a very little by his daily labor in the eastern or middle 
states, makes up his mind in April or May to come to the state of Illinois. He can count 
when he gets here, all told, say §150, perhaps twice or at most four times that amount. He 
locates, or to use the classic language of the county, "squats" near a grove on the bor- 
ders of some fine prairie. Not an acre is " fenced in " for miles around. In a week or two 
a "log cabin"' — blessings on all log cabins, let every man who rightly appreciates the pro- 
gress of his country, take off his hat and make a bow to every one he passes — in a week or 
two, we were about to say, he has a log cabin built and his wife and three children — per- 
haps there are " three times three," aud if so all the better — are safely housed. They lack 
some of the " elegancies of life " it is true, but they have what is far better, strong arms 
and honest hearts, and a disposition to be content and do the best they can under the cir- 
cumstances. He has taken care, after he made his location, to find who owns the land he is 
on. If it belong to the government, he takes out a preemption or enters it at $1.25 per 
acre ; if it belongs to some individual, he has got a bond for a deed, at from three to five dol- 
lars per acre, payable "one quarter down, the balance in one, two and three years," or longer. 
A few days finds half an acre fenced and the garden seeds are all planted. Twenty acres 
are at once plowed and the corn is planted. Then hurrah for the fence while it is coming 
up. Drive the cattle off on the prairies for a week or two, if the fence don't get done in 
time, and as for the venerable, matronly old porker with her numerous family, she must be 
kept in the yard till the corn is ripe. Fall finds him with six or eight hundred bushels of 
corn, potatoes and pork enough for his family during the winter, and three or four fine hogs 
to spare, hay enough for his cattle, cut wherever he pleased on the prairie, and his corn 
ground sown with winter wheat. But why follow him further. In five, or at most eight 
years, he has three-eighties (240 acres) under cultivation, his farm is well stocked with herds 
and flocks, he is an independent, thriving farmer. With the blessing of providence on 
industry and economy, all this can certainly be accomplished. The picture above has its 
reality in the case of thousands of the enterprising farmers of the prairie state. But our 
business is simply with facts, and to those we return as really more in accordance with the 
design of this article. 

MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Having spoken of the agricultural resources of Illinois, the next in order, and scarcely 
less in importance, are her mineral resources. 

In some of the central and southern counties, iron ore is found in considerable quantities. 
The mines have not been worked to any very considerable extent, and we are without any 



XXXIV G. W. HAWES' GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. 



definite information as to their richness and locality. Zinc and copper have also been found 
in several counties. But the two minerals in which Illinois is specially rich, are lead and 

C °The two north-western counties form a part of the richest and most extensive bad region 
known to the scientific world. During the year 1854, there were received in Chicago, by 
Tie Galena railroad 4,051,346 pounds of lead, and the amount shipped down the Mississippi 
from Galena, must have been ten perhaps fifty times as large. These mines lorm an inex- 
haustible source of wealth to the north-western parts of the state, and will afford a supply 
of this important mineral to all the northern states for all time to come 

I ho™ has as much, and perhaps more, coal than any other state in the Union Till 
wi bin the last few years, her mines have been very imperfectly wrought and hence the 
reputation of our coal has not been good. But it is found that as the deposits are worked at 
a Teater depth, the quality becomes much better, and we have no doubt that a very few 
years will suffice to supply our markets with fuel from our own state equal to the best Ohio 
or Pennsylvania coal. Bituminous eoal is the only variety as yet found in Illinois Some 
eeo5 tTbelieve that cannal coal exists in the state, as the south-eastern part of it is thought 
fo be°in the same great basin in which the best varieties of Kentucky cannel coal are 

f ° Tt has heretofore been supposed that the whole state rested upon one great coal basin 
Rece fexp orations by Dr. Stevens have shown that this is not the fact. There are a great 
number of Ens in different parts of the state, entirely distinct from each other, differing 
L nudity but by being in separate beds the coal can be mined with much less expense ; a 
veiy important feet when we consider how esential coal is to her prosperity. From an 
SESdlv loaned us by Dr. Stevens, and prepared from actual observations, we 
S that coS is found in Gallatin and Hardin counties, on the Wabash ; in near y a dozen 
count Song the valley of the Big Muddy river, and the upper branches of the Little 
wSSandthe Kaskaskia ; in several of the counties along the Ilhnois; at Danville in 
Vermn on county, there is a very extensive bed, owned by a company m this city ; and from 
S cheiSS analysis, it is found that in some respects it is equal and m others superior 
To the oest Erie Coal. In the valleys of the Kankakee and Vermilion rivers on the I hmos 
neaMors a La Salle, and at various points along the line of the Rock Island railroad 
from La Salle to Eock Island are a number of beds; the principal one, and so far as we 
know the best being at Sheffield. The valleys of the Sangamon and Spoon rivers also con- 
Sn beds "of coal, and it is also found in Schuyler and several other counties, lying between 
thP Illinois and Mississippi rivers, usually called the " military tract. 

The Xove description is very general, it is true, but it is as particular as we have space to 
male it Enough has been said to show that Illinois has enough coal to supply the wants of 
her citizens for all time to come. Our navigable rivers, canal and magnificent net v> oik of 
railroads wiU be able to distribute itcheaply to those counties in which i may not be found. 
His thought, however, that when more thorough explorations are made, it will be found in 
olm/vst pvptv county south of Kendall and Whiteside. ... . *■* i 

The provaUhig ro 7 ck of the state is limestone, and in some counties it becomes a beautiful 
marble At Athens on the Illinois and Michigan canal, there is a quarry of beautiful white stone 
Syas^naTd as marble, from which some of the most beautiful public and private buildings 
in riiimwo have been erected within the last two years. 

SattSSS tf considerable value, are found in the southern comities. Several years since 
that SlXite extensively and as some of them yield largely they will doubtless 
X^^^^ hwl ^.f dB !l! y plenty, and labor less expen- 
sive, so as to enable their owners to work them with profit. 

MANUFACTURES, 
Tn the early history of any state, only those manufactures are introduced which the 
necessities of the people absolutely require. The first object of the settler is to secure a 
home and provide for L sustenance of his family. Hence, till the so. is occupied, especially 
where H is al rich and productive as that of Illinois, the occupants can better afford to 
purchase n ost of Uieir manufactured articles, than to produce them the^s, We are 
Sow sending wool to the more sterile states of Massachusetts and Connecticut, and also flour 
Serf and pork to feed the operatives who manufacture it, paying freight and insurance both 
S1^^oS?pJy-in.partliiolo*hi for our daily apparel And why this enormous 
S" Sly because we have not capital enough and people enough to manufacture it 
We The capital is rapidly accumulating, and people are coming by thousands and he must 
be blind indeed who cannot see that ere many years it will be cheaper to manufacture woolen 
Sod ana a Uiousand other articles here, than to send east for them. With hands , oungh 
fo i-ai'se it, food always must be cheap in Illinois, and ^ experience of all ajesha slmwn 

that where BREAD IS CHEAP THERE THE PEOPLE WILL CONCENTRATE. Att.tl alt, IB S^Cling 

a permanenrhome the gastronomic argument will sway greater multitudes of people than 
any other. 



G. W. HAWES GAZETTEER HISTOEICAL. XXXV 

Not only will food always be relatively cheap, but we have, as has already been shown, an 
abundance of coal to propel our machinery. Flax and wool we can produce without limit; 
iron and copper can be brought to our commercial emporium by propellers or sail vessels from 
the rich mines of Lake Superior ; the Mississippi and our different railroads give us a direct 
communication with New Orleans, so that it is safe to say, that cotton can be laid down as 
cheaply in almost any city in Illinois as it can be taken to most of the towns in Massachusetts, 
where "it is manufactured so extensively. Now with all these advanlages, need we predict in 
the no distant future a position for Illinois as a manufacturing State, second to none in the 
Union '? 

To show how rapidly this prediction is being fulfilled, take the following facts : The censu9 
returns of 1850 make the total amount of capital invested in the manufacture of iron, §325,- 
400 and the value of the manufactured articles, $511,385. The statistics of the manufactures 
in this department in the city of Chicago alone, for the year 1856, as may be learned from a 
carefully prepared article, published in the Democratic Press in Feb. 1837, showthatthe capi- 
tal invested in the manufacture of iron was $1,763,900, and the value of the products was 
$3,887,000. The total capital invested in manufactures of a 1 ! kinds in this city was §7,759,- 
400, and the value of the products was $15,515,000. It is probable, however, that Chicago 
manufactures more than all the rest of the State ; but the progress of the State within five 
years in this respect has been very rapid, and with our railroad lines penetrating the State in 
all directions, in the next five years it will be much more so, 

PRINCIPAL CITIES. 

For so young a State, Illinois has a great number of large and flourishing cities. The capital, 
Springfield, is in Sangamon county, pleasantly situated, and is rapidly improving in all 
respects, It is a city of some ten or twelve thousand inhabitants. The Chicago and Missis- 
sippi, and the Great Western Railroads pass through it nearly north and south, and east and 
west, which, with their connections, make it easily accessible to the citizens of all parts of 
the State. 

The principal city in Illinois, is Chicago, situated on Lake Michigan. Her progress in 
wealth and population is a fair specimen of Western enterprise. In 1830-31 the site of the 
present city of Chicago was an open prairie, surrounded and inhabited in part by Potawatamie 
Indians. It was not till October, 1833, less than twenty -five years ago, that the last remnant 
of this tribe were removed west of the Mississippi, under the direction of our fellow-citizen, 
Col. J. B. F. Russell. The town of Chicago was incorporated on the 10th of August, 1S33, 
there being at that time only twenty-eight voters in the village. The first election for city 
officers was held on the first Tuesday in May, 1837. Chicago, as a city, is therefore, only a 
little more than twenty-one years old. 

No one who has studied her unrivaled commercial position, and the richness, beauty and 
extent of the country by which she is surrounded, can doubt for a moment that Chicago, at 
no distant day, is destined to become the great central city of the continent. In the centre 
of one of the most fertile agricultural regions on the globe; surrounded by exhaustless mines 
of lead, iron, copper and coal ; having a water communication with the Atlantic and the Gulf 
of Mexico, and holding the key to a coasting trade of three thousand miles, with more than 
half a score of railroads branching off for thousands of miles in all directions, every element 
of prosperity and substantial greatness is within her grasp. She fears no rivals, confident 
that the enterprise and energy which have heretofore marked her progress, will secure for 
her a proud and pre-eminent position among her sister cities of the Union. She has to wait 
but a few short years the sure development of her " Manifest Destiny." 

We have been thus particular in regard to this city, as the facts were within our reach. 
The other cities of the State have prospered far beyond the expectations of their most san- 
guine inhabitants, and have all the elements of substantial prosperity. 

We have only room to mention the names of several of the other principal cities. On the 
line of the Galena Railroad, west of Chicago, are situated Elgin, Belvidere, Rockford, and 
Freeport. On and near the Mississippi, there are Galena, Rock Island, Qumcy, Alton, 
Belleville, Kaskaskia, and Cairo. On the Rock Island and other railroads, and the Illinois 
River, Joliet, Morris, Ottawa, La Salle, Peru, Peoria, Bloomington, and perhaps several other 
interior cities^ whose names do not occur to us. Most of these cities contain from three to 
fifteen thousand inhabitants, and are rapidly improving in population and wealth. Peoria 
and Quincy are acknowledged to be as beautiful cities as can be found anywhere in the Union. 
Beside the cities we have named, there are a great many fine towns in all parts of the State, 
in which the mechanic, the merchant, the manufacturer and all classes of the industrious and 
the enterprising, down to the humblest day laborer, will find steady and profitable employ- 
ment. 



XXXVI ' a. W. HAWES GAZETTEER HISTORICAL. 



ILLINOIS AND MICHIGAN CANAL. 

By reference to the map it will be seen that the Illinois and Michigan Canal connects Lake 
Michigan at Chicago with La Salle, the head of navigation on the Illinois river. The summit 
level of the canal is only eight feet above Lake Michigan. The canal is a hundred miles long, 
and has, if we mistake not, seventeen locks ; all but one at Bridgeport being on the descent 
toward the Illinois River. It is navigable for boats of a large class, and is in ail respects one 
of the finest canals in the Uniou. 

ILLINOIS RAILROADS. 

Did space permit, we should be glad to present a detailed statement of the railways of 
the state. The great Illinois Central runs from Chicago, on lake Michigan, and Dunleith on 
the upper Mississippi, south to Cairo at the mouth of the Ohio. It alone is 704 miles long. 
Other roads cut the state in all directions, so that there is now scarcely any place in it fifty 
miles from a railway, now in operation. There are from 2,800 to 3,000 miles now com- 
pleted, and a few others in progress. Nearly all this mighty work has been accomplished 
within the last eight years. We should have cut short other matters and given a detailed 
statement of the directions and locations of our railways; but as this is addressed at once 
to the eye on all the new maps, it was thought our space could be better occupied with 
other facts. 

RATES OF INTEREST. 

We have written thus far mostly for those who want farms — a home of their own. We 
have a word, also, for the capitalist. No state in the Union is improving so fast as Illinois. 
Hence there is no state where so large a rate of interest can be realized, and where the 
people can afford to pay it. Ten per cent, is the legal rate ; and if the interest be carefully 
invested every year, money, at this rate, will double in a little more than seven years. But 
money can be so used, ligitimately tmd honestly, as to benefit the borrower and realize to 
the lender from fifteen to twenty-five per cent. Suppose a man buys eighty acres to add to 
his farm, at the rate of five dollars per acre. That is just $400. He has §300 and borrows 
§100 at fifteen per cent. At the end of three years he pays his hundred dollars, and at com- 
pound interest at fifteen per cent, he pays in all §152.08. His land is worth, or he sells it for 
$10 per acre, §800 — and his §300 has become §647.92, giving §347.92 clear profit. Allow- 
ing him fifteen per cent, on his own money, and he still has cleared over and above that per 
centage $191.65, that is over sixty per cent, in three years. This illustration is given merely 
to show how men can make money by paying a large interest for the use of it. 

After careful reflection we are satisfied that scarcely within the lifetime of the present 
generation, will the rate of interest in the State of Illinois be less than ten per cent. So 
rapidly is the price of our rich lands appreciating, that the people of this state can better 
afford to pay ten per cent, for the use of money, than can those of the old eastern states to 
pay five. One word more. Investments can be made here as safely as in any other state in 
the Union, or anywhere else in the world beside. Illinois, therefore, offers as inviting a 
field to the capitalist as it does to the farmer and mechanic. 

CONCLUSION. 

We should like, had we space, and sufficient nerve, to turn to the future and speculate 
upon what Illinois is destined to become within the lifetime of the children born in 1858. 
Situated as near as may be in the centre of the great central valley of the continent ; with so 
large a territory, and so much of it still to be brought under cultivation; with agricultural 
and mineral resources, which it were worse than folly to attempt to estimate ; a climate 
stretching through five degrees of latitude, and railroads and navigable rivers running" 
through the State in all directions and on all sides of her, giving her unequaled commercial 
facilities; with her chief commercial and manufacturing city at the head of the most magnifi- 
cent chain of lake3 upon the globe; and with avast multitude of intelligent and enterprising 
people pouring in upon us, determined to make their homes amid our quiet groves and upon 
our rich and beautiful prairies — he would be a bold reasoner, indeed, who should dare to pre- 
dict what even the next fifty years will accomplish of our glorious Prairie State. Let those 
who want cheap lands, and" the dearest of all earthly possessions, a "home of theik own;" 
those who have strong arms and honest hearts, and a will to achieve fame and fortune in 
manufacturing, mercantile, mechanical, or professional pursuits ; those who have capital and 
want to invest it to the best possible advantage — and in fact all who want to rise in honor, 
wealth and influence with a rising State, cast their lot with us, and our word for it, not one in 
ten thousand will ever regret that he became a citizen of the State of Illinois. 



GEORGE W. HA WES' ILLINOIS 



'late §Btiiux anb %mmm Wmt 



FOR 1858-9. 



ABINGDON 

Is a fine flourishing city, situated in Knox 
county, on the Quincy branch of the Chicago, 
Burlington and Quincy railroad, 1V8 miles 
from Chicago, and 90 from the Mississippi 
river. It was first settled by Josiah Stilling, 
K. M. Chesney, and John Green, Esqs. Mr. 
Chesney is still living, and is one of the 
most thrifty of our western farmers, and 
has had the satisfaction of seeing a flourish- 
ing city rapidly growing up, where a few 
years since was only the wild Indian hunting 
grounds. In the year 1855, the snort of the 
iron horse awoke the inhabitants (then about 
500 in number) to energy, since which time 
they have been receiving constant accessions 
to their numbers. One secret of their rapid 
advancement has been owing to the entire 
suppression of the liquor traffic. In the 
early part of 185*7 a city charter was ob- 
tained. The city is beautifully laid out at 
right angles, corresponding with the cardinal 
points of the compass, in the midst of a 
most lovely and productive prairie, bounded 
on every side by beautiful groves of useful 
and ornamental trees, rendering the whole 
scenery picturesque in the extreme. Like 
many other places in this vicinity, the city is 
underlaid with coal of an excellent quality ; 
twenty mines are now in operation, giving 
employment to about 200 men. There is an 
abundance of lime and sandstone for building 
purposes, and several extensive brick yards 
are operated. Abingdon is well supplied 
with institutions of learning, having a col- 
lege and a seminary, known as "Heading's 
Collegiate Seminary," and four district 
schools. They have also four regularly 
organized churches. 

^ The colleges, churches, schools, and prin- 
cipal business buildings are built of brick, 
in good taste, and in the most durable 
manner. 



The inhabitants of Abingdon are remark- 
able for the harmony in which they live, 
independent of nation or religion. They 
also afford the principal support to a weekly 
newspaper, under the editorial management 
of O. White, Esq., who is also proprietor. In 
point of traffic this city is not behind her 
neighbors, being already one of the most 
important shipping points on the road. In 
manufactures they are doing a good amount, 
there being a steam flouring mill, known as 
the " Abingdon City Mills," two steam saw 
mills, a sash, door and blind factory, and an 
agricultural implement factory. There are 
two hotels — the Union House and the City 
Hotel — the first is kept by G. Secenich, 
Esq., and will be found to be the best and 
most convenient in every respect. Present 
appearances indicate that, at no very distant 
day, this city must take a prominent rank 
among the inland cities of the west. The 
present population is 1,*700. 

William Shannon, Postmaster. 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
Mayor, William H. Gillespie. 
City Clerk, C. L. Summers. 
Aldermen, J. Perdue, C. C. Lewis, G. 
Innis. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Barber & Sanderson, lumber. 

Bassett George, dry goods, etc. 

Bassett T. S., steam planing mills. 

Bourland J., D.D., pastor of Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Boydston & Co., steam saw mills. 

Brown M. L-, carpenter and house joiner. 

Cambridge R., commission and produce. 

Chesney J. H., dry goods and varieties. 

Chesney J. B. F., dry goods, groceries, and 
general varieties. 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



CHRISTIANER F., WATCHMAKER AND 
DENTIST. 

Davey William, tailor. 

Divin T., cabinet maker. 

Dunn T., physician. 

ENCELL C. K., BOOKS, STATIONERY 
AND YANKEE NOTIONS. 

Epperson H. B., tinware and stoves. 

Fitch G. & Son, merchants. 

Frey H., boot and shoemaker. 

Gillespie W. E. & Co., groceries and provis- 
ions. 

Harden E. S., commission and produce. 

Harvey & Hoffman, proprietor of Abingdon 
City Mills. 

HUEY J. S., AMBROTYPIST. . 

Jacobi & Tarbill, manufacturers of clothing. 

Kennedy J., wagon maker. 

Latimer A. & Co., dry goods, etc. 

LEWIS S. M., justice of the peace, collecting 
and real estate agent. 

LEWIS C. C. & BRO., STEAM SAW 
MILLS. 

Lewis N. C, professor of " Heading Semin- 
ary." 

LEWIS J. H., TAPER BROKER AND 
DEALER IN REAL ESTATE. 

Long N. J., ice cream and oysters. 

Murphy P. H., president of " Abingdon Col- 
lege" and pastor of Christian church. 

Nelson P., boot and shoemaker. 

OSBORN & ANDERSON, .tailors. 

OWEN S., GROCERIES AND PROVIS- 
IONS. 

Parkinson M. C, physician, druggist and 
dealer in paints, oils and dye stuffs. 

PARKINSON M. C, PHYSICIAN, DEAL- 
ER IN BOOKS, STATIONERY AND 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

PERDUE J. G., ARCHITECT AND 
BUILDER. 

RITCHEY S. H., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

RITCHEY & WELSH, COLLECTING 
AND REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 

Ritchie William, butcher. 

Shafer L., blacksmith and wagon maker. 

Stayman J., homeopathic physician. 

SUMMER CHARLES L, AT ENCELL'S 
BOOKSTORE. 

TERRY, WHEELER & CO., DRY GOODS 
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 
ETC, ETC. 

Terry, Wheeler & Co., commission and pro- 
duce. 

TERRYS & FULLER, WHOLESALE 
DEALERS IN HARDWARE, CUT- 
LERY AND BUILDING MATERIALS, 
ETC. 

VANCE A. P., saddler and harness maker. 

Vandoren M., pastor Wesleyan Methodist 
church. 

VICKERY ABNER, GROCERIES AND 
PROVISIONS. 

White 0., editor and publisher of the Abing- 
don Messenger. 

Young , pastor of Protestant Methodist 

church. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 

This is a flourishing county, in the extreme 
western part of the state, bordering on the 
Mississippi river, which separates it from 
Missouri ; has an area of 760 square miles. 
The north-west part of the county is drained 
by Bear creek, an affluent of the Mississippi. 
The surface is generally undulating and 
adorned with forests of deciduous trees ; the 
soil is exceedingly rich and extensively culti- 
vated-; wheat, Indian corn, oats, cattle and 
pork are the staples. The county contains 
extensive beds of stone coal and limestone. 
Capital, Quincy. Population, 32,800. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, W. H. Catiier. 

County Clerk, Alexander Johnson. 

County Treasurer, Wilson Lane. 

Clerk of Circuit Court, Thos. W. M. Fall. 

Coroner, Thaddetjs Munroe. 

Sheriff, John P. Cadogan. 

School Commissioner, A.sa W. Blakeslky. 

Surveyor, Bakzilla I. Chatten. 



ADAMS, 

A post office, located in the eastern section of 
Adams county. 
Thomas Tripp, Postmaster. 



ADDISON 



Is a post village in Du Page county ; it is a 
thriving village, surrounded by a rich farm- 
ing district. It lies eighteen miles west from 
Chicago. Population of village, 120; of 
township, 1,200. 

Henry Bartling, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc • 
Fisher H. P., justice of peace and super- 
visor. 
Fischer F., farmer. 
Fischer A., farmer. 
Fischer H. D., farmer. 
Friend A. C, merchant. 
Fraudre E. A., clergyman. 
Hess L., merchant. 
Hoffman F. A., horticulturist. 
Houkman P., lime burner. 
Keepling J. G., merchant. 
Kent P., wagon maker. 
Lester Br*>s., dealers in cattle. 
Pierce S. D., secretary fire ins. co. 
Pierce T. P., justice of peace. 
Ralph H., blacksmith. 
Ralermand H., cashier of fire ins. co. 
Ralermand W., president fire ins. co. 
Schmidt L., farmer. 
Vogeler E., physician. 
Weber H., farmer. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTOEY. 



ADELINE, 

A post office in Ogle county, is situated about 
fifteen miles north-east of the II inois Central 
railroad. 
Gkorge W. MucnELL, Postmaster. 



ALBANY 

Is delightfully located upon a gradually slop- 
ing limestone bluff, on the east bank of the 
Mississippi river, in Whiteside county, one 
hundred and forty miles west of Chicago, 
and about four hundred miles by river from 
St. Louis. One distinguishing feature about 
this town site is, that it has a beautiful rocky 
levee, unsurpassed by any on the river above 
St. Louis, being about one mile in extent 
and accessible at all points at any stage of 
water, and without shoal or bar. It is backed 
by some of the most beautifully rolling and 
fertile farming lands in the State. The 
population of this town is about 800. It has 
three churches : one Methodist, Rev. A. M. 
Early, pastor ; one Congregational, Rev. 
Samuel Heminway, pastor ; one Presbyterian, 
Rev. L. Gano, pastor. It has one select 
school, L. Swett, principal ; two hotels, two 
steam saw mills, one steam planing machine 
and sash manufactory, one steam flouring 
mill. 



Alphabetical list of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Boice, Ewing & Co., steam saw mills. 

Booth II. M., physician. 

Buck & Olds, sash and doors. 

Chamberlain W. A., druggist. 

Cottle B., physician. 

Durant W. W, produce dealer. 

Elner D. S., notary public. 

Emmons A. B., postmaster. 

Happer, Nevitt & Co., steam saw mills. 

Mcllvain & Hopper, merchants. 

McMahan 0., banker. 

Minta William, farmer. 

Mitchell Abraham, steamboat captain. 

Mitchell Samuel, produce dealer. 

Nevitt E. H., ins. agent. 

Pease C. P., merchant. 

Pease & Slaymaker, merchants. 

Proshrow William, farmer. 

Rood C. R., surveyor. 

Stockton E. A., physician. 

Van Nest P. B., farmer. 

Walker Olds, druggist. 



ALBION 

Is capital of Edwards county, 170 miles south- 
east of Springfield, has a high and healthy 
situation ; a plank road, about thirteen miles 
long, which connects it with Grayville, on | 
the W abash river, and it is extended twenty 
miles westward. Albion contains a brick 
court house and several fine buildings. 
Joseph Williams, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Orange John B., nurseryman. 
Smith John, insurance agent. 
Thompson F. B., physician and surgeon. 
Trosset Ga'spard, tinware, stoves, etc. 
Utley M. W., attorney and counselor at law. 



ALDEN. 

Alden is a small village, situated in the 
north-west part of McHenry county. It lies 
five miles north-west of Kenosha. The line 
of the Rockford railroad passes along the 
borders of this town. 

Newton .M. Capron, Postmaster. 



ALEXANDER COUNTY, 

A county forming the southern extremity 
of the state; has an area of 245 square 
miles. It is situated at the confluence of the 
Ohio with the Mississippi river, the latter of 
which forms its southern and south-western 
boundary, and separates it from Missouri. 
Cash river flows along the eastern borders of 
the county until it enters the Ohio, a few 
miles from its mouth. The surface is low, 
and, in some parts, is subject to inunda- 
tion. The soil is fertile. Wheat, Indian 
corn, grass, cattle and swine are the staples. 
The Illinois Central railroad passes 
through this county, having its terminus at 
Cairo. Capital, Thebes. Population, 2,890. 



ALEXANDRIA 

I3 a post town situated in Alexander county, 
it being the south-west county of the state, 
bordering on the Mississippi river. 
Alexander M. Fountain, Postmaster. 



ALGONQUIN, 

A post village in township of the same name, 
in McHenry county, 38 miles north-west 
from Chicago. It is in communication 
with the surrounding country by means of 
Fox river and the Fox river railroad. Con- 
tains several stores, grist mills, etc. Popu- 
lation, 200. 
J. J. Sears, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bluevet H. W., dry goods and groceries. 

Chandler & Barnum, dry goods, clothing, etc. 

Hunt R. B., physician. 

Plumligh Thomas, miller. 

Porter M. S., proprietor Algonquin House. 



ALHAMBRA 

Is a new post town, situated in Madison 
county, one of the western counties of the 
state, bordering on the Mississippi river. 
William J. Lowry, Postmaster. 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



ALMA 

Is a postal town located in Marion county, 
one of the interior counties of the State. 
• John S. Martin, Postmaster. 



ALTON, 

A large and flourishing city in Madison 
county, situated on the Mississippi river, 25 
miles above St. Louis, on the line of St. Louis, 
Alton and Chicago railroad and the termi- 
nus of the Torre Haute and Alton railroad ; 
contains several beautiful churches, nine 
public schools, four printing offices. There 
are several newspapers published here. It 
has five iron foundries, three large packing 
houses, distilleries and several grist mills. 
There are also a number of quarries, which 
give an inexhaustible supply of excellent 
limestone for building purposes. Coal is also 
found in the immediate vicinity of the city. 
Population, 12,000. 

J. L. Exglisii, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trade3, Etc. 

ALTHOFF & HAZARD, furniture, Short st. 
Alton House, cor Front and Alby streets 

(Hicks & Murray). 
Allen George T., physician, over Alton bank. 
Barry A. S. & Co., drugs, medicines, paints, 

oils, etc, cor State and Second sts. 
BERTHOUD F., furniture, picture frames, 

show cases, etc, Fourth st. 
Bemont & Miller, marble dealers, Belle st. 
BETTS J. S., wholesale liquors, ales and 

porter, State st. 
Billings H. W., attorney and counselor at 

law, Third st. 
Blair, Ballinger & Co., grocers, commission 

and forwarding merchants, Short street 

and Levee. 
Blair J. L., wholesale groceries. 
Bowman H. B., fancy and staple dry goods, 

oil cloths and carpets. 
BROWN GEORGE T., BOOK, JOB AND 

FANCY PRINTER AND BOOKBIND- 
ER, State st. 
Brown David E., clocks, watches, jewelry, 

etc, Third street opp Belle. 
Brath A., real estate agent, Belle st. 
Bruner J. D. & Co., manufacturer of stoves, 

castings, agricultural implements, etc, 

State st, 
Carey W. W., watch maker and jeweler. 
Chancy John, architect and builder, Belle st. 
CHURCH & CO., FORWARDING AND 

COMMISSION WAREHOUSE, WISE'S 

BLOCK. 
CLEMENT & RAYMOND, DEALERS IN 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN MARBLE. 
CLEAVELAND L. D., architect, cor Third 

and Belle sts. 
CORNWELL & WILLIAMS, Photograph 

and Daeuerreian artists, Third st. 



Davis Levi, attorney and counselor at law, 
Second st. 

Davis W. H. & Co., queensware, cutlery, 
wall paper, etc, wholesale, Second st. 

Davis & Bro., confectionery, toys, cigars, 
fruits, etc, Third st. 

Dimmock E. L. & Co., boots and shoes, 
wholesale, Second st. 

Dow J. & B. F., foreign and domestic fruits 
and groceries, Belle st. 

Empire saloon, Second st. 

FLAGG RICHARD, STAPLE AND FANCY 
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING. GROCER- 
IES AND BOOTS AND SHOES. Sec- 
ond st. 

Franklin House, stage office, State st. 

FRANCIS C. T., SUPT. MADISON COUN- 
TY COAL CO. 

GAMBRILL A. H, attorney and counselor 
at law, Belle st. 

Hawver & Ferguson, clothing, hats and 
caps, boots, shoes, etc, Second st. 

Haagen & Baehr, dry goods, boots, shoes and 
family groceries, Second street and 
Levee. 

Hart & Birdsall, staple and fancy dry goods, 
clothing, boots and shoes, etc, Second st. 

Heslop Frederick J., attorney at law and 
notary public, Third st. 

HAPPE A. L., CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, 
HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES, 
ETC, Third st. 

Hollister & Coffy, commission and forward- 
ing, and dealers in groceries, lime, coal, 
grain and fruits. Levee and Belle st. 

Hull E. S. & M. D., dentists, Third st. 

James & Pogues, physicians, Third st. 

JOHNSON & EMERSON, manufacturers of 
steam engines, boilers, saw mills and mill 
machinery, cor Eighth and Belle sts. 

Johnson P. E., homeopathic physician and 
surgeon, Belle st. 

Kellenberger L. & G. T., agents for .Etna 
Insurance Co., Third st. 

Lawson L. J. & Co., dry goods, Second st. 

McArdle James, tailor, Second st. 

MAUZY C. G. & B., fine and common fur- 
niture, mattresses, etc, Belle st. 

Marsh, Alton bank. 

METCALF & HIBBARD, books, stationery, 
wall paper, window shades, etc, whole- 
sale, Third st. 

Middleton Thomas, justice of peace, Third st. 

MITCHELL J. A. & CO., MILLERS AND 
DISTILLERS, MILL ST. AND LEVEE. 

Morrison R. C. & Co., forwarding and com- 
mission, Short street and Levee. 

Nelson & Hayner, hardware, etc, wholesale, 
Second st. 

Nixon & Quiston, dry goods and groceries, 
Belle st. 

ALCOTT A., parlor, hotel and steamboat 
furniture, etc, Second st. 

PARKER & READ, teas, coffees, brandies, 
wines, tobacco, cigars, candies, etc, Short 
street and Levee. 

Pierce W. C, physician and surgeon. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



5 



FIERSON J. H. & CO., LUMBER, LATH, 

SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS & CEDAR 
POSTS, cor Fourth and State sts. 

Tost William, groceries, wines and liquors, 
Third st. 

Pogue William Harrison, attorney and coun- 
selor at law, Third st. 

Quigley & Bro., drugs, medicines, paints, oils, 
glass, etc, Second st. 

KEHER & BRO., stoves, tin, japanned and 
hollow ware, roofing, guttering, etc, 
Third st. 

Rippe Herm H., tobacco, cigars, snuff, etc, 
Piasa st. 

Ryrie D. D. & Co., wholesale grocers, com- 
mission and forwarding merchants, rail- 
road and steamboat landing. 

Ryan Daniel, hardware, farming implements, 
etc, Second st. 

Sawyer Seth T., attorney and counselor at 
law and notary public. 

SCARRITT ISAAC & CO., foreign and do- 
mestic dry goods, carpets, etc, Third st. 

Simms D. & Co., drugs, medicines, paints, 
oils, glass, etc, cor Third and Piasa sts. 

Smith Utin, recorder, Belle st. 

Soule & Wills, lumber merchants, Second st. 

TACKABERRY JOHN, grocery and pro- 
vision store, Piasa st. 

TANSEY JAMES P., CARPENTER AND 
BUILDER, STATE ST. 

Tapping Bros., hardware, iron and steel, etc, 
Second st. 

Trumbull Charles, commission and forward- 
ing merchant and dealer in lime, cement, 

TURNER & SID WAY, MANUFACTURERS 
OF SADDLES, HARNESS, ETC, AND 
DEALER IN HIDES, LEATHER, 
TRIMMINGS, ETC, SECOND ST. 

Warren J. W., dry goods, Second st. 

WaplesT. L., clothing, hats, caps, etc, whole- 
sale, cor Piasa and Second sts. 

Wade, Barry & Co., grocers and commission 
merchants, Second street and Levee. 

Weiller Bros. & Co., clothing and furnishing 
goods, Second st. 

White D. C, dentist, Third st. 

Williams II., physician, Third st. 

Woo J R. T., boots and shoes, Second st. 

Wuerker C. & F., guns, rifles and pistols, 
Third st. 

YAGER JOHN H., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW, NOTARY 
PUBLIC, ETC, post office building. 



ALTON, UPPEH. 

A post village in the township of Monticello, 
Madison county, is a flourishing and pleas- 
antly located village, has a large college 
and several good streets, is situated on the St. 
Louis, Alton and Chicago railroad, 26 miles 
from St. Louis, 72 from Springfield and — 
from Chicago. Population, 2,500. 
Joseph Chapman, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
EL WELL J. M., undertaker and carpenter. 
Hewitt F., dry goods and groceries. 
HEIRSAY E. D., groceries, boots and shoes. 
Jackson J. B., physician. 
KELL & HARRISON, HARDWARE, TIN- 
WARE AND STOVES. 
MAXEY J. A., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
Murphy T. R., drugs and medicines. 
Pattison S., groceries. 
Handle J. D., dry goods, boots and shoes. 
Stocker G. R., dry goods and groceries. 
Wendell D. F., justice of peace. 



ALTOITA, 
A small station on the Chicago, Burlington 
and Quincy railroad, 1G miles east from 
Galesburg. 



AMBOY 
Is a small post town in Lee 'county, four 
miles south-east from Dixon, on the line of 
the Illinois Central railroad. It is rapidly 
improving both in numbers and wealth, and 
is a point of some considerable interest. A 
weekly paper is published there called the 
Times. There is also an Odd Fellows' Lodge, 
and other institutions of usefulness. Popula- 
tion, 800. 

Sidney S. Read, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Allen C, harness, saddles, etc. 

Ambros & Little, bankers. 

Andrews J., agent Freeport "nsurance co. 

Aniold Oliver, agent Stephenson county in- 
surance co. 

Barton J. B., drugs and medicines. 

Barber & Payne, dry goods. 

Billow F., hardware. 

Brown Samuel, justice of peace. 

Carson & Pirie, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Chase N. S., clothing. 

Clark D. L., proprietor Burnet House. 

Cottrell, Pratt & Miller, publishers of Amboy 
Times. 

Crombie T. M., physician and surgeon. 

Cross J. & Co., storage and commission. 

Gushing & Wood, house, sign and carriage 
painters. 

Doan Jacob, meat market. 

Edsall & Sheffield, attorneys and counselors 
at law. 

Edwards S., livery stable. 

Eustace John V., attorney at law. 

Farwell Bros., lumber. 

Finney & Garretson, carpenters and builders. 

Graham D. C, boots and shoes. 

Gravey J. C, meat market. 

Greene H. S., physician. 

Hale Jesse, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Howard J. T. & Co., provisions. 

Kinyon A., attorney and counselor at law, 

Little E., coal, salt, lime, etc. 



G 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Miller & Barrell, groceries. 

Minkler F. G., teacher of music. 

Nobles S. & Co., bankers and exchange. 

Patten E. W., books, jewelry, pianos, etc. 

Perry H. S., notary public. 

Pratt Truman L., notary public and justice 

of peace. 
Sleeper T. P., dentist. 
Stevens J., attorney and counselor at law. 
Taylor W. M., insurance agent and notary 

public. 
Weddell J. D., furniture. 
Whitcomb H. D., eclectic physician. 
Whitford D., harness, saddles, etc. 
Woodbury Nathan, tin shop. 
. Woodcock Miss H. N., milliner. 
"".*-Wooster & Co., dry goods, groceries, etc. 
Zubrod Alex., barber and hair dresser. 



AMERICA, 

A small station on the Chicago, Burlington 
and Quincy railroad, about 20 miles east of 
the Mississippi river. 



ANDERSON, 



A post office of Clark county. 
Moore McIntosh, Postmaster. 



ANDOVEE 



Is a postal town, situated in the western por- 
tion of Henry county. 

George E. Peterson, Postmaster. 



ANGOLD, 

A small post village of Lake county, about 
45 miles north-west by north from Chicago. 
Amaziah Smith, Postmaster. 



ANNA 
Is a post town located in Union county, one 
of the south-western counties of the state. 
David L. Phillips, Postmaster. 



ANNAWAN 
Is situated in Henry county, on the line of 
the Chicago and Rock Island Railroad, about 
145 miles from Chicago and 35 miles from 
Rock Island. It is surrounded by a rich and 
fertile country. Population, 500. 
B. C. Sargent, Fostmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Brown Wilson, Annawau House. 

Burton Mrs. R., millinery. 

Carpenter F., grocery. 

Crist A., grocer. 

Dow J. & Co., lumber and grocers. 



Dow & Brother, merchants. 
Gering Charles, shoemaker. 
HARDS, DOW & CO., Annawan Mills. 
Harris Henry, wagon maker. 
Hutchinson H., furniture dealer. 
Kochler Israel, cabinet maker. 
LABAUGH HENRY, harness maker. 
Lincham, Richards & Co., harness makers. 
McNEEL JOHN PROPRIETOR OF CITI- 
ZENS' HOTEL. 
Petteys H, notary public. 
PHELPS & PURDY, stoves and tinware. 
Remington J. M., proprietor Union House. 
Sargent B. C, merchant. 
Sargent B. C, postmaster. 
Wilson D. W., station agent. 
Woodard Paul, blacksmith. 



ANTIOCH, 

A small post village in Lake county, about 50 
miles north-west by north from Chicago. 
John M. Clark, Postmaster. 



APPLE RIVER, 

A' post office in the north-western part of 
Jo Daviess county. The river, from which 
the office takes its name, rises in Jo Daviess 
county, and flows in a southerly course with 
a winding channel, falling into the Mississippi 
river in Carroll county. 

James M. Irwin, Postmaster. 



APPLE TREE 



Is a post office located in Saline county. 
Henry Garner, Postmaster. 



ARCADIA 



Is a post office situated in Morgan county. 
James M. Dougherty, Postmaster. 



ARENZVILLE, 

A small post village in Cass county, on the 
Indian creek, about 48 miles west from 
Springfield. 

John L. Cire, Postmaster. 



ARGYLE, 



A post office of McDonough county, 92 miles 
north-west from Springfield. 
George W. Wilcii, Postmaster. 



ARISPEE, 



A small post village of Bureau county, about 
60 miles north from Peoria. 
Henry A. Morgan, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ARLINGTON 

Is a post office located in Bureau county, on 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy rail- 
road. 
James Waugh, Postmaster. 



ARMINGTON, 

A small post village of Tazewell county, 45 
miles north-east from Springfield. 
M. Triedman, Postmaster. 



ARMSTRONG, 

A small post village of Wabash county, 
situated on the Wabash river, nine miles 
J\ T .N.E. from Mount Calumet. 
John Abbietz, Postmaster. 



ARNON, 

A postal town situated in Will county, one 
of the eastern counties of the state. 
Jacob Goodenow, Postmaster. 



AROMA, 

A post office of Will county. 



ARROW, 

A post office in La Salle county. 
George L/Dillman, Postmaster. 



ASBITRY, 

A post office in La Salle county. 
James M. Vannosdoll, Postmaster, 



ASHBY, 

A small village in Coles county. 
Benjamin F. Bulla, Postmaster. 



ASHFORD, 

A post office in Carroll county. 
George Ashby, Postmaster. 



ASHKUM, 

A post office in Iroquois county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad. 
William S. Ogden, Postmaster. 



ASHLEY, 

A post office in Washington county, on the 
Illinois Central railroad. 

James Ramsey, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Childres R., furniture. 

Vandyke & Hunter, commission and forward- 
ing. 



ASHMORE, 

A small post village in Coles county. 
James M. Ashmore, Postmaster. 



ASTORIA, 

A post office in Fulton county. 
Joseph Deary, Postmaster. 



ASHRIDGE, 

A post office in Pulaski county. 
Lewis K. Barfield, Postmaster. 



ATHENS 

Is a post town situated in the south-western 
portion of Menard county, about 15 miles 
from New Salem. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Boyd J. W., cabinet maker. 

Boyd J. W., justice of the peace. 

Canterbury C. H., farmer. 

Claypool L., farmer. 

Clark T. H. & Co., brick makers. 

Collier N. B., farmer. 

Farley B. F., physician. 

Freeman J. V., citizen. 

Gibbs Levi, shoemaker. 

Hall Elihu, farmer. 

Hall J., druggist. 

Hall Joel, farmer. 

Hulings M. S., physician. 

Johnson John, farmer. 

Higgin H., farmer. 

Kincaid J. K., farmer. 

La Vancer D. A., hotel. 

La Vance A., physician. 

McKinley Daniel, harness maker. 

Miller Jonathan, citizen. 

Moran William L., farmer. 

Mott James, cabinet maker. 

Myers M. & Bro., merchants. 

Primm A. C, merchant. 

Primm D. C, farmer, 

Primm F, J., physician. 

Roberts William F. & Co., merchants. 

Russell Thomas, boots and shoes. 

Salzenstein L., merchant. 

Spencer G. W., blacksmith. 

Sudduth J. M., physician. 

Tice Jerman, farmer. 

Tice Thomas, wagon maker. 

Turner William, farmer. 

Ward J. M., citizen. 

Whitney A. H., justice of the peace. 

Winters & Pierce, wagon makers. 

Young J. E., farmer. 



ATHENSVILLE, 

A small post village of Green county. 
John Armstrong, Postmaster. 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



ATKINSON, 

A new post town located in Henry county, 
on the line of the Chicago & Rock Island 
railroad, about 30 miles east from Rock 
Island and 151 miles west from Chicago. 
Contains a post office, store, mechanics' 
shops, etc. 
N. W. Taylor, Postmaster. 



ATLANTA 

Is situated on the north-east corner of Logan 
county, about 150 miles from Chicago, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton & Chicago rail- 
road. It is a flourishing town. Population, 
800. 
Ellas B. Johnson, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 
Ball J. H., agent of Etna insurance co. 
Dicks & Martin, real estate agents. 
Fusch Charles, homeopathic physician. 
Glotfelter E. S., daguerreian artist. 
Goodrich C. H., attorney at law. 

Haise , physician. 

Hoblit J. C, blacksmith. 

Hunts , saddler and harness maker. 

Kirk W. T., physician. 

Lacy & Curnmings, attorneys at law. 

Lecher & Lenard, hardware. 

Ludlam & Co., staple and fancy dry goods. 

Martin & Reed, lumber, laths, etc. 

McLaughlin , physician. 

Milner, Edes & Co., dry goods and clothing. 

Pallady John, boots and shoes. 

Pell & Pearson, house and sign painters. 

Rank A. C, physician. 

Sanford H. B., carpenter and builder. 

Turley Andrew J., attorney at law. 

Waters 0., druggist. 

Whitesides & Harvey, plasterers. 



ATLAS, 

A post office in Pike county. 
John L. Ball, Postmaster. 



ATTILA, 

A post office in "Williamson county. 
Will W. Mitchell, Postmaster. 

AUBURN, 

A post village of Sangamon county, 17 miles 
south-west from Springfield. Is situated in 
a rich farming district, which is rapidly 
increasing in population. The St. Louis, 
Alton & Chicago railroad passes through 
the place. 

Benj. Kesler, Postmaster. 



AUDUBON, 

A post office in Montgomery county, 
lished in Dec, 185*7. 



Estab- 



AUGUSTA 

Is an incorporated town, situated in the 
south-east part of Hancock county, on the 
Northern Cross railroad, 210 miles from 
Chicago and 120 from St. Louis. The prairie 
on which it is located is rolling, bounded on 
the south-east and north by fine groves of 
wood and timber. The soil here and in the 
vicinity is rich and highly productive. $175,- 
000 worth of provisions are shipped annually 
to New York, besides large quantities to 
Chicago and other points. There are also 
several extensive coal mines, which are 
worked to advantage. A great portion of this 
mineral is shipped to Chicago and Quincy. 
Building materials, stone and brick, are in 
abundance, and there are several lime kilns 
in successful operation. The climate of 
Augusta is healthy, and the water of a supe- 
rior quality. The town is fast becoming one 
of importance in a commercial point of view, 
and from its peculiar location bids fair to 
increase in population and wealth at a rapid 
rate. There are here twelve stores, three 
blacksmith shops, one machine shop, ten 
carpenter shops, one fine flour mill, one 
steam saw mill, planing mill and sash and 
blind factory, three churches (of brick), two 
large school houses. The town is governed 
by a president and board of trustees. Pop- 
ulation, 800. 
O. Grove, Dept. Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Anderson J. W., groceries and fancv goods. 

BELL WILLIAM, PROPRIETOR "SICKLE 
AND SHEAF HOUSE." 

BELTON JAMES, RESTAURANT. 

Bennett W. L., constable. 

Cassada S. W., physician. 

COMPTON J. & J. B., PACKERS. 

Compton J. & J. B., dry goods, etc. 

Dee A., plasterer. 

ELDER T. H., STOVES AND TINWARE. 

ELLIS & HAWLEY, livery and sale stables 
and proprietors of "Augusta House." 

Ellis D., physician. 

Hurd E. L., pastor Presbyterian church. 

Jackson J., county constable. 

JONES & MILLSPAUGH, LUMBER 
DEALERS AND PROPRIETORS OF 
PLANING MILL AND SASH AND 
BLIND FACTORY. 

Jones Julius, clothing, etc. 

Kennedy E. R., millinery and fancy goods. 

Leach William, wagon maker. 

McCANN T. J., FURNITURE. 

Mead H., justice of peace. 

Mead S. B., physician. 

Pierson D., physician. 

PITNEY D. B., DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Ramsey W. F., attorney at law. 

Seem A, daguerreian artist. 

Seem Charles, carriage maker. 

SKINNER & CO., DRY GOODS, CLOTH- 
ING, HARDWARE, ETC. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



SMITH GEO., TAILOR 
Staiks J., pastor of Christian church. 
STARK J. & G., DRY GOODS AND GRO- 
CERIES. 
Sylvester B., blacksmith. 
TAYLOR D. C, BLACKSMITH & SHOER. 
Ward E., justice of peace. 
Warner A., carpenter. 
WATSON W. H., DRUGGIST. 
Winfield A. & Co., blacksmiths. 
Working J., carpenter. 
Young H. A., harness and saddle maker. 



AURORA 

Is a city in the township of Aurora on the 
Fox river, in the south-east part of Kane 
county,*- 43 miles from Chicago, 122 miles 
north-east from Springfield and 10 miles from 
the county seat. It was settled in 1834, and 
is rapidly increasing in population. The 
city is drained by Fox river, which affords 
abundance of water power for the various 
manufacturing establishments, among which 
are the celebrated " Black Hawk Mills." It 
has a rich soil, adapted to grass and grain. 
In the immediate vicinity is found an abund- 
ance of building material, in the shape of 
limestone and clay and sand for brick. The 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad passes 
through the city, thus affording facilities for 
travel and transportation, and making it the 
center of trade for the surrounding country. 
The railroad company has erected some fine 
buildings, used as freight houses and machine 
shops. There are in the city three hotels, 
nine churches, eleven schools and a seminary, 
which has an excellent reputation. The 
building used by the latter is a magnificent 
structure, erected at a cost of $65,000. Two 
weekly newspapers. The city government 
consists of a mayor, city clerk and eight 
aldermen. 
R. C. Mix, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trade3, Etc. 

ALBEE, FITCH & CO., dealers in leather, 
Broadway. 

Allen E. R. & Co., Am. express agents, La 
Salle st. 

Andrus & Smith, bakers, River st. 

AURORA HOUSE. This hotel is situated 
in the most business part of the city 
and close to the railroad depot. Bag- 
gage conveyed to and from the cars free 
of charge. Chapman & Thorp, propri- 
etors. 

Bartlett A. B., phvsician, Main st. 

BABCOCK C. J., "book binder, Main st. 

BARR J. G., clerk of city, circuit and com- 
mon pleas courts, and justice of peace. 

BEMENT & KEARNEY, watch makers and 
jewelers. 

Bennett R. O, merchant tailor, Broadway. 

BRADLEY E. A. (of A. Jenks & Co.) 

Brady L. D., lumber, Broadway. 



BRADY & PEASE, dry goods, etc, corner 
of Main street and Broadway. 

Buck & Roe, drugs, medicines, books and 
stationery. 

CAHN A., clothier, cor Main and Broadway. 

CARPENTER D. G., musical instruments 
and merchandise. 

CHURCH Z., BOOTS AND SHOES, Main st. 

Clark J., alderman. 

Clegg Wm., watchmaker and jeweler, River st. 

Cotterall S., alderman. 

Cramer N. S. & Co., butchers, Galena st. 

CROSBY I., house and sign painter, River st. 

Day George W. & Bro., hardware and cut- 
lery, cor Mill and River sts (west town). 

DAY 0. D., attorney and counselor at law. 

Denney Joseph, furniture, Broadway. 

Douney P., boots and shoes, Broadway. 

FENTON M., fishmonger and grocer, Broad- 
way. 

Fickenscher & Weise, hair dressers and wig 
makers, Main st. 

FOX MRS. L., dress and cloak maker, Mainst. 

FULLER A. B., attorney at law, River st. 

Gardner W., alderman. 

Gardner G. H., lumber, lath and shingles, 
River st. 

Gill Charles, saw mills, proprietor of Aurora 
City and Eagle mills. 

GOODWIN J., hardware, stoves, glass, etc. 

Hackney B., real estate agent, Main st. 

Hackney & Gardner, lumber dealers, Broad- 
wav. 

HALL& BROTHERS, BANKERS AND 
EXCHANGE BROKERS. 

Hawley John S., dry goods. 

Hawley L. I. & Martin, milliners. 

Hale B. F., Mayor. 

Harman A. (of Knickerbocker & Co.), Aurora 
Weekly Beacon. 

HOYT R.W. & CO., dry goods, River st. 

Hoyles Saml. & Co., boots and shoes, Main st. 

HUNTOON E. D., proprietor Fox River 
Hotel, Galena st. 

Howard & Hugell, physicians and surgeons, 
Main st. 

Isbell L. H., saddle and harness maker, Broad- 
way. 

Jackson S. L., alderman. 

JENKS ALBERT & CO., Exchange bank. 

JENKS L. (of Albert Jenks & Co.) 

Johnson & Leggett, horse shoers, Broadway. 

Kemp John, saddle and harness maker, cor 
River and Mill sts. 

KNICKERBOCKER A. B. & CO., editors and 
proprietors of Weekly Beacon. 

Krymer W., River st. 

Krymer J. Y., confectioner, River st. 

Lawyer S. E., butcher, Broadway. 

LEE L. C. & 0. W., watches, clocks and 
jewelry, Main st. 

Liess N., groceries and provisions, Broadway. 

Long 0. A., watches, clocks and jewelry, 
silver and plated ware. 

LUGG WILLIAM, groceries and provisions, 
River st. 

McWicken Wm. & Co., merchant tailors. 



10 



G. W. IIAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Mallory Charles A., furniture. 

MARSHALL J. W., dry goods, cutlery and 
glassware. 

Mix R. C, alderman and postmaster. 

MILES MASON" M., physician and surgeon-, 
Masonic block, Main st. 

Miers G. W., chemist and druggist, River st. 

Miller C. K. & G. B., horse shoers, Galena st. 

Miller II., alderman. 

Miller & Pease, staple and fancy dry goods, 
groceries, crockery, etc, Main st. 

MOORE & BEVIER, druggists and chemists, 
Broadway. 

MONTGOMERY & McLALLEN, provisions 
and groceries. 

Munsou Sylvester, cigars and tobacco, Broad- 
way. 

Noble W. J., groceries and provisions, River 
st. 

OTIS NEWTON, hardware, cutlery, etc, 
Main st. 

PIERCE J. D. & BRO., brick and lime 
burners, N. Broadway. 

Plum W. N., alderman. 

Pratt , Excelsior photographic gallery. 

PUTNEY & BENTOIN, pork, sausages and 
provisions, Main st. 

Putnam Mrs. J. P., milliner, Broadway. 

RAKE G. W., tailor and renovator, Broad- 
way. 

REEDER & MERRILL, doors, sash and 
blinds, Broad st. 

Rising & Bro., boots and shoes, River st. 

RISEING JOHN, groceries and provisions, 
Broadway. 

ROBERTSON W. A., guns and sporting 
apparatus. 

Root A., groceries and provisions, River st. 

RUNDELPH & FOWLAR, feed, coffee, 
sugar and hardware, Main st. 

Seligman & Bro., Young America clothing 
house. 

Sheppard & Reeves, merchant tailors and 
clothiers. 

Simon & Fickensher, apothecaries and chem- 
ists. 

Slosson C, proprietor Empire House. 

Smith H., butcher, Broadway. 

SNELL & BAXTER, merchant tailors, fur- 
nishing goods, etc. 

SQUIERS k WHITFIELD, proprietors of 
Blackhawk mills (west town). 

Squiers & Whitfield, copper factory. 

Steen A. L., physician, Empire block, Main st. 

STEWART MISSES, millinery and fancy 
goods, Main st. 

Stolp J. B., alderman. 

STOLP J. G., mnfr of woolen yarn, cloths, 
sheetings, etc. 

Strong J. M., artist, Main st. 

Swarthout & Moore, provisions, cor Main 
street and Broadway. 

Tanner & Rice, iron, steel, stoves, etc. 

THOMPSON J. H., boots and shoes, Broad- 
way. 

TIMERMAN E., bakery and provision store, 
36 Broadway. 



TITSWORTH L. & SON, hardware, cut- 
lery and stoves. 

TOMBLIN IRA, produce merchant, Seneca 
street near Clark. 

UNDERWOOD J. K, engraver, Main st. 

Valentine G. W., marketman (east and west 
towns). 

VAUGHN J. R., crockery and glassware, 
Masonic block, Main st. 

VOLINTINE, HURD & CO., dry goods, 
groceries and crockery. 

WALKER & GILLETT, "drugs, medicines, 
paints, oils, etc. 

Welsh J., blacksmith, Bridge st. 

WELLS H. S., groceries and provisions, 
cor Main and La Salle sts. 

Westover E.'C, blacksmith. Galena st. 

WHIPPLE T. H., editor Aurora Republican. 

WHITELEY S., publisher Aurora Repub- 
lican. 

WHITE JOHN B., trav. agent for Chicago 
Press. 

WIGHTWICK JOHN, fancy dry goods. 

WILSON J. J., dentist, Masonic block, 
Main st. 

WILSON 0., JR., surgical and mechanical 
dentist, Main st. 

Wills S. H., boots and shoes, Broadway. 

Williams T. C, furniture, River street (west 
town). 

Woodworth E. & A., carriages, wagons, etc. 

Wright W. E., druggist. 



AU SABLE. 

A post office in Kendall county, 50 miles 
south-west from Chicago. 
Ebenezer Henderson, Postmaster. 



AVERY. 

A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
William Avert, Postmaster. 



AVISTON. 

A small post village in the west part of Clin- 
ton county, about 80 miles south of Spring- 
field. 

Josiah C. Shelton, Postmaster. 



AVOCA. 



A small post village of Livingston county, on 
the south fork of Vermilion river, 98 miles 
north-east from Springfield. 
James McDonald, Postmaster. 



AVON. 

A post office in Fulton county. The place is 
quite new, but is rapidly increasing in popu- 
lation. The Northern Cross railroad passes 
through it. 

Stephen Tompkins, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIEECTOBY. 



11 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AYLSWORTH & WIARD, proprietors Nov- 
elty mills. 

Chambers E. P., freight agt C, B. & Q. R. R. 

Churchill J. M., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Conrad S. M., blacksmith. 

Crawford John, wagon mnfr. 

Fitzgerald E. H., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

GOODSPEED k SON, GROCERIES, PRO- 
VISIONS, ETC. 

Goodspeed & Son, furniture. 

Johnson M. G., ticket agt C, B. & Q. R. R. 

Mantania J. D., boots and shoes. 

MUNNERY & GILL, BLACKSMITHS. 

RIGGS W. H., STOVES AND TINWARE. 

ROCKHOLD J. M., DRUGGIST. 

Rose & Woods, proprietors Union mills. 

SHREVES & BAYS, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC. 

SHREVES T. J., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

STUMP D. M., DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 
ETC. 

TOMPKINS & GUTR1DGE, PROPRIETORS 
PRAIRIE STATE MILLS, AND GEN- 
ERAL PRODUCE MERCHANTS. 

Tompkins Stephen, dry goods and general 
produce. 

Townsend R. W., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Vanderveer W. T., lumber and produce. 

WELLS S. T., daguerreian artist. 



BABCOCKS GROVE, 

A post village of Du Page county, 24 miles 
from Chicago. 
Joseph B. Hull, Postmaster. 



BAINBRIDGE, 



A post office of Williamson county, about 
175 miles south-east from Springfield, and 
340 south-west from Chicago. 
George L. Owen, Postmaster. 



BALDWINVILLE, 

A post office of Eagan county, about 178 
miles from Chicago. 

Alanson Baldwin Postmaster. 



BANNER, 



A small village of Kane county, in the north 
central part, about 42 miles north-west from 
Chicago. 



BARCLAY, 



A post village of Whiteside county, about 108 
miles west from Chicago. 
Daniel O'Kane, Postmaster. 



BARNETT, 

A post office of Macon county. 
James Barnett, Postmaster. 



BARREVILLE, 



A post village of McHenry county, about 46 
miles north-west from Chicago. 
Frederick Bryant, Postmaster. 



BARRINGTON, 

A post township in Cook county, about 35 
miles north-west from Chicago. Popula- 
tion. 780. 

Theodore A. Miller, Postmaster. 



BABRINGTON STATION, 

A post village in the township of Barrington, 
36 miles north-west from Chicago. 
John M. Porter, Postmaster. 



BARR'S STORE, 

A post office in M acoupin county. 
Frederick Steidlet, Postmaster. 



BARRY, 

A post town and village in the west part of 
Pike county, about 15 miles from the Missis- 
sippi river. 

Londoree N. Ferris, Postmaster. 



BASCO, 

A post office in Hancock county. 
Martin Shdet, Postmaster. 



BAT AVI A, 

Kane county, is an incorporated town of con- 
siderable importance, on the Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy railroad, at its junction 
with Fox river, 36 miles from Chicago, and 
2 from Geneva, the county seat. Its location 
is exceedingly health}'. The river affords the 
best water power in the state, and at this 
point is spanned by a substantial stone bridge, 
with six arches. The town is built on and 
surrounded by an extensive ledge of stone, 
affording an abundance of building material, 
which is shipped to various points by railroad. 
They have here five churches, six schools 
and an institute, three factories, three large 
blacksmith shops, and two good hotels. The 
facilities which are offered has induced a 
large amount of wealth and enterprise to 
centre here, and the whole appearance of 
the town indicates one of health and 
prosperity. Population, 4,600. 
A. M. Moore, Postmaster. 



12 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Albert C. H., pastor of Episcopal church. 

Brown C. H., justice of peace. 

Burr Nelson & Co., pumps, etc. 

CHAMBERS W. H., proprietor Eagle hotel, 
(east town). 

Chapel Jason, general merchant. 

Coffin William, banker. 

Corwin George E., sheriff of Kane county. 

Dewey L. H., watch maker. 

Dickinson J. IL, merchant tailor. 

Finch C. W., drugs, medicines, etc. 

FOWLER GEO. W, lumber. 

Fowler G. W , dry goods. 

Gladding H. D. W, merchant. 

Grimes A., surgeon dentist. 

Grimes A. & Bro., general dealers. 

HAMMOND & CALDWELL, groceries and 
provisions. 

Hemmann Augustus, boots and shoes. 

Houck & Stearns, flour and produce. 

Hurlburt H. H. & Co., grocery. 

Ilurlburt H. H., proprietor steam mills. 

Kemp Milo M., hardware. 

LATHAM A., lumber. 

Latham Adolphus, steam sawmill. 

Lockwood S. D., judge. 

Lord I. S., homeopathic physician. 

Lord M. N., insurance agent. 

McCarthy P. V., dry goods, boots and shoes. 

McKEE & MOSS, proprietors of Batavia 
mills. 

Mead T., physician. 

Merriman W., pastor Congregational church. 

Moore & Davis, proprietors of Revere hotel. 

Newton & Co., carriages, coaches and 
wagons. 

RAPELJE H. L., saddles, harness, trunks. 

Read E. A., pastor Methodist church. 

Rockwell James, cabinet maker. 

SHUMWAY C. W., hardware. 

Smith Benjamin, reaper factory. 

Tanner J. B., confectionery, musical instru- 
ments, etc. 

Town Elija S., proprietor stone quarry. 

UPDIKE LEWIS, dry goods and varieties. 

Wheaton Charley, attorney at law. 

WilliousH. W., physician. 

Wilson 0., justice of peace and notary public. 

Wolcott , dry goods, groceries, etc. 

WRIGHT C. A., drugs and medicines. 



BATCHELDER'S GROVE, 

A small post village of Cook county. 
Robert Pamrick, Postmaster. 



BATH, 

A post village of Mason county, on the Illi- 
nois river, 50 miles southerly from Peoria, is 
situated in a fertile country, and has a good 
run of trade, being a shipping port for St. 
Louis. It was formerly the county seat. 
Population, about 800. 
William J. Odell, Postmaster. 



BAY, 

A post office of Pope county. 
Andrew Jenkins, Postmaster. 

BEAR CREEK, 
A township of Hancock county, about 235 
miles from Chicago. 



BEAR CREEK, 
A post office in the township so called in 
Montgomery county. Population, 800. 
William Russell, Postmaster. 



BEARDSTOWK, 
A thriving town, the capital of Cas3 county, 
is situated on the Illinois river, 50 miles 
W.N.W. from Springfield. It contains, be- 
sides the county buildings, several churches, 
hotels, stores and fine residences. The sur- 
face is diversified, soil rich and is fast in- 
creasing in population. A paper is published 
here called the Central IU'moisan. There is 
also here two lodges of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, one lodge of Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, one lodge of Good 
Templars, and one of Sons of Temperance. 
Population, 2,000. 
James Siiaw, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Allard L. S., physician and dealer in drugs, 

medicines, books, stationery, etc. 
Billings H., furniture and carpetings. 
Bonn C, pastor German Methodist Episcopal 

church. 
Campbell W. P., proprietor Virginia House. 
Craig John, surveyor and land agent. 
Cutter E. F., pastor Congregational church. 
DeSollar H. B., carriage factory. 
Dowler J. R., physician and surgeon. 
Dummer H. E., attorney at law. 
Eyre Benjamin, carriage, wagon and plow 

depot. 
Eyre Matilda, drugs and medicines. 
Finley & Turpin, produce and commission. 
Grau F., pastor German Lutheran church. 
Hitchcock & Billings, lumber. 
Housekeeper C. II. , attorney at law and 

notary public. 
Hurley Miss M., millinery. 
Huttenbouer S. & Co., clothing. 
Kuhl George, clothing, groceries, furniture, 

etc. 
Lemmon W. D., pastor Methodist Episcopal 

church. 
Leonard J. C, & Co., bankers and exchange 

dealers. 
Maxwell E. R., dentist. 
Maehring George, barber. 
Menke & Fletcher, drugs and medicines. 
Nolte & McClure, dry goods, etc. 
Parker C. E., physician and surgeon. 
Petri August, gunsmith and dealer. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



13 



Plalm George, storage. 

Putnam John, watches, jewelry and fancy 
goods. 

Read M. L., clothing. 

Rearick F. H. & Co., iron and steel, stoves, etc. 

Reavis Isham, attorney and counselor at law. 

Rice & Maxwell, drugs, paints and oils, books, 
stationery, etc. 

Seeger G. Henry, dry goods. 

Shaw J. Henry, attorney at law. 

Skurtleff & Dilley, plain and fancy printers, 
publishers of Central lllinoisan. 

Shurtleff D. W., proprietor National Hotel. 

Warner R,, clothing. 

Whipp Miss Sarah, millinery. 

Whipp William, drugs and musical instru- 
ments. 

Whitney , surgeon dentist. 

Wiles Thomas S., justice of peace, notary 
public and conveyancer. 



BEAVER CREEK, 

A post office of Bond county, 80 miles south 
from Springfield, 230 from Chicago, and 45 
from St. Louis. 
David W. Wise, Postmaster. 



BEAVER TOWU, 

A post office in Boone county. 
Samuel Clark, Postmaster. 



BEDFORD, 

A post village, situated in Pike county, on 
the Illinois river, about 40 miles from its 
mouth. 

Thomas M. Kilpatrick, Postmaster. 



BELDEK", 

A small post town in McHenry county. 
Garret W. Deitz, Postmaster. 



BELL AIR, 

A small post village of Crawford county, 123 
miles south-east from Springfield. 
William B. Bauman, Postmaster. 

BELL PLAIN, 

A post office in Marshall county. 
James J. Lucas, Postmaster. 



BELLEVIEW, 

A post village of Calhoun county, situated 
about two miles east of the Mississippi river. 
Henry G. Hart, Postmaster. 



BELLEVILLE, 

The county seat of St. Clair county, is pleas- 
antly situated on the line of the Belleville 



and Minfreysboro' railroad, about 16 miles 
south-east from St. Louis, and 310 miles from 
Chicago. The region abounds in coal, which 
is dug to a great extent and shipped to dif- 
ferent points by rail and the Mississippi river. 
These beds of coal extend to a great distance 
below the surface. The surrounding country 
is quite populous, and advancing steadily in 
wealth and numbers. The city contains a 
handsome court house, several fine churches 
and seminaries, a bank, besides numerous 
manufacturing establishments. The popula- 
tion is estimated at about 6,500. 
Chamfness Ball, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Betchtold Philip G., book binder, paper hang- 
er, etc. 

Burckhart H., proprietor Belleville House. 

Diedesheimer Henry & Co., dry goods, gro- 
ceries, etc. 

Dollus J., tobacco and cigars. 

Ermer John, Sr., hardware. 

Gumpertson M., clothing. 

Horn Charles L., flour and feed. 

Kreb Edward, millinery, etc. 

Miller k Madera, leather, boots and shoes. 

Murray D. H., groceries, provisions and teas. 

Nolen & Belt, real estate agents and auc- 
tioneers. 

Oster William, dry goods, groceries, hard- 
ware, etc. 

Patrick John J., dental surgeon. 

Piepcr & Randle, dry goods, clothing, etc. 

Trimm A. T., books and stationery. 

Quick Thomas, attorney at law. 

Roman J. A., physician. 

Schrader J. M., chair manufacturer. 

Throp T. A. & Co., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Trumbull George, attorney at law. 

Stuart W. H., druggist. 

Underwood W. H. & J. B., attorneys at law. 

Valentine P. G., homeopathic physician. 

Vaughn A. G., marble worker. 

Walker Thomas J. & Co., land agents. 



BELLEPAME, 

A post office in Tazewell county. 
Cyrus B. Chase, Postmaster. 



BELVIDERE, 

County seat of Boone county, situated *76 
miles north-west of Chicago, on the Galena 
and Chicago Union railroad, the junction of 
the Beloit branch of which is at this place. 
The town lies on both sides of the river 
Kishwaukee, a small stream which affords 
some water power. It has been settled about 
twenty-two years, and contains a population 
of about 2,500 in the incorporated limits. 
It contains about 40 stores of all kinds ; 4 
banks; a printing office, from which the 
Standard (rep.) is issued weekly, which is 
now in its sixth volume ; 3 flour mills, 1 



14 



G. W. H AWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



steam planing mill and sash factory, a brew- 
ery, 9 churches, a female seminary, two 
union schools and several select schools, 5 
hotels. The various trades and professions 
are all well represented. The country back 
of this town is very fine, and well settled by 
people mostly from New York and New 
England. 
John Saxton, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AMERICAN HOTEL, TRUESDELL, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Ames B. & Son, druggists and books, near 
the railroad depot. 

Baker D. S , merchant tailor. 

Bartlett Miss M. J., millinery, etc. 

Benson Thomas, blacksmith. 

Bidwell & Reynolds, carriage and wagon 
makers. 

Bigelow Jeremiah, groceries. 

Bishop E. R., groceries. 

BLAIR, NELSON & BELDEN, HARD- 
WARE AND CUTLERY, cor State and 
IVrpcliJUiic sts 

BLAIR, NELSON & BELDEN, stoves, fence 
wire, tin, copper and sheet iron ware, 
cor State and Mechanic sts. 

Boone county Bank. 

BOYCE M. M., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

Bush E. N., freight and ticket agent G. & 
C. U. R. R. 

CAD WELL WILLIAM H., news and peri- 
odical depot. 

CHAPMAN L. F., cabinet maker and dealer 
in furniture. 

Clark 0. D., blacksmith and plow maker. 

CROSBY & WILCOX, Southern Hotel, south 
side. 

Cunningham H., variety store. 

Doty S. P., proprietor Belvidere Hotel. 

Ellis D. E., physician and dentist. 

FERRILL B. E., photographic artist, rooms 
on south side. 

Fisk Jacob, sash, doors and blinds. 

FOOTE D. E., physician and surgeon. 

Foote W. S., dentist. 

Fuller & Wood, attorneys at law. 

Fuller, Lawrence & Woods, bankers. 

Garcelon P. J., dry goods, produce, etc. 

Garvin J. W., physician and druggist. 

Glasner John M., dry goods, boots and shoes, 
ready-made clothing. 

Green & Holden, lumber dealers, south side. 

Hamlin Fayette B., attorney at law. 

Haywood William, blacksmith. 

Hebden R. W., lumber. 

Heffermen James, merchant tailor. 

Herren A., ambrotypes. 

Hurlburt S. H., lawyer. 

Ide D. B., meat market. 

Ives C. W., agent Am. Ex. Co. 

Jennison H. F., ins agent. 

Jinks & Winchell, produce and commission 
merchants. 



Jones J. B., M. D. 

Jones J. B. & Son, grocers, Mechanic st. 

JULIEN HOUSE, south side river, near rail- 
road depot, J. C. PARKHOUSE, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Kandy C. B., flour and feed. 

KERR JOHN. BOOKSELLER AND STA- 
TIONER.' 

LEONARD M. G, banker and dealer in 
exchange, and collections made and 
remitted. 

LEWIS WILSON, merchant tailor and dealer 
in clothing. 

Longcov S., wagon and plow maker. 

LOVELESS, BENNETT & COMPTON, 
dealers in groceries, wooden, willow 
and stone ware, Mechanic st. 

Lyons William, grocer. 

Miller & Yents, blacksmiths. 

MIXER H., PROPRIETOR ARCADE 
HOUSE, near the depot. 

Murch & Brother, saddlers and harness 
makers, Mechanic st. 

Neely & Co., bankers and dealers in ex- 
change. 

Oaks J. C, painter. 

Owen R. II., merchant tailor. 

Peckham J., boots and shoes. 

Peirce & Cunningham, hardware. 

PERKINS WILLIAM, grocery, etc. 

PHILLIPS J., dentist. 

PLANE JOHN & CO., hardware (see advt). 

JOHN PLANE. J. B. TRUBER. 

JOHN PLANE & CO., /X 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN XajW 

HARDWARE, 

Iron, Steel, Kails, Glass, Cutlery, 
Ciusis, Stoves and Fence Wire. 

COR. STATE & MECHANIC STREETS, BELVIDERE 



POWELL & DOWNS, WHOLESALE AND 

RETAIL GROCERS, State street, opp 

Boone county bank. 
Frouty B. T., sash, doora and blinds. 
RANSON & FULLER, drugs and medicines, 

perfumery and fancy articles, Mechanic 

street, opp bank. 
Reichmuth F., baker and confectioner. 
Reiss & Moldinhance, cigars and tobacco. 
Rice F. n., Boston boot and shoe store. 
Rice G. H., boots, shoes and rubbers, store 

near south side bank. 
Rider J., dry goods, south side. 
Rider J., groceries, boots and shoes, hats and 

caps, ready-made clothing, south side. 
Rix & Harper, boots and shoes. 
Ramsey Mark, saddles and harness. 
ROBERTS R., JOB PRINTER and publisher 

of BELVIDERE STANDARD. 
SAXTON JOHN, POSTMASTER. 
Soule J. K., physician and surgeon. 
Spencer A., general dealer. 
Stocking D. C., pump manufacturer. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



15 



Streeter W. H., carpenter and joiner. 

TAYLOR JAMES B., justice of peace. 

THOMPSON & RANDALL, attorneys. 

Thomas D. S., groceries. 

Thomas W. H., barber. 

TOWNER D. M., surgical and mechanical 
dentist. 

TURNER JOHN T., city meat market. 

Waterman & Rogers, grocers. 

Webb J. W., tailor. 

Whitworth E., ale brewery. 

Williams Joseph B., grocer. 

Wilson Ira, livery stable. 

WILLSON J. D., watches, jewelry and silver 
ware. 

WILLSON N. B., baker and confectioner. 

Wing & Nichols, carriage makers. 

WOODRUFF W. R., druggist and apothe- 
cary. 

Yourts John, lumber. 



BEMENT, 

A post office of Piatt county. 
Joseph Rodman, Postmaster. 



BENTON, 

A thriving village of Henderson county, 
about 6 miles from the Mississippi river, and 
220 from Chicago. 



BENTON, 

A post village, capital of Franklin county, is 
situated on a prairie, near Big Muddy river, 
152 miles south-east from Springfield. 
John G. Goessman, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Casey Samuel K., attorney at law. 
Crawford M. C, attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Duff Andrew D., attorney and counselor at 

law, 
Elston William, attorney at law. 
Jackson A. D., saddlery. 
Logan & Allen, attorneys at law. 
Pierce Edward V., publisher of the Benton 

Stajidard. 
Renokls Francis, plnsician and surgeon. 
Uhls F. M., blacksmith. 
Wilkey , physician. 



BERKSHIRE, 

A post village of Kane county, 50 miles 
west-by-north from Chicago. 

Lawrence M. Baker, Postmaster. 



BERLIN, 

A post village of Sangamon county, on the 
line of the Great Western railroad, 15 miles 



west-by-south from Springfield, and about 
235 south-west from Chicago. 
Thomas Pollock, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams James D., lawyer. 

Allen J. W., farmer. 

Allen H. J., miller. 

Blecker William, grocer. 

Bangor & Ticher, house carpenters. 

Conklin , paints and glass. 

Ellis , grocer. 

Gibson J. H., M. D. 

Gordorr John W., telegraph clerk. 

Gibson J. H., farmer. 

Harmon H., justice of peace. 

Hent Lewis, boot and shoe dealer. 

Hoshall D. W., architect. 

Mendenhall T. G., lumber dealer. 

Montague & Hardin, general merchants. 

Pollock Thomas, grocer and dealer. 

Price R. H., general merchant. 

Reed John, farmer. 

Steel Isaac, proprietor flouring mills. 

Willson N. E., M. D. 

Yates & Bro., general merchants. 

Yates H., farmer. 



BERLIN, 

A township of Bureau county, in the eastern 
part, about 98 miles south of west from Chi- 
cago. 



BERNADOTTE, 

A small post village in a town of the same 
name, in Fulton county, on the line of the 
Spoon river, an affluent of the Illinois, 65 
miles north-west from Springfield. 
John Lewisport, Postmaster. 



BERRYTOWN, 

A small post village of Cass county, about 30 
miles west-north-west from Springfield. 
Jesse Crews, Postmaster. 



BERWICK, 

A post village of Warren county, about 170 
miles south-west from Chicago. 

Samuel W. Whitenack, Postmaster. 



BETHALTO, 

A post village of Madison county. 
Wm. Trton, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 
Tryon William, insurance agent. 



16 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



BETHEL, 

A small post village of Morgan county, 48 
miles west from Springfield. 

Andrew J. Thompson, Postmaster. 



BEVERLY, 

A post township forming the south-east ex- 
tremity of Adams county, 220 miles from 
Chicago and 90 from St. Louis. Population, 
1,000. 
John B. Robertson, Postmaster. 



BIBLE GROVE, 

A post village of Clay county. 
Wm. W. Apperson, Postmaster. 



BIG NECK, 
A post office of Adams county, 
tion, 200. 
James Shannon, Postmaster. 



Popula- 



BIG PRAIRIE, 

A post village of Logan county. 
Norman Sumxer, Postmaster. 



BIG ROCK, 

A post township of Kane county, 
tion, 523. 
Josiica H. Rhodes, Postmaster. 



Popula- 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Amant Justice, farmer. 

Barton George, farmer. 

Chapman Washington, farmer. 

Clark Charles, farmer. 

Cooper Charles, brickmaker. 

Coriel John, farmer. 

Costar Peter, farmer. 

Goodell John, proprietor of saw mill. 

Hatch Isaac, supervisor. 

Henrick N. M., justice of peace. 

Landers James, plow manufacturer. 

Rhodes J. H., town clerk and postmaster. 



BIG SPRING, 

A post office of Shelby county, about 185 
miles south-west from Chicago. 
John Spain, Postmaster. 



BIGGSVILLE STATION. 

A post office of Henderson county. 
Peter Downey, Postmaster. 



BIG WOODS, 

A post office of Du Page county, 28 miles 
from Chicago. 

John Warne, Postmaster. 



BIRMINGHAM, 

A post village of Schuyler county, on Crooked 
creek, an affluent of the Illinois river, about 
80 miles west-north-west from Springfield 
and 235 from Chicago. Considerable amount 
of milling is done here. 
David P. Graham, Postmaster. 



BISHOP HILL, 

A post office of Henry county. 
John Erickson, Postmaster. 



BISTOE 



Is a post village in Kendall countv, 3 miles 
from the C, B. & Q. R. R., and 6 "miles from 
Oswego, the county seat. Its principal 
buildings are, a church, district school house, 
paper mill, 2 flour mills, 2 saw mills, and a 
hotel. It is watered by Fox river, which 
affords excellent power for manufacturing 
purposes, and is fast engaging the attention 
of men of enterprise. Population, 350. 
J. Short, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Arnold C. H, dry goods and groceries. 
Bountwell H, wheelwright. 
Boyd — , attorney at law. 
Cooper William, boots and shoes. 
Cooper H., harness maker. 
Crocker & Hobbs, dry goods, etc. 
Graham William, blacksmith. 
Hopkins — , physician. 
Lane L. H., physician. 
Lowry — , attorney at law. 
McMurty — , blacksmith. 
Martell — , boots and shoes. 
Miller — , physician. 
Short J., justice of peace. 



BLACKBERRY STATION, 

A post village of Kane county, in Blackberry 
township, on the Dixon Air Line railroad. 
Apollos S. Fisher, Postmaster. 



BLACK OAK, 

A post office of Wayne county, about 308 
miles south from Chicago. 

Daniel M. Williams, Postmaster. 



BLAIRSVILLE, 

A small village of Williamson county, on Big 
Muddy river, 40 miles from its entrance into 
the Mississippi, and 356 miles west of south 
from Chicago. 

George W. Aiken, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



17 



BLANDINSVILLE, 

A post village of McDonough county, 100 
miles north-west from Springfield. 
Delevan Martin, Postmaster. 



BLISSVILLE, 

A post village of Jefferson county. 
Solomon Patterson, Postmaster. 



BLIVENS' MILLS, 

A post village of McHcnry county. 
Rachel Blivens, Postmaster. 



BLOOD'S POINT, 

A post office, situated in the north part of 
De Kalb county. 
John Lee, Postmaster. 



BLOOM, 

A post township of Cook county, about 27 
miles south from Chicago. 

Christopher Brown, Postmaster. 



BLACKBERRY, 

A post township of Kane county. 
Joel Fish, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Acres Henrick, physician. 

Acres John, farmer. 

Anderson Andrew, farmer. 

Amiis D. W., farmer. 

Baker J, R., farmer. 

Barber C. C, farmer. 

Beeler David, farmer. 

Beeler James, farmer. 

Bentley Arnold, farmer. 

Carter George, carpenter. 

Dennison James, shoemaker. 

Hopkins Joseph, blacksmith. 

Miner M. R., blacksmith. 



BLOOMFIELD, 

A small village in McDonough county, 4 
miles southerly from Macomb and 175 miles 
from Chicago. 



BLOOMFIELD, 

A village in Adams count} T , about 5 miles 
from the Mississippi river, near the line of 
the Northern Cross railroad. 



BLOOMFIELD, 

A post village of Edgar county, about 125 
miles east from Springfield and 176 from 
Chicago. 
"William B. Bailt, Postmaster. 

2 



BLOOMINGDALE, 

A post township in Du Page county, about 25 
miles west by north from Chicago. ' 
Hiram Codt, Postmaster. 



BLOOMIWGTOISr 

Is a beautiful and flourishing city, capital of 
McLean county, at the intersection of the 
Illinois Central and St. Louis, Alton and 
Chicago railroads, 61| miles from Springfield, 
157 from St. Louis and 128 from Chicago. 
It was settled in 1830, by James Allen, who 
purchased the land of government, at $1.25 
per acre. In the year following he succeeded 
in getting a bill passed by the state legisla- 
ture for the formation of McLean county, 
the boundaries of which were so fixed as to 
make his " farm", as he styled it, the most 
eligible site for the county seat, for which 
Mr. Allen donated 30 acres of ground. So 
rapid was the settlement, that the same year 
lots sold there from $5 to $50 each. Pre- 
vious to its purchase from the government 
this land was in possession of the Delaware 
and Kickapoo Indians, evidences of whose 
existence are occasionally met with even 
at the present day. For a series of years 
Mr. Allen's log cabin was used as a court 
room, where the several courts of the county 
held their sessions. 

In 1847 a city charter was granted, and in 
1854 an act was passed providing for an 
extension of the city limits, and from this 
date a constant rapid advancement has been 
evident, both in the number and wealth of 
her inhabitants. Few of the interior cities 
of the state, or of the west, present more 
plainly than this the energy which has made 
this western country so desirable in a com- 
mercial and agricultural point of view. 
Besides the county buildings, there are 
many other fine buildings, both of a public 
and private character. There are 1 1 churches, 
a state normal institution, Bloomington col- 
lege for females, Wesleyan university, the 
Bloomington high school. All these institu- 
tions possess fine buildings, and are admirably 
adapted to their various uses. Bloomington 
also has five district schools and a number of 
private ones. Bloomington college, for 
females, was founded by the united efforts 
of the citizens, under the guidance of W. T. 
Major. The cost of the building alone was 
$25,000, and was defrayed solely by its 
principal founder. The building affords 
ample accommodations for 75 boarders and 
200 pupils. The Wesleyan seminary is de- 
signed for males, and is a thorough institu- 
tion, possessing all the advantages of older 
similar ones at the east. It will accommo- 
date about 200 students. There are also 
three chartered banks, viz. : Bloomington 
Bank, Lafayette Bank and McLean Bank ; 
three newspaper offices: Pantagraph, Na- 
tional Flag and Times, the two first have 
daily and weekly issues. A circulating 



18 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



library, culled the Ladies' Library Associar- 
tion, is also a marked feature among other 
matters of interest. Four good hotels are 
now in operation: the Landon House, Wa- 
verly House, Denman House, and American 
House. The first was fomerly known as the 
Pike House, but has recently been refitted 
and furnished, and is fast gaining popularity. 
Like all other western cities, Bloomington 
has made rapid strides of advancement, and 
it is predicted that in the next ten years her 
population will more than double. Present 
population, 7,500, 

George D. McElhenet, Postmaster. 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
Mayor, A. J. Meriman. 
Treasurer, T. Haws. 
Clerk, W. W. Orme. 
City Marshal, A. T. Briscoe. 
Aldermen, M. Chatfield, M. Ross, A. B. 

SCHAFFER, W. C. WaTKINS. 

City Physician, W. A. Elder. 
City Surveyor, G. W. Stevens. 

Allen & Launder, dry goods, etc, Front st. 
ALLEN JAMES, PIONEER SETTLER. 
ALLEN LEE, SURGEON DENTIST, 4 

FRONT ST. 
ANDERSON WILLIAM, AMBROTYPE 

ARTIST, COR PUBLIC SQUARE. 
Aull N. L., proprietor of Waverly House. 
BARBER J. S. & G. P., PRODUCE AND 

COMMISSION, MARKET ST. 
BARBER J. S. & G. P., LUMBER DEAL- 
ERS. 
Baty John, groceries and provisions, Front st. 
Bender & Co., bakers and confectioners. 
Benjamin & Schermerhorn, dry goods, boots, 

shoes and clothing, west side Public sq. 
BENTLEY & PECK, BILLIARDS AND 

BOARDING, NORTH PUBLIC SQ. 
BIRCH JESSE, NOTARY PUBLIC. 
BISCOE A. T., CITY MARSHAL. 
BOWMAN A., SURGEON DENTIST. 
BOYD JOHN, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, 

ETC, 2 MAIN ST. 
Boyd John, cutlery, saws, files, etc., 2 Main st. 
Boyd John, crockery, glass ware, etc, 2 

Main st. 
BOYD JOHN, clothing and furnishing goods, 

2 Main st. 
BOYD JOHN, boots, shoes, etc, 2 Main st. 
BRIER & BIRCH, ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 
Briggs Mrs. M. J., millinery, Jefferson st. 
BROWN J. & SON, PROPRIETORS OF 

AMERICAN HOUSE, FRONT ST. 
BROWN SIMON B., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
BUNN, ELLSWORTH & CO., PLOW 

MANUFACTURERS, MAIN STREET, 

COR OF NORTH. 
Burch & Brothers, dry goods. 
Burtis, Davis & Co., carriage manufacturers, 

Washington st. 
BUSH M., PROPRIETOR OF POND'S 

PATENT WASHING MACHINE. 



BUSH M., WATCH AND CLOCK MAKER, 

FRONT ST. 
CAPENS & SIMONS, CROCKERY AND 

GLASS WARE. 
CAPENS & SIMONS, CANDLE AND 

SOAP MAKERS. 
CARTER WILLIAM, DENMAN HOUSE 

SALOON, COR MAIN AND FRONT 

STS. 
CHATFIELD M., TOBACCONIST AND 

CONFECTIONER, MAIN ST. 
CnRISMAN J. A., BLACKSMITH AND 

JOBBER, CENTRE ST. 
COLVIN & DAVIDSON, GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS, COR MAIN AND 

FRONT STS. 
Corson B., butcher and cattle dealer. 
CRANE & BRONSON, PROPRIETORS OF 

DENMAN HOUSE. 
Cranmer Henry, grain and produce, Front st. 
Crist D. L. & D. 0., physicians and surgeons. 
Crist William, groceries and provisions, north 

side Front st. 
Dalton J. M., produce dealer. 
Davenport D. E., grain and produce. 
DENISON & MITCHELL, GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS. 
DEPEW & RUGGLES, FURNITURE 

MANUFACTURERS, FRONT ST. 
DIETRICH & BRADNER, HARDWARE, 

MAIN ST. 
EAGER & DENMAN, DRY GOODS. 
Elder Charles S., stoves and tinware, Main st. 
ELLIS JESSE, HATS, CAPS AND FURS, 

CENTRE ST. 
ENRIGHT J. H., LIQUORS, COR FRONT 

AND CENTRE STS. 
Fcrre G. L., carriage manufacturer. 
FRANKS R. M., PROPRIETOR OF GEM 

SALOON, MAIN ST. 
FREESE & HERME, SADDLES AND 

HARNESS, CENTRE ST. 
FRIEND & BROTHER, CLOTHING, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, MAIN ST. 
Gaffrin A. H., cigars and tobacco. 
Gallagher S. & Co., groceries and provisions, 

cor Main and Washington sts. 
GLIMPSE JONATHAN, GROCERIES AND 

PROVISIONS, FRONT ST. 
Green J. L. & Co., silver plated ware, varie- 
ties, etc. 
Greenwald Peter, stone cutter. 
GRIDLEY ASAHEL, PRESIDENT OF 

McLEAN COUNTY BANK. 
Haldeman & Bro., marble workers, Front st. 
Hanna & Scott, attorneys at law, cor Front 

and Main sts. 
HART & FELL, LIVERY AND SALE 

STABLES, COR NORTH AND CEN- 
TRE STS. 
HARDY F. W., CLOTHING AND FUR- 
NISHING GOODS, 3 UNION BLOCK. 
Hartrv E., stock dealer, Front st. 
HARVEY & LUCAS, BAKERS AND 

CONFECTIONERS, FRONT ST. 
HARWOOD & RUGG, BOOTS, SHOES 

AND LEATHER, MAIN ST. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



19 



Hatch & Prince, attorneys at law, cor Centre 
and Washington sts. 

HATCH L. L., AT KENDRICK & CO.'S, 
MAIN ST. 

Hay & Co., proprietors of Bloomington House. 

HOLDER C. W. & CO., AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS, SEEDS AND HARD- 
WARE. 

Holmes W. H., attorney at law. 

Hord & Carle, produce and commission. 

HOUGH 0. C„ BILLIARDS, PHCENIX 
BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Hoover L. L., proprietor Bloomington Citv 
Mills. 

Howlett & Clary, hardware. 

HUMPHREYS J. F. & BRO., GROCERS, 
SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 

HUMPHREY, WAKEFIELD & CO., PRO- 
PRIETORS OF LE ROY FLOURING 
MILLS. 

HUMPHREY, WAKEFIELD & CO., PRO- 
PRIETORS OF LE ROY STEAM 
MILLS. 



HUMPHREY, WAKEFIELD & CO., GRO- 
CERIES, PROVISIONS, ETC., FRONT 
STREET. 

Hutchinson & Wonderly, groceries and pro- 
visions. 

Hvde E. C, merchant tailor. 

ISCHUS & KUHL, SADDLES AND HAR- 
NESS, MAIN STREET. 

Johnson Andrew, boots and shoes, Front 
street. 

Johnson N. D., dry goods, etc. 

KEAYS W. & BRO., WATCHES, JEWEL- 
RY AND SILVER WARE, EAST SIDE 
MAIN ST. 

KENDRICK & CO., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC , MAIN ST. 

KENYON S. E. & SON, GROCERIES AND 
PROVISIONS, CORNER CENTRE & 
FRONT STS. 

Kimball A., grain and produce. 

Lafayette Bank. 

Lance P., groceries and provisions, Front 
street. 



«»•-*«»*-♦■( 



PEOPEIETOES. 



**&■ »-«2>*—» *, 



This House has been recently 

REFITTED AND. REFURNISHED, 

And in every way made what it should be, to afford 



les 



CARRIAGE TO JLNJD IPROHNl THE HOUSE, 

Meeting' ail Trains eff Cars. 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS. 



Landon R. R., commission. 

Larrimore John N., deputy clerk of circuit 

court. 
LASELLE & BEAN, MANUFACTURING 

CONFECTIONERS, MAIN ST. 
LAWRENCE Z., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
LEWIS B. W., REAL ESTATE AGENT 

AND NOTARY PUBLIC. 



Lewis B. W., clothing, Front st. 

Lichenthaler G. W., druggist, corner of Main 
and Front streets. 

Lusk W. W. & Co., grocers and commis- 
sion. 

McClure, Boots and shoes, Front st. 

McClure, gents' furnishing goods. 

McCullough W., clerk of circuit court. 



20 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



McMillan & Tator, groceries and commission, 
3 Main st. 

McMillen & Wilmeth, groceries and provisions 

McMillen & Wilmeth, restaurant. 

MAGOUN, McCLUN & CO., BROKERS & 
COLLECTING AGENTS, CORNER 
COURTHOUSE SQUARE. 

Marblesten & Bro ., clothiers. 

MARBLE STONE & BROTHER, CLOTH- 
ING, MAIN ST. 

March Oliver, broker, Main st. 

Martin- & Reeves, druggists. 

MATERN LOUIS, SIGN AND CARRIAGE 
PAINTER, COR. MADISON & FRONT. 

Matthews & Adams, livery and sale stables. 

MAYFIELD & CRIST, SURGEON DENT- 
ISTS, MAJOR'S BLOCK. 

Mellinish F., watch maker. 

MERREMON A. J., MAYOR AND JUDGE 
OF COUNTY. 

Merriman H. P., groceries and provisions, 
Main at. 

MILLER J. G., BLACKSMITH & SHOER, 
COR. FRONT AND MADISON STS. 

MOORE & CARSON, GROCERIES, PRO- 
VISIONS, BOOTS & SHOES, FRONT 
STREET. 

NealR., furniture, Washington st. 

Nickcrson E. J., restaurant, Main st. 

Oberkoetter & Co., groceries, wines, liquors, 
etc, Front st. 

Packard F. A. & Co., dry goods. 

PAIST & MARMON, DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES, MAIN ST. 

Paist & Marmon, patent medicines, cam- 
phene, burning fluid, etc, Main st. 

PARDEE THERON, CASHIER McLEAN 
COUNTY BANK. 

Parke & Hoopes, grocers. 

PARKE C. R., PHYSICIAN & SURGEON, 
WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 

Paulick John, clothing, Chestnut st. 

PECK R. M., CARRIAGE MAKER, FRONT 
STREET. 

PECK THOMAS C, ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

PERSON M. & SON, LUMBER, FRONT ST. 

Person M. & Son, sash, doors and blinds, 
Front st. 

Phillips E. M., clothing. 

Pigall J., merchant tailor, Front st. 

Poston & Didlake, produce and commission. 

Priest Miss, millinery, 3 Metropolitan block. 

Prince E. M., attorney at law and notary 
public. 

PULLEN JOHN 0., AUCTION AND COM- 
MISSION. 

RANKIN & STOUTS, BUTCHERS AND 
CATTLE DEALERS, FRONT ST. 

Behker T. & Co., groceries and provisions, 
Front st. 

Reeves 0. T., Jr, attorney at law. 

Richardson & Haines, dry goods, Main st. 

Robinson George 0., attorney at law. 

ROGERS & LEARNING, REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS. 
ROGERS & LEARNING, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 



ROGERS A. W., NOTARY PUBLIC. 

ROUSE JOHN, CARPET WAREHOUSE. 

Rovce, Harwood & Co., hardware. 

SCHELL & ROBINSON, FURRIERS AND 
HATTERS, FRONT ST. 

SCHULZ ALEXANDER, MATTRESS 
MAKER, FRONT ST. 

SCIBERD & CO., PHOTOGRAPHIC AR- 
TISTS, OPP SCHAFFER HOUSE. 

SLASON M., MUSIC DEALER, WEST 
SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 

Slason M., professor of music. 

SMITH G. A. & CO., DRY GOODS, MAIN 
STREET. 

Smith J. R., President Lafavette bank. 

SPARROW T. H., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND REAL ESTATE AGENT, Main st. 

STEELE A., CONSTABLE. 

STEELE MAT. L., TELEGRAPHIST. 

STEVENSON & DOWTHELL, PROPRIE- 
TORS " EAGLE FLOURING MILLS," 
JEFFERSON ST. 

Stockton R. T., cashier Lafavette bank. 

STONE & BROTHER, GROCERIES AND 
PRODUCE. 

Stryker W. H., architect, Union block. 

STUMP & HAYES, CARRIAGE MANU- 
FACTURERS, COR MADISON AND 
FRONT STS. 

TEMPLE & FUNK, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC. 

Thompson R. & Co., druggists, 5 Washing- 
ton st. 

VIETS OLIVER 0., WATCHES AND 
JEWELRY, COR CENTRE AND JEF- 
FERSON STS. 

Waggoner T. T. & Co., forwarding and com- 
mission. 

Wait W. S., groceries and provisions. 

WALTON & HAMILTON, PLOW AND 
WAGON FACTORY, CENTRE ST. 

WARD & PHELPS, AGRICULTURAL IM- 
PLEMENTS. 

Ward & Phelps, flour, grain and provisions. 

Ward & Phelps, flour and coal. 

Ward & Phelps, bag manufacturers. 

Ward J. N., mnfr of Moore's patent grain 
drill. 

Wariner P. 0., books, stationery, binding, 
etc. 

Washburn & McCrum, meat market, Centre 
street. 

Washburn, Miller & Co, lumber, sash, doors 
and blinds, and building materials gen- 
erally. 

Whitney "& Son, groceries and provisions, 
Main st. 

Williams & Dackurd, attorneys at law. 

Williams D. R., architect and carpenter, 
Washington st. 

WOLF & BERGMAN, CLOTHING AND 
FURNISHING GOODS, COR MAIN 
AND WASHINGTON STS. 

Wolf H. H., blacksmith and jobber, Front 
street. 

Wright Miss M. E., milliner and dress maker, 
east side public square. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



21 



BLOOMVILLE, 

A post village of Kankakee county. 
Henky S. Bloom, Postmaster. 



BLUE GRASS, 

A small post village of Vermilion county, 
about 100 miles south from Chicago. 
John Carter, Postmaster. 



BLUE POINT, 

A post office of Wayne county, about 305 
miles south from Chicago. 
Ellis Evans, Postmaster. 



BLUEVILLE, 

A small post village of Christian county. 
Isham J. Hicks, Postmaster. 



BLUFEDALE, 

A post village of Greene county, 65 miles W. 
S.W. from Springfield. 
John Russell, Postmaster. 



BLUPPVILLE, 

A post office of Carroll county, three miles 
east from the Mississippi river. 
George Cole, Postmaster. 



BOLTON, 

A post village in the south-east part of Wil- 
liamson county, about 348 miles west of south 
from Chicago. 

Burgess S. Young, Postmaster. 



BONAPARTE, 

A post village of Du Page county, 25 miles 
west by south from Chicago. 

William Anderson, Postmaster. 



BOND COUNTY, 

A county in the south-west central part of 
the state ; has an area of about 400 square 
miles. It is intersected by Shoal Creek and 
its branches, the east and west forks of which 
flow southward ; the Kaskaskia river touches 
the south-eastern extremity. The surface is 
undulating, and presents an alternation of 
beautiful prairies and tracts of timber, in 
nearly equal proportions. The soil is highly 
productive. Indian corn, wheat, oats, pork 
and butter are the staples. The projected 
Atlantic and Mississippi railroad will inter- 
sect the county and tend greatly to advance 
its interests. The county was named after 
Shadrach Bond, first governor of Illinois. 
Capital, Greenville. Population, about 9,000. 



BOND'S POINT, 

A post office of Christian county. 
Thomas Simpson, Postmaster. 



BON PAS, 

A post office of Richland county, about 240 
miles west of south from Chicago. 
Wm. Higgixs, Postmaster. 



BONUS, 

A post township in Boone county, about eight 
miles north-east from Belvidere, 63 miles from 
Chicago and 260 from St. Louis. 
Wallace W. Lambert, Postmaster. 



BONWELL, 

A post office of Edgar county, about 164 
miles from Chicago. 

Wm. M. Jones, Postmaster. 



BOONE COUNTY. 

One of the northern tier of counties, lying 
about seventy miles north-west of Chicago. 
It contains eight towns, and an area of twelve 
by twenty-four miles. The north end joins 
the Wisconsin line. The first settlements 
were made at Belvidere, about 1835. The 
county is one of the thickest settled in the 
state, the inhabitants being mostly from New 
York and New England. It is traversed by 
three streams, the Kishwaukee, Pikesaw and 
Beaver, each of which affords power for sev- 
eral mills. It has a fair supply of timber and 
the farming land is mostly rich, rolling prairie. 
The main products are wheat, oats, corn, etc. 
Two railroads cross the county, the Galena 
& Chicago Union, and the Beloit Branch. 
The county seat is Belvidere, where a fine, 
substantial court house and jail are erected, 
costing about $15,000, on the public square; 
a beautiful mound, on the top of which is the 
grave of " Big Thunder," the noted chief of 
Pottawattomies. The county has a flourish- 
ing agricultural society. Population, about 
12,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 
Circuit Clerk, Daniel H. Whitney. 
Count!/ Judge, Allen C. Fuller. 
County Clerk, Abraham H. Bradley. 
Sheriff, Elias L. Tisdel. 
School Commissioner, John B. Tinker. 
County Treasurer, Asher E. Jenner. 
County Justice, Amos Older. 
County Justice, Charles F, Witt. 
Coroner, L. L. Lake. 
County Surveyor, Wm. Mc Vicar. 



BOONE, 

A post township in Boone county, ten miles 
north-east from Belvidere, 68 from Chicago 
and 265 from St. Louis. 
James Alexander, Postmaster. 



22 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



BOONSBQRO', 

A post village of Ogle county, near the west- 
ern part, about 100 miles north of west from 
Chicago. 

BOURBON, 

A post town of Coles county. 
Wm. Chandler, Postmaster. 



BOWLING GREEN, 

A post village of Fayette county, 50 miles 
direct south-east from Springfield. 
James A. McClanahan, Postmaster. 



BRACEVILLE, 

A small post village in Grundy county. 
Nicholas Colton, Postmaster. 



BRADLEY, 

A post village in the north part of Jackson 
county. 
Daniel Snider, Postmaster. 



BRADFORD, 

A post office of Stark county, about 123mileS 
south-west from Chicago. 
Alfred Foster, Postmaster. 



BRADFORD, 

A township of Lee county, about 78 miles 
due west from Chicago. 



BREESE, 

A post village of Greene county. 
Lemuel J. Patterson, Postmaster. 



BREMEN, 

A post office of Randolph county. 
William Vingard, Postmaster. 



BREMEN, 

A post village in a township of the same 
name, in the southern part of Cook county 
on the Illinois Central railroad, Chicago 
Branch, about 25 miles from Chicago. 



BRICKTON, 



A small post village of Cook county, on the 
line of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac 
railroad, about fourteen miles from Chicago. 
Beautifully located, and is rapidly being im- 
proved by capitalists from that place, who 
have summer residences at the station. 



BRIDGEPORT, 

A small village of Greene county, on the 
Illinois river. A large amount of grain and 
produce are annually shipped from here. 
Bfnj. F. Warner, Postmaster. 



BRIGHTON, 

A post town in Macoupin county, on the St. 
Louis, Alton & Chicago railroad, 270 miles 
from Chicago, 12 miles from Alton and 35 
miles from St. Louis. Population, 500. Pop- 
ulation of town and township, 1,000. 
Wm. C. Merrill, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Trades, Professions, Etc. 

Altro J., farmer, 

Andrews, J., farmer. 

Bean T. T., engineer. 

Bean T. S., groceries. 

Berrv D. P., carpenter. 

BLODGETT D., DRY GOODS AND GRO- 
CERIES. 

Brown M., farmer. 

Brown T. A., physician. 

Chase T. A., farmer. 

Clark K., farmer. 

Coleman J., miller. 

Crandall J. R., dry goods and groceries. 

Crandall R., farmer. 

Cunningham N. & Co., lumber. 

Davis L. P., music teacher. 

ELLSWORTH J. W., TELEGRAPH OPE- 
RATOR. 

Eldridge Capt. A. H., farmer. 

Eldridge P., farmer. 

Eldridge Wm. N., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

Ferguson S., farmer. 

Finch R. W., farmer. 

Gifford A., carpenter. 

GILSON J. N., GRAIN DEALER. 

Griggs & Johnson, fruit dealers. 

Hart J., farmer. 

BILLIARD A. A., fruit dealer. 

Hill J. D., butcher. 

Hoester J, G., carpenter. 

Hume N., dealer in pumps. 

Johnson B., physician. 

Jones Wm., farmer. 

Kates J., farmer. 

Keas E. blacksmith. 

Koester J. G., carpenter. 

Loveland W. A. H., dry goods and groceries. 

Marten B., farmer. 

Marten H. F., justice of the peace. 

Merrill W. C, groceries. 

Montgomery J., farmer. 

Moore Wm. C, justice of peace. 

MOORE W. C, WHEELWRIGHT. 

Mundy R., lightning rods. 

Nelson H, dry goods and groceries. 

Paddock J., stone mason. 

Palmer J., farmer. 

Pelham Wm., carpenter. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



23 



Percival C, hotel keeper. 
Pinckard J., farmer. 
Potter A., teacher. 
Randall G., livery. 
Skillman C, physician. 

Snead , clergyman. 

Stewart F., wheelwright. 

Stall H. G., station agent. 

Stratton E. B., blacksmith. 

STRATTON L. P., GRAIN DEALER. 

Stubblefield H. D., clergyman. 

Taylor G., fruit dealer. 

Turner T. C, stone mason. 

Yanavsdell Miss F., teacher. 

Ward J., farmer. 

Wead F. & Co., grain dealers. 

We ad J., hotel keeper. 



BRIMFIELD, 



A post village of Peoria county, 18 or 20 
miles from Peoria, on the borders of a beau- 
tiful and fertile prairie. Population, about 
five hundred. 

Curtis Cadt, Postmaster. 



BRISTOL, 



A post township of Kendall county, on the 
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad. 

Population, 850. 

Andrew H. Arnold, Postmaster. 



BRISTOL STATION, 

A post village of Kendall county, on the right 
bank of Fox river, 6 miles below Oswego, 
and 52 miles west-south-west from Chicago. 
It has abundant water power, which is being 
improved for milling purposes. 
Reuben Hunt, Postmaster. : 



BROAD OAK, 

A post office of Pope county. 
James M. Culp, Postmaster. 



BROOKDALE, 

A post village of McHenry county. 
Wm. Butterfield, Postmaster. 



BROOKFIELD, 

A township in the south-east part of La Salle 
county, about 70 miles in a south-westerly 
direction from Chicago. 



BROOKLYN, 

A township of Lee county, about 65 miles 
from Chicago, in a westerly direction. 



BROOKLYN, 

A post village in the township of the same 
name, in Schuyler county, on Crooked creek, 
an affluent of the Illinois river, 76 miles 
west-north-west from Springfield. The water 
power here afforded is employed in manufac- 
turing. 

Cotton M. Leach, Postmaster. 



BROOKVILLE, 



A post township in Ogle county. Popula- 
tion, 5*70. 

David Hoffhine, Postmaster. 



BROOMSBURG, 

Is a small village in the south part of Effing- 
ham county, about 90 miles from St. Louis, 
and 190 from Chicago. They have a good 
school of about 40 scholars. Population of 
township, 500. 

J. Hearrell, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Andrews H. A., dry goods and groceries. 

Brown John, farmer. 

Cannon Ira, farmer. 

Hearrell Jethro, dealer in cattle and hogs. 

Hearrell J., physician. 

Mahon Isham, farmer. 



BROWN COUNTY, 

Is situated in the west part of Illinois, and 
has an area of about 320 square miles. It 
is bounded on the east by the Illinois river, 
and intersected by McKee's creek. The 
surface is generally level or slightly undulat- 
ing, and is divided between prairie and tim- 
ber land, the soil is highly productive and 
well improved. The Bureau Valley railroad, 
connecting Peoria with Hannibal, Missouri, 
and also a branch connecting the Northern 
Cross with the Great Western railroad, will 
intersect the county. Capital, Mt. Sterling. 
Population, 8,760. 



BROWNING, 

A post township in Schuyler county, about 
198 miles south-west from Chicago. Popu- 
lation, 1,050. 

Thomas J. Kinney, Postmaster. 



BRUCE, 

A township of La Salle county, near the 
south-east part, about 76 miles south-west 
from Chicago. It comprises a part of the 
Grand Prairie. 



24 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



BRUCE, 

A post office of McDonough county. 
John S. Wilson, Postmaster. 



BRUNSWICK, 

A post village of Peoria county, about 60 
miles north-north-west from Springfield. 
William Fahnestock, Postmaster. 



BRUSH HILL, 

A post village of Du Page county, about 16 
miles west from Chicago. 
Benj. Fuller, Postmaster. 



BRUSHY FORK, 

A small post village in the north-east part of 
Coles county. 

Benj. Maddox, Postmaster. 



BUCK CREEK, 

A post office of La Salle county. 
Nathan Woolsey, Postmaster. 



BUCKEYE, 

A township of Stephenson county, near the 
northern central part, about 120 miles north 
of west from Chicago. 



BUCKHORN, 

A post village of Brown county, about 210 

miles from Chicago, and 98 from St. Louis. 

Alexander Hedrick, Postmaster. * 



BUDA, 

A small post village of Bureau county, on 
the line of the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy railroad, about 110 miles from Chi- 
cago and 1S9 from ^t. Louis. 

George S. Emerson, Postmaster. 



BUENA VISTA, 

A small post village of Stephenson county, 
about 105 miles north of west from Chicago. 
James M. Smith, Postmaster. 



BUFFALO PRAIRIE, 

A small post village of Rock Island county, 
about 170 miles south of west from Chicago. 
Flavel J. Whitney, Postmaster. 



BULLBONAS GROVE, 

A post village of Kankakee county. 
Peter Muskants, Postmaster. 



BUNKER HILL, 

A thriving village of Macoupin county, 60 
miles south by west from Springfield. 
Philander C. Higgins, Postmaster. 

Delano J. A., drugs, medicines, etc. 



BUREAU COUNTY 

Is located toward the north-west part of 
Illinois, and has an area of about 800 square 
miles. It is bounded on the south-east by 
the Illinois river, and intersected by Green 
river and Bureau creek. The surface is 
generally level or slightly undulating, and 
destitute of timber, excepting small groves. 
The soil is good. The staples are, wheat, 
corn, oats and pork. The Chicago and Rock 
Island, and the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy railroads both intersect this county. 
The Illinois river is also navigable by steam- 
boats, on the border of the county. Capital, 
Princeton. Population, 10,870. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Judge of County Court, George McManis. 
Clerk of County Court, Stephen G. Pad- 
dock. 

Sheriff, Zachariah K. Waldron. 

Clerk of Circuit Court, Edwd. M. Fisher. 

Treasurer, Roderick B. Frary. 

School Commissioner, Charles P. Allen. 

County Surveyor, Frank W. Winship. 

Coroner, Hezekiah B. Smith. 



BUREAU JUNCTION, 

A small post village of Bureau county, at 
the junction of the Chicago and Rock Island, 
and Chicago, Burlington and Quincy rail- 
roads. 

Wm. H. SniELDS, Postmaster. 



BURLINGTON, 



A post township of Kane county. 
John W. Ellithorpe, Postmaster. 



BURNS, 



A post village of Henry county, 55 miles 
north-west from Peoria. 

Jas. E. Carson, Postmaster. 



BURNSVILLE, 



A. post village of McDonough county, 90 
miles north-west from Springfield. 
Ebenezer Bishop, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



25 



BURNT PRAIRIE, 

A post village in the northern part of White 
county, about 320 miles south from Chicago. 
Jehiel H. Reeves, Postmaster. 



BURRITT, 

A post township in Winnebago county, abou* 
10 miles north-west from Rockford and 94 
north-west from Chicago. 
Joseph Manchester, Postmaster. 



BURTON, 

A post village of Adams county, 10 miles 
east by south from Quincy, 22S miles from 
Chicago and 103 from St. Louis. 
Isaac N. Enlow, Postmaster. 



BURTON'S CORNERS, 

A small post village of Boone county, about 
72 miles from Chicago and 270 from St. 
Louis. 
Benj. P. Patten, Postmaster. 



BUSHNELL, 

A post office of McDonough county. 
Joseph Ceafford, Postmaster. 



BUTLER, 

A township of Winnebago county, in the 
extreme south-east corner, about 70 miles 
north of west from Chicago. 



BUTLER, 

A post village of Montgomery county, on the 
line of the Terre Haute and Alton railroad. 
Henry Richmond, Postmaster. 



BUTLER'S POINT, 

A post village of Vermilion county, about 
110 miles south from Chicago. 
Wm. R. Simmons, Postmaster. 



BYRON, 

Is a small but nourishing village in Ogle 
county, 80 miles west from Chicago, and 
about 300 north from St. Louis. It is 
situated on the banks of Rock river, on the 
high and beautiful prairie, unequaled for 
scenery in the state. There is one large 
steam foundry and machine shop, one large 
plow manufactory, two hotels, four dry goods 
stores, one hardware store and tin shop, one 
clothing store, two shoe shops, four black- 
smith shops, two wagon and carriage shops, 



two saddlery and harness shops, one large 
academy in a nourishing condition, a district 
school house, equal to any in the state, two 
large church buildings, occupied by four 
different denominations. On the opening of 
navigation a steamboat will run from Rock- 
ford to Oregon city, touching at this place. 
Silas St. John Mix, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Austin Theodore, farmer and stock dealer. 
Bovington Albert, general business. 
CAMPBELL A. O., MERCHANT. 
DUNNING W. C, MERCHANT. 
DWIGHT S., PLOW MANUFACTURER. 
JOHNSON J. J., MERCHANT. 
Smith J. P., justice of peace. 
SMITH & MARTIN, MERCHANTS. 
Styers Thomas, farmer and stock grower. 
Swan George G., general business. 
WHEELOCK F. A., MERCHANT. 
White Col., farmer and stock grower. 
WOOD DUDLEY, STEAM FOUNDRY. 
Woodburn Allen, farmer and stock grower. 



CAIRO, 

An enterprising town of Alexander county, 
is situated at the southern extremity of the 
state, on a point of land formed by the 
confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi 
rivers, one hundred and seventy-five miles 
below St. Louis. The situation is low and 
subject to frequent inundations, which have 
retarded somewhat its growth. A levee is 
built along the river, which is said to have 
cost nearly one million dollars. It is the 
southern terminus of the Illinois Central rail- 
road.* 

Samuel S. Brooks, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Antrim & Cahn, dealers in ready-made cloth- 
ing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, 
Commercial av, one door below Sixth st. 

BAKER DAVID J., JR., ATTORNEY AT 
LAW. 

Baker J., Jr., attorney and counselor, office 
with C. C. Simons. 

Brooks S. S., notary public, office in the post 
office. 

BROWN C. C, ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW, No. 2 SPRING- 
FIELD ST., UP STAIRS. 

Burke W., M.D., cor Commercial avenue and 
Fourth street. 

Bywater — , dentistry. 

Cowman Seth G., with N. R. B. Whitemore 
& Co., dealers in hats, caps, straw goods, 
etc, No. 127 Main st. 

Dishons & Standnig, Cairo City mills. 

Edwards N. W., attorney at law. 

Farnbaker J., boots and shoes. 

Faxon Len. G., publisher of Weekly Times. 



26 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



DOWDALL, OWEN & CO., 

ENGINE AND MACHINE MANUFACTORY, 



Near Freight Depot, 



Cairo, Illinois. 



Manufacture to order, Steam Engines and Boilers, Saw and Grist Mill Machinery, Lard 
Kettles, Presses, Screws and Cylinders, Horse Powers, Threshing, Hoisting and Wool Card- 
ing Machines, Railroad and Building Castings, Brass Work of all kinds, Blacksmithing of 
every description. Steamboat, Mill and Agricultural Machinery repaired with neatness and 
dispatch. Fire Fronts, Grate Bars and Sash Weights, always on hand. Terms reasonable 
and work warranted. 



Finch William T., public administrator for 
county of Alexander, one door from 
Sixth street. 

Finch & Shick, dealers in lime. 

Gill J. R., house carpenter and joiner. 

Green & Garner, land agents. 

HACKER & WEBB, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

HAMMON DAXIEL, JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Harmon John Q., clerk of court of common 
pleas. 

HARRELL BAILEY' S., STAPLE AND 
FANCY DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 
HARDWARE, QUEEXSWARE. 

Hastings T. D., builder, office cor Washington 
avenue and Fourth st. 

Hastings T. D., architect, office cor Washing- 
ton avenue and Fourth st. 

Hillington Mrs., millinery and dress making, 
cor Fourth street and Washington av. 

Jones G. Hilbert, counselor and attorney at 
law. 

LEWIS J. S., M.D., office next door to the 
City drug store. 



JOHN T, LOUDON. 



JOHN H. MULKEY. 



LOUDON & MULKEY, 

%tUxup ani Counselors 

CAIRO, - ILLINOIS. 

Will practice in the various counties in the 
3d Judicial District, and in the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas in the city of Cairo; also, at Brand- 
ville and Hickman, Ky., and Charleston, Mo. 
Prompt attention given to the collection of 
debts. 

Office, cor. Wash. Av. and 4th St., near Taylor Honse. 

Lutz Henry, jeweler and watch maker, No. 4 

Springfield block. 
Lyman & Smith, attorneys at law, office over 

Humphreys & Martin's drug store. 
McKinzie George W., carpenter and builder. 
McKENZIE J., STEAMBOAT LUMBER 

MERCHANT. 



Malinski F., boots and shoes, Sixth street 

near Commercial av. 
NEFF PETER, MERCHANT TAILOR. 
O'Shea John T., plasterer. 

PHILLIPS, HUNT & CO. 

COMMISSION AND 

FORWARDING MERCHANTS 

RAILROAD & TRANSPORTATION AGENTS, 



WHARF BOAT PROPRIETORS, 
CAIRO, ILL. 

Will make Cash Advances on Flour, Grain 
and all kinds of Produce, shipped through 
them to New Orleans. 

5^" Mark Goods in all cases to our care. 

RAWLINGS & WILLETT, ATTORNEYS 
AT LAW. 

Ritter A., tailoring, and clothing renovated, 
Ohio levee. 

Rudoff H., stoves and tin ware, and tin 
worker, Commercial av. 

SIMONS CYRUS G., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW, OFFICE 
COR SEVENTH STREET AND COM- 
MERCIAL AV. 

Smith J. L., fruits and confectionery, Ohio 
levee, 2d door from Springfield block. 

Stephenson William & Co., grocers and com- 
mission merchants, dealers in boat stores. 

STETSON A. P. & CO., DEALERS IN 
LUMBER, COR TWELFTH AND 
LEVEE STS. 

Stratton, Keily & Co., grocers and commis- 
sion merchants. 

Sumerwell James, carpenter and builder, 
Thirteenth street. 

TAYLOR HOUSE, H. M. DAVIS, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Tilden Samuel, dealer in dressed and rough 
flooring, cedar posts, poplar and oak. 

TIMMONS W. P. & T. W., DRY GOODS, 
HARDWARE, ETC. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



21 



CAIRO, ILLINOIS. 



EEARDEN & WHITE, 

(lateral Janfo wfo Cfllkimg Jpis, 

WILL GIVE PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL BUSINESS ENTRUSTED TO THEIR CARE. 

Will attend to the Purchase and Sale of Seal Estate, Stocks and Bonds, 

Negotiating Loans, Locating and Entering Lands, Buy and Sell 

Land Warrants, and Pay Taxes for Non-residents, 

Office, No. 3 SPRINGFIELD BLOCK. 



GEO. W. REARDEN. 



JOHN C. WHITE, 

Notary Publie and Conveyancer. 



N. B. Particular attention paid to the investigation of disputed titles to Real Estate. 



Vinent F., groceries, produce, cigars and 

liquor dealers, No. 18 Ohio levee. 
Warner & Schroeder, brick makers, Section 

S I C R R 
WHITE WILLIAM, DRY GOODS, BOOTS 

AND SHOES, COMMERCIAL AV. 
WHITE & CUNNINGHAM, FURNITURE 

AND DRY GOODS, OHIO LEVEE 

COR SIXTH ST. 

A. Williams. W. M. Williams. W.I.Stephens. 

WILLIAMS, STEPHENS & CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

COMMISSION AND 



II 



AND DEALERS IN 

TOBACCO, CIGARS AND LIQUORS. 

Also, Agents for the Sale of 

Iron, Nails, Plows, Powder, Cement, 
etc., etc. 

CAIRO, ILL. 

Willson & Thrupp, forwarding and commission 
merchants, groceries and boat stores, 
near I. C. R. R. depot. 

YOST & JONES, ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 



CALEDONIA, 

A post village, capital of Pulaski county, on 
the Ohio river, 1 3 miles from its mouth and 
220 miles south from Springfield. Popula- 
tion, about 450. 

Wm. J. Spencer, Postmaster. 



CALEDONIA STATION, 

A post village of Boone county, on the Be- 
loit branch of the Galena and Chicago Union 
railroad, 8 miles from Belvidere. 
Marquis L. Pierce, Postmaster. 



CALHOUN COUNTY 

Is situated in the west part of the state, bor- 
dering od Missouri, and has an area of 260 
square miles. It occupies a narrow strip of 
land between the Mississippi and Illinois 
rivers, which unite at the south-east extremi- 
ty of the county. The surface is broken by 
bluifs and ravines, and is partly subject to 
inundations. The river bottoms produce 
good pasture for cattle. Pork and beef are 
extensively exported from this county. On 
the banks of the Mississippi stone and coal 
are very abundant. Capital, Hardin. Popu- 
lation, 4,260. 



28 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



CALHOUN, 

A post office of Richland county. 
Wm. C. Bruce, Postmaster. 



CALUMET, 



A post office of Cook county, on the direct 
line of the Illinois Central railroad (Chicago 
branch) 14 miles from Chicago. 
Corydon F. Stewart, Postmaster. 



CAMBRIDGE, 

A flourishing post village of Henry county 
140 miles north by west from Springfield. It 
is surrounded by a rich farming district, in 
which stone coal is abundant, 
Elijah Adams, Postmaster. 

Wells IT. W., attorney and counselor at law. 



CAMDEN, 



A post village of Schuyler county, in a 
township of the same name, 72 miles west- 
north-west from Springfield. 
John A. James, Postmaster. 



CAMDEN MILLS. 

A thriving post village of Rock Island 
county, on Rock river, at its entrance into 
the Mississippi, 2 or 3 miles south-west from 
Rock Island. It is well supplied with water 
power, which is turned to account for manu- 
facturing purposes. 

David Brownlee, Jr., Postmaster, 



CAMERON, 

A post village of Warren county. 
Augustin B. Hawkins, Postmaster. 



CARMI, 

A thriving post village, capital of White 
county, on Little Wabash river, 150 miles 
south-east from Springfield. 

Philip P. Hunter, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Graham R. S., insurance agent. 
Robinson & Creby, attorney at law. 
Whiting J. E., attorney and counselor at law. 



CAMPBELL, 

A post village of Coles county, about 8 miles 
south-west from the capital. 
John Phipps, Postmaster. 



CAMP POINT 

Is a post village in the eastern part of Adams 
county, on the Chicago and Quincy railroad, 
at the point of junction with the Toledo and 
Quincy road. This town sprang into exist- 
ence on the opening of the Chicago and 
Quincy railroad. It is laid out on a beautiful 
undulating prairie, bounded on the south by 
McKee's creek, timber belt, and on the north 
by Bear creek, a considerable stream, on 
which there is a saw mill erected. There 
are extensive coal mines and stone quarries 
in the neighborhood. Camp Point has three 
churches and a school house, three steam 
saw mills, and an excellent grist, or flour 
mill, a carding mill, and a machine shop. 
There are numerous private warehouses, be- 
sides the depot buildings, affording ample 
storage. There are 15 stores of various 
kinds, 4 hotels, 2 livery stables, 2 brick 
yards, 2 carriage factories, 4 blacksmith 
shops, 1 cooper shop, 6 carpenter shops, 2 
lumber yards, 1 sash, door and blind factory, 
and 2 cabinet makers. This town shipped to 
Quincy within the last year 111,000 bushels 
of wheat, 50,000 bushels of corn, 300 barrels 
green apples, 200 cords of hoop poles, and a 
large quantity of produce to other points. 
Camp Point has growing facilities, and must 
become a point of great commercial import- 
ance. Present population, 700. This town 
is situated 100 miles from Springfield, and 77 
from Galesburg. 

Granpison Hess, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bailey T., dry goods and groceries. 
Beckett R., farmer. 

Brvant M. O., proprietor Camp Point Hotel. 
BUTLER JOHN, HALL KEEPER. 
CURTIS E. B., DEALER IN DRY GOODS, 

AND GENERAL MERCHANT. 
DICKINSON H, TAILOR. 
Dickinson J., hair dresser and barber. 
Furde I. A., police constable. 
Garrett P. B., farmer. 
OLIVER W. L., MERCHANT TAILOR. 
O'NEILL WILLIAM, FOREMAN ON I. C. 

R. R. 
Owen D. C, M.D., physician and surgeon 
PHELPS SAMUEL, PROPRIETOR OF 

PHELPS HOUSE. 
ROBERTSON I., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
Rodman A. L., M.D. 
Robertson J., farmer. 
ROSEBURG JAMES, GROCERIES AND 

PROVISIONS. 
ROTH JOHN A., DRY GOODS. 
Sigler L.. broker. 
STEVENS A. F., M.D., PHYSICIAN, 

SURGEON, AND DRUGGIST. 
STEWART L. A., PROVISIONS AND 

GROCERIES. 
Thompson W., farmer. 
Wallace W. W., farmer. 



GAZETTEER &KD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



29 



Wbitford H., farmer. 
Wilks D., farmer. 



CAMPTON, 

A post township in Kane county. Population, 
about 1,100. 
Ansell R. Gilman, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Anderson T., faimer. 

Anderson Ole, farmer. 

Arnold E. B,, farmer. 

Barber H., farmer. 

Barber L., farmer. 

Bartlett Joseph P., farmer. 

Beatty John, farmer. 

Currier Adner, town clerk and farmer. 

Garfield Timothy P., assessor and farmer. 

GASAWAY W. F., GROCERIES & PRO- 
VISIONS. 

GAS AW AY W. I., GROCERIES & PRO- 
VISIONS. 

Greenhalgh W. J., dry goods and general 
merchant. 

Hagertv I. T., lumber merchant. 

HERNDENT & KIRKPATRICK, DRY 
GOODS & GENERAL MERCHANTS. 

Hess & Hana, groceries and provisions. 

HESS J. II., POSTMASTER. 

Howden S. L., bookseller and stationer. 

HUBBARD T., PROPRIETOR STEWART 
HOUSE, GENERAL STAGE OFFICE. 

Kindale R. G., police magistrate. 

KIND ALE R. G., TIN PLATE WORKER. 

Kirkpatrick, physician and surgeon. 

Lewis H. M., farmer. 

McFarlane L., justice of peace. 

McNulty S., farmer. 

Miller N. farmer. 



CANTON, 

A flourishing village of Fulton county, 70 
miles north-north-west from Springfield. A 
plank road 12 miles long connects it with 
Liverpool, on the Illinois river. The village 
is situated in a fertile and populous district, 
has an active trade, and is one of the princi- 
pal places in* the county. Coal is found in 
abundance in the vicinity. It was laid out 
* in 1S30. Population, 1,750. 

Parley C. Stearns, Postmaster. 



CARBONDALE, 

A small village in Jackson county, on the 
line of the Illinois Central railroad. The 
proposed Belleville and Murfreysboro' rail- 
road crosses at this point. 
Asgill Conker, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Barber T. S., lumber. 

Brush D. H., dry goods, hats and caps, drugs, 
clothing, etc. 



Hamilton D N., police magistrate and notary 
public. 

Huston J., mail contractor and livery. 

Kennedy R. T., stoves and tinware. 

Loudon John T., attorney and counselor at 
law, and land agent. 

Morgan J. M. &Bro., dry goods, etc. 

Richart & Co., dry goods, groceries, hard- 
ware, drugs, crockery, etc. 

Sams R. W., attorney and counselor at law. 

Sanders Henry, dry goods, boots and shoes, 
clothing, etc. 

Sanders H. & Co., bakers and grocers. 

Scoville & Thompson, lumber. 

Thomas & Clinton, hardware. 

Willis Mrs. Mary, dress maker, 

CARLINVILLE. 

The county seat of Macoupin county, is beau- 
tifully located on the Chi., Altod & St. Louis 
railroad. As a shipping point, it is not ex- 
celled by any inland town in the state. Vast 
amounts of produce are annually shipped from 
this point, its location being in the centre of 
one of the finest wheat, corn and oats grow- 
ing counties in our young and fertile state. 
It was laid out in the spring of 1829, and 
moved slowly along until the spring of 1851, 
when a new impetus was given it by the con- 
struction of the above named road. From 
indolent inactivity everything assumed a dif- 
ferent aspect. Bustle and life took the place 
of inactivity. Impi ovements sprang up as if by 
magic. The population in 1851 amounted to 
about 500 persons. It now numbers about 
2,300 souls, and is still making rapid strides 
in the way of improvements. 

Carlinville was thus named in honor of Mr. 
Carlin, tifterward governor of the state, who 
was one of the persons appointed to survey 
the town. Twenty years ago, and the spot 
where Carlinville now stands was the domain 
of the red man, the country in which it is lo- 
cated bearing the name of "Black Hawk 
hunting ground." On the shores of the little 
creek near which the town is situated, their 
lodges rose in myriads, their dusky inmates 
thronged the forests, their council-fires 
crackled, and the old chiefs gathered round 
in silence, smoking their pipes, and musing 
on the daring deeds of their fathers, or form- 
ing plans of vengeance on some offending 
foe. They now live only in the memory of 
those who have followed where the star of 
civilization pointed the way, and where the 
soil, teeming with life and richness, invited 
them to share its blessings. Thus has the 
hand of the white man made subservient to 
his uses all the natural resources of a country 
whose yielding are sent to supply almost a 
world with the means of existence. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 
AMERICAN HOTEL, H. H. Walker, pro- 
prietor. 
Anderson & Glass, druggists. 
Andrist C. L., jewelry. 



30 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



Bacon D. C, daguerreian artist. 

Barry L. K., cabinet warerooms. 

Bettersworth A. P., physician, 

Boyce & Plain, dry goods. 

Boyd & Rielev, wagon and carriage shop. 

CHAPIXO HENRY, dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 

Chesnut & Blackburn, bankers. 

Corning Thomas R., drv goods and clothing. 

DE HASS A. J., MARBLE WORKER AND 
DEALER. 

DORMAN D. H.,daguerreotypist. 

Drish J. F., dry goods, queens ware, etc. 

DUGGER & WOODS, DRY GOODS. 

Gilbert & Jayne, attorneys at law. 

Graham M., drugs. 

Hale 0. W., grocer. 

Hall Mrs. Arma'M., milliner and dress maker. 

HAMILTON GEO.'W., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS, 
ETC. 

Hawkins J. M., physician. 

Hughes G. R., dry goods and queensware. 

Hurd N., lumber. 

Keller and Weaver, lumber. 

KELLER E. C, stoves and tinware. 

Maddix W. M., dry goods and hardware. 

Page Chas., forwarding and commission. 
•'Palmer & Pitman, attorneys at law. 

Page E. S. & Co., hardware, iron and cutlery. 

Partridge Wm., stoves and tinware. 

PHILLIPS & KIMBALL, publishers of Free 
Democrat. 

Phillips Thaddeus, painter, glazier and paper 
hanger. 

Queen & Williams, groceries. 

RICE HENRY, clothing and furnishing 
goods. 

Rider W. H, dry goods, queensware, etc. 

Rinaker John J., attorney at law. 

Sharp P., confectionery and groceries. 

Siemans Wm., proprietor City Hotel. 

SIMON GEORGE, merchant tailor and 
clothier. 

Stimmery & Locher, dry goods and groceries. 

VALENTINE J. M., hardware and iron. 

WALTERS F., STAPLE AND FANCY 
GOODS. 

WALKER H. H., proprietor American Hotel. 

Walker, Phelps & Co., dry goods and clothing. 

Weeir John, grist mill. 



CARLYLE, 

A post village, capital of Clinton county, on 
Kaskaskia river and on the border of a highly 
fertile prairie, 95 miles south from Spring- 
field. The river is navigable by small boats 
in high stages of water. It contains a com- 
modious court house, several stores, and 
manufacturing is carried onto some consider- 
able extent. The Ohio & Mississippi railroad 
runs through this place. 

Oliver A. Heryey, Postmaster. 



Bond Richard S., attorney and counselor at 
law. 



CARNENT PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Perry county, 
Jas. Campbell, Postmaster. 



CARPENTERVILLE, 

A post village of Kane county, about 50 
miles west from Chicago. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Ete. 

Anderson Samuel. 

Anderson Thomas. 

Buck John S. 

Buck G. S. 

Bradley Henry. 

Buck Anson. 

Carpenter C. V. 

Collins Edward. 

Dahibom S. 

Dillon Thomas. 

Dodge W. H. 

Dunton Delos. 

Edward John G. 

Edwards Isaac. 

King Charles. 

King Joseph. 

McEwen B. T. 

Mehi Michael. 

Marshall George. 

Masters Thomas. 

Perry Nathan. 

Pickering Charles. 

Read CD. 

Rigby Amos. 



CARROLL COUNTY 

Is in the W.N.W. part of the state, and has 
an area of 416 square miles. The Mississippi 
forms its western boundary separating it from 
Iowa, and it is drained by Plum, Elkhorn, 
Otter and Rush creeks. The surface is un- 
dulating and diversified with prairies and 
tracts of timber, the former of which are the 
most extensive. The soil is productive. 
Wheat, corn, oats, pork and butter are the 
staples. A considerable quantity of land 
has also been obtained in this county. The 
Racine & Mississippi railroad is located in 
this county, and is designed to connect Lake 
Michigan and the Mississippi, passing through 
Beloit, Freeport and terminating at Savannah. 
Capital, Mount Carroll. Population, 5,480. 



CARROLTON, 

A thriving and pleasant post village, capital 
of Greene county, in a township of the same 
name, on the line of the Jacksonville & Car- 
rollton railroad, 70 miles south-west from 
Springfield. It is situated in a populous and 
fertile district. The abundance of stone coal 
and timber in the vicinity, added to the 
facilities for transportation, have led to the 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIEECTOEY. 



31 



establishment of several manufacturing com- 
panies The village contains several churches, 
three academies and other similar institutions. 
Population, estimated at 1,650 
Marshall Dulaney, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Armstrong C, M.D. 

BAINEY W. C, justice of peace. 

Brace S. G., farmer. 

Cloud Rev. Newton, M. E. C. 

Davis J. M., physician. 

Davis W. A., general merchants. 

DULAXEY M., POSTMASTER. 

Eldred Silas, farmer. 

English James W., attorney. 

Epping & Brother, general store. 

Evans John, farmer. 

Gardner E. W., justice of peace. 

Green Wm. L., county treasurer. 

Hardcastle John, farmer. 

Hardcastle Wm., farmer. 

HEADRICH, proprietor of Carrolton House. 

HINTON ALFRED, proprietor of Mansion 

House. 
Hodges C. D., county judge. 
Hodge C. D., attorney. 
Mason Wm. P. & Co , general store. 
Paterson L. J., sheriff. 
Pierson D., banker. 
Rice A. H., justice of peace. 
Spencer A., circuit clerk. 
Sharon J. K., physician. 
Thomas Samuel, farmer. 
Vedder T. P., county clerk. 
Woodson D. M., circuit judge. 
Woodson J. M., attorney. 
Wright & Co., general merchants. 
Wright David, farmer. 



CARTER, 

A post office of Sangamon county. 
Young M. Hudson, Postmaster. 



CARTHAGE, 

A post village, capital of Hancock county, 
twelve or fourteen miles from the Mississippi 
river and 110 miles W.N.W. from Spring- 
field. It is surrounded by a fertile region in 
which stone coal abounds. The railroad from 
the Illinois river at Pekin to the Mississippi at 
Keokuk, will pass through this village. Pop- 
ulation, estimated at about 650. 
Caswell R. Hendrix, Postmaster. 



CARY STATION, 
A post office of McHenry county. 
James Nish, Postmaster. 



CASEY, 

A post village of Clarke county, on the 
National road. 
Jonathan Marixg, Postmaster. 



CASEYVILLE, 

A post office of St. Clair county. 
E. M. Mallory, Postmaster. 



CASS COUNTY, 

Is located in the central part of the state, and 
has an area of about 350 square miles. It is 
bounded on the north-west by the Illinois 
river, and on the north by the Sangamon river. 
These streams unite on the border of the 
county. The surface is nearly level, consist- 
ing of prairie and timber land ; the soil is 
excellent. Wheat, corn, oats, hay and pork 
are the staples. The Illinois and Sangamon 
rivers are navigable by steamboats on the 
borders of the county. The Illinois River 
railroad, which is projected, will divide the 
county nearly in the center from north to 
south. The road is designed to connect 
Peoria with St. Louis direct. Capital, Beards- 
town. Population, S,360. 



CASS, 

A post office of Du Page county. 
Thomas Andrus, Postmaster. 



CASTLEFIN, 



A post office of Jefferson county. 
Geo.W. Freese, Postmaster. 



CAVE, 

A post village of Franklin county, 40 miles 
west-north-west from Shawneetown. 
John W. M. Creesy, Postmaster. 



CAVE-IN-ROCK, 

A post village of Hardin county, on the Ohio 
river, about 400 miles below Cincinnati. 
Commodore D. Miller, Postmaster. 



CEDAR BLUFF, 



A post office of Johnson county. 
David H. Mead, Postmaster. 



CEDARVILLE, 



A post office of Stephenson county. 
Tnos. J. Wilcoxon, Postmaster. 



CEDRON, 



A post office of Cumberland county. 
Wm. H. Woodbury, Postmaster. 



32 



G. W. ITAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



CENTER RIDGE, 

A post office of Mercer county. 
Almond Shaw, Postmaster. 



CENTRAL CITY, 

A post office of Marion county. 
H. K. S. O'Melveny, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Moore I. N., notary public. 
White J. W., physician. 



CENTRALIA, 

A post town of Marion county, on the line of 
the Illinois Central railroad, at the point 
where the Chicago branch connects with the 
main trunk. But slow progress has been 
made by its inhabitants in comparison with 
other towns on the line of the road, and at 
the present time (1857) the population is less 
than 300. 
James M. O'Melveny, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Benham W. S., books and stationery. 
Blanchard & Holcomb, general collecting 

agents. 
Blum E. A., jeweler. 

Dishon & Hammons, dry goods and groceries. 
Bunning C. W., physician. 
Edick A. J. & Co., Field House. 
Eram & Smalley, dry goods and groceries. 
Hallam J. L., physician. 
Hutchins J. M., dentist. 
Ingraham, Folsom & Co., land agents. 
Jennings & Nolmau, lumber. 
Kohl & Warner, dry goods and groceries. 
Kohl Jacob, furniture. 
Lindsley J. B., architect and builder. 
McCord D. H., physician. 
Sawing G. W., furniture. 
Stiekney X. R., land agent. 
Thorpe Mrs. J. W., milliner and dressmaker. 
Watts P. K, carriage manufactory. 



CERRO GORDO, 

A post office of Piatt county. 

Isaac R. M. Kennedy, Postmaster. 



CHAMBERSBURG, 

A post office of Pike county, 60 miles west 
of Springfield. 

J. II. Dennis, Postmaster. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 

Is situated in the east part of the state, and 
has an area of about 8 SO square miles. It is 
drained by the head streams of the Kaskas- 



kia, Embarrass and Vermilion rivers, and is 
traversed in the north-west part by the north 
fork of Sangamon river. The surface con- 
sists of an open plain or prairie, slightly roll- 
ing, and interspersed with small groves of 
timber. This county comprises a part of the 
Grand Prairie. The soil is deep, fertile and 
durable. The staples are corn, wheat, oats, 
hay and pork. The Illinois Central (Chicago 
branch) and the Great Western railroads 
pass through this county, and have added 
largely to its wealth and population. Capi- 
tal, Urbana. Population, 3,678. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Edward Atio. 

County Justices, John P. Tenbrook and 
Lewis Jones. 

Sheriff', Penrose Stidham. 

Deputy Sheriff, John Griffith. 

County Surveyor, John Thrasher. 

Circuit Clerk andRecorder, Wm. H. Simers. 

Treasurer and Assessor, Wm. Munhall. 

Clerk of County Court, S. I. Fry. 

Master in Chancery, T. R. Webber. 

County Notaries Public, Wm. D. Simers 
and Jos. W. Sim. 



CHANNAHON, 



A post village of Will county, on the Illinois 
and Michigan canal, about 45 miles south- 
west from Chicago. It hasan active business 
in shipping produce. 

Hknry Henderson, Postmaster. 



CHARLESTOWN, 

A post village, in a township of the same 
name, capital of Coles county, on the border 
of Graud Prairie near Embarrass river, 81 
miles east by south from Springfield. The 
Terre Haute and Alton railroad passes 
through the place. 

Jacob J. Brown, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Ashmore H. I., farmer. 
Bain & Oliver, foundrymen. 
Beck D. M., daguerreotypist. 
Brady W., dental surgeon. 
Briggs James H., dealer in pumps. 
Brown Thomas, groceries, glassware, etc. 
Bundy J. S., Baptist missionary, 
Bunnell W. & Co., restaurant and grocery. 
Calhoun N. C, constable. 
Chambers W. M., physician. 
Clark J. S., coroner. 

Clark Mrs. II., millinery and fancy goods. 
Collom & Mitchell, furniture. 
Compton & Mount, general merchants. 
Cottingham John J., farmer. 
Craddock W. W., attorney and counselor at 
law. 



GAZETTEEE AND EUSI1SESS DIEECTOEY. 



33 



Cunningham J. T., farmer. 

Davidson W. H., groceries, etc. 

Davis & Barnard, drugs and medicines. 

Dawron R. W., lumber. 

Dryden D., farmer. 

Dunbar A. P., attorney and counselor at law. 

Eastin E., groceries. 

Edwards Gideon, county judge and justice of 
peace. 

Ellington James D., notary public and dealer 
in real estate. 

Erskine Mrs., millinery. 

Ferguson A., physician. 

Ficklin 0. B., attorney and counselor at law. 

Fisher W. W., groceries, etc. 

Garrison Peter, farmer. 

Gilman Wm., constable. 

Hackett M. F. & Bro., general merchants. 

HARDING G. C. & W. P., publisher of 
Coles county Ledger. 

HARR WILLIAM, publisher of Charleston 
Courier. 

Henry A. M., merchant. 

Hill J. B. & Co , groceries and provisions. 

Hitchcock C. H., agricultural implements 
and stoves. 

Hulman T., groceries, wines, oils, etc. 

Hutchason, Ashmore & Co., general mer- 
chants. 

Hutchason B. M., general merchant. 

Ingersoll X. T., watches, jewelry, etc. 

Jeffries J. R., saddlery, harness, etc. 

Jeffries Thomas, farmer. 

Johnson W. L. P., proprietor of Capitol 
House. 

Jones B. F., farmer. 

Landes Felix, merchant tailor. 

LightfootR., tannery. 

Linden &Brom well, attorneys and counselors 
at law. 

Linden Elisha, farmer. 

McAlmont C, physician and surgeon. 

McCrory James, county clerk. 

McLain M. C, attorney and counselor at law. 

March Thos. J., burial cases and coffins. 

Martin A., farmer. 

Miles & Craig, boots and shoes. 

Miller & Munn, jewelry, fancy goods, etc. 

Mills & Brown, insurance agents, drugs, medi- 
cines, groceries, books, stationery, etc. 

Mitchell Daniel G., groceries. 

Mitchell R. A., pastor 0. S. Presbyterian 
church. 

Monroe B., general merchant. 

Moore J. G. L., constable. 

Moore, Steven B., county surveyor. 

Norfalk H. R., dry goods, etc. 

Olmstead J. T., farmer. 

Owens C, provisions and groceries. 

Parcels John F., dry goods, groceries, hard- 
ware, etc. 

Payne J. L., watches, jewelry and fancy 
goods. 

Pinatel Charles, dry goods, etc. 

Pugh Jas., plow and wagon shop. 

Rhoderous F., groceries, etc. 

Rose D., pastor Universalist church. 

3 



Rupert & Fackler, groceries, etc. 

Ryan , pastor Catholic church. 

Shriver L. B., sheet iron and tinware. 

Silverthorn J. L., physician. 

Starkweather & McLain, attorneys and coun- 
selors at law. 

Taylor T. B., pastor M. E. church. 

Teel Geo. W., circuit clerk. 

Templin & Devault, plow and wagon shop. 

Trower T. B., physician. 

Yanderen D. J., farmer. 

Yanmeter S., physician. 

Wallace E. T., drugs, medicines, books, sta- 
tionery, etc. 

Wallace E. T., justice of peace. 

Weirkler Y. E., farmer. 

Wiess H., hardware. 

Wilson J. A. & W. W., dry goods, groceries, 
etc. 

Winchester & Wyeth, stoves, hardware and 
trimmings. 

Winter Isaac, tailor. 

Worley H. B., sheriff. 

W right James, plow and wagon shop. 

Young W. A., pastor Christian church. 

Wyche Jas. E., attorney and counselor at 
law. 



CHATHAM, 

A post village of Sangamon county, on the 
St. Louis, Alton & Chicago railroad, ten miles 
S.S.W. from Springfield; is surrounded by 
a rich farming district and does a flourishing 
business. 

Kehemiaii Weight, Postmaster. 



CHEBANSE. 

A post village in Iroquois county on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad (Chicago 
branch). It is in the midst of a rich farming 
district and is being rapidly increased in 
numbers. 

Amos M. Fishburx, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 
Baldwin A., general merchant. 

Frintle , physician. 

Gere Geo., farmer. 

Hanna R. J. & Brother, general merchants. 

Hanna W. J., postmaster. 

Milk Samuel, farmer. 

Rice Thomas, farmer. 

WAY J. H., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Way J. H , lumber dealer. 



CHELSEA, 

A post village of Will county, 177 miles 
north-east from Springfield, about 34 miles 
from Chicago and near the line of the Illinois 
Central railroad (Chicago branch.) 
M. Yan Home, Postmaster. 



34 



Q. W. HAWES' ILLESTOIS STATE 



CHEMUNG, 

A thriving post village of McHenry county, 
on Pickasaw creek, 70 miles W.N.W. from 
Chicago. It is situated on a fertile prairie 
and contains several stores and mills. Popu- 
lation, about 550. 

Geo. Wooster, Postmaster. 



CHENEY'S GROVE, 

A post office of McLean county, 80 miles 
north-east of Springfield. 
J. B. Beckwith, Postmaster. 



CHENOA, 



A flourishing little village of McLean county, 
at the junction of the St. Louis, Alton & 
Chicago, and Peoria & Oquawka railroads, 
104 miles from Chicago. These roads have 
recently erected a. fine depot building, to take 
the place of one destroyed by fire some time 
ago. 

J. B. Lanet, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Brownell & Spencer, merchants. 

Carpenter & Co., lumber dealers. 

Chamberlin A. A., farmer. 

Chamberlin P. E. 

Courtright C, farmer. 

Farley James, farmer. 

Fitch John, farmer. 

Hamilton R. G., clergyman. 

Hartmore B. G., clergyman. 

Hale A. E., justice of peace. 

Howe & Ferry, general merchants. 

Johnson Jas. B., farmer. 

Johnson & Manning, general store. 

Miller Ezra, farmer. 

Robinson & Co., druggists. 

Robinson Horace, justice of peace. 

Roberts E. F., grain and produce dealers. 

Ring & Eason, druggists. 

Starkey Horace, farmer. 

Wilson Hower, broom manufactory. 



CHERRY GROVE, 

A post village of Carroll county, 218 miles 
north from Springfield. 

Samuel Sheller, Postmaster. 



CHERRY VALLEY, 

A post village of Winnebago county, on the 
Kishwaukee river and on the Galena & Chi- 
cago Union railroad, 84 miles from Chicago. 
It contains several manufacturing establish- 
ments. 
Alfred Johnson, Postmaster. 



CHESTER, 

A thriving post village, capitol of Randolph 
county, on the Mississippi river, about one 
mile below the entrance of the Kaskaskia, 
and 149 miles south from Springfield. It is 
a place of considerable business ; the surplus 
produce of the county is mostly shipped at 
this place. Population, estimated at about 
1,700. 
Alex. Dunn, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 
Allen Thomas G., attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Allmyer J. H., grocery and variety store. 
Andrews & Henderson, drugs, books, jewelry, 

etc. 
Beare Joseph, dry goods, clothing, etc. 
Beare N., lumber. 
Block D. & Brother, grocers. 
Dillon M., marble worker. 
Dunn & Co., clothing, hats, caps, boots and 

shoes. 
FLETCHER & RALLS, EDITORS AND 

PUBLISHERS RANDOLPH COUNTY 

DEMOCRAT. 
Gordon & Pollock, physicians and surgeons. 
Hall E. J., drugs, paints and oils, books, sta- 
tionery, etc. 
Harris E., dry goods, groceries, hardware, 

clothing, etc. 
Lyman W. W., dry goods, boots and shoes, 

hardware, etc. 
Miltenberger G, cashier Bnnk of Chester. 
Nelson Isaac H., county clerk. 
Nevill Harvey, attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Parks & Smith, meat market. 
Ralls James M., clerk of circuit court. 
Roberts Cyrus &Co., threshing machines, etc. 
Schane Philip, brickmaker, contractor and 

supplier. 
Smith Thomas, baker and confectioner. 
Starbird Charles N., attorney and counselor 

at law. 
Thompson James, county surveyor. 
Underwood & Watt, attorneys at law. 
Walker Thomas J. & Co., agents for Alton 

threshers. 
Watt James, attorney at law. 
Widen W. S., sign painter. 
Williamson John, tin, copper and sheet iron 

ware. 



CHESTERFIELD, 

A flourishing post village of Macoupin coun- 
ty, 50 miles south-west from Springfield. 
John R. Murphy, Postmaster. 



Lee M. & S. J., dry goods, groceries, cloth- 
ing, etc. 

Ledbrook L., physician. 

Upham & Loomis, dry goods, groceries, boots, 
and shoes. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



35 



CHENNING-, 

A post office of St. CJair county. 
Josiah Hill, Postmaster. 

CHICAGO, 

The county seat of Cook county, is the most 
populous and commercial city of the state. 
It is situated on the south-western shore of 
lake Michigan, and on both sides of Chicago 
river, 278 miles west by south from Detroit, 
and 285 miles north from St. Louis. The 
first explorers of lake Michigan, the first 
white men to pitch their tents on the Chica- 
go prairie, and to haul up their boats upon 
its river banks and lake shore, were the 
French Jesuit missionaries and fur traders, 
under the guidance of Nicholas Perrot, who 
was also acting as the agent of the govern- 
ment in the west. This was in the latter 
part of the year 1669. At that time this 
territory was in possession of the Miami tribe 
of Indians, but subsequently the Pottawato- 
mies crowded back the Miamis, and became 
sole possessors, until the year 1795, when 
they became parties to the treaty with 
Wayne, by which a tract of land, six miles 
square, at the mouth of the Chicago river, 
was ceded to the United States — the first ex- 
tinction of Indian title to the land on which 
Chicago is built. For nearly an hundred 
years during the time of the French posses- 
sion, and after its cession to the English, Chi- 
cago has little mention in history. During 
this time it is only known from incidental 
circumstances, that in those dark days of 
French possession there was a fort near the 
mouth of the river, that there were Indian 
villages near the Calumet and on the Des 
Plaines, that here were the roving grounds 
of the Pottawatomies, and that from the 
head waters of the Illinois to the Chicago 
river, was the common portage for the trade 
and transit of the goods and furs between the 
Indians and the traders, and that the ship- 
ping point was from the port at Chicago. 
The few white men who were there, were I 
there not for the purpose of making settle- 
ments, but simply to carry on a trade with 
the Indians, the gain from which must have 
been of no inconsiderable amount. They 
were men of limited education, and could 
not have been expected to have any accounts 
of their adventures. This state of things ex- 
isted until the close of the general western 
Indian war, soon after the termination of 
the war of the revolution. During this war 
the intrigue of the English was constantly 
exciting the Indians to warfare, to such a de- 
gree that, after peace was declared between 
the old and the new country, a general war 
of the Indians against the United States 
broke out. This war continued until 1795, 
when, after having been severely punished 
by Gen, Wayne, the chiefs of the several 
tribes assembled, by his invitation, at Green- 



ville, Ohio, and there effected a treaty of 
peace, thus closing the war of the west. In 
this treaty numerous small tracts of land were 
ceded by the Indians to the states, and 
among them was one described as " one piece 
of land six miles square, at the mouth of 
Chickajo (Chicago) river, emptying into the 
south-west end of lake Michigan, where a fort 
formerly stood." This may be called the first 
"land sale," and which has been the precur- 
sor to a business which has entailed to its 
participants independence and wealth. But 
little time passed before the proprietors 
thought best to enter upon active possession, 
and in 1804 a fort was built upon the spot by 
government. This fort remained until the 
year 1816, when it was destroyed by the In- 
dians, at the time of the massacre. This fort 
was called Fort Dearborn, a name which it 
retained during its existence. Its location 
was upon a slightly elevated point on the 
south side of the river, near the lake shore, 
and commanded a good view of the lake, the 
prairie extending to the south, the belt of 
timber along the south branch and the north 
branch, and the white sand hills to the north 
and south, which had for so many years been 
the sport of the lake winds. Up to the time 
of the erection of this fort, no white man had 
made here his home, the Pottawatomie In- 
dians having undisputed sway. After the 
establishment of the garrison, there gathered 
here a few families of French Canadians and 
half-breeds, none of whom possessed more 
than ordinary intelligence. The only link in 
the chain of civilization which admits of 
identity, existed in the Kinzie family, who 
came here to reside in 1804, the same year 
in which the fort was built. John Kinzie, 
then an Indian trader in the St. Joseph coun- 
try, Michigan, in that year became the first 
permanent white resident of Chicago, and to 
him is due the honor of establishing many of 
the improvements which have made Chicago 
what it is. For nearly twenty years he 
was, with the exception of the military, the 
only white inhabitant of Northern Illinois. 
During the years, from 1804 to 1820, the 
lake trade was carried on by a small sail ves- 
sel, coming in in the fall and spring, bringing 
the season's supply of goods and stores for 
the fort, and taking away the stock of furs 
and peltries which had accumulated. Mr. 
Kinzie pursued the business of fur trading 
until the breaking out of hostilities with the 
Indians, which resulted in the massacre of 
1812. The friendly feelings which had been 
cultivated between himself and the Indians, 
preserved himself and family from the fate 
which befell his neighbors of the fort. Re- 
moving for a time, in 1816 he returned to 
Chicago, and re-opened the trade with the 
Indians, residing there until the time of his 
death, in 1828. It was a saying with the 
Indians that "the first white man who set- 
tled there was a negro," by which was meant 
Jean Baptiste Point-au-Sable, who, in 1796, 



36 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



built the first house in Chicago, which he af- 
terward sold to Le Mai, who subsequently 
sold it to Mr. Kinzie. In 1812 there were 
but five houses outside of the fort, all of 
which, with the exception of that owned by 
Mr. Kinzie, were destroyed at the time 
of the massacre. In August, 1816, a 
treaty was concluded by commissioners ap- 
pointed by the government, with the various 
Indian tribes, by which the country between 
Chicago and the waters of the Illinois river 
was ceded to the United States, on the 4th 
of July. In the same year, the troops again 
returned to their former locality, and a new 
fort was erected, under the direction of Capt. 
Hezekiah Bradley, then commander. It 
stood upon the same ground as the former 
one, and remained until the summer of 1856, 
when it was demolished to make room for 
the increasing amount of business. The re- 
occupancy of the fort by the troops continued 
until May, 1823, after which time it was oc- 
cupied by the Indian agent, and used for the 
temporary accommodation of families of resi- 
dents recently arrived. On the 10th of Au- 
gust, 1828, the fort was again occupied by a 
company of volunteers, and afterward by two 
companies of regular troops, under the com- 
mand of Major Fowle and Captain Scott. 
These last remained until May, 1831, when 
the fort was given in charge of George W. 
Dole, as agent for the government. On the 
breaking out of the Black Hawk war, in 1 832, 
it was re-occupied by a detachment under 
Gen. Scott, until the removal of the Indians, 
in 1836, and, until near the time of its demo- 
lition, was held by the government for the 
occasional use of its army officers, engineers, 
and agents connected with the public works. 
From 1816 to 1830, Chicago had gained the 
number of twelve or fifteen houses, with a 
population of less than one hundred. In 
1818, the public square, where now stands the 
court house, was a pond, on whose banks the 
Indians had trapped the muskrat, and where 
the first settlers hunted ducks. This pond 
had an outlet in a " slough," as it was then 
called, which passed over the present site of 
the Tremont House, entering the river at the 
end of State street. Along the shores of the 
river the wild onion was found in great abund- 
ance, to which the Indians gave the name 
CJii-ka-jo, and from which the city doubtless 
derived its name. In the autumn of 1829, 
the town of Chicago was laid out, which 
is the part now known on the maps as the 
" original town." This was an act of organ- 
ization, with a mere handful of inhabitants, 
which in twenty-eight years has swelled to 
the enormous number of one hundred and 
twenty thousand. With giant strides, Chi- 
cago has risen, in point of importance, till 
it has become one of the wealthiest cities 
of the west, and the first primary grain depot 
in the world. In point of location, Chicago 
is much favored, being situated on both sides 
of the Chicago river, and its north and south 



branches, which unite about three-quarters 
of a mile from the lake, thus separating the 
city into three divisions, the north, south and 
west. The main stream of the river is from 
50 to 75 yards wide, and 20 to 30 feet deep. 
Vessels ascend it and one of its branches 
nearly 5 miles. The city is laid out in 
squares, the streets corresponding nearly to 
the cardinal points of the compass. The 
shore of the lake, and the northern part of 
the city are occupied with private residences, 
many of which are of a magnificent order. 
The business is principally confined to the 
river and those streets running parallel with 
and adjacent to it. At the termini of the va- 
rious railroad lines are immense warehouses, 
used for the storage of grain and produce. 
Tracks are laid to these, and while the great 
staple of the state is being unloaded from 
the cars on one side, it is being delivered 
into vessels and steamers on the other. 

Among the many public buildings of 
which Chicago can boast are, the Court House, 
Marine Hospital, Medical College, Armory 
building, etc. A new custom house and 
post office is in process of erection, which, 
when completed, will be second to none in 
the Union. The number of churches is 
, some of which are model spe- 
cimens of architectural design and fini-sh. 
The Second Presbyterian church is a particu- 
lar object of interest, owing to the material 
of which it is built — it being of the limestone 
order but filled with a black, pitchy sub- 
stance, which is constantly oozing out, giving 
to the whole structure the appearance of an 
old and venerable cathedral, whose walls are 
liveried with ivy green. 

Chicago possesses every advantage for 
business, being connected by lake and rail- 
road with almost every commercial city of 
the Union. In 1851 the number of vessels 
arrived at this port was 7,557, having a ton- 
nage of 1,753,413. The lake tonnage of the 
district was, on the commencement of the 
year 1858, steam 7,954.07, sail 62,727.00, 
making a total of 70,681.07. The amount 
of leading articles received and shipped, for 
the year 1857, are reported as follows: 

Redd. SMjypcd. 

Wheat, bus 10,554,761 9,485,052 

Corn, 7,409,130 6,814,615 

Oats, 1,707,245 1,416,778 

Barley, 127,689 17,993 

Rye 87,911 

Flour into wheat,. 1,969,670 1,298,240 

Lumber, ft, 459,639,198 311,608,793 

The manufacturing interests of Chicago are 
well represented, when we say that in 1856 
the amount of capital invested was $7,759,- 
400 ; number of hands employed, 10,563 ; 
value of manufactured goods, $15,515,063. 
The most important branches are the manu- 
facture of iron work, steam engines and 
railroad machinery, agricultural implements, 
carriages, wagons, lumber, etc. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



37 



In point of railway facilities Chicago is 
second to no city in the Union. Six years 
ago and only 95 miles were completed in the 
entire state, now there are over 3,000, show- 
ing an increase of over 500 miles per year. 
Over 120 trains arrive and depart daily from 
the various station houses. 

The idea of opening a direct trade with 
the cities of the Old World had long en- 
gaged the attention of the business men of 
Chicago, and in 1856 the Dean Richmond 
was built and fitted out for Liverpool, and in 
July, 1857, Capt. Pierce, who commanded 
the Richmond on her trial trip, took out the 
C. J. Kershaw, having on board a cargo of 
staves. As a return on the part of the Liv- 
erpool merchants, in the summer of '57 the 
Madeira Pet, with a cargo of iron, crockery, 
hardware, cutlery, etc., dropped anchor in 
the harbor and was hailed with lively inter- 
est by every business man in the city. The 
feasibility of direct trade has thus become a 
reality, and will doubtless be increased as 
time advances. 

The city is supplied with water from the 
lake, raised by steam power, and distributed 
throughout the city in iron pipes. The main 
engine is of 500 horse power, and capable of 
furnishing over twenty millions of gallons of 
water in twenty-four hours. This engine, 
with its accompanying machinery, is an ob- 
ject of interest to strangers visiting the 
city. The reservoir building for the South 
Division is located near the corner of 
Clark and Adams streets, is two stories 
high, with a capacity of 500,000 gallons, 
the surface of the water being 83 feet 
above the lake. New reservoirs are to be 
erected in the West and North Divisions, the 
latter covering an area of 275 feet square, 
and capable of holding 7,000,000 gallons of 
water. 

Until the year 1856 most of the streets 
were planked, and the buildings then erected 
were without cellars, but since that time a 
new grade has been established, which, 
when finished, will raise the entire city from 
two to five feet. It needs only that the sys- 
tem of paving and sewering the streets, 
which has been so vigorously commenced, 
should be carried out, to render Chicago one 
of the healthiest as it will inevitably be one 
of the largest cities of the continent. The 
system of sewerage is under the superintend- 
ence of Mr. E. S. Chesbrough, who was for 
many years at the head of that department 
in Boston. Population, 120,000. 

Wm. Price, Postmaster. 

[For a more extended history of the im- 
provements for 1857, see Chicago matter 
after business directory of state.] 

THE CITY GOVERNMENT 

Is invested in a mayor and twenty aldermen. 
At present the 

HON. JOHN WENTWORTH, Mayor. 



Board of Aldermen. 

James Long, H. Greenebaum, 

Wm. Bross, Geo. Sitts, 

J. Harris, John Dempsey, 

O. Kendall, John Dunlap, 

C. D'Wolf, S. D. LaRue, 

Hiram Joy, C. Wahl, 

Samuel Myers, M. Diversy, 

J. M. Kennedy, P. Conley, 

R. Green, J. Schmidt, 

A. Carter, D. Coughlin. 

City Clerk, Herman Kreisman. 

City Comptroller, S. D. Ward. 

City Treasurer, C. N. Holden. 

City Collector, Joseph N. Hendricks. 

City Surveyor, S. S. Greeley. 

Superintendent of Public Works, Nath. S. 
Bouton. 

City Marshal, James M. Donnelly. 

City Attorney, John C. Miller. 

Captain of Police, B. C. Yates. 

Street Commissioners, S. D., D. C. Hawley; 
W. D., Wm. M. Dunn ; N. D., Owen Dough- 
erty. 

Superintendent of Special Assessments, John 
H. Kinzie. 

Board of Health, Wm. H. Brown, Isaac 
Speer, H. W. Abeck, R. Cleaveland, Geo. 
W. Dole, Caspar Butz. 

Health Officer, A. Bumham. 

CHy Physician, Gerhard Paoli. 

Superintendent of Public Schools, W. H. 
Wells. 

Harbor Master, H. Fuller. 

Assistant Harbor Master, L. C. Hugunin. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Wm. A. 
Green. 

Inspector of Pish, Ezra Taylor. 

Market Clerks, South Market, Chas. Hanss- 
ner; West Market, H. Lochbiehler; North 
Market, A. Nelson. 

Keeper of Bridewell, Wm. Justice. 

Water Commissioners, Orrington Lunt, 
Geo. W. Dole, John C. Haines. 

Sewerage Co?n?nissioners, Wm. B. Ogden, 
J. D. Webster, S. Lind. 

City Sexton, S. D. Ward. 

Superintendent of Reform School, D. B. 
Nichols. 

Board of Guardians of Reform School, 
Mark Skinner, J. K. Botsford, Joseph H. 
Gray, Samuel D. Wakd, F. Letz, E, S. 
Wadsvvorth, Henry Smith. 

RECORDER'S COURT. 
Judge, R. S. Wilson. 
Clerk, P. A. Hoyne. 

POLICE COURT. 
Justices, John King, Jr., Michael Grants. 
Clerk, E. G. Hooke. 

POST OFFICE, 
86, 88, 90, 92 & 94 Dearborn St. 

Office Hours. — Summer, from 7 A. M. to 
8 P. M. Winter, from 8 A. M. to 8 P. M. 
Sunday, from 8 to 11 A. M. 



38 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



RATES OF rOSTAGE. 

Notice. — No letters will be sent from this 
office to places within the United States, 
imless the postage is pre-paid. 

Letters. — The inland postage (which must 
be pre-paid, for 3,000 miles or under, upon 
single letters, is three cents ; double letters 
twice, and treble three times these rates. 

Letters for California and Oregon, ten 
cents. 

Drop letters, for delivery, only one cent. 

Newspapers. — The postage per quarter on 
the regular numbers of a newspaper mailed 
from the office of publication to subscribers 
anywhere within the United States, is as fol- 
lows : On a daily paper, 39 cents ; tri-weekly, 
19| cents; semi-weekly, 13 cents ; weekly, 
6j"cents; semi-monthly, 3 cents; monthly, 
li cents. Payable quarterly in advance. 

Transient Newspapers. — One cent each to 
any part of the United States, if pre-paid. 

Magazines, transient rates. — One cent for 
first three ounces ; every additional ounce, or 
fractional part of an ounce, one cent, pre- 
paid. To subscribers, one-half the above 
rates, payable quarterly in advance. 
Postmaster, William Price. 
Assistant Postmaster, Truman C. Everts. 
Cashier Stamp Office, Thomas J. Kinsella. 
Chief of Western Distribution Room, James 

Barrell. 
Chief of Eastern Distribution Room, H. S. 

Brown. 
Chief of Registry Department, D. S. Moore. 
Chief of General Delivery, Wm. Knusemark. 
Chief of Box Delivery, M. T. Kierdon. 
Chief of Newspaper Department, F. E. 

Barber. 
Local Agent, P. E. Dennis. 



Legal Hack and Cab Pares. 

For carrying one passenger one mile or 
less, 50 cents. 

For carrying each additional passenger of 
Same party, 25 cents. 

For carrying one passenger between one 
and two miles, $1. 

For carrying each additional passenger of 
same party, 25 cents. 

For carrying one passenger any distance 
in the city over two miles, $1.50. 

For carrying each additional passenger of 
same party, 50 cents. 

Children under five years carried free any 
distance not exceeding one mile. 

Children between five and fourteen half 
price of regular rates. 

No charges for ordinary baggage. 



AGENCIES. 

Advertising. 

GALLAGHER J. J., No. 10 MASONIC 

TEMPLE 
SCHIVEN C. H., 63 DEARBORN ST. 



Mercantile. 
DOUGLASS B. & CO. 96 RANDOLPH, 

CORNER DEARBORN ST. 
JONES WM. JR. & CO., EXCHANGE 

BANK BUILDING. 



Police. 
BRADLEY C. P. & CO., 109 RANDOLPH 

ST. 
Pinkerton & Co., Washington and Dearborn 
streets. 



Collecting. 
Ferris E. G., 10 Masonic Temple. 
Gallagher J. J., 10 Masonic Temple. 



Insurance. 
ACKLEY JNO. B. & CO., 4 MASONIC 

TEMPLE. 
ALLIS LEWIS E., 4 DOLE'S BUILDING. 

Atwater S. T., corner S. Water and Clark sts. 

Brooks J. P., post office building. 

Dodge John C, 196 Lake st. 

EDWARDS H. J. & A. R., 152 LAKE ST. 

Ellsworth & Wadsworth, 58 and 60 Lake st. 

Hubbard & Hunt, corner S. Water and La 

Salle sts. 
Hubbard G. S., corner S. Water and La 

Salle sts. 
Kinzie John H., corner Clark and S. Water 

streets 
LOUNSBURY & WRIGHT, 148 S. WATER 

STREET. 
Merrill, Mason & Co., 150 S. Water st. 
Miller T. L., 7 Clark st. 
OLMSTED L. D., CORNER LAKE AND LA 

SALLE STS. 
Parsons Justin, 56 W. Lake st. 
Van Buren T. G., 147 S. Water st. 
Ward E. P. & Co., corner Clark and S. Water 

streets 
WILLMARTH H. B., 3 CLARK ST. 



Intelligence, etc. 

Warrington Thomas, 108 Randolph st. 



News. 

Osband & Carhart, 3 Tremont block. 
Andrews E. A., 63 Clark st. 
McNally J. & Co., 75 Dearborn st. 



Real Estate. 

Allen Thos., 41 Clark st. 

Ayers Enos, 80 Dearborn st. 

Borden & Pickering, 190 Lake st. 

Boyd & Spencer, corner Dearborn and Ran- 
dolph sts. 

Bradstreet & Co., 55 Clark st. 

Broome, Osborne & Co., 36 Clark st. 

CLARK & PL ATT, 11 METROPOLITAN 
HALL. 

Clarke & Thomas, 76 Dearborn st. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



39 



CLARKE GEO. W., N. W. CORNER LAKE 

AND CLARK STS. 
CLINE GEO. T., 22 CLARK ST. 
Colbv W. H., 48 Clark st. 
CRONE JULIUS, CORNER CLARK AND 

RANDOLPH STS. 
DE WOLF & MACLAY, 118 RANDOLPH 

STREET. 
Doolittle. Wicker & Beal, 196 Randolph st. 
DOWNING, SIMEON & CO., 8 CLARK ST. 
Eisendrath & Co., 7 Metropolitan block. 
Evans Albert S. 

Galloway A. J. & Co., 75 Lake st. 
Gendtner F., 38 and 40 La Salle st. 
Griffith Robert, 196 Lake st. 
Hamilton J. G., 51 Claik st. 
Hartmann & Brookes, 55 Clark st. 
Holmes & Salisbury, 29 W. Randolph st. 
Honore & Bradley, 105 Randolph st. 
Hoyt Win. H., 69 State st, 
IGLEHART N. P. & CO., 56 LA SALLE 

STREET. 
James & Springer, 13 Metropolitan block. 
Johnson B. F., 86 Dearborn st. 
KERFOOT S. H. & CO., 58 LA SALLE ST. 
Marshall Jas. A., 16 Dearborn st. 
Nutt Jas. & Co., 421 Canal st. 
OERTEL A. C, 17 CLARK ST. 
OGDEN DAVID S., 62 LAKE ST. 
OGDEN, FLEETWOOD & CO., EXCHANGE 

BUILDING. 
PEARCE M. L. & J. I., 36 STATE ST. 
Proudfoot W. S. & Co., 100 Randolph st. 
Prussing Ernst, 50 Clark st. 
Rice W. H., 48 Randolph st. 
Russell J. B. F., 89 Randolph st. 
Salisbury S., 49 Clark st. 
Sampson W. H., 3 Metropolitan block. 
SHOUP M., 122 RANDOLPH ST., AND 

CORNER OF CLINTON & TWELFTH 

STS., W. SIDE. 
Stone H. 0., 63 Lake st. 
STONE L. W. & CO., 69 STATE ST. 
TAYLER REUBEN, 58 W. LAKE ST. 
THROOP A. G., 78 DEARBORN ST. 
Toothe Wm., 86 Dearborn st. 
TRABUE ISAAC H., 153 RANDOLPH ST. 
Trowbridge J. M., 150 Lake st. 
Vail A., 14 Metropolitan block. 
Ward Ephriam, 42 Clark st. 
Williamson J. H., 69 State st. 
YERBY GEO. W., 82 DEARBORN ST. 



Agricultural "Warehouses. 

CHAPMAN F. M. & CO., 141 KINZIE ST. 
EMERY HENRY D., 204 LAKE ST. 
Hooker & Jones, 107 Lake st. 
Millard David J., 22 State st. 



Ale Dealers. 

Gridley & Shaw, 110 Dearborn st. 
Keeley Michael, 60 W. Lake st. 



Architects. 

Backus Wm. & Co., No. 9 Masonic Temple. 

BAYLESS & COLEMAN, 151 RANDOLPH 
ST. 

Boyington & Wheelock, 80 and 82 Dear- 
born st. 

Burling & Smith, 46 La Salle st. 

Carter & Bauer, 51 and 53 La Salle st. 

Kahle F. E., 7 Clark st. 

Langley & Peabody, 110 Dearborn st. 

Nicholson & Wadskier, 110 Dearborn st. 

Randall G. P., Portland block, cor Wash- 
ington and Dearborn sts. 

Rankin & Janes, 112 Dearborn st. 



Artists, Daguerreian. 

Alschuyler & Florence, 142 Lake st. 
Battersby J., 136 Clark st. 
BRIGHAM CHAS. B., 92 LAKE ST. 
CRESSY R. M., cor Randolph and Canal sts. 
FASSETT & COOK, 131 LAKE ST. 
HESLER A., METROPOLITAN BUILD- 
ING, LA SALLE ST. 
HUTCHINSON & CO., 53 W. Randolph st. 
Kelsey C. C, 96 Lake st. 
Lillibridge C. H., 77 Lake st. 
Mead Mrs. R., 65 Lake st., and 34 State st. 
Rock Mrs. M., 1 N. Clark st. 
Sutterley J. K., 21 and 23 Clark st. 
Towle Samuel D., 44 Dearborn st. 
Wakely G. D., 75 Lake st. 
Wood A. W., 94 Dearborn st. 



Attorneys at Law. 

See also Solicitors in Cliancery, Proctors hi 
Admiralty, Notaries Public, and Commis- 
sioners of Deeds. 

Andrick Louis M., 59 Clark st. 

Anthony Elliot, 130 Lake st. 

ARNOLD, LARNED & LAY, 110 DEAR- 
BORN ST. 

ARRINGTON & VAN SODEN, 102 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

Asay Edward G., 120 Lake st. 

Ash ton S., 46 La Salle st. 

Baldwin George W., 123 Lake st. 

BASS & MULVEY, 47 CLARK ST. 

Barker & Hyatt, 157 Randolph st. 

BARNARD D. E., 122 RANDOLPH ST. 

BEATTIE D. C, RANDOLPH ST. 

Beck T. Romeyn, 123 Lake st. 

Beck with & Merrick, 16 Dearborn st. 

Bentley Cyrus, 110 Dearborn st. 

BINGHAM L. F. % 114 RANDOLPH ST. 

BLACKWELL R. S. & CO., 99 AND 101 
DEARBORN ST. 

BOND & SEATON, 122 RANDOLPH ST. 

Brizee George W., 151 Randolph st. 

BROSS JOHN A., 123 LAKE ST. 

Brown M. D., 63 Clark st. 

Buell Ira W., 151 Randolph st. 

BURGESS WM. T., 49 CLARK ST. 

CHAMBERLAIN E. M., 110 DEARBORN 
ST. 



40 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Chickering & James, 146 Lake st. 

CLAFLIN ISAAC, 65 CLARK ST. 

Clarke & Thomas, 76 Dearborn st. 

Clark son & Tree, 123 Lake st. 

Cone J. E. & G. W. I.. 157 Randolph st. 

CONDE H. CLAY, 16 DEARBORN ST. 

CONKLIN 0. M., 122 RANDOLPH ST. 

Cornell, Waite & Jameson, 65 Clark st. 

DAVENPORT & PADDOCK, 124 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

Davenport Edwin, 88 Dearborn st. 

Davis Lewis H., 151 Randolph st. 

D'Wolf & Daniels, 50 Clark st. 

Dickey & Wallace, 25 Metropolitan block. 

Doggett & Eldridge, 14 Clark st. 

DOW & FULLER, 40 CLARK ST. 

Drummond & Davis, 20 Metropolitan block. 

DU PFUHL FRANCIS, 46 CLARK ST. 

Eastman & Beveridge, 42 Clark st. 

Ely George, 76 Dearborn st. 

Enos A. W., 34 and 17 N. Clark st. 

FARNS WORTH & LUMBARD, 130 LAKE 
ST. 

Felker S. M. & W. S., Randolph st. 

Ferguson D. C, 42 Clark st. 

Gallup & Hitchcock, 10 Clark st. 

Goodrich, Farwell & Smith, 47 Clark st. 

Groves Wm. A., cor Clark and Randolph sts. 

Harvie & Miller, 112 Dearborn st. 

Hervey, Clements &Hosmer, 162 Lake st. 

HOG AN M. W., 13 N. Clark st. 

Hooke & Coolidge, 124 Randolph st. 

Hosmer C. B., 121 Lake st. 

Huntington J. M., 151 Randolph st. 

Ingersoll 0. P., 46 La Salle st. 

Irvin & Adams, 151 Randolph st. 

JOHNSON & WILLITS, 65 Clark st. 

Kelley H. C, 42 Clark st. 

KERR JOHN S., COR LAKE & WELLS. 

KING, SCOTT & WILSON, 39 CLARK ST. 

Le Moyne J. V., 48 Dearborn st. 

LULL 0. R. W , 106 RANDOLPH ST. 

McMurray F., 13 N. Clark st. 

Marsh & King, 76 Dearborn st. 

MARTIN & PERRY, 46 LA SALLE ST. 

Mason John, 9 N. Clark st. 

Mather, Taft & King, 82 Dearborn st. 

Mattocks & Barron, 130 Lake st. 

MENAGER EDWARD S., 122 RANDOLPH 
ST. 

Monroe & Spencer, 48 Clark st. 

Moulton J. T., 123 Lake st. 

Mueller & Hawley, 123 Lake st. 

Mulligan & Fitch, 17 Clark st. 

NELSON JOHN M., 77 Clark st. 

NICHOLES & McKINDLEY, 159 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

O'Sullivan James, 9 N. Clark st. 

Parsons Myron C, 48 Clark st. 

PAYSON & WARE, 80 DEARBORN ST. 

Pearson George T., 59 Clark st. 

PECK & HENNESY, 17 STATE ST. 

PeckE., 121 Lake st. 

PHELPS P., 65 CLARK ST. 

Porter William A., 17 Clark st. 

Rae Robert & Co., cor Water and Clark sts. 

Rich & Steele, 44 La Salle st. 



Root & Young, 75 Randolph st. 

Scammon & Fuller, 5 Marine Bank bldg. 

Scates, McAllister, Jewett & Peabody, 2 Ma- 
rine Bank bldg. 

Scoville George, 10 Metropolitan block. 

Sedgwick & Walker, 50 Dearborn st. 

SEELYE & ELY, 47 CLARK ST. 

Sherman & Kales, cor Lake & Clark sts. 

Snumwav, Waite & Towne, 107 Lake st. 

SNYDER H. N., 126 RANDOLPH ST. 

Spafford & Jones, cor State and Randolph. 

Stewart W. W., 47 La Salle st. 

Stiles B. B., 88 Dearborn st. 

Taylor T. Benton, 51 Dearborn st. 

Thomas Joshua, 126 W. Washington st. 

THOMPSON GEORGE W. & J. A., 46 
CLARK ST. 

Tracy E. W., 46 Clark st. 

Tuley & Gary, 157 Randolph st. 

Van Buren E. A. & J., 48 Clark st. 

Voorhees Abraham, 110 Dearborn st. 

Walker Lysander, 65 Clark st. 

Wall & Allen, 16 Metropolitan block. 

Webster Franklin, 53 Clark st. 

Westcott J. W., 139 Randolph st. 

Wilder D. P., 123 Lake st. 

Wilkinson & McGilvra, 46 Clark st. 

Williams, Woodbridge & Grant, custom 
house bldg. 

WINDETT ARTHUR W., 41 CLARK ST. 

WINSLOW & KNOTT, 73 S. CLARK ST. 



Auctioneers and Commission. 

BUTTERS W. A. & CO., 76 DEARBORN 

ST. 
Grubb & Gilbert, 104 Lake st. 
JENKINS & PARSONS, 18 DEARBORN 

ST. 
Levi George G., 18 La Salle st. 
Marshall James A., 1 6 Dearborn st. 
Nickerson S., 224 Lake st. 
Rankin John, 177 Randolph st. 
Runnion, Bowman & Kelly, 53 Dearborn st. 



Bag Manufacturers. 
ASHARD GEORGE W., 116 Dearborn st. 

(See adv't. next page.) 



Bakers. 

Kendall 0., cor Washington and Dearborn sts. 
THOMSON & ANDRUS, 17 CLARK ST., 
AND 477 STATE ST. 



Bankers. 

See also Brokers. 
ADAMS F. GRANGER, 44 CLARK ST. 
Adsit J. M., 39 Clark st. 
Aiken & Norton, Clark st. 
Barboe J. C, 42 Clark st. 
BROOM, OSBORNE & CO., 36 CLARK ST. 
Bunker Ed. H., 154 Lake st. 
Burch I. H. & Co., Chicago Bank, cor Lake 
and Clark streets. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



41 



BAGS! BAGS!! BAGS!!! 



* 



CHICAGO BAG MANUFACTORY. 




HOMINY, 



GUN NY, 



SEED BAGS A.NI3 SACKS. 



116 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



BAGS and SACKS, of the above, as well as other varieties, furnished in any 
quantify, upon the shortest notice, and at the lowest market prices. 

P. S. — Our designs for Branding, as heretofore, are more 

numerous and original than those of any other 

similar establishment in the ciiy. 



GEO. W. ASHARD. 

Post Office Address, Box 1597. 



42 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



CHURCH & CO., D. H. FOWLIN, Cashier. 

FORREST BROS. & CO., 65 CLARK ST. 

Greenebaum Bros. 45 Clark st. 

Hoffman & Gelpcke, 44 and 46 La Salle st. 

Ingalls & Co., Celtic Bank. 

Kendrick S. B., 25 Clark st. 

Long Chas. W. & Co., cor North Water and 
Clark sts. 

LULL & MAYER, 124 RANDOLPH ST. 

Morford Bros., cor Clark and Lake sts. 

OFFICER & BRO., 154 LAKE ST. 

Rockwell & Co., 44 La Salle st. 

Sherman A. T. & Co., 46 Clark st. 

Silverman Lazarus, 50 La Salle st. 

Smith, Burr & Co., 151 Randolph st. 

STATE BANK, J. P. CAMPBELL, CASH- 
IER, 55 CLARK ST. 

Strong & Wiley Bros., cor Randolph and 
La Salle sts. 

TAYLOR & KRIEGH, 154 LAKE ST. 

Tucker H. A. & Co., Exchange Bank, cor 
Lake and Clark sts. 

UHRL AUB, S ATTLER & CO., 22 LA SALLE 
STREET. 

Watson, Tower & Co., South Water st. 

WHITE BROS., 37 CLARK ST. 

WHITNEY G. C. & SON, 38 CLARK ST. 

WILLARD ALEXANDER & CO., 50 CLARK 
STREET. 

WILLARD E. K. & YOUNG, 74 DEAR- 
BORN ST. 

Woodward P., 80 Dearborn st. 

Wright & Bro., 34 Clark st. 



Barbers. 
BENNETT CHAS. E., 23 DEARBORN ST. 
Bluthardt Theo., 9 West Randolph. 
Dowaire E. W., Briggs House. 
JOHNSON WM ., 1 24 LAKE ST. (BATHING. ) 



Bedstead Manufacturers. 

Clark A. B., cor Green and Fulton streets, west 
side. 



Bell Hangers. 

Colson Chas. W., 104 Randolph st. 

Belting. 

Garfield A. G., 120 Lake st. 

Grey, Marshall & Co., 235 Lake st. 

Ideson John B. & Co., cor S. Water and 

Dearborn sts. 
Stanton, Wooley & Fulton, 52 Lake st. 



Billiard Table Manufacturers. 
Griffith W. H. & Bro., 45 Franklin st. 



Blacksmiths. 
Tear John, Kinzie street, near bridge. 
Baragwanath Win., cor Market and Van 

Buren sts. 
Gorrey & Boomer, 116 Dearborn st. 
Stoddard F., 167 Randolph st. 
Stewart & Bates, 145 W. Lake st. 



I Blank Book Manufacturers. 
BURLEY A. H. & CO., 122 LAKE ST. 
CULVER, PAGE & HOYNE, 128 and 130 

LAKE ST 
MUNSON & BRADLEY, 81 LAKE ST. 
SONNE CHAS., 51 and 53 La Salle st. 



Boiler Makers. 

Gates, Warner, Chalmers & Fraser, cor Canal 
and Washington sts. 

Mason, McArthur & Co., cor Canal and Car- 
roll sts. 

Reissig C, foot Jackson street, west side. 



Bonnet Pressers. 

Weston C. S., 155 Lake st. 



Book Binders. 

Culver, Page & Hoyne, 128 and 130 Lake st. 
MUNSON & BRADLEY, 81 LAKE ST. 
SONNE CHAS., 51 and 53 La Salle sts. 



Booksellers and Publishers. 
AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 
W. TOMLINSON, AGENT, 58 RAN- 
DOLPH. 

American Tract Society, S. Warren, agent, 
69 State st. 

CARNES & WILSON, 134 Lake st. 

Cooke D. B. & Co., Portland block, cor Dear- 
born and Washington sts. 

Griggs S. C. & Co., Ill Lake st. 

Holmes Wm. B., 69 Lake st. 

Keen Wm. B., 148 Lake st. 

OSBAND & CARHART, FOOT OF SOUTH 
WATER ST. 



Boots and Shoes, Wholesale. 

Buel, Hill & Granger, 62 Lake st. 
Dittman & Fleishman, 233 south Water st. 
Doggett, Bassett & Hills, 157 south Water st. 
Exchange, 161 Lake st. 
Fales & Grout, 14 south Water st. 
Lamkin & Higgins, 173 Randolph st. 
MILLER & BROWN, 187 SOUTH WATER 

STREET. 
Pearson & Dana, 184 Lake st. 
Rawson, Bartlett & Co., 211 and 213 south 

Water st. 
Smith & Boughton, 386 State st. 
Wadsworth, Wells & Co., 58 Lake st. 
WHIPPLE, ALLEY & BILLINGS, 183 

SOUTH WATER ST. 
Wiswell Chas. E., 133 Lake st. 



Boots and Shoes, Retail. 

Abercrombie & Hood, 46 north Clark st. 

Baber Joseph, 236 Clark st. 

Barbour H. E., 64 Lake st. 

Exchange, 161 Lakest. 

Greensfelder & Rosenthal, 55 west Randolph 

street. 
Jewett J. T., 91 Lakest. 
Keller John, 57 Wells st. 
Lamkin & Higgins, 173 Randolph st. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



43 



Le Guere Geo. H., 256 State st. 

Lutzy H., 225 Randolph st. 

Needkam A., cor Clinton and Harrison sts. 

Pearson & Dana, 184 Lake st. 

Rattle S., 53 Clark st. 

Reis John M., 55 La Salle st. 

Sheridan , 24 Clark st. 

Smith & Bonghton, 386 State st. 
SMITH & BROWNE, 22 CLARK ST. 
Taylor W. H , 122 Randolph st. 
Wells E. S., 163 Randolph st. 
Weyer & Reiser, 91 Dearborn st. 
Wiswell Chas. E., 133 Lake st. 



Boxes, (Paper,) Manufacturers. 
SCHNEIDER J. B., 64 Lake st. 
Weisle F.,11 Lake st. 



Brewers. 
HUCK JOHN A., COR WOLCOTT and N. 

DIVISION STS. 
Lill & Diversy, cor Pine street and Chicago 

avenue. 
Roethin^er & Reiser, Blue Island. 
SANDS J. J. 



Brickmakers. 

Walter & Rogers, cor Market and Monroe 

streets. 
Copeland G. S., Archer Road. 
Tiffany Jos. C, 123 Lake st. 
Sleight & Bro., Milwaukee avenue. 
Sherman F. T., office 2 Odd Fellow's Hall. 
Page Peter, 24 Washington st. 
Chicago Pat. Brick Co., N. Branch. 



Bridge Builders. 

Boomer L. B., office 14 Dearborn st. 
GOODWIN J. W., OFFICE 14 DEARBORN 
STREET. 



BROKERS. 

Flour, Grain & Produce. 
Brine Wm, 156 S. Water st. 
MOHR A. JUL, 45 KINZIE ST. 
RICHARDS J. J., COR. LA SALLE AND 
WATER STS. 

General. 

Grafton & Hull, 432^ S. Water st. 

Milward Henry. 

Scott G. Wentworth, 96 and 98 S. Water st. 



Real Estate. 

Allen Thos., 41 Clark st. 
ANDERSON J., 24 DEARBORN ST. 
Boyd & Spencer, corner Dearborn and Ran- 
dolph sts. 
Broom, Osborne & Co., 36 Clark st. 
BUCHANAN J. S., 118 RANDOLPH ST. 
CLEAVER ED. C, 55 CLARK ST. 
CUMMINGS E. H., 114 RANDOLPH ST. 



DE WOLF & MACLAY, RANDOLPH ST. 
Doolittle, Wicker & Beal, 196 Randolph st. 
Eisendrath & Co., 7 Metropolitan block. 
EVANS ALBERT S., 41 CLARK ST. 
Ger dtner F., 38 and 40 La Salle st. 
Honore & Bradley, 105 Randolph st. 
KERFOOT S. H., & CO., 58 LA SALLE ST. 
LIMBERG & MOCKIN, 40 LA SALLE ST. 
Marshall Jas. A., 16 Dearborn st. 
NICHOLS J. A. & CO., 44 CLARK ST. 
Otis L. B. & Co., 40 Clark st. 
Proudfoot W. S. & Co., 100 Randolph st. 
Prussing Ernst, 50 Clark st. 
Rice W. H., 48 Randolph street, corner of 

State st. 
Russell J. B. F., 89 Randolph st, 
Shimp Peter, 18 Clark st. 
SIM THOS., 9 METROPOLITAN BLOCK. 
Stone H. 0., 63 Lake st. 
Warburg Edward, 48 Clark st. 



Stock Exchange and Bill. 

Adams F. Granger, 44 Clark st. 

Adsit J. M., 39 Clark st. 

Barber J. C, 42 Clark st. 

Beecher J., 156 Lake st. 

Broome, Osborne & Co., 36 Clark st. 

Buckingham F. W. & Co., 156 Lake st. 

Church & Co. 

Cobb S. B., 156 Lake st. 

EVANS ALBERT S., 41 CLARK ST. 

Forrest Bros. & Co., 65 Clark st. 

Gendtner F., 38 and 40 La Salle st. 

Greenebaum Bro3., 45 Clark st. 

Long Chas. W. & Co., corner N. Water and 

Clark sts. 
Lull & Mayer, 124 Randolph st. 
Officer & Bro., corner Lake and La Salle sts. 
QUIMBY B. F. & CO., 98 RANDOLPH ST. 
Sherman A. T., 46 Clark st. 
Silverman Lazarus, 50 La Salle st, 
Smith, Burr & Co., 151 Randolph st. 
State Bank, 55 Clark st. 
Strong & Wiley Bros., corner Randolph and 

La Salle sts. 
Walcott J. E., Tremont block. 
Watson, Tower & Co , S. Water st. 
Whitney G. C. & Son, 38 Clark st. 
Williard, Alexander & Co., 50 Clark st. 
Willard E. K. & Young, 74 Dearborn st. 
Woodward, Ellis & Saltonstall, 17 Clark st. 
Woodward P., 80 Dearborn st. 
Wright & Bro., 34 Clark St. 



Brooms and Broom Corn. 

Warner E. W , 370 and 372 Franklin st. 



Brush Manufacturer. 

Gerts George E. & Co., 77 Wells st. 

Builders. 
CLEVELAND & RUSSELL, 74 AND 76 
FULTON ST. 

Glasscock T. P., State st. 



44 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



Burning Fluid. 
PARRAMORE S. S. & CO., 345 STATE ST- 



Carpets, Oil Cloths, Etc. 
BEECHERH0LL1STER& WILKINS, 135 

LAKE ST. 
KIMBEL & FREDIN, 226 CLARK ST. 
Leonard & Baldwin, 124 Lake st. 
Whitney, Lyon & Co., 155 Randolph st. 

Carriages. 

DE FOREST D. B , 207 RANDOLPH ST. 

Furst & Bradley, 73 W. Randolph st. 

MENSDEN J. F. & CO., COR W. RAN- 
DOLPH AND ANN STS. 

Outhet J. C, 167 and 169 W. Randolph st. 

Peck & Keeler, 86 Randolph st. 

Schuttler Peter, 78, 80 and 82 Franklin st. 

SHELTON & TUTTLE, 216 Randolph st. 

Whitbeck H. & Co., corner Randolph and 
Jefferson sts. 

Wright John J., 753 State st. 



Carriage Materials. 

Stow N. L., 76 W. Randolph st. 

Carvers. 
BROWN ANDREW, 1 98 ILLINOIS ST. 
Lee & Preble, 77 Kandolph st. 



Car "Wheel Manufacturers. 
RUSSELL & AN CELL, COR. W. KINZIE 
AND HALSTED STS. 

Chemical Works. 

Sears John, Jr., N. Branch near Chicago av. 

China, Glass and Earthenware. 

Burley A. G. & Co., 175 Lake st. 

Byrn T. P., 170 Lake st. 

Conklin A., 240 S. Clark st. 

CRAWFORD, SHARP & CO., 84 LAKE 

STREET. 
Jackson Obadiah, 237 and 239 S. Water st. 
JAEGER A. & CO., 239 LAKE ST. 
Knowlton M. N., 214 Randolph st. 
Rankin John, 117 Randolph st. 
RUNYON D. M., 105 LAKE ST. 
Shiverick F., 254 State st. 



Clothing, "Wholesale. 

Barrett, King & Co., 205 and 207 S. Water 

street. 
Bond Wm. S., 47 Clark st. 
CLINGMAN WM. & CO , 179 LAKE ST. 
Crane, Brother & Co., 42, 44 and 46 Wabash 

avenue. 
FOREMAN BROTHERS, 46 LAKE ST. 
Hunt H. W. & Co., 50 Lake st. 



HUNTINGTON, WADSWORTH & PARKS, 

58 AND 60 LAKE ST., UP STAIRS. 
Jackson Ob., 237 and 239 S. Water st. 
Jewett, Gates & Johnson, 123 S. Water st. 
Leopold & Scblossman, 47 Lake st. 
Selz & Cohen, 11 La Salle. 



Clothing, Retail. 

Barbe B., 211 Randolph st. 

Cook E., 400 State st. 

Dodd & Lock, 119 Lake st. 

Husted H. H. & Co., 131 Lake st. 

Kruse Henry, 8 N. Clark, and 252 and 254 

Lake sts. 
Lee James A., 300 State st. 
LUDWIG P., 349 CLARK ST. 
McCormick John, 145 Lake st. 
Marks & Turner, 115 Lake st. 
Putnam Augustus A., 116 Randolph st. 
Scott, Keen & Co., 142 Lake st. 
Somali/ J. & A., 171 Randolph st. 
Tappan Bros., 108 Lake st. 
Titsworth A. D. & Co. 132 Lake st, 
WITKOWSKY S., 153 & 157 LAKE ST. 



Clothing, Children's. 

Harvey Mrs., 85 Lake st. 
Putnam A. A., 116 Randolph st. 



Cloths, Cassimeres and Vestings. 

FIELD, BENEDICT & CO., 81 AND 83 S. 

WATER ST. 
Leopold & Scblossman, 47 Lake st. 
Neuberger J. & S., 168 Lake st. 
Selz & Cohen, 11 La Salle st. 



Coal. 



Chicago & Carbon Co., F. O. Boyd agent, 50 
Dearborn st. 

Hubbard E. K, near Rush street bridge. 

HUTCHINSON & CO., CORNER RAN- 
DOLPH AND W. WATER STS. 

Price, Morris & Co., 132 N. Water street 
and 132 Canal street, west side. 

Reno C. A., Peyton street, north side. 

Walters & Rogers, corner Market and Mon- 
roe sts. 

Waupecan Co., S. T. Burrell agent, 448 Clark 
st. 



Coffee and Spice Mills. 

American Mills, A. H. Blackall proprietor, 

122 Michigan st. 
DOWNER & CO., 199 S. WATER ST. 
HUNTOON W. F., 18 W. WATER ST. 



Commission Merchants, Fruit. 

Bushnell J. W., 244 S. Water st. 
Doane J. W. & Co., 84 Dearborn st. 
Little Wm. & Co., 161 S. Water st. 
McAfferty J. K., 106 Lake st. 
Ruby J. J. & Co., 173 Randolph st. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



45 



Commission Merchants, General. 

Alexander T. W. & Co., 197 S. Water st. 
Allen Geo. M. & Co., 51 N. Water st. 
Allen, Haven & Co., 250 and 252 S. Water 

street. 
Anderson P., corner S. Water and La Salle 

Streets. 
Bogue 0. A. & H. B., 132 S. Water st. 
Fisher C. C, 81 W. Lake st. 
Flint & Wheeler, corner Clark and S. Water 

streets 
HAYWARD P. & A. J., 186 N. JEFFER- 

SOX ST. 
Hunter E. S., 18 River st. 
JACKSON W. W., 245 KINZIE ST. 
Knapp N. H. & Co., 132^ S. Water st. 
Magill & Pickering, I. C. R. R. freight office. 
Munch & Armstrong, East Terminus of G. & 

C. H. R. R. 
Norton C. A. & Co., corner Dearborn aDd S. 

Water sts. 
Parker, Hawkins & Co., 276 S. Water st. 
Pierson S. H. & Co., 12 S. Water st. 
Plaisted & Rockwell, 278 S. Water st. 
Proudfoot W. S. & Co., 100 Randolph st. 
Raymond B. W. & Son, 53 Lake st. 
Reck en Robt. J., 37 Kinzie st. 
SAWYER, MELLEN & CO., 258 AND 260 

S. WATER ST. 
Jeckel & Brush, cor W. Lake and Jefferson 

streets. 
Spaids C. D., cor S. Water and Franklin sts. 
Steel, Wilkins & Co., 13 La Salle st. 
UNDERWOOD & CO., 152 S. WATER 

STREET. 
Vandenbergk Jas. M„ cor Franklin & S. Wa- 
ter sts. 
Watson, Tower & Co., 160 S. Water st. 



Rees, Chase & Co., 46 La Salle st. 
Wilson W. A., 50 Clark st. 



Commissioners of Deeds. 

Bass & Mulrav, 47 Clark st. 
Bingham L. F., 114 Randolph st. 
Beck T. Romeyn 123 Lake st. 
Bentley Cyrus, 110 Dearborn st. 
Clarkson & Tree, Portland block. 
Holden C. N., cor Lake and Clark sts. 
Lull 0. R. W., 106 Randolph st. 
Pearson Geo. T., 59 Clark st. 
Stewart W. W., 47 La Salle st. 
Westeott J. W., 1 39 Randolph st. 



Confectionery, Manufacturers and 
Dealers in. 

HENNEGEN J. B. & CO., 17 CLARK ST. 

Roe C. E., 94 Dearborn st. 

Jassaman & Hickman, cor Randolph and 

State sts. 
SCANLAN EDWARD, 18 CLARK ST. 
Simon Jas. C, 92 W. Randolph st. 
Southwell John, 364 State st. 



Conveyancers. 

Conklin Oliver M., 122 Randolph st. 
Mueller & Harrlav, 123 Lake st. 



Coopers. 

Jenson S. & Bro., Illinois st. 
Smaltey E., 231 W. Lake st. 



Coppersmiths. 

Fullage 1 ' & Smith, cor W. Randolph and Des 

Plainessts. 
Ho;ts Fred, 465 N. Clark st. 
Nugent A., cor Market and Washington sts. 



Curriers and Tanners. 

Oito Charles C„ 379 Clark st. 
Perrolitet & Sawvain, 195 S. Water st. 



Curtains and Materials. 

Richer, Halliston & Wilkins, 135 Lake st. 
Whitney, Lyon & Co., 159 Randolph st. 



Cutlery. 

BLAIR WM. & CO., 176 Lake st. 
Botsford J. K. & Co., 109 Lake st. 
Claggett & Anderson, 189 Lake st. 
Fisk Joseph, 51 Lake st. 
Garfield A. S., 120 Lake st 
Johnson R. & Son, 196 Lake St. 
Johnson, Spencer & Co., 16 S. Water st. 
Larrabee & North, 174 Lake st. 
Loom is, Abbot & Chapman 143 Lake st'. 
Murray, Haight & Co., 73 Lake st. 
O'Bannon & Monroe, 44 and 46 S. Water st. 
Schiffer, Bros. & Co., 182 Lake st. 
Tuttle, Hibbard & Co., 32 Lake st. 
UBRLAUB, SATTLER & CO., 163 AND 

165 S. WATER ST. 
Wettstein & Kampman, (39 W. Lake st. 



Daguerreotype Materials. 

BRIGHAM CHARLES B., 92 LAKE ST. 

Gray Charles W., 170 Lake st. 

Harvey G. M., 77 Lake st. 

Kelsey C. C, 96 Lake St. 

Thayer N. C, 21 Metropolitan block. 



Dentists. 

ABELL J. B., 144 LAKE ST. 
DORION HENRI, 169 LAKE ST. 
HONSINGER E., 77 LAKE ST. 
Kennicott & Bogue, 131 Lake st. 
KENNICOTT J. A., 96 LAKE ST. 
QUINLAN & CUSHING, 83 CLARK ST. 



Distillers. 

CURTIS C. H., DOUGLAS AVENUE, 
COR PALO ALTO ST. 

NICHOLSON C. W. & CO., 77 W. RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 



46 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



O'NEILL, HICKEY & CO., 118 MICHI- 
GAN ST. 

SHUFELDT W. T. & CO., 220 S. WATER 
STREET. 



Drugs, Wholesale. 

Barclay Bros., 235 S. Water st. 
Bockee, Innis & Co., 35 S. Water st. 
Burnham & Smith, 113 Lake st. 
Fuller 0. F. & Co., 195 Lake st. 
Honore & Co., 125 S. Water st. 
LORD THOMAS, 43 LAKE ST. 
Penton & Robinson, 15 S. Water st. 
REED J. H. & CO., 144 LAKE ST. 
SARGENT & ILLSLEY, 140 LAKE ST. 
Sawyer, Paige & Co., 70 Lake st. 



Drugs, Retail. 

Breck & Paine, cor Randolph and State sts. 

Bryan F. A., 2 Tremont House. 

Clemmons L. D., cor Randolph and Halsted 

streets. 
Ennis G J., 402 Clark st. 
Foster C. C, 249 S. Canal st. 
Fuhring F., 151 W. Randolph st. 
Gale Bros., 202 Randolph st. 
Griffin John A., 196 Blue Island avenue. 
Hargesheimer Ed., 306 Clark st. 
Hitchcock, 527 State st. 
Jerome M., cor Clark and Adams sts. 
JONES J. W. & CO., 183 Randolph st. 
MAHLA F., 387 State st. 
PENTON, FISHER & CO., 94 LAKE ST. 
Reed J. H. & Co., 144 Lake st. 
Sehrader F. & Co., 306 S. Canal st. 
Thayer & Pike, 77 Randolph st. 
White & Brabrook, 30 W. Madison st. 
Wilder E. C, 3 Garrett block. 
Woodworth J. M. & Co., 504 Lake street. 



Dry Goods, Wholesale. 

BORREN BROS., 72 LAKE STREET. 
Cooley, Farwell & Co., 42, 44, 46, Wabash 

avenue. 
DAVIS, MOODY & CO., 41 S. WATER 

ST. 
Harman, Aiken & Gale, 53 Lake st. 
Mills J. R. & Co., 107 S. Water st. 
Peake, Marsh & DeLong, 30 Lake st. 
Richards, Crutnbaugh & Shaw, 47 & 49 S. 

Water st. 
Savage, Keith & Co., 49 Lake st. 
Stacy & Thomas, 201 and 203 South Water 

street. 
Stine J. M. & Co., 173 South Water st. 



Dry Goods, Retail. 

Biselow A., 166 Lake st. 
CARTER T. B. & CO., 130 LAKE ST. 
DohertyM. & T., 137 Lake st. 
Downs & VanWyck, 150 Lake st. 
Frasher & Carr, 124 Lake st. 
Higginbottom & White, 82 Lake st. 



McFadden S, 242 South Clark st. 

Palmer P. & Co., 139 Lake st. 

PRATT, ARCHAMBAU & WHITE, 130 

LAKE AND 20 CLARK ST. 
Ross Wm. M. & Co., 167 and 169 Lake st 
Thompson, Wetmore & Co., 68 Lake st. 
Wood W. R. & Co., 152 Lake st. 



Dress Trimmings. 

Atkinson C. J., 66 Lake st. 
Blakeslee H. L., 7 Garrett block. 



Dyers. 

COOK & McLAIN, 98 DEARBORN ST. 

Cook Brothers, 12£ Clark st. 

Taylor John, Clark street, below Madison. 



Elevators. 

Flint, Wheeler & Co., near C. & R. I., St. 
L., A. & C. and M. S. & N. I. Railroad 
Depots. 



Engine Builders. 

Buckminster & Co., 303 Canal st. 
Granger Bros., cor Franklin & Indiana sts. 
MOSES H. P., CHICAGO WORKS, WEST 

END OF POLK STREET BRIDGE. 
Sherman, Bay & Co., 61 & 63 Canal st. 
WARRINGTON HENRY, CLINTON ST. 

NEAR FULTON. 

Engravers, Die Sinkers and 
Stencil Cutters. 

BAKER WM. D , 65 CLARK AND 105 

RANDOLPH STS. 
CHILDS L. D., im RANDOLPH ST. 
DAY & ELLIS, 65 CLARK ST. 
GEMMEL JOHN, 132 LAKE ST. 
Greene Wm. C, 149 Lake st. 



Express Companies. 

American, Jas. C. Fargo, superintendent, 20 
Dearborn st. 

EUROPEAN, KEHLHOLZ B., PROPRIE- 
TOR, 41 CLARK ST. 

Merchants' Dispatch, H. B. Bogue, agent, 
foot South Water st. 

Union Dispatch, E. G. Stiles & Co., proprie- 
tors, 24 Dearborn St. 

Valentine Freight, D. S. Knapp, agent, 73 
State st. 



Fancy Goods, Wholesale & Retail. 

Barnum R. S., 106 Lake st. 
OBERMIER BROTHERS, 152 LAKE ST. 
Vergho, Ruhling & Co., 89 South Water st. 
Weber J. D., 198 Lake st. 
Westerman H. & Co., 163 and 165 South 
Water st. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



47 



File Manufacturers. 

EADES CHARLES, MILWAUKEE AV., 

COR OF CARROL ST. 
Eagle Works, Whitfield, proprietor, 242 S. 

Clark st. 



HAMILTON, FULLER & CO., 116 and 
118 FRANKLIN ST., salesroom 194 
Lake st. 



Fire Grates, Fenders, etc. 
PRICKETT G. W., 118 CLARK ST. 



Firemen's Trimmings. 

Swenie D. J., 213 Randolph st. 



Flour and Grain. 

Allen Geo. M. & Co., 51 N. Clark st. 

Beurgen Edward, 50 N. Wells st. 

Bevan John, cor Canal and Harrison sts. 

Brookes F. & Co., cor Canal and Madison sts. 

Chase H. A., 12 and 14 Canal st. 

Cogger Henry, 195 W. Canal st. 

FIN LEY S. "B., 76 STATE ST. 

Gage & Haines, cor S. Water and River sts. 

KIMBALL W. C. & CO,, 189 S. WATER 
STREET. 

McNair James, 530 and 532 State st. 

ROBERTS, BERRY & CO., COR JEFFER- 
SON AND HUBBARD STS. 

Von Trebra Henry, 229 Wells st. 



Forwarding Merchants, see also 
Commission. 

ALLEN, HAVEN & CO., 250 and 252 S. 

WATER ST. 
Bogue 0. A. & H. B., 132 S. Water st. 
BONHAM JERIAH, 77 LAKE ST. 
Chapin, Hurl but & Co., cor S. Water and 

La Salle sts. 
GALE J. H., 212 KINZIE ST. 
Hale & Co., near Wells street bridge, north 

side. 
HODGEN, ROBERTS & CO., 280 S. 

WATER STREET. 
Knapp U. H. & Co., 1324- S. Water st. 
McGEE J. W. & CO., 194 S. WATER ST. 
Magill & Pickering, in I. C. R. R. freight 

depot. 
MARSH C. C. CONSIGNEES OF M. S. 

AND LAKE SHORE RAILROADS, 

S. CLARK ST. 
Mather & Co., foot of La Salle st., N. side. 
Merrick C. C & Bro., 60 Canal and 40 W. 

Water sts. 
NERRHODSE JOHN S., 196 S. WATER 

STREET. 
Spencer A. T. & Co., cor. State and S. Water 

streets. 
Vandenbergh Jas. M., cor S. Water and 

Franklin sts. 



Founders, Brass. 

Crane R. T. & Bro., 102 W. Lake st. 
Debozear Lewis, 125 S. Canal st. 



Founders, Iron. 

Nugent Mrs. A., cor Market and Washington 
streets. 

Cobb S. R. & Co., DesPlaines st. 

EXCELSIOR WORKS, MASON McAR- 
THUR & CO., COR CANAL & CAR- 
ROLL STS. 

HEZMALHALCH THOS., COR. HALSTED 
AND WAYMAN STS. 



Founders, Type & Electrotype. 

Chicago Type Foundry, 90 Washington st. 
ROUNDS & LANGDON, 155 RANDOLPH 
STREET. 



Frames, Looking Glass and 
Picture. 

Ferris Thos. R., 177 Lake st. 
Haelsig Adolph F., 268 Clark st. 
KEITZ JOSEPH, 37 LA SALLE ST. 
Oldershaw S. P., 10 Clark st. 
SONNE CHAS., 51 and 53 LaSalle st. 
STOLTZ FERDINAND, 130 CLARK ST. 
Wiggins & Paschen, State st. 

Fruit Dealers. 

Corey Saml. J., agents, 89 Randolph st. 

Crandall J. E., 94 Dearborn st. 

Hojt W. M. & Co., 63 Dearborn st. 

Lonergan & Scanlan, 16 S. Clark st. 

NEWHALL & GREEN, 13 CLARK ST. 

NEWHALL F. & BRO., 9 CLARK ST. 

Newhall & Co., 91 Randolph, and 14 S. 
Water sts. 

Roe C. E., 96 Dearborn st. 

SHEPHERD & CHAPPELL, 119 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

Talcott L. A., 65 Randolph st. 



Furniture Dealers. 

BABCOCK, PECK & CO., 155 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

Bode William, 476 State st. 

Finerty & Liebenstein, 190 Randolph st. 

Hale D. T., 19 Canal st. 

HA.NSON D. & F., c Lake and Union sts. 

Heilbronn S., 293 S. Clark st. 

Hutchins William, 151 Randolph. 

Jacobus D. L. & Bro., Jefferson st., W. side. 

Kimbel & Fredin, 226 Clark st. 

Liebenstien J. & A., 159 Randolph st. 

Marsh Bros., 110 Randolph. 

Morgan C, 119 Lake st. 

Parsons A. E. & H. N., 179 Randolph. 

SHEARER, PAINE & CO., 18 and 15 
CANAL ST. 

Strehl Jacob, 49 Franklin st. 

Thayer F. Porter, 196 Randolph st. 

West John, 197 Lake st. 



48 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Furnaces. 

Raymond B. W. & Son, 55 Lake st. 
Simonds N. W. & Co. (Culver's Patent), 
41 Wells st. 



Gas Fitters and Fixtures. 
BEAL H. GARDNER, 226^ Clark st. 
Brown & Wilder, 47 State st. 
Comly E. L., 72 Randolph st. 
Gerould J. H., 75 Clark st. 
McFarlane R. D., 54 La Salle st. 



Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

Anderson & Farr, 90 Lake St. 

Barrett, King & Co., 205 and 207 S. Water 

street. 
Bolton W. H., 118 Lake st. 
CREESY L. W., 69 LAKE ST. 
Hunt W. H. & Co., 50 Lake st. 
Huntington, Wadsworth & Parks, 58 and 60 

Lake st. 
Husted H. H., 131 Lake st. 
Janes Joseph T., 77 Clark st. 
Jarrett, Gates & Johnson, 123 S. Water st. 
Scott, Keen & Co., 142 Lake st. 
Tappen Bros., 108 Lake st. 
Tits worth A. D. & Co., 132 Lake st. 



Glass. 



THOMSON ALSTON, 181 RANDOLPH ST. 
UHRLAUB, SATTLER & CO., 163 and 
165 SOUTH WATER ST. 



GJass Stainers. 

Cooke W. & E., 313 State st. 
Jerni & Almini, 152 Kinzie st. 
Stolz Ferdinand, 130 Clark st. 



Bowen E. R. 



Gloves. 

8 Clark st. 



Glue Manufacturers. 

Wahl C. & Sons, 149 Lake st. 



Gold Pen Manufacturers. 
BECKWITH A. S., 149 Lake st. 



Grocers, Wholesale. 

Bailey & Mead, 215 S. Water st. 

Barber L., 246 S. Water st. 

Clark & Dater, 73 S. Water st. 

Dike, Bros. & Co., W. Water and Canal sts. 

Doggett J. B. & Co., 145 and 147 S. Water 

street. 
Durand Bros., 22 River st. 
Ewing, Briggs & Co., 16 River st. 
Flanders George W. & Co., 219 S. Water st. 
FOLLANSBEE C, 26 LAKE ST. 
George, Dudley & Tureman, 97 S. Water st. 



Gilman M. D. & Co., 153 S. Water st. 
Gould & Bro , 159 S. Water st. 
Gray, Densmore & Phelps, 109 S. Water st. 
Harmon C. L., 12 River st. 
HEMPSTEAD EDWARD, 71 S. Water st. 
Hinsdale & Babcock, 114 and 116 S. Water 

street. 
Lanman, Burt & Co., 197 S. Water st. 
McKindley, Church & Co., 77 S. Water st, 
Norton M. H. & Co., 49 S. Water st. 
Reynolds, Ely & Co., 20 S. Water st. 
Satteilee, Cook & Co., 16 and 18 State st. 
Saws Henrv, 85 S. Water st. 
Smith, Pollai-d & Co , 163 S. Water st. 
Stearns, Briggs & Forsyth, 242 Lake and 263 

S. Water sts. 
Whitaker Bros, 9 S. Water st. 
Wicker C. G. & Co., 91 and 93 S. Water st. 
Williams & Thompson, 45 S. Water st. 



Grocery, Retail. 

Aldrich B. F. & Co., 330 S. Canal st. 

Barnard & Wilson, 100 Michigan st. 

Bassett, Renne & Co., 3] 8 S. Clark st. 

BECKWITH C. H., 78 Randolph st. 

Brennan P., cor Canal and Wilson sts. 

Clarke B. F. & Co., 603 State st. 

Clarke Henry W., cor Sangamon and Ran- 
dolph sts. 

Clowry John, Canal st., bet Maxwell and 
Mitchel. 

DAVIDSON A. & CO., 10 DEARBORN ST. 

Davis William J., 112 Dearborn st. 

Doggett J. B. & Co., cor Michigan and Dear- 
born sts. 

Drysdale & Whitcher, 235 State st. 

Ellis F. A. & Co., 241 W. Randolph st. 

Harvey & Bro., 173 Michigan st. 

Holdsworth William, ]29 W. Randolph st. 

Howe A., State st., near R. R. crossing. 

HOYT H. H. & CO., 280 STATE ST., COR 
VAN BUREN. 

Iverson Knud, 149 N. Des Plaines st. 

IVES G. & M. S., COR STATE AND 
TWELFTH STS. 

Law Robert, 145 Clinton st. 

LEAVITT F. A., 355 STATE ST. 

Lehman Joseph, 359 S. Canal st. 

LYMAN JOHN, 700 CLARK ST. 

McAndrews & Tobin, cor W. Water and 
Randolph sts. 

McGCTNNESS P., COR DES PLAINES 
AND HUBBARD STS. 

Mclaughlin peter a., 721 s. clark 

ST. 
Mavpole T., 365 S. Canal st. 
MULYEY P., COR CANAL AND MATHER 

STS. 
Murphy John, cor Canal and Jackson sts. 
Nicol John C, W. Madison st. 
Pollock L. J., State St., below Twelfth. 
Sayrs Henry, 54 and 56 State st. 
SCHOELLKOPF HENRY, 212 RANDOLPH 

ST 
Snydacker & Bro., 141 W. Randolph. 
WATSON B. K., 394 and 408 STATE ST. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



49 



Wellington J. F., 231 W. Randolph st. 
Wheeler C. H. & N. M., 490 State St. 
Whitaker A. W., 279 State st. 



Guns and Sporting Apparatois. 
Abbey George F., 220 Lake st. 
Eaton D. & Co., 86 Lake st. 
UHRLAUB, SATTLER & CO., 163 and 165 

S. Water st. 



Hardware, Wholesale. 
Botsford J. K., 109 Lake st. 
FISK JOSEPH, 54 LAKE ST. 
O'Bannon & Honore, 44 and 46 S. Water st. 
Tuttle, Hibbard & Co., 32 Lake st. 



Hardware, Wholesale and 
Retail. 

BLAIR WILLIAM & CO., 176 LAKE ST. 
Claggett & Anderson, 189 Lake st. 
Edson & White, 173 Lake st. 
Gardner & Dequindre, 10 N. Wells st. 
Garfield A. G., 120 Lake st, 
HUNT EDWIN, 79 LAKE ST. 
JEWETT & BUTLER, 203 LAKE ST. 
Johnson R. & Co., 196 Lake st. 
Kennedy J. M. & W. W., 193 Lake st. 
LARRABEE & NORTH, 174 LAKE ST. 
Looinis, Abbott & Chapman, 143 Lake st. 
MARVIN D. & CO., 98 LAKE ST. 
MAYPOLE T., 363 S. Canal st. 
Miller, A. R. & G. H., 237 State st. 
Murry, Haight & Co.. 73 Lake st. 
Schieffer Bros. & Co., 182 Lake st. 
Surdara S. J. & Co., 178 Lake st. 
Wettstein & Kampmann, 69 W. Lake st. 
WHITE A., 200 LAKE ST. 



Hardware, Housekeeper's. 

Jewett & Root, 71 Lake st. 
Metz G, 50 and 52 State st. 



Saddlery and Hardware. 

Horton & Kidder, 98 Randolph st. 
Stanton, Wooley & Fulton, 52 Lake st. 



Hat Manufacturers. 

Grosset & Gerardin, 41 La Salle st. 
Parmly J., 69 Lake st. 



Hats, Caps and Furs, Wholesale. 

Baker, Moody k Gifford, 186 Lake st. 
Bassett & Hammond, 192 Lake st. 
BENEDICT, MALLORY & FARNHAM, 

45 and 47 LAKE ST. 
KELLOGG E. R. & CO., 56 LAKE ST. 
SMITH J. A. & CO., 118 LAKE ST. 
WEBER J. H. & CO., 203 & 207 S. 

WATER ST. 



Hats, Caps, etc., Retail. 

Adams, Paoli & Co., 127 S. Clark st. 
Baum J., 335 S. Clark st. 
Emerson Edward, 85 Lake st. 
KALISKY L., 198 RANDOLPH ST. 
Keeler W. 0., agent, 101 Randolph st. 
LOOMIS & BREWSTER, 120 RANDOLPH 

STREET. 
Schuvler H, 172 Randolph st. 



Hides and Pelts. 

Plaisted & Rockwell, 278 S. Water st. 
White Asa, 118 and 120 S. Water st. 



Hosiery, Wholesale and Retail. 

BOLTON WM. H., 118 LAKE ST. 

Stein Charles, 75 Randolph st. 
Sutton & Burkitt, 41 La Salle st. 



Hotels. 



Adams House, near Central R. R. Depot. 
American House, cor Lake st. and Wabash 

avenue. 
BURNETT HOUSE, S. CLARK ST., BE- 
LOW HARRISON. 
Cambridge House, cor Des Plaines and 

Carroll sts. 
CITY HOTEL, COR LAKE AND STATE 

STREETS. 
CLEVELAND HOUSE, WEST LAKE ST.., 

NEAR CANAL. 
"COTTAGE," COTTAGE GROVE. 
DAVIDSON HOUSE, COR JEFFERSON 

AND KINZIE STS. 
DEMPSEY'S HOTEL, 105 and 107 N. 

WATER ST. 
DOTY HOUSE, 80 RANDOLPH ST. 
EXCHANGE HOTEL, 130 VAN BDREN 

STREET. 
Foster House, cor N. Clark and Kinzie sts. 
GAGE HOUSE, CORNER STATE AND 

TWELFTH STS. 
GARDEN CITY HOUSE, COR MADISON 

AND MARKET STS. 
HAMILTON HOUSE, COR N. CLARK 

AND N. WATER STS. 
Jennings' Hotel, Griswold st. 
Jervis House, cor Van Buren & Sherman sts. 
Lake House, cor Rush and Kinzie sts. 
LAKE SHORE HOUSE, COTTAGE 

GROVE. 
LAKE ST. HOUSE, COR LAKE AND 

CANAL STS. 
MARTIN'S HOTEL, 17 and 19 and 21 

DEARBORN ST. 
Massasoit House, opp central R. R. depot. 
Matteson House, cor Randolph and Dear- 
born sts. 
Merchants' Hotel, La Salle St., between Lak 

and S. Water. 
Metropolitan Hotel, cor Randolph and Wells 

streets. 
Naperville House, 207 Randolph st. 



50 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



New York House, 229 Randolph st. 

Richmond House, cor S. Water st. and Mich- 
igan avenue. 

SCOTT HOUSE, N. WELLS ST., OPP. 
GALENA DEPOT. 

"SHADES," COTTAGE GROVE. 

Sherman House, cor Clark and Randolph sts. 

Sollitt House, cor Washington and Franklin 
streets. 

Stanwix Hall, cor Clark and Van Buren sts. 

WASHINGTON HOUSE, 4 and 10 W. 
WATER ST. 

W ATKINS HOUSE, COR LAKE AND 
CLINTON STS. 

Waverly House, 223 and 225 Kinzie st. 

WILLARD & KIES' HOUSE, 18 N. Wells 

WILLIARD HOUSE, COOK ST., (West 
side.) 



lee Dealers. 

Joy & Frisbee, 123 S. Water st. 



India Rubber Goods. 

IDESON JOHN B. & CO., 89 S. WATER 
STREET. 



Insurance Companies, Foreign. 

.Etna Insurance Co., Hartford. Cor. La Salle 
and S. Water sts. 

Astor Insurance Co., N. Y. Cor. S. Water 
and Clark sts. 

Atlantic Insurance Co. Cor. S. Water and 
Clark sts. 

Bridgeport Insurance Co., Conn. Cor. Clark 
and S. Water sts. 

CONNECTICUT MUTUAL LIFE, HART- 
FORD, CONN., 4 MASONIC TEMPLE. 

Consolidated Ins. Co. Philadelphia. 150 S. 
Water st. 

Continental Ins. Co., N. Y. 150 S. Water 
street. 

Commonwealth Ins. Co., Harrisburg, Pa. 
3 Clark st. 

Commonwealth Ins. Co., Philadelphia. Cor. 
S. Water and Clark sts. 

Delaware Mutual F. & L. Ins. Co., Philadel- 
phia. Cor. S. Water and Clark sts. 

Equitable Ins. Co., Philadelphia. Cor. S. 
Water and Clark sts. 

Exchange Ins. Co., Philadelphia. Cor. S. 
Water and Clark sts. 

Fame Ids. Co., Philadelphia. Cor S. Water 
and Clark sts. 

Farmers' Union Insurance Co. of Pennsyl- 
vania, 4 Masonic Temple. 

Girard Fire & Life Insurance Co., Philadel- 
phia, corner S. Water and Clark sts. 

Hartford Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn., 
3 Clark st. 

Home Insurance Co., N. Y., 3 Clark st. 

Hope Insurance Co., N. Y., 147 S. Water st. 

Hope Insurance Co., Philadelphia, corner S. 
Water and Clark ste. 



Howard FF. & M., Philadelphia, 5S and 60 

Lake st. 
Independent Insurance Co., Philadelphia, 

corner S. Clark and Water sts. 
Knickerbocker Life Insurance Co., N. Y., 3 

Clark st. 
Liverpool & London Fire & Life, Dole's 

building. 
Lorrillard Insurance Co., 7 Clark st. 
Manhattan Life Insurance Co., 7 Clark st. 
Mass. Mutual Life Insurance Co., post office 

building. 
Monarch Fire Insurance Co., London, 3 Clark 

street. 
Mutual Insurance Co., Buffalo, corner S. 

Water and Clark sts. 
Mutual Life Insurance Co., N. Y., 196 Lake 

street. 
Niagara Fire Insurance Co., N. Y., 3 Clark 

street. 
North American Insurance Co.,N. Y., 150 S. 

Water st. 
North Western Insurance Co., Otsego, 150 S. 

Water st. 
North Western Insurance Co., Philadelphia, 

corner S. Water and Clark sts. 
Norwich Insurance Co., Conn., cor S. Water 

and La Salle sts. 
People's Fire & Marine, N. Y., cor S. Water 

and La Salle. 
Philadelphia Fire & Life, cor S. Water and 

Clark sts. 
Phoenix Insurance Co., N. Y., 7 Clark st. 
Reliance Insurance Co., Philadelphia, cor S. 

Water and Clark sts. 
Royal Insurance Co., London, cor S. Water 

and Clark sts. 
Washington Insurance Co., N. Y., 3 Clark st. 
Western Insurance Co., Philadelphia, cor S. 

Water and Clark sts. 



Insurance Companies, Home. 

Chicago City, Masonic Temple. 

Chicago Firemen's, N.W. cor Lake and Clark 

streets. 
Chicago Mutual, 120 S. Water st. 
Garden City Fire & Marine, 148 S. Water st. 
GREAT WESTERN, 160 S. WATER ST. 
PHOZNIX, 62 LAKE STREET, COR STATE 

STREET. 
Waugonsha Insurance Co , cor Lake and 

WESTERN VALLEY INSURANCE CO., 
82 DEARBORN ST. 



Iron and Steel Merchants. 

Crawford & Sacket, cor S. Water and Wells 

streets 
FLOYD & MALCOM, 237 LAKE ST. 
Hall E. G., 231 S. Water st. 
Lake, Brown & Co.. 103 Lake st. 
Ryerson Jas. T., 218, 220, 222, 224 S. Water 

street. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



51 



Iron Fence Railing Manufacturer. 
STODDARD A. F., 197 RANDOLPH ST. 

Iron, Pig. 

Walter & Rogers, cor Market and Monroe sts. 

Iron Pipe. 

Walworth, Hubbard & Co., 233 Lake st. 

Jewelers, Manufacturing. 

Campbell M., 125 Clark st. 

Hemleb B., 153 Randolph St., (up stairs.) 

Matthei Theodore, 98 Lake st. 

Justices of the Peace. 

Beattie D. O, Randolph st. 

De Wolf Calvin, cor Clark and Randolph sts. 

Fitz C. D., W. Randolph st. 

Hoisington J., cor Clark and Randolph sts. 

McGuire Michael, 181 Ontario st. 

O'Donoghue James, 9 N. Clark st. 

Ruger H. J., 63 Clark st. 

Wallis W. J., 63 Clark st. 



Lamps and Lanterns. 
HAMBLEN L. A., 43 FRANKLIN ST. 



Lead and Shot. 

Collins & Blatchford, cor Clinton and Fulton 

streets. 
Eaton D. & Co., S7 Lake st. 



Leather and Findings. 

CHAPMAN J. L. & CO., 174 N. WATER 

STREET. 
Grey, Marshall & Co., 235 Lake st. 
HACH HENRY, 45 Wells st. 
KELLY JAMES, 245 LAKE ST. 
Osborne, Adams & Co., 206 Lake st. 

Leather and Hides. 

Blackburn R. T., 201 and 203 S. Water st. 
CHATROOP LEWIS, 368 S. CLARK ST. 
Johi.son George, 47 and 49 N. Water st. 
Wallin C. C. & Sons, 59 W. Randolph st. 



Lightning Rods. 

CORDREY, CUTLER & CO., 150 KINZIE 
STREET. 



Lime and Building Materials. 

SHERMAN & CO., 212 AND 214 WASH- 
INGTON ST. 
Stearns & Co., Lake street bridge. 
SWIFT & KILLMER, 43 RANDOLPH ST. 
Van Schaick & Co., N. Water st. 



Lithographers. 

Gcmmell John, 132 Lake st. 

Mendel Ed., 162 Lake street cor La Salle st. 

O'Shanessy J. J., 32 Dearborn st. 



Livery Stables. 

Adams, Eber & Co., 115 and 117 Dearborn 

ANDREWS D. k SON, 76 RANDOLPH ST. 
BOYINGTON E., THEATER ALLEY, BET. 

DEARBORN AND STATE STS. 
BUSH JOHN, COR LAKE STREET AND 

WABASH AY. 
EDDY W. H., STATE STREET, SOUTH OF 

ARCHER ROAD. 
GROSS JACOB, CLINTON STREET, BET. 

LAKE AND RANDOLPH STS. 
McCarthy & Doyle, 51 and 53 Dearborn st. 
PLATT & HOPKINS, 113 RANDOLPH ST. 
SUTHERLAND & GOULD, COR STATE 

AND ADAMS STS. 

Locksmiths. 
Dav C. F. & J. A., 86 Randolph st. 
Foot D. A. & Co., 88 Randolph st. 
Hunt Edwin, 72 Lake st. 
Letz F., 84 Franklin st. 



Lumber. 

Adams, Blinn & Co., Twelfth street bridge. 
Aldrich J. F. & Co., cor Market and Yan 

Buren sts. 
Avery T. M., cor Canal and W. Water sts. 
Beidler J., Brother & Co., cor Canal and 

Madison sts. 
Bickford R. K., 3 W. Water st. 
BLACKWELL S. O, COR STATE AND 

NORTH STS. 
Brewster B. & Co., Clark st. 
Bradley & Brother, cor Olds and Lumber sts. 
Canfield E. & J., W. Water st. 
CARTER ARTEMAS, PEYTON STREET, 

OPPOSITE ILLINOIS ST. 
Chapin, Marsh & Foss, Canal st. 
CONE & O'BRIEN, S. CLARK ST. 
Covert D. H., Franklin bet Yan Buren and 

Harrison sts. 
De Clercq, Morris & Co., W. end of Randolph 

Bridge. 
Dunkee, Truesdell & Co., near head of Canal 

street. 
Eastman Galen, W. end Lake st. bridge. 
Foster A. & Co., S. Clark st. 
FRASER & JILLETT, SHERMAN STREET, 

S. OF TAYLOR. 
Gardner T. B. & Co., Wells street, between 

Harrison and Polk streets. 
Goodridge, Eckgold & Co., cor Halsted and 

Carroll sts. 
Green & Holden, Carroll st. 
Higginson Geo. M., North Pier. 
Hillard & Morton, cor Market and Adams sts. 
Hills & Garrick, cor Market and Jackson sts. 
Holbrook & Co., Grove st. 



52 



G. W. HAWES ILLIISTOIS STATE 



Holt & Mason, cor Monroe and Market sts. 

HOWARD & BARTON, Twelfth st. bridge. 

Howland H. & Co., South Clark st. 

Jennison & Roberts, Lumber st. near Old. 

Johnson A. B. & Co., Canal st. 

Johnson & Taintor, cor Lake and Market sts, 

Kennedy & Day, North Pier. 

Leonard Jas. & Co., cor Market and Jackson 

streets. 
Lind & Slater, Canal st. 
Loomis & Ludington, W. end Twelfth street 

bridge. 
LUNT G. T., GROVE ST. 
Ludington M. & Co., cor Van Buren and 

Canal sts. 
Lull & Lewis, Canal st. 
McCarr & Co., cor River and Dock sts. 
McDougall R. & Co., cor Lake and Market sts. 
Mears Chas. & Co., Kinzie st. 
MERSHON A. H., LUMBER STREET, BET. 

TWELFTH AND MAXWELL. 
Newell J. & Co., Wells street, between Har- 
rison and Polk sts. 
New York Lumber Co., above Twelfth street, 

west side. 
Officer A. & Co., cor Canal and Adams s's. 
Palmer T. W. & Co., 216 Clark st. 
PARSONS k FARLIN, S. CLARK ST. 
Peacock J. & Co., Stowell's slip, near R. I. 

R. R. Depot. 
RANSON & BATCHAM, LAKE SHORE, 

P. 0. BOX 1838. 
Reed John S. & Co., North Pier, opp. Central 

Depot. 
ROBERTS GEO. K. & CO., COR HARRI- 
SON AND WELLS STREETS. 
RYERSON, MILLER & CO., COR CANAL 

AND FULTON STREETS, AND WEST 

END POLK STREET BRIDGE. 
Scran ton D. C, Grove st. 
Scott & Morse, cor Harrison and Ellsworth 

streets. 
Sheppard, Sheriffs & Smith, 200 South Canal 

street. 
Skinkle J. W. & Co., cor Canal and Jackson 

streets. 
Steers, King & Co., betw. Taylor and Twelfth 

streets. 
Stewart Dugald, cor Market and Washington 

streets. 
Stouffer & Mead, Clark st. 
SUTHERLAND & CO., 83 CANAL STREET, 

N. BRANCH. 
SWARTWOUT & CO., 1 PEYTON STREET, 

N. BRANCH. 
Thomas & Reever, cor Sherman and Taylor 

streets. 
Throop, Learned & Chase, Charles street, 

W. side. 
Trowbridge, Thing & Swan, cor Canal and 

Monroe sts. 
TURNER H. H., S. OF R. I, FREIGHT 

DEPOT. 
Tuttle, Green & Co., cor Market and Van 

Buren sts. 
WALKER W. J., S. CLARK ST. 
WALLACE J. S., cor Old and Grove streets. 



Walls & Son, head of Canal st. 

WILCOX & LYON, FRANKLIN STREET 
SOUTH BRANCH. 

Wilde J. & Son, W. end Van Buren Street 
Bridge. 

Wing Edward, Market street, between Mon- 
roe and Adams sts. 

Wood & Carter, Lumber st. 

Wood, Arms & Co., Stowell's slip, opp. R. I. 
Freight Depot. 

Woodworth H. & Co., Lumber street, and 
between Old street and depot ground. 



Lumber Inspectors. 

Davis J. C. & Son, cor W. Washington and 

W. Water sts. 
Grant Daniel F., Lumber st., S. of Old. 



Machinery Dealers. 

BAKER A. D., 55 LAKE ST. 
DOANE W. H. & CO., 149 S. WATER ST. 
FAY & CO., 149 S. WATER ST. 
Rendall James, 2 N. Wells st. 



Machinists. 

See Engine Builders. 
Cobb S. R. & Co., Des Plaines St., on Kinzie. 
Hezmalhalch Thos., cor Halsted and Wayman 

streets. 
Mason, McArthur & Co., corner Canal and 

Carroll sts. 
Perkins & Krause, cor Canal and Washington 

POTTER, BROWN & CO., 148 CANAL ST. 



Map Publisher. 
BLANCH ARD RUFUS, 52 LA SALLE ST. 



Marble Workers. 

Cassidy and Dunn, cor Clinton and Randolph 

streets 
SCHUREMANS & MELLICK, 196 CLARK 

STREET. 
Wilson H. & 0., cor State and Washington 

streets. 



Masonic Regalia, etc. 

Carter & Cabery, 93 Lake st. 



Mathematical Instruments. 

See also, Optical Instruments. 
Whitcomb J. 0., 47 La Salle st. 



Mattresses. 

Atwood A. N. & Bro., 175 W. Randolph st. 
Manahan Thos., 131 W. Lake st. 



Merchant Tailors. 

Breumer Robt., 185 Lake st. 
Burnett H., 7 Tremont Buildings. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



5 3 



Clark Henrv, 129 W. Randolph st. 

Ely Edward, 9 Tremont Block. 

Ely Jas. H., 93 Randolph st. 

Hawley & Eaton, 83 Lake st. 

Hodgson & Perry, 121 Randolph st. 

Jenks & Beers, 89 and 91 Lake st. 

Ludwig P., Clark st. 

Neill J. P., 70 State st. 

Roberg & Anderson, 146 N. Des Plaines st. 

Robinson J. A., 51 and 53 Dearborn st. 

SMITH RUSSELL, 100 RANDOLPH ST. 

Speer J., T&J Lake st. 

Thompson Albert, 323 Clark st. 

Van Duzer J. S., 194 Randolph st. 

WISTENDORF J. B., 234 CLARK ST. 

Wunderle Louis, 182 Randolph st. 



Mercantile Colleges. 

Bell & Sloan, Portland block, Washington st. 
BRYANT & STRATTON, COR CLARK 
AND WASHINGTON STS. 



Military Goods. 

Carter & Cabery, 93 Lake st. 
Larrabee & North, 174 Lake st. 



Millinery Goods. 

Fisk & Ripley, 53 and 55 Lake st. 
Secombe W. W., 64 Lake st. 
STOW W. R., AGENT, 87 LAKE ST. 
Wamsley, Hiscox, & Hueston, 65 Lake st. 
Weber J. H. & Co., 205 and 207 S. Water 

street. 
Wetherell Brothers, S2 Lake st. 
Whiteley, Haseltiae & Co., 54 Lake st. 



Milliners. 

Gannet Mrs. M. & Daughters, 252 Clark st. 
HAGERTY M. A., 126 LAKE STREET, 

COR CLARK. 
Lacy Misses, 138 Lake st. 
Loyd Mrs. B. F., 165 Randolph st. 



Mill Stones. 

BAXTER T. W. & CO., W. WATER 
STREET, BETWEEN RANDOLPH 
AND MADISON. 

Travis C. F., Canal street, between Randolph 
and Washington. 



Mills, Flouring. 

Adams B. & Co., N. Water st. 

Chicago Mills, cor S. Water and River sts. 



Empire, Rickard & Beierlein, La Salle near 

cor North. 
Garden City, H. A. Chase, 12 and 14 Canal 

street. 
Hydraulic, Clinton street, between Lake and 

Fulton. 
North Street, Port & Co., proprietors, cor S. 

Clark and North sts. 
NOVELTY, JAMES McNAIR, 530 AND 

532 STATE ST. 
SHAWMUT MILLS, A. D. HAYWARD 

& CO., PROPRIETORS, STATE ST., 

COR OF NORTH. 



Musical Instruments. 

Higgins Brothers, 84 Randolph st. 



Newspapers. 

ASHLAR, masonic, 48 LA SALLE ST. 

CHICAGO BANK NOTE REPORTER, 44 
CLARK ST. 

CHICAGO RECORD, Episcopal, monthly, 
LAKE ST. 

CHRISTIAN TIMES, Baptist, 53 LA SALLE 
STREET. . 

COMMERCIAL EXPRESS, 69 LAKE ST. 

CONGREGATIONAL HERALD, weekly, 53 
LA SALLE ST. 

DEMOCRAT, daily and weekly, 45 LA 
SALLE ST. 

DEM. PRESS, daily, tri-weeklv and weekly, 
45 CLARK ST. 

EVENING GAZETTE, German, daily, 178 
RANDOLPH ST. 

HOMEOPATHIC JOURNAL, monthly. 

JOURNAL, daily, tri-weekly and weekly, 50 
DEARBORN ST. 

JOURNAL DE L'lLLINOIS, 47 W. RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE, weekly, 
204 LAKE ST. 

MUSICAL REVIEW, monthly, 84 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 

NATIONAL DEMOCRAT, German, daily 
and weekly, 222 RANDOLPH ST. 

NEW CHURCH MISCELLANY, Swedish, 
monthly, 155 RANDOLPH ST. 

NEW COVENANT, Universalist, 76 STATE 
STREET. 

N. W. BANK NOTE REPORTER, 17 S. 
CLARK ST. 

NORTH WESTERN CHRISTIAN ADVO- 
CATE, Methodist, 66 WASHINGTON 
STREET. 

NORTH WESTERN HOME JOURNAL, 
Temperance, 22 CLARK ST. 

N. W. MEDICAL AND SURGICAL JOUR- 
NAL, monthly, 57 RANDOLPH ST. 

PRAIRIE FARMER, weekly, 47 CLARK 
STREET. 

PRESBYTERIAN EXPOSITOR, monthly, 
155 RANDOLPH ST. 

PRINTERS' CABINET, monthly, 155 RAN- 
DOLPH ST. 



54 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



REAL ESTATE NEWS LETTER. 

PUBLISHED AT 

GALLAGHER'S ADVERTISING AND 

COLLECTING OFFICE, NO. 10 

MASONIC TEMPLE, 

Opposite the Post Office, Chicago, Illinois : 
Devoted to the Real Estate, Land, Railroad, 
Agricultural and Mechanical interests of the 
entire North-west. 

J. J. GALLAGHER. 

S. M. GILBERT. 

Editors and Publishers. 

STAATS ZIETUNG, 10 WELLS STREET 
BETWEEN WATER AND LAKE. 

SWENSKA REPUBLIKANER, Scandina- 
vian. 

TIMES, daily and weeklv, 43 AND 53 LA 
SALLE ST. 

TRIBUNE, dailv, tri-weekly and weekly, 51 
CLARK ST. 



Notaries Public. 

Bass & Mulvey. 
Bross John A., 123 Lake st. 
Claflin Isaac, 65 Clark st. 
Evans Albert S., 41 Clark st. 
Griffith Robert, 194 Lake st. 
Holden C. N., cor Lake and Clark sts. 
Lull 0. K. W., 106 Randolph st. 
Magill J. W., 37 S. Clark st. 
Morey H. C, 13 Metropolitan block. 
Stewart W. W., 47 La Salle st. 
Sumraerfield John, 41 Clark st. 
TAYLOR REUBEN. 58 W. Lake st. 



Oil Dealers. 

Ball & Sears, 611 and 613 State st. 
Breckenridge Coal Oil Co., J. Langlands 

agent, 185 S. Water st. 
BUSH WM. R. & CO., 91 S. WATER 

STREET. 
CROCKER & BARRETT, STATE STREET 

S. OF TWELFTH ST. 
Great Western Oil Company, 20 River st. 
Johnston J., 55 S. Water st. 
New York Oil Co., A. W. Turner, agent, cor 

Franklin and S. Water sts. 
PEASE F. S., I. D. SMEDLEY AGENT, 

154 AND 166 S. WATER ST. 
Scammon F , 79 S. Water st. 



Opticians. 

MAUSS LOUIS, 79 CLARK ST. 
Rosenberg L. E., 37 Clark st. 



Oysters. 

COOKE H., 12 CLARK ST. 
Harris & Schoolfield, Lake street, under 
Adams House. 



Packers. 

Brown Andrew & Co., office cor State and 

South Water sts. 
Moore, Seaverns & Co., 118 and 120 South 

Water st. 
Stewart Geo. & J., cor Harrison and Clinton 

streets 
TOBEY, BOOTH & CO., COR OLD AND 

GROVE STREETS, OFFICE 16 SOUTH 

WATER ST. 

Painters ; House, Sign, and Orna- 
mental. 

CHAMBERS & SANBORN, 116 CLARK 

STREET. 
DRAKE & BRO., 224 SOUTH CLARK ST. 
GAETTI J., North Water street, eastof Wells 
Hummer C. W., 91 Kinzie st. 
JEVNE & ALMINI, 91 KINZIE ST. 
Robbins & Gaylord, rear 45 Randolph st. 



Paints, Oils and Glass. 
Heath & Hurd, 52 and 54 Franklin st. 
LEWIS & PAGE, 103 S. WATER ST. 
Reynolds Hiram, 99 S. Water st. 
Shipman & Goodridge, 43 S. Water st. 
Short J. S., 218 Lake st. 
Thomson & Alston, 181 Randolph St. 

Paper Hangings. 
ANDRESS H. W. & CO., 83 RANDOLPH 
STREET. 

Faxon E. G. L, 52 Randolph st. 
Otto J. W. & Co., 81 Randolph St. 
Short J. S., 218 Lake st. 



Paper "Warehouses. 

Bradner, Smith & Co., 12 La Salle st. 
Butler & Hunt, 48 State st. 
Guild & Porter, 118 S. Water st. 
LAFLIN G. H. & L., 25 S. WATER ST. 

Patent Medicines. 

Fahnestock & Davis, 108 Randolph st. 
Wells E. M., 93 Dearborn st. 



Physicians. 

Andrew E., 96 Randolph st, 

Baltzall Wm. H., 11 Metropolitan block. 

Beebe G. B., 94 La Salle st. 

BENSON J. W., 122 RANDOLPH ST. 

Byford Wm. H., 69 Randolph st. 

Davis N. S., 69 Randolph. 

EGAN C. B., 108 RANDOLPH ST. 

EGLESTON & BECKET, VETERINARY, 

CANAL STREET, BET. RANDOLPH 

AND WASHINGTON STS. 
Eldridge J. W., 8 Clark st. 
Fisher A., 59 Clark st. 
FITCH CALVIN M., 104 MONROE ST. 
Freer J. W., cor Lake and Clark sts. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



55 



GAINES ASA, cor Clark and WatePsts. 
Hollister J. H., cor Lake and Clark sts. 
Hummer J. H., homeopath, 77 Clark st. 
HURLBUT H. N., OFFICE 3 WARNER'S 

HALL, RESIDENCE PRAIRIE AV. 
Isham Ralph N., 47 Clark st. 
KELLOGG JOHN L., HOMEOPATH, 75 

CLARK ST. 
Kelly C. V., homeopath, 196 Lake st. 
Lecroy — , 16 S. Clark st. 
LUDLAM R., HOMEOPATH, 43 ADAMS 

STREET. 
Lynn J. P., 8 Clark st. 
Parker H, cor Clark and Lake sts. 
PARKER M., 98 RANDOLPH ST. 
Peterson N. P., 83 W. Lake st. 
Pollock Irving J., 91 Clark st. 
Powell — , 53 Clark st. 
Robinson S. 0., 79 Clark st. 
Rogers E. C. 

Rowland J. S., 98 Michigan st. 
Sampson T. W., 91 S. Clark st. 
SLATTERY T. P., 10 N. WELLS ST. 
Smith H. F., 252 State st. 
STARR J. F., N. Water st. 
Teare John, 17 N. Clark st. 
Wagner W., 411 State st. 
Wescott A.B., 63 Dearborn st. 
Wilson James J., room 21 Garrett block. 
Winer W. D., 88 Dearborn st. 
WOODWORTH J., OFFICE 504 STATE 

STREET, RESIDENCE 170 EDINA 

PLACE. 



Pianos. 

Gould Nathaniel, 170 Clark st. 
Higgins Bros., 84 Randolph st. 
Kimbel & Fredin, 226 S. Clark st. 
STONE H, 19 N. CLARK ST. 
Watkins C. L. & Co., 67 Randolph st. 



Planing Mills. 

COBB, GAGE & CO., cor Canal and Adams 

streets. 
Flagg Geo. A. & Co., 399 Wells st. 
Foss & Bros., cor Canal and Monroe sts. 
Goldie ffm, 224 Monroe st. 
HALL & WINCH, 324 WELLS ST. 
LAMB & HAUGHTON, COR FULTON 

AND JEFFERSON STS. 
Temple & Wright, cor Canal and Polk sts. 

Platers, Gold and Silver. 

CURTIS JAMES, 8 Hale's block, N. Wells 

street. 
Foot D. A., 88i Randolph st. 
Wiele R., 55 W. Randolph st. 

Plumbers. 

GREENEBAUM SONS, 222 RANDOLPH 

STREET. 
HampsoD & Ruggles, 159 Lake st. 



Mills John, 40 W. Lake St. 
Ragen Alex. & Son, 261 Wells st. 
Schendel & Hansmith, 159 W. Randolph. 
Wightman R. V., 227 W. Randolph st. 
Wilson & Hughes, 44 Dearborn st. 



Potash, Soap, Powders, Etc. 

EDWARDS F., COR S. WATER AND 
CLARK STS. 



Powder. 

Austin Powder Company, 20 River st. 

Eaton D. & Co., 86 Lake st. 

Laflins, Smith & Boiss, 138 S. Water st. 



Printers, Book and Job. 

Barnet & Clark, 189 Lake street, cor Wells. 
Church, Goodman & Co., 53 La Salle st. 
Cravens W. & Co., 132 Lake st. 
DUNLOP, SEWELL & SPAULDING, 145 

LAKE ST. 
Hodge & Wood, 20 S. Clark st. 
Marshall J. R., 161 Lake st. 
Millar S. S , 123 Lake st. 
Pool Isaac A., 17 Clark st. 
Rand Wm. H, 148 Lake st. 
Scott Chas. & Co., cor Clark and S. Water 

of ppp + Q 

SCRIPPS, BROSS & SPEARS, 45 Clark. 
THOMPSON J. S., 55 LA SALLE ST. 
Wells & Adams, 69 Lake st. 



Proctors in Admiralty. 

Anthony Elliott, 130 Lake st. 

Bingham L. F., 114 Randolph st. 

Bross John A., 123 Lake st. 

Hervev, Clements & Hosmer, 162 Lake st. 

Hogan M. W., 13 N. Clark st. 

Kerr John S., cor Lake and Wells sts. 

Payson & Ware, 80 Dearborn st. 

Pearson Geo. T., 59 Clark st. 

Rae Robert & Co., cor Water and Clark sts 

Van Buren E. A. & J., 48 Clark st. 

Westcott J. W., 139 Randolph st. 

Winslow & Knott, 73 Clark st. 



Produce Commission Merchants. 

Ball & Anderson, 15 N. Canal st. 
Bau & Griffin, cor Clark and S. Water sts. 
Bates, Sharp & Co., 172 N. Water st. 
Black J. P. & E. A. & Co., 216 Kinzie st. 
Brown W. W., 92 N. Water st. 
Bruce E. A., cor Lake and Market sts. 
BURRELL BROS, 147 S. WATER ST. 
BURT & HIGGINS, COR DEARBORN & 

KINZIE STS. 
BURTON HORACE, OPPOSITE C, ST. P. 

& F. DU L. R. R. 
CATLIN J. S. & CO., 31 KINZIE ST. 
Church Luther W., cor Polk and Canal sts. 
CLOUGH & KING, 263 KINZIE ST. 
Crane & Sherman, 107 S. Water st. 



56 



G. W. II A WES ILLINOIS STATE 



CULVER & CO., 158 S. WATER ST. 

Dole Chas. S. & Co., 158 S. Water st. 

Dorsett F. & W., 47 La Salle st. 

Everest E. F., 13 Dearborn st. 

FAY & CO., 228 KINZIE ST. 

Finley S. B., 76 State st. 

Fish & Lester, 14 Dearborn st. 

FORD J. A. & CO., 10 MARKET ST. 

Funkhouser W. C. & Co., cor S. Water and 
State sts. 

Gilbert John, jr., M. C. R. R. bldg. 

Gray Moses & Co., 140 Des Plaines st. 

Hanford Z. & Co., cor Michigan and Dear- 
born sts. 

Harless, Parker & Co., 10 S. Clark st. 

Harmon & Huntoon, cor Franklin and S. 
Water sts. 

Harris S. M. & Co., 167 S. Water st. 

Hibbard, Abbey & Co., 139 and 141 N. Wa- 
ter st. 

Hinckley & Vilas, 182 and 184 S. Water st. 

Hitchcock A. & Co., 82 Randolph st. 

Hosmer E. & H. M. C. R. R. bldg. 

HUNTINGTON BROS. & VOGELL, 188 
KINZIE ST. 

JACKSON NATHAN, COR KINZIE AND 
WOLCOTT STS. 

Kennedy L., 28 Dearborn st. 

KENT A. E. &CO., 14 S. WELLS ST. 

Low A. C. & Brother, 46 W. Lake st. 

McAULEY M., DEARBORN STREET, OP- 
POSITE GALENA FREIGHT DEPOT. 

McLean & Zimmerman, 12 River st. 

Mather & Kellogg, 62 Lake st. 

Mitchell W. W., 214 and 216 S. Water st. 

Moore H. F. & C. S., 18 Dearborn st. 

Moss, Chambers & Co., 5 N. Dearborn and 
12 S. Water sts. 

Neeley & Kinney, cor S. Water and Frank- 
lin sts. 

Paddock, 74 N. Water st. 

Pollak & Winning, cor Lake street and Mich- 
igan av. 

Quirk D. L. & Co., cor La Salle and S. Wa- 
ter sts. 

Richmond & Co., 8 Richmond block. 

Rising N., 75 Kinzie st. 

ROGERS & WOOD, 10 RICHMOND BLK. 

RUMSEY BROS. & CO., 146 S. WATER 
STREET. 

Spencer B. H., cor Kinzie and Dearborn sts. 

Staples & Chamberlain, cor Clark and S. 
Water sts. 

Stewart & Durkee, River street, cor Dock. 

StrattonO., 180 N. Water st. 

Taylor S. G., 18 Dearborn st. 

Vandeubergh J. M., corS. Water and Frank- 
lin sts. 

Vane & Bridges, cor S. Water and River sts. 

VINCENT AKIN, 32 W. MADISON. 

Walker, Bronson & Co., 72 S. Water st. 

WALKER LUCAS B., 49 KINZIE ST. 

Watson & Akin, 191 S. Water st. 

WENTWORTH & CO., 137 N. WATER 
STREET. 

Whitney & Haven, 49 Kinzie st. 

WOODS WILLIAM, 261 KINZIE ST. 



Zinkeisen A. & Co., 77 Kinzie st. 



Public Buildings, Offices, Halls, 
Etc. 

Armory Hall, 12 and 14 Dearborn st. 

Armory Building (city), La Salle st. 

Asylum, Catholic Orphan, Wabash av bet 
Jackson and Van Buren sts. 

Asylum, Protestant Orphan, State st. 

Catholic College, Superior street bet Cash 
and Rush sts. 

Cemetery, Catholic, lake shore near Chicago. 

Cemetery, Chicago, N. Clark st. 

Circuit Court Clerk's office, 6 courthouse. 

City Clerk's office, 2 court house. 

City Bridewell, cor Wells and Polk sts. 

City Surveyor's office, 15 court house. 

Cook county drainage commissioners, 46 
Clark st, 3d story. 

County Clerk's office, 4 court house. 

County Jail, basement of court house. 

County Treasurer's office, 13 court house. 

Court House, public square. 

Custom House, La Salle st. 

Firemen's Benevolent Association, No. 1 en- 
gine house. 

Garden City Institute, 69 and 71 Adams st. 

Harmony Hall, 46 and 48 Clark st, 3d floor. 

Irving Hall, 94 and 96 Randolph st. 

Kinzie Hall, Kinzie street, bet Clark and 
Dearborn sts. 

Marine Hospital, foot of Michigan av. 

Masonic Hall, cor W. Randolph and Clinton 
sts. 

Masonic Temple, Dearborn near Randolph st. 

Mayor's office, 1 court house. 

Mechanic's Institute, 102 and 106 Ran- 
dolph st, 3d floor. 

Metropolitan Hall, north-west cor Randolph 
and La Salle sts. 

Lyceum Hall, 168^^1%: st. 

North Market, Michigan street, bet Clark and 
Dearborn sts. 

Odd Fellow's Hall, 100 Randolph street, 3d 
floor. 

Post Office, 84, 86 and 88 Dearborn st, 

Rush Medical College, Dearborn street, bet 
Indiana and Illinois sts. 

Scandinavian Union Hall, 81 Kinzie st. 

Sons of Malta Hall, cor Washington and 
State sts. 

South Market, State street, bet Lake and 
Randolph sts. 

St. James Hospital, 79 Illinois st. 

Temperance Hall, cor Clinton and W. Ran- 
dolph sts. 

Templars' Hall, Metropolitan block, La Salle 
street. 

Theater, Chicago, Dearborn street, south of 
Randolph st. 

Theater, North's, Monroe St., near Wells st. 

Theater, McVicker's (new) cor Madison and 
State sts. 

Trade, board of, S. Water street, foot of La 
Salle st. 



GAZETTEER AXD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



51 



Union Telegraph office, 11 La Salle st. 
United States Court, 124 Lake st., 2d floor. 
Warner's Hall, 122 Randolph st. 
Water Works, lake shore, north side. 
West Market, Randolph street, bet Des 

Plaines and Union sts. 
Young Men's Association Rooms, Portland 

block, Dearborn st. 
Young Men's Christian Association, 46 and 

48 Clark st. 



Pumps. 

Haggard S. B., 242 Randolph st. 



Pumps; Blocks, Ship and Manu- 
facturers. 

Scranton & Bro., 117 N. Clark st. 



Railroad Stations. 

CHICAGO, ALTOX & ST. LOUIS, foot of 

S. Water and Lake sts. 
CHICAGO & MILWAUKEE, X. Kinzie st. 
CHICAGO & ROCK ISLAND, cor Van Bu- 

ren and Sherman sts. 
CHICAGO, BURLIXGTOX & QUIXCY, foot 

of S. Water and Lake sts. 
CHICAGO, ST. PAUL & FOND DU LAC, 

X. Kinzie st. 
GALEXA & CHICAGO UXIOX, cor Wells 

and X. Water streets, and foot S. Water 

and Lake sts. 
ILLINOIS CEXTRAL, foot of S. Water and 

Lake sts. 
MICHIGAX CEXTRAL, foot of S. Water 

and Lake sts. 
MICHIGAX SOUTHERX, cor Van Buren 

and Sherman sts. 
PITTSBURG, FT. WAYXE & CHICAGO, 

cor Van Buren and Sherman sts. 



Railroad Supplies. 

Higgins, Mowry & Co., 24 River st. 
Le Bert John B., 22 Dearborn st. 
Xew England Car Spring Co., (India rubber,) 
Charles L. Xoble, agent, 47 La Salle st. 



Reaper Manufacturers. 

Wright J. S. & Co., cor Peyton and Michi- 
gan sts. 



Restaurants. 

Robinson's Exchange, 61 S. Water st. 
St. Charles, M. Conlev, proprietor, 15 X. 
Clark st. 



Roofing. 

CHILDSW.E. & CO., ELASTIC CEMEXT, 
H. G. MERIWETHER, PROPRIETOR, 
23 DEARBORN ST. 



Dakin & Barker, 278 State st. 

Davis A. & Co. (Patent Cement), 122 Ran- 
dolph st. 

LESTER F. & CO. (Russell's Mastic), 53 La 
street. 

Many & Derundeon, 81 W. Randolph st. 

Poison & Arentz, 148 Kinzie st. 



Saddle & Harness Manufacturers. 

Chapman R., 67 Lake st. 
FISCHBECK & GAREISS, 133 W. Ran- 
dolph st. 
Leverenz G., 21 Market st. 
ORTMAYER A., 49 W. RANDOLPH ST. 
Swenie D. J., 213 Randolph st. 
WalzGeo., 15 W. Randolph st. 



Safes. 

BRIDLE J. P. (LIPPINCOTT & BARR'S), 
22 DEARBORN ST. 

HEEF M. A. (DAVIDSON'S "FIRE KING"), 
11 WELLS ST. 

Pierson S. H. & Co. (Wilder's Patent), 12 
S. Water st. 

Raymond B. W. & Son (DURTEE & FOR- 
SYTH'S), 55 Lake st. 

Salt. 

Syracuse Salt Co., Richmond & Haskin, agts, 
190 and 192 S. Water st. 



Sashes, Doors and Blinds. 

ABBOTT & KINGMAN, 500 CLARK ST. 
BAKER & McEWEN, COR N. WELLS and 

PEARSON STS. 
Ballard A., cor Market and Tyler sts. 
CLEVELAND & RUSSELL, 74 and 76 

FULTON ST. 
Cobb, Gage & Co., cor Canal and Adams sts. 
Cobb L. J. & Co., 156, 158 and 160 Canal 

street. 
Fricker X., 17 1 W. Lake st. 
Goldie Wm., 224 Monroe st. 
GOSS & PHILLIPS, 42 FRANKLIN ST. 
HALL & RICHARDS, JOHNSTON'S 

BUILDING, STATE ST. 
Hall & Hinch, 324 S. Wells st. 
Hummer C. W., 91 Kinzie st. 
VAX VLACK E. B., 12 X. WELLS ST. 



Scales and Weights. 
Held & Brother, 41 Franklin st. 



School Apparatus. 

HOLBROOK'S SCHOOL APPARATUS 
MAXUFACTURING CO., 194 Lake st. 



Sewing Machines. 

GIBBS' PATEXT, A. WILMOT, AGEXT, 
80 DEARBORX ST. 



58 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



WHEELER & WILSON'S 




So well known throughout the United States and Europe, may be 
Examined and Purchased at the Western Office. 



These Machines will stitch the Finest and Coarsest Fabrics, at the pleasure of the 
Operator, making One Thousand beautiful and durable stitches per minute. 

For Families, these instruments of industry are rapidly becoming an indispensable of 
the household, and a favorite of the ladies, as affording a pleasing, satisfactory, and 
healthful pastime ; for, with apparent amusement, a person can sew in one hour, with 
one of these machines, as much as would require ten monotonous, weary hours, by 
needle and hand. 

For Manufacturers, these Machines are no less adapted than for family purposes. 

THE FIRST [PREMIUM 

Was awarded these Machines at the late Illinois State Fair, and the Cook County Fair. 



Chicago, 1858. 



GEO. R. CHITTENDEN, Agent, 

Western Office, 169 Lake St., over W. M. Ross & Co.'s. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



59 



GROVER & BAKER'S, HUGH ALEXAN- 
DER, AGENT, 166 LAKE STREET 
(UP STAIRS). 

SINGER I. M. & CO'S., WM. BRODERICK, 
AGENT, 140 LAKE ST. 

WHEELER & WILSON'S MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO'S., GEO. R. CHITTENDEN, 
AGENT, 169 LAKE ST, See Adv't. 

Ship Chandlers. 

Hubbard G. & Co., 183 S. Water st. 
Prentice Wm. R., 75 Canal st. 
Purington & Scranton, 217 S. Water st. 
Stafford & Colburn, 134 and 136 S. Water 

street. 
Walter Chadwick, cor State and S. Water 

streets. 



Shirt Manufacturers. 

Creesy L. W., 69 Lake st. 
James Jos. T., 77 Clark st. 
Schwarz J., 153 Randolph st. 



Show Cases. 

Campbell A. J. & Co., 63 Dearborn st. 
Hollacher M. & Co., 296 State st. 
Rider & Nicholls, 195 Clark st. 



Soap. 

Ritchie Hugh, cor Wolcott and Grand Haven 
slip. 



Soap and Candles. 

Chicago Soap & Candle Co., 121 S. Water 

street. 
Cleaver Chas., 99 S. Water st. 
Crocker & Barrett, State street, below Tenth. 
Hugg Oliver, 110 Michigan st. 
REID, WHITE & CO., 224 KINZIE ST. 

Solicitors in Chancery. 

Anthony Elliot, 130 Lake st. 

Beck T. Romeyn, 123 Lake st. 

Bentley Cyrus, 110 Dearborn st. 

Bingham L. F., 114 Randolph st. 

Bond & Seaton, 122 Randolph st. 

Bross John A., 123 Lake st. 

Brown M. D., 63 Clark st. 

Claflin Isaac, 65 Clark st. 

Clarkson & Tree, Portland block. 

Conklin Oliver M., 122 Randolph st. 

Farnsworth & Lumbard, 130 Lake st. 

Groves Wm. A., cor Clark and Randolph sts. 

Hogan M. H., 13 N. Clark st. 

Kerr John S., cor Lake and Wells sts. 

Pearson Geo. T., 59 Clark st. 

Scates, McAllister, Jewett & Peabody, Marine 

Bank building. 
Snyder H. N., 126 Randolph st. 
Van Buren E. A. & J., 48 Clark st. 
Walker Lysander, 65 Clark st. 
Winslow & Knott, 73 Clark st. 



Stationers. 

BURLEY A. H. & CO., 122 LAKE ST. 
CARNES & WILSON, 134 LAKE ST. 
Griggs S. C. & Co., Ill Lake st. 
Holmes Wm. G., 69 State st. 
Keen Wm. B., 148 Lake st. 
MUNSON & BRADLEY, 81 LAKE ST. 



Stone Dealers. 

Blinois Stone Co., Dr. Hess, treasurer, cor 

Wells and Taylor sts. 
PARK L. H , COR WELLS and JACKSON 

STREETS. 



Stone "Ware. 

ABBEY & CO., 139 and 141 N. WATER 

STREET. 
Bittinger G. W., 112 N. Water st. 
BROWN & ABBEY, 92 N. Clark st. 



Stoves and Hollow "Ware. 

Dakin & Barker, 278 State st. 

Edson & White, 173 Lake st. 

GARDNER & DE QUINDRE, 10 N. Wells 

street. 
JEWETT & ROOT, 71 LAKE ST. 
Jewett & Root, 14 River st. 
JOHNSTON, FARNSWORTH & CO., 171 

LAKE ST. 
Kennedy J. M. & W. W., 193 Lake st. 

Metz , 50 and 52 State st. 

MILLER A. R. & G. H., 237 State st. 
Moulton & Barber, 214 Clark st. 
NEWBERRY, FILLEY & CO., 231 LAKE 

STREET. 
RUBEL, BRO. & CO., 241 Lake st. 
Surdam S. J. & Co., 178 Lake st. 
Vincent, Himrod & Co., 242 Lake st. 
Wiswell William, 231 Lake st. 
Wyman & Davis. 116 Dearborn st. 



Surgical Instruments. 
Reed John H. & Co., 144 and 146 Lake st 



Teas. 

Warren Horace, agent, 127 S. Water st. 



Tea and Coffee Dealers. 

Blackall A. H., 56 S. Clark st. 
Donner & Co., 199 S. Water. 
Fairman H. A., 124 Randolph st. 
Huntoon & Towner, W. Water near Lake. 



Tin and Sheet Iron "Workers. 

Diehi C, 411 State st. 
Jewett & Butler, 203 Lake st. 
Moulton & Barber, 214 Clark st. 
Wrightman R. V., 227 W. Randolph st. 
Wiswell William, 231 Lake st. 



60 



G. W. HAVES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Tobacco and Cigars. 

Beck and Wirth, 14 Clark st. 
Bodenschatz C, 165 W. Randolph st. 
Brewer A., 24 W. Madison st. 
Corbin D. W. & Co., 59 Clark St. 
Daniels William Y., Matte son House. 
Finkler&Co., 45 Wells st. 
Frank A., 14 N. Wells st. 
FRANKENTHAL E. & CO., 129 S. WATER 

STREET. 
Green & Gray, 1 2 Dearborn st. 
Heller Jacob, 404 State st. 
Kiesling E. A., 9 W. Randolph st. 
Montague C. A., 5 Tremont block. 



Transportation Lines. 

American Transportation Co., cor Market 

and Washington sts. 
Buffalo, Cleveland and Chicago Propellers, 

Hale & Co., agents. 
Chicago and St. Louis Transportation Line, 

1 94 S. Water st. 
Despatch Line Sail Vessels, cor Market and 

Lake sts. 
Great Western Dispatch, Dearborn st. 
Lake Michigan and Lake Superior Trans- 
portation Line, A T. Spencer & Co., cor 

State and Water sts. 
Lake Navigation Co., J. C. Walker, agent, 

156 S. Water st. 
Merchants' Canal Line, cor State and S. 

Water sts. 
Northern Transportation Co., Mather k Co., 

foot La Salle st., N. side. 
North Western Transportation Co., A. T. 

Spencer & Co., State and S. Water sts. 
Old Oswego Line, S. Water, foot Dearborn st. 
Union Dispatch Co., 13 Dearborn st. 
Union Line, T. J. Hurlbut, agent. 
Valentine Co. Fast Freight, Garrett block. 
Western Transportation Co., R. Robinson, 

agent, cor State and S. Water sts. 



Trunk Manufacturers. 

Wright W. G. S., 61 Clark st. 



Turners, Wood and Ivory. 

Lauer Jacob, N. Wells st. 
Thomas G. G., 5 W. Washington. 



Undertakers. 

BULKELEY C. F., 226 WASHINGTON 
STREET. 

Jordan C. H., 134 Clark St. 

Wright & McClure, La Salle St., bet Ran- 
dolph and Washington. 



Upholsterers. 
Bode William, 476 State st. 
Brown & Hilliard, 188 Lake st, 
Doehler J. W., 153 Randolph st. 
Finerty & Liebenstein, 190 Randolph st. 



HeilbronnS., 293 S. Clark st. 
Hutchins William, 151 Randolph. 
Liebenstein J. & A., 159 Randolph st. 
Whitney, Lyon & Co., 155 Randolph. 



Variety Store. 
BARNUM R. S., 106 LAKE ST. 



Vinegar. 

Palmer John & Co., 146 Kinzie. 



"Watches and Jewelry. 

Bruen S., 51 S. Clark. 
Carter & Carbery, 93 Lake st. 
EBERLE PETER, 244 Randolph st. 
Edwards J. T. & E. M., 40 Clark st. 
Folsom R., 128 Lake St., cor Clark. 
Feuerstein L , S. Clark st., under Buruet 

House. 
Gaubert C. H. & Co., 108 Lake st. 
Hendrie W. A., 35 Clark st. 
Hoard and Avery, 117 Lake st. 
Ingols A. B., 57 Clark st. 
Miller A. H. & Bros., 126 Lake st. 
Nowlin L., 57^ Clark st. 
Peacock E., 205 Randolph st. 
Roath R. W. & Son, 81 Clark st. 
Smith Edwin F., 144 Clark st. 
Speer J., 77 Lake st. 

STEVENS, GEO. W. & CO., 96 LAKE ST. 
TEUFEL H., 79 W. Lake st. 



Whip Makers. 
Am. Whip Co., J. F. Jordan & Co., agents 
87 Randolph st. 



White Lead Mills. 
Lyon L. & Co., cor Halsted and Fulton sts. 



Wig Makers. 
Gray John, 7 Clark st. 
Hudson F., 129 Lake st. 

Window Shades. 

Williams 0. S., 45 Wells st. 



Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

BECKWITH C. H., 78 RANDOLPH ST. 
Bernauer B., 54 W. Lake st. 
Bing Francis, 15 Dearborn st. 
Coomby G., W. Water st. 
Currier D. P., 232 Randolph st. 
DAVIS T. B., 46 DEARBORN ST. 
Dodge George & Co., 11 Franklin st. 
Erler Carl, 53 W. Randolph st. 
Foerster Thomas & Co., 89 W. Lake st. 
FORD & BRADLEY, 6 DEARBORN ST. 
Fuller & Myers, 37 S. Water st. 
Haven, Turrell & Co., 77 S. Water st. 
HOPKINS & SUIT, 187 S. WATER ST. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



61 



Jennings G. W., 186 Randolph st. 
Knox William, 116 Des Plaines st. 
Koeffler G A. & Co., 47 Franklin st. 
KRAEFFT THEO., 73 W. Lake st. 



Long John & Co., 85 W, Randolph st. 
McClevey & Smith, 100 S. Water st. 
Maznusson & Co., 106 Lake st. 
Miles J. B. & Co., 100 Randolph. 



J. IB. MILES & CO., 



IMPORTERS OF 



100 RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Pure Brandies and "Wines for Medical purposes. 

Native Wines. 



-Agents for Longworth's 



Monks & Johnson, 165 S. Water st. 
MOOR A. M. & BRO., 119 S. WATER ST. 
NOTT, HENRY & CO., 64 Dearborn st 
O'Neill John, 63 S. Water st. 
Parramore S. S. & Co., 345 State. 
PFIRMANN & PFUND, 221 RANDOLPH 

STREET. 
POST & THOMPSON, 45 FRANEXIN ST. 
Read L., 117 S. Water st. 
Sues Louis, 157 W. Lake st. 
TRUE & THAYER, 8 DEARBORN ST. 
VANDERBECK WM, 17 LA SALLE ST. 
Watkins E. T. & Co., 20 State st. 
Watkins V. D., 17 La Salle st. 
WEINMANN J., 49 LA SALLE ST. 
Whitney & Co., 216 Clark st. 



Wood and Coal. 

ACKLEY BENJ., W. WATER, BET. RAN- 
DOLPH AND WASHINGTON STS. 

HAYDON R. NELSON, 82 DEARBORN 
STREET. 

Jones B. F. & Co., 13 W. Randolph st. 

PRINDIVILLE R., 402 N. Water st. 

Roedel C. F., corner W. Water and Washing- 
ton sts. 

Skinner D. H., cor Market and Adams sts. 

SMITH, ALFRED & CO.. 69 AND 71 N. 
PIER. 



Wooden Ware. 

Briggs & White, 254 and 256 S. Water st. 
MURDOCK J., 13 DEARBORN ST. 
Paine Enoch H., 243 S. Water st. 



Miscellaneous. 

CHICAGO SOUTH BRANCH CANAL 
COMPANY. A. G. Throop, agent ; A. 
J. Kniseley, secretary. 

Hunter E. S., agent for Belcher's sugar re- 
fining company of St. Louis, 18 River st. 



ILLINOIS SAVINGS INSTITUTION, 15 
STATE STREET, for all classes, includ- 
ing minors and married women. Divi- 
dends payable on first Mondays of Jan- 
uary and Julv. 

METROPOLITAN BILLIARD SALOON, 
M. & J. GEARY, PROPRIETORS, 111 
AND 113 RANDOLPH ST, 

PEARSON G. C, TIFFANY'S AIR WARM- 
ER AND VENTILATOR, 59 CLARK 
STREET. 

Spaids T. E., shipping merchant, cor S. 
Water and Franklin streets. 

TILTON THOS. IL, PROPRIETOR OF 
"CANNABIS INDICA," DR. GIL- 
BERT, AGENT, 141 STATE ST. 

Union Telegraph Office, 1 1 La Salle street, 
composed of Western, Union and Illi- 
nois and Mississippi Telegraph com- 
panies. 



CHILI, 

A post village of Hancock county, is situated 
in a fertile prairie, about 100 miles W.N.W. 
from Springfield. 

A. T. Dickinson, Postmaster. 



CHILLICOTHE, 

A flourishing post village of Peoria county, 
on the right bank of the Illinois river, at the 
head of Peoria lake, 20 miles above Peoria 
city. It has a fine steamboat landing. Large 
shipments of grain are made annually from 
this point, amounting in some years to over 
$225,000. Population, about 800. 
Lewis H. TnoM.vs, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Booth & Beebe, carpenters and joiners. 
Canterbury E., livery and exchange stable. 
Cleveland J. S., groceries and provisions. 
CutrightMrs. M. A., milliner and dress maker. 



62 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



Folliott J. C, hardware and stoves. 

Grosh D. F., furniture. 

Howe W. P., merchant tailor. 

Hunter Allen, variety store. 

Kenner J. L., auction and commission mer- 
chant and dealer in provisions. 

McCully J. W., groceries and provisions. 

Kellar J. H., restaurant. 

McLean Wm., groceries, wood, willow and 
stone ware. 

Miner H. T., watch and clock repairer. 

Piper Geo. H, groceries and provisions. 

Scholes Richard, clothing, hats, caps, etc. 

Sprague Ezra, proprietor of Chillicothe 
House. 

Stevens Mrs., ambrotypist. 

Thomas L. H., drugs, medicines, paints, oils 
and fancy goods. 

Todd S. A. & Co., steam flour mill. 

Truitt & Jack, lumber. 

Walter Alex. W., cigars, tobacco and snuff. 

Wilder Geo. J., house and sign painter. 

Wood 0. G., groceries. 

Young 0. W., dry goods, groceries and drugs. 



CHITTENDEN, 

A small but beautiful suburban villiage of 
Cook county, on the Chicago and Milwaukee 
railroad, seven miles from Chicago. 



CHRISTIAN COUNTY 

Is located in the south central part of the 
state, and has an area of 675 square miles. 
The Sangamon river forms the northern 
boundary, and the south fork of that river 
flows through the middle of the county. 
The surface is generally level or slightly un- 
dulating ; the soil is fertile. Fruits flourish 
in this county to some extent. The staples 
are wheat, corn, hay and oats. The county 
contains extensive prairies and tracts of good 
timber. The Illinois Central and the Terre 
Haute & Alton railroads intersect the county. 
Capital, Taylersville. Population, 4,181. 



CHRISTMASVILLE, 

A post office of Gallatin county. 
Wm. Cook, Postmaster. 



CIRCLEVILLE, 



A village of Tazewell county. 
Edward Woostall, Postmaster. 



CLARK COUNTY 

Is in the east part of the state, bordering on 
Indiana, and has an area of 460 square miles. 
The Wabash river, navigable by steamboats, 
forms its boundary on the south-east. The 



county is intersected by the north fork of 
Embarras river, and is also drained by Fox and 
Crane creeks. The surface is diversified by 
prairies and forests, the soil is productive, 
adapted to wheat, corn, oats and pasturage. 
Along the Wabash river stone coal is found 
to some extent. The county is intersected 
by the great National road. The projected 
Atlantic and Mississippi railroad will also pass 
through the county. Capital, Darwin. Pop- 
ulation, 11,672. 



CLAY, 

A post office of La Salle county, 140 miles 
north-north-east from Springfield. 
Ephriam S. Beardsley, Postmaster. 



CLAYTON, 

A post village of Adams county, 89 
west from Springfield. 

Josefii Wallace, Postmaster. 



miles 



CLIOLA, 

A small village on the line of the Northern 
Cross railroad, 9 miles from Quincy. 



CLEAR CREEK LANDING, 

A post village of Alexander county, 215 
miles south from Springfield. 
Warren Stewart, Postmaster. 



CLERMONT, 

A post office of Richland county. 
Jacob May, Postmaster. 



CLINTON. 



This is the county seat of DeWitt county, 
situated on the Illinois Central railroad, distant 
from Chicago 146 miles, and from St. Louis 
146 miles. It is located in a good rolling 
country with an abundance of good timber, 
has an inexhaustible supply of good water, 
and is one of the most healthy towns in 
Illinois. This town is progressing steadily ; 
it possesses several good stores, a number of 
excellent schools, a grist mill, one paper 
office and several handsome churches. Pop- 
ulation, 2,000. 

J. G. Woodward, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams W. W., M.D. 

ADAMS McHUGH, PHYSICIAN AND 

SURGEON. 
ATHERTON A. P. & CO., STOVES, TIN 

AND HARDWARE. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



63 



BARNETT HOUSE, A. BARNETT, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Campell B., dry goods. 

Clinton House, Caredappe, proprietor. 

Dyre A. M., druggist, books and stationery. 

EDMISTON T. K., physician and surgeon. 

Foard C. P., harness and saddler. 

GOODBRAKE C, PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

Harris & Son, dry goods and groceries. 

Adgate Asher, wagon maker, east side. 

Ballentine H. A. & Co., distillers, ease side. 

Ballentine Henry A. (of H. A. B. & Co.), 
east side. 

Ballentine James M., distiller, east side. 

Brown & Webster, general dealers. 

Brown James W., general dealer, west side. 

Brown Joseph, carpenter, east side. 

Clinton Paper Mills, E. Tefft, proprietor, 
east side. 

Collins William, clerk at Brown & Webster's, 
west side. 

Cox John, fanning mills, and justice of peace, 
east side. 

Davis A. W., miller, east side. 

Eastman Henry W., station agent and post- 
master, east side. 

Erbe W., shoemaker, east side. 

Fifer Hiram, shoemaker, east side. 

Hill J. H., saddler and harness maker. 

E. O. HILL, 

iffiiiii it uir. 

Prompt Attention paid to collecting 
LAND CLAIMS, 
And Agency in general with all other pro- 
fessional business intrusted to me. 

JONES & COLLON, PUBLISHERS OF 
TRANSCRIPT. 

JONES & BROTHER, GROCERIES. 

JONES B. F., ATTORNEY AND JUSTICE 
OF THE PEACE. 

JONES D. C, HARDWARE AND CUT- 
LERY. 

LEWIS L. F., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND COLLECTOR. 

McGRAW, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

McHUGH JOHN, M.D. 

MELDON Z., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

MAYIL & CO., DRY GOODS. 

MORGAN A. E. & CO., GROCERS AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



CLINTONVILLE, 

A post village of Kane county, at the junc- 
tion of the Fox River Valley and G. & Ch. 
Railroads. 

Erastus Tefft, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Furlong William, miller, east side. 
Gilbert Truman, farmer, east side. 
Gibbs, Griffin & Co., distillery and mills, 

east side. 
Goff Mrs. J., storekeeper, east side. 
Hanley Patrick, stone mason, east side. 
Hawkins Isaac B., blacksmith, east side. 
Hawley Abel, cooper, west side. 
Hawley Chancy, cooper, east side. 
Hemm Jacob, cooper, west side. 
Howe George, miller, west side. 
Kerber Charles, miller, east side. 
Larkin J., clerk, at E. Teffc's, west side. 
Lynch Eugene, general merchant, east side. 
Matherson Chanzler, carpenter, east side. 
McFARLAND J., SURGEON AND DEN- 
TIST. 
Matherson George, blacksmith, east side. 
Niles George R., paper maker, west side. 
Ockett Thomas, grocer, west side. 
Olden Rufus, mason, west side. 
Olden Willard, mason, west side. 
Orcutt Daniel, peddler, west side. 
Oxenschlager P., cooper, west side. 
Panton William, proprietor of Clinton mills, 

west side. 
Peaslee James M., mason, east side. 
Perry John H., miller, west side. 
Peterson Hiram, carpenter, west side. 
Peterson J., carpenter, west side. 
Porter Octavus, track foreman. 
Prairie State Mills, Gibbs, Griffin & Co., 

Prairie St., east side. 
Rinhard Mashman, east side. 
Roads J & Brother, boots, shoes and 

groceries. 
Ross Elick, carpenter and joiner, east side. 
Roberts Lewis, attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Ross J., carpenter, east side. 
Sackett & Co., drug store. 
Sams William, miller, east side. 
Sharpless Henry, foreman of paper mill, west 

side. 
Smith, Taylor & Co., dry goods. 
Switzell Valentine, cooper, east side. 
Smith N. W, watch maker and jeweler. 
Tift E., proprietor of paper mill, west side. 
Taylor W. H., boot and shoe maker. 
Treest Peter, mason, east side. 
Tidbule & Boyar, cabinet makers and dealers 

in furniture. 
Ulsaver David, proprietor of stone quarry, 

west side. 
Ulsaver Stephen, proprietor of stone quarry, 

west side. 
VanWie Robert, painter, east side. 
VanWie William, blacksmith east side. 
Vaughan Michael, laborer, east side. 
White William T., carpenter and joiner, east 

side. 

Winters , cooper, west sice. 

Woodward J. G., dry goods and boots and 

shoes. 



(34 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



CLYDE, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 
Joseph Milnes, Postmaster. 



CLYDE, 

A village of Macoupin county, on the line of 
the Terre Haute and Alton railroad, 48 miles 
from St. Louis. 



COATSBURG, 



A post office of Adams county, on the North' 
era Cross railroad, about 12 miles east from 
Quincy. 
Hiram T. Keenan, Postmaster. 



COCHRAN'S GROVE, 

A post village of Shelby county, about 70 
miles east-south-east from Springfield. 
James Cochran, Postmaster. 



COGSWELL, 

A post office of McHenry county. 
David P. Abbott, Postmaster. 



COLCHESTER, 

A post village of McDonough county, on the 
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad, 53 
miles from Quincy. 

James P. Taylor, Postmaster. 



COLD SPRING, 

A post village of Shelby county, 12 miles 
south-west from Shelbyville. 
John Williams, Postmaster. 



COLES COUNTY 

Is located in the south-east central part of 
Illinois, and has an area of 880 square miles ; 
it is intersected by the Kaskaskia and Em- 
barras rivers, which flow nearly southward ; 
the surface is rolling, and quite destitute of 
forests ; a part of Grand Prairie is included in 
this county ; the soil is very fertile. Indian 
corn, wheat, oats, hay, pork and butter, are 
the staples. The county is well supplied with 
churches, schools and newspaper offices, 
which fact is a sufficient guarantee of the 
intelligence and good sense of the people. 
The Chicago branch of the central railroad 
intersects the county. Named in honor of 
Edward Coles, second governor of Illinois. 
Capital, Charlestown. Population about 
14,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Gideon Edwards. 
Associate Justice, Robert Leitch. 

" " Robert Hopkins. 

Sheriff, Harvey D. Worley. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, George W. Teel. 
Clerk of County Court, James McCrory. 
Treasurer and Assessor, A. Y. Ballard. 
County Surveyor, Stephen B. Moore. 
School Commissioner, Gideon Edwards. 
Public Administrator, James D. Elling- 
ton. 



COLLINS STATION, 

A small village of Clinton county, on the 
Ohio and Mississippi railroad, 53 miles east 
from St. Louis. 

W. H. H. Dobbins, Postmaster. 



COLLINSVILLE, 

A post village of Madison county, 86 miles 
south by west, from Springfield, and 1 4 miles 
east-north-east from St. Louis ; some con- 
siderable milling is done at this place. 
Joseph W. Griffith, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Albright, Wells & Co., carriage manufa c - 

turers. 
BassettL. S., carriage manfacturer. 
Williard S., physician and insurance agent. 



COLONA, 



A post office of Whiteside county. 
Lemon H. Emmons, Postmaster. 



COLONA STATION, 

A village of Henry county, on the line of the 
R. I. R. R., 13 miles from Rock Island, and 
169 from Chicago. 
John J. Baum, Postmaster. 



COLUMBUS. 



A post village of Adams county, 100 miles 
west from Springfield. 
John Gault, Postmaster. 



COMO, 



A post town and village of Whiteside county 
on Rock river, and on Chicago, Fulton and 
Iowa railroad, 114 miles from Chicago, and 
200 from St. Louis. Population of village, 
about 600; township and village, 1,200. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



65 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Crook A. C, farmer. 

Donaldson H. C, M.D. 

Hapgood A. C, merchant. 

Russell Charles M., merchant. 

Holmes Charles, farmer. 

Holmes & Willson, merchants. 

Sampson Simeon, merchant. 

Scott Asa, farmer. 

Loomis W., farmer. 

Utley H., M.D. 

Willson Geo. C, justice of the peace. 



COMORN, 



A post village of Cook county. 
Elvin A. Hempstead, Postmaster. 



CONCORD, 



A township of Adams county, in the eastern 
border, about 25 miles from the Mississippi 



CONCORD, 

A village of Iroquois county, on the Iroquois 
river, a few miles north of the capital, and 
about 78 miles south from Chicago. 



CONCORD, 



A post village of Morgan county, on the line 
of the Great Western railroad, 232 miles 
from Chicago and 141 from St. Louis, by 
railroad. 
Eugene W. Wiswell, Postmaster. 



COOK COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-east part of Rlinois, 
bordering on Indiana and Lake Michigan, 
and has an area of 1,027 square miles. It is 
intersected by the Des Plaines, Calumet and 
Chicago rivers. Lake Michigan washes the 
eastern border. The surface is slightly un- 
dulating. Its prairies are large and fertile, 
and are interspersed with fine groves of tim- 
ber. Its soil is deep and highly productive. 
In 1850 the quantity of oats, hay and butter 
produced by this county exceeded those of 
any other in the state. The county is inter- 
sected by the various lines of railroad lead- 
ing out from its capital, making access to all 
parts easy, and increasing its value to an 
almost incredible extent. Organized in 1831, 
and named in honor of Daniel P. Cook, a 
member of congress from the state, who ob- 
tained from government a grant of 300,000 
acres of land in aid of the Illinois and Michi- 
gan canal. Capital, Chicago. Population, 
about 220,000. 

5 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Wm. T. Barron. 
County Clerk, Chas. B. Farwell. 
Board of Supervisors, Chairman, William 
James ; Clerk, C. B. Farwell. 

Judge of Circuit Court, Geo. Manierre. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, Wm. L. Church. 
Judge of Common Pleas, John M. Wilson.' 
Clerk of Common Pleas, Walter Kimball. 
State's Attorney, Carlos Haven. 
Sheriff, John L. Wilson. 
Coroner, Geo. P. Hansen. 
School Commissioner, W. L. Greenleaf. 
County Surveyor, Edmund Bixly. 
County Treasurer, A. H. Boydex. 
Recorder of Deeds, . 



TERMS OF COURTS, 1858. 
cook county. 

Circuit Court. — Trial terms, 2d Monday 
in April and 3d Monday in November. Va- 
cation term, 1st Monday in March and 2d 
Monday in October. Geo. Manierre, Judge ; 
Wm. L. Church, Clerk. 

Recorder's Court. — 1st Monday in each 
month. Robt. S. Wilson, Judge; Philip A. 
Hoyne, Clerk. 

U. S. Circuit and District Courts. — Cir- 
cuit Court, 1st Mondays in March, May, July 
and October, and 3d Monday in December. 
Special Admiralty term, 1st Monday in each 
month. Thomas Drummond, Judge ; W. H. 
Bradley, Clerk. 

Common Pleas. — Trial term, 1st Monday 
in February and 2d Monday in September. 
Vacation term, 1st Mondays in January, 
April, June, July and November. John M. 
Wilson, Judge ; Walter Kimball, Clerk. 

County Court. — 1st Monday in each 
month. Wm. T. Barron, Judge ; Chas. B. 
Farwell, Clerk. 



COOPERSTOWN, 

A post village of Brown county. 
G. A. Byrns, Postmaster. 



CONKEY'S STORE, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
Wm. A. Conkey, Postmaster. 



COPPERAS CREEK, 

A post village of Fulton county, on a creek 
of the same name, near its entrance into the 
Illinois river, about 50 miles north by west 
from Springfield. It is a shipping point by 
steamboat for the produce of the surround- 
ing country. 
John McCann, Postmaster. 



66 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



COPPER CREEK, 

A post office of Rock Island county, on the 
southern boundary line between that and 
Mercer county. 
Dennis Pullen, Postmaster. 



CORAL, 

A post village in a township of the same 
name, in McHenry county, near the Galena 
and Chicago railroad, 60 miles north-west 
from Chicago. The railroad passes directly 
through the center of the township. 
Elijah Dunham, Postmaster. 



CORDOVA, 

A post village of Rock Island county, on the 
Mississippi river, about 25 miles above Rock 
Island city. 
John L. Phillips, Postmaster. 



CORNTON, 

A post village of Cumberland county. 
Leman H. Faunce, Postmaster. 



CORNVILLE, 

A post village of La Salle county. 
Newton Ward, Postmaster. 



COTTAGE HILL, 

A post village of Du Page county, on the 
Galena and Chicago railroad, 16 miles west 
from Chicago. 

Gerry Bates, Postmaster. 



COTTONWOOD, 

A small post village of Gallatin county. 
Thompson Boyd, Postmaster. 



COTTONWOOD GROVE, 

A small post village of Bond county. 
David J. McCord, Postmaster. 



COULTERSVILLE, 

A small post village of Randolph county. 
H. H. Rice, Postmaster. 



COUNCIL HILL, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, 8 miles 
north-east from Galena. Has rich lead 
mines in the vicinity. Contains about 600 
inhabitants. 
John McCallister, Postmaster. 



COURTLAND STATION, 

A village of De Kalb county, on the line of 
the Chicago, Fulton and Iowa railroad, 55 
miles west from Chicago. 
Chauncey Luce, Postmaster. 



COTJRTWRIGHT MILL, 

A post village of Iroquois county. 
Joseph Thomas, Postmaster. 



CRAB ORCHARD, 

A post village of Williamson county. 
Benj. F. Esminger, Postmaster. 



CRANE CREEK, 

A post office of Mason county. 
D. B. Morgan, Postmaster. 



CRANE'S GROVE, 

A post office of Stephenson county. 
W. II. Hollinbeck, Postmaster. 



CRAWFORD, 

A post office of Gallatin county. 
John Crawford, Postmaster. 



CRETE, 



A post village of Will county, near the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad (Chicago 
branch), about 32 miles from Chicago. 
Rodney A. Mott, Postmaster. 



CRITTENDEN, 

A post office of Franklin county. 
Benj. E. Pope, Postmaster. 



CROSS ROADS, 

A post office of Johnson county. 
Wesley Reynolds, Postmaster. 



CRETTY, 

A post office of La Salle county. 
Jeremiah Cratty, Postmaster. 



CROW MEADOWS, 

A post village of Marshall county, near the 
center, 122 miles from Chicago. 
Abijah S. Sherwood, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



67 



CRYSTAL LAKE, 

A flourishing post village of MeHenry 
county, on a small lake of the same name, at 
the intersection of the Chicago, St. Paul 
and Fond du Lac, and Fox River Valley rail- 
roads, about 43 miles north-west from 
Chicago. It is in the midst of a highly fertile 
district, and for healthiness of climate cannot 
be excelled. 

James Marlow, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc, 

BRADLY T. F., proprietor Bradley Hotel. 

HUNTER A. S., dealer in dry goods, gro- 
ceries, boots, shoes and clothing. 

Harris S. W., wagon and paint shop. 

Jackman William, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Marlow J. W., postmaster. 

McDonnell "William, blacksmith. 

SAUXDERS F., dealers in family groceries, 
wines, liquors, etc. 

WILSON DR. W. T., dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 



CUBA, 

A post village of Fulton county, about 15 
miles west from the Illinois river. 
Daniel G, Haverxale, Postmaster. 



CUMBERLAND, 

A post village of Fayette county, a few miles 
east of the Illinois Central railroad, 75 miles 
south-south-east from Springfield. 
Ezra Griffith, Postmaster. 



CUMMINGTON, 

A post village of Macoupin county, 30 miles 
in a direct line south-west from Springfield. 
Dempset N. Solomon, Postmaster. 



CYPRESS CREEK, 

A post office of Johnson county. 
Asa W. Carter, Postmaster. 



DALLAS CITY, 

A village of Hancock county, on the Missis- 
sippi river. 

John McFinch, Postmaster. 



DAMASCUS, 



A post village in Stephenson county. 
Norman Phillips, Postmaster. 



DANBY, 

A post village of Du Page county, on the 
Galena and Chicago R. R., 22 miles from 
Chicago. 
Mark Davis, Postmaster. 



DANVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Vermilion 
county, on the Vermilion river aEd also on 
the line of the Great Western R. R, 110 
miles east from Springfield and 174 from 
Chicago. The river furnishes abundance of 
water power. Stone, coal and timber are 
both found in abundance. A United States 
land office is located here. 
Henry G. Brtce, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Brady Wm., stoves and tinware. 

Beck with H. W., attorney at law and notary 
public. 

Brown W. H. & Son, stoves and tinware. 

Dalton Walter, lime dealer. 

Drake & Moses, attorneys at law and real 
estate agents. 

Faris James H, physician and surgeon. 

Frazier & Gessie, clothing and dress goods. 

Giddings W. , carriage, wagon and plow man- 
ufactory. 

Kilpatrick Jas. D., editor and publisher of the 
Vermilion County Press. 

Latham Allen, dentist. 

Lawrence George W., attorney at law. 

Leslie John M., attorney at law. 

McCormack & Bro., lumber. 

Merrill G., master in chancery. 

Snyder J., cloths, trimmings, hats, caps and 
clothing. 

Wolf & Busher, clothing. • 

Wright S., lumber. 



DARWIN, 

A thriving post village in a township of the 
same name in Clark county on the Wabash 
river, 133 miles E.S.E. from Springfield. 
Hugh Malone, Postmaster. 



DAWSON, 

A post village of Sangamon county, on the 
line of the Great Western R. R., 11 miles 
east from Springfield, 199 from Chicago. 
Carmon W. Clark, Postmaster. 



DAYSVILLE, 

A post village of Ogle county, on Rock river, 
174 miles north by east from Springfield and 
about 85 from Chicago. 
Wm. J. Mix, Postmaster. 



68 



Q. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



DAYTON, 

A village of Adams county, about 55 miles 
W. by N. from Springfield. 



DECATUR, 

A flourishing city, capital of Macon county. 
Is situated 1 mile north from Sangamon river, 
40 miles east from Springfield and 168 miles 
W. of S. from Chicago. The Illinois Central 
and Great Western railroads intersect each 
other at this point. The district surrounding 
is highly adapted for agricultural pursuits and 
has rapidly increased in population and busi- 
ness. The railroad facilities are such that a 
ready market is had for the various articles 
of produce and have had a tendency to draw 
a large amount of wealth and enterprise from 
the east which is here concentrated. Besides 
the county buildings which are located here, 
the city contains several very fine churches 
and other public buildings, which do credit to 
the taste and enterprise of its citizens. Laid 
out as a town in 1829. Population, about 
1,900 
Johx P. Post, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ADAMS & JOHNSON, BUTCHERS, ON 
THE NEW SQUARE. 

ATHONS S. A., PLOW MANUFACTORY, 
WEST MAIN ST. 

BARNES W. B., DEALER IN DRUGS 
AND MEDICINES. 

BARNWELL E. A. & CADMORE, AM- 
BROTYPE GALLERY, OPPOSITE 
POST OFFICE. 

BEAR S. & CO., GROCERIES & PRO- 
VISIONS. 

BUNN A. B., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

BURROUGHS C. C, DRY GOODS AND 
BOOKS. 

BUSHER W. F., BOOTS, SHOES AND 
LEATHER, EAST MAIN STREET, 
NEAR R. R. BANK. 

BRADSBY H. C, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 
OFFICE WEST SIDE, COR PUBLIC 
SQUARE. 

BROWN & BRO. W. J., DRUGGISTS, 
OPPOSITE TEMPLAR HALL. 

CARTER G. D., DEALER IN GROCER- 
IES. 

CASSELL JOHN, CABINET WARE AND 
UPHOLSTERY. 

CLOSE & MOREHOUSE, HARDWARE, 
CUTLERY, IRON, STEEL, GUNS, 
ETC. 

CURTIS J. B., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

DAVIS & CARTER, WOODEN PUMPS 

AND LIGHTNING RODS. 
DAVIS A. S. & J. UNDERWOOD, PUB 
LISHERS AND PROPRIETORS OF 
WEEKLY GAZETTE. 



DILLARD JOHN, PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, OFFICE, NEAR CLOSE & 
MOREHOUSE'S HARDWARE STORE. 

Dillon W. M., phyiscian. 

DILEHUNT, LUMBER MERCHANT. 

DRAKE A. W. & WM. D. MOTT, FUR- 
NITURE DEALERS, UNION BLOCK, 
SOUTH SIDE. 

EASENHUTH L. E., PROPRIETOR CEN- 
TRAL HOTEL AND EATING HOUSE. 

ELIAS SAMUEL, READY-MADE CLOTH- 
ING, SOUTH SIDE OF MAIN ST. 

FAUST, DEALERS IN HATS, CAPS, 
ETC. 

FRENCH & LOYD, DENTISTS. 

FREESE A. & S. Jr., GROCERIES AND 
PROVISION DEALERS. 

Freese W. L., attorney at law. 

GALLAGER A. S., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

GATES S. M., HOUSE, SIGN & CAR- 
RIAGE PAINTER. 

GILVES & DENNIS, FURNITURE AND 
MATRESSES. 

GIRLES DAVID, FURNITURE DEALER 
OF ALL VARIETIES. 

GOODMAN GEORGE, JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

GOODE S. S., ATTORNEY AT LAW, 
NORTH EAST COR OLD SQUARE, 
CENTRAL BLOCK. 

Green T. A., attorney and councelor at law. 

HABE S., STEAM PLANING MILL, 
SHOP NEAR THE DEPOT. 

HANCE & METTLEN, AUCTIONEERS 
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
EAST MAIN ST. 

HAMMER WM. H., JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

HAMSHER & BROTHERS, SADDLERY. 

HARTLEY J. W., CITY MARSHAL, GEN- 
ERAL INTELLIGENCE AGENT. 

HAVENS & CRANDAL, IMPORTERS, 
DEALERS IN CHINA AND GLASS. 

HENDRICKS J. D., PROPRIETOR EM- 
PIRE SALOON, ONE DOOR SOUTH 
OF OGLE SB Y HOUSE. 

HOSTELLES D. J., PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON. 

HINKLE & CONDLE, PROPRIETORS OF 
ILLINOIS CENTRAL MILLS. 

HILL A. T., GENERAL MERCHANT, 
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING. 

JAMES & CO., PAINTERS, GLAZIERS 
AND PAPER HANGERS. 

LIEB H. & CO., FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 
LIQUORS. 

LOWENSTEIN & BRO., DRY GOODS, 
HATS, CAPS, ETC. 

LUTHRELL ALEX., HOUSE & SIGN 
PAINTER, GLAZIER AND PAPER 
HANGER, COR OF JACKSON AND 
WILLIAM STS. 

McBRIDE — , PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, OFFICE EAST OF MAIN 
STREET. 

MALONE L. G., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

McCLURE J. B., SURGEON DENTIST. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



69 



McGINXESS HODGE, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS AND SHOES. 

MoKANND & CUMMINGS, PROPRIE- 
TORS OF COPPER DISTILLERY. 

McMILLIN & MOOR, PHYSICIANS, OF- 
FICE IN THE COURT HOUSE. 

WEEKS J. D. L., HOUSE AND SIGN 
PAINTER, PAPER HANGER. 

MILLIKIN JOSEPH, LAND AGENT. 

MORE E. W., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

MOFFIT D. S., DEALER IN CLOTHING. 

MORNEY JOHN, WOOD SAWING BY 
HORSE POWER. 

ODER S. D. A., COURT CLERK. 

OGLESBY HOUSE, WHITE, HOUSE & 
OGLE SB Y, PROPRIETORS. 

PATHERN & CORINS, STOYE DEAL- 
ERS, TIN, COPPER & SHEET IRON 
WARE. 

PEAKE WM. T., WATCHES, CLOCKS 
AND JEWELRY. 

PHELPS, COCKLE & CO., REAL ES- 
TATE AND GENERAL AGENTS. 

POST J. S. & CO., ATTORNEYS, OFFICE 
THE NORTH EAST CORNER OF 
COURT HOUSE. 

POWERS 0., REAL ESTATE AND GEN- 
ERAL AGENT. 

PRATHER, ATTORNEY AT LAW, OF- 
FICE SOUTH-EAST COR OF THE 
COURT HOUSE. 

RACE J. R., READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

RICKETTS JOHN, COUNTY JUDGE AND 
POLICE MAGISTRATE. 

DECATUR : BLOUMINQTON : 

SAMUEL STEEL,' J0SEPH H - STEEL. 

Proprietors and Manufacturers for the State 
of Illinois of 

"Willson k&s \A/'est's 

RECIPROCATING 

CROSS CUT SAW, 

FOR HAND OR POWER. 



The Prize Machine of the Ohio and Indiana 
State Fairs. Machines and Territory for sale 
by the Proprietors. 

ROBERTS, STEEL k CO. 
Decatur, 111, 

RUEHL & CO., GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISION DEALERS. 
SCULLIN FISHER, COAL DEALER, 

YARD ON THE GREAT WESTERN 

R R TRACK 
SHELL ABARGERD. & CO., DEALERS 

IN LUMBER AND SHINGLES, 

DOORS AND SASH. 
SHOAFF & HANKS, DEALERS IN DRY 

GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, 

QUEENSWARE, ETC. 



SILLEY B. F., HOMEOPATHIC PHYSI- 
CIAN, OFFICE UNDER TEMPLARS' 
HALL. 

SIMPSON MARK, BRICK LAYER AND 
PLASTERER. 

SITES SAMUEL, BOOK AND DRUG 
STORE, PAPER HANGINGS, ETC. 

SKINNER N. C, PHYSICIAN, OFFICE 
PRAIRIE STREET, WEST SIDE OF 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

SMITH & STAPP, PRODUCE AND COM- 
MISSION MERCHANTS, BRICK 
WAREHOUSE, NEAR G. W. R, R. 
DEPOT. 

SMITH L. P., COAL DEALER. 

SMITH B. F., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

SNIDER JAS. & CO., BUTCHERS, SOUTH 
OF THE NEW SQUARE. 

STEPHER A. G., DENTISTRY, OFFICE 
NO. 3 CENTRAL BLOCK. 

STAMPS & ELIOT, DRY GOODS, CLOTHS. 

STEEL SAMUEL, AGENT FOR WILL- 
SON & WEST'S PATENT WOOD 
SAW, ALSO FOR ENOCH'S PATENT 
WHEAT DRILLS. 

STARR J. G., SADDLERY AND HAR- 
NESS MAKER, 

STROCH & HENDERSON, PRODUCE 
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

STRATTON & HUBBARD, DEALERS IN 
GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS, WA- 
TER ST. 

TALCONAR E. G., JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

TAPPER D., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

THORPE & TUPPER, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNCELORS AT LAW, OFFICE 
SOUTH SIDE EAST MAIN ST. 

TITUS & SCULLIN, BUTCHERS. 

TUTHE & BURGESS, LAND AGENTS. 

WESSELS GEO. F., BOOTS, SHOES 
AND LEATHER DEALER. 

WALTON W. T., DEALER IN FOREIGN 
AND AMERICAN MARBLE. 

WOLFE C. T. H., CONFECTIONERY 
STORE, SOUTH SIDE OF SQUARE. 

WOOD GEO., CLOTHING AND FUR- 
NISHING GOODS, No. 2, TEMPLAR'S 
HALL, MAIN ST. 

WOOD G. M. & CO., FANCY AND 
STAPLE DRY GOODS, HATS, CAPS 
AND BONNETS. 

WILLSON AND WEST, PATENT WOOD 
SAW; also, ENOCK PATENT WHEEL 
DRILLS. 

WYKOFF, ADAMS & JOHNSON, BUTCH- 
ERS, DEALERS IN HIDES. 



DEER CREEK, 



A psst village of Tazewell county. 
John W. Osbo'rn, Postmaster. 

DEERPIELD, 

A post township of Lake county, about 20 
miles north from Chicago. The Chicago and 



70 



G. W. IIAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 



Milwaukee R. R. runs through this township. 
Eliab Giffoed, Postmaster. 



DEER GROVE, 

A post village of Cook county, 30 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 

Mason Sutherland, Postmaster. 



DEER PARK, 



A post village of La Salle county, about 120 
miles north by east from Springfield, and 
about 95 from Chicago. 

Richard Shapland, Postmaster. 



DEER PLAIN, 

A post office of Calhoun county, in the ex- 
treme southern part, about 5 miles from the 
Mississippi river, 45 miles from St. Louis and 
about 800 from Chicago. Extensive cbal 
beds are found in the vicinity. Population, 
250. 
John G. Ruckstuhl, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Aderton M. L., farmer. 

Andrews R. G., farmer. 

Auers Jacob, carpenter. 

Baugert Adam, farmer. 

Bell Samuel, farmer. 

Bradford Thomas, physician. 

Brown Chauncy, farmer. 

Buechi Andrew, blacksmith. 

Bush H. L., farmer. 

Cunningham James, farmer. 

Cunningham Michael, farmer. 

Dougherty James, farmer. 

Gleason Dennis, farmer. 

Gleason James, farmer. 

Gleason Patrick, farmer. 

Gray John, justice of the peace. 

Johnson M. B., justice of the peace. 

Kinder F., farmer. 

Kinder John, farmer. 

Keuhner John, farmer. 

Meetz John, farmer. 

Miller John, farmer. 

Miller Libeny, farmer. 

Nixon James, farmer. 

Regal , clergyman. 

Robinson M. L., justice of the peace. 
Ruckstuhl J. & H., merchants. 
Scrivener J. R., farmer. 



DE KALB COUNTY, 

Is located in the north part of Illinois, and 
has an area of 648 square miles. It is drain- 
ed by Sycamore and Indian creeks, affluents 
of the Kishwaukee and Fox rivers. The 
surface is undulatinsr, and the soil good. 



The greater part of the country is cultivated 
prairie, with some good timber. Wheat, 
corn, oats and hay are the staples. It con- 
tains many fine churches, and its school ad- 
vantages are excellent. Capital, Sycamore. 
Population, about 11,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 
Judge Circuit Court, Isaac G. Wilson. 
Judge County Court, Geo. H. Hill. 
Clerk Circuit Court, James H. Beveridge. 
Clerk County Court, A. K. Stiles. 
Sheriff, Silas Tappen. • 
County Surveyor, H. W. Fay. 
Coroner, L. Whittlemore. 
School Commissioner, James Harlincton. 
County Treas. and Collector, Roswell Dow. 
County Agent, E. L. Mayo (by appointment). 



DE KALB 



Is a flourishing post village, of about three 
years' growth, situated in the center of De 
Kalb county, on the Dixon Air Line railroad, 
58 miles west from Chicago. It is the center 
of a large trade, principally in grain, $7, 000- 
000 worth of which was exported from this 
place during the fall of 1857 ; the receipts 
ranged as high as 30,000 bushels per day. 
Over 40 buildings of various grades were 
erected during 'the fall of the same year. The 
country surrounding is undulating, and the 
soil very rich and productive. The western 
boundary is formed by a large grove, through 
which the Kishwaukee flows on its way to 
unite with Rock river. The climate is re- 
markably healthy, and its location for busi- 
ness unsurpassed. There are here six ware- 
houses, one steam flouring mill, planing mill, 
a large number of stores, two churches, a 
union school building, etc. A new hotel 
has recently been erected, called the "Walker 
House," and is one of the principal features 
of the town. A weekly newspaper is pub- 
lished here, called the Western World, 
Andrew & Doty, publishers. Population, 
1,500. 
Jackson Hiland, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ANDREWS & DOTY, BOOK AND JOB 

PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS. 
Briston Joseph, groceries. 
BURROUGHS IRA, coal merchant. 
Burt S. D., house and sign painter. 
Butts S. D. & Co., commission merchants. 
CARTWRIGHT & HAYDEN, DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, HARDWARE. 

Crowthorn , meat market. 

Dewey L. H., watchmaker and jeweler. 
DOW LEWIS, DAGUERREIAN AND 

AMBROTYPE ARTIST. 
ELLWOOD & DELONGE, DRUGGISTS. 
ELWOOD & SCOTT, HARNESS AND 

SADDLERY. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



n 



Flin Charles G. 

Fowler & Blown, planing mill and dealers in 
lumber. 

Fox S., attorney at law. 

Gilbert Eli B., justice of the peace. 

GOLDEN D. M., LIVERY STABLE. 

Goodrich, Winship & Co., dry goods. 

Hamlin J. R. & Co., bankers. 

Hyslop S. R., M.D. 

Johnston P., dealer in stoves. 

King J. W.j surgeon and dentist. 

Knight Charles, glaizer. 

Knight Mrs. Sarah, millinery. 

LOWE CHRISTOPHER, PROPRIETOR 
EAGLE HOTEL. 

NICHOLS ISRAEL, DEALER IN GRAIN, 
STOVES, FURNITURE AND LUM- 
BER. 

NICHOLS WARREN, TICKET AND 
FREIGHT AGENT, DIXON AIR 
LINE R. R. 

Randall E. S., dealer in West India goods. 

RANDALL S. V., attorney at law. 

Ruby B., drugs and medicines. 

SAMUEL & PHILIPS, CABINET WARE- 
ROOMS (at the post office). 

Sherman Albeit, soloon. 

SMALL S. M., postmaster. 

SMITH, FOWLER & CO., LUMBER 
MERCHANTS. 

Stone & Harroun, blacksmiths. 

TAYLOR S., merchant tailor. 

Thomas John, barber shop and eating saloon. 

Thompson & Simmons, dealers in dry goods 
and groceries. 

VAUGHAN , FRUIT AND GROCERY 

DEALER. 

WALKUP HOTEL, H. H. WALKUP, 
PROPRIETOR. 

White Marcus, attorney and counselor. 

Young & Day, dry goods. 



DELAVAN, 
A post village of Tazewell county, in a town- 
ship of the same name, about 153 miles south- 
west from Chicago. 

Eisen P. Saxford, Postmaster. 



DELHI, 

A post village of Jersey county, on the line 
of the Jacksonville and Carrolton R. R. (pro- 
posed), about 15 miles from Alton, and 275 
from Chicago. 

William A. Scott, Postmaster. 



DEL RAY, 

A post village of Iroquois county. 
Lemuel Botp, Postmaster. 

DELTA, 

A post village of McLean county. 
James N. Savidge, Postmaster. 



DEMENT STATION, 

A post village of Ogle county, on the line of 
the Fulton and Iowa R. R., 69 miles fiom 
Chicago. 

Thomas Smith, Postmaster. 



DEMOCRAT, 



A post village of Iroquois county. 
John Clark, Postmaster. 



DENNY, 



A post office of Warren county. 
William Mitchell, Postmaster. 



DERINDA, 



A post town of Jo Daviess county. 

GOTLIEB SCHABBE, Postmaster. 



DE SOTO, 



A thriving village of Jackson county, 300 
miles from Chicago, and 140 miles from St. 
Louis, on the line of the Illinois Central 
R. R. Population, 2,000. 
D. H. Tuthill, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc . 

Beasley Joseph, farmer. 

Eliot J., physician and surgeon. 

Gill John, furniture. 

Hall P. G, farmer. 

Hall S. S. & Bro., merchants and grain 

dealers. 
Hanson John M. & Son, merchants. 
Keiple Jonathan, justice of the peace. 
Kusten Fred. R., notary public and land 

agent. 
Kiefer & Aiken, merchants. 
Kimniel Philip, prop of ho'el and steam saw 

mill. 
Martin & Trover, grocers and confectioners. 
Murphy C. H, physician. 
Parrish Thomas, farmer. 
Reeves & Saundery, general merchants. 
Robinson John, farmer. 
Ross Edward, farmer. 
Schwartz William, farmer. 
Tuthill & Bro., merchants. 
Will Frank, farmer. 
Wolf J. L., druggists. 



DETROIT, 

A township of Peoria county, on the west 
shore of L'eoria lake, 6 miles north-north- 
east from Peoria. 



72 



W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



DETROIT, 

A post village of Pike county, 110 miles 
from St. Louis in a township of same name. 
Enjoys a good business and is on the increase. 
Population of village, 150; village and town- 
ship, about 1,500. 

W. W. Birchard, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Ellis Thomas, farmer. 

Foreman James, farmer. 

Hall Thomas, farmer. 

Harris George C, physician. 

Johnston H. C, lawyer. 

Lyster John, farmer. 

Marlow H., merchant. 

Push James, farmer. 

Sanderson A. C, justice of the peace. 

Stornents C. & S. Caldwell, physicians. 

Stoner D., farmer. 

Stoner Thomas, clergyman. 

Taylor John, farmer. 

Williams & Bro., merchants. 

Williams J. A., farmer. 



DE WITT COUNTY 

Is situated in the central part of the state, 
and has an area of 675 square miles. It is 
drained by the head waters of Salt creek, an 
affluent of the Sangamon river. The surface 
is generally level, and diversified with prairies 
and forests of good timber. The soil is 
highly productive and easily cultivated. 
Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes and pork are the 
staples. Wool is also raised to some extent. 
Coal is found in large quantities. The Illinois 
Central railroad is located through the center 
of the county. The name was given in honor 
of De Witt Clinton, a former governor of 
New York. Capital, Clinton. Population, 
9,700. 



DE WITT, 

A post village of De Witt county, 60 miles 
oast-north-east from Springfield, and about 
130 from Chicago. 
Samuel Walton, Postmaster. 



DIAMOND LAKE, 

A post village of Lake county, near the 
central part. The village takes its name 
from a beautiful sheet of water located with- 
in its borders. 

Samuel A. Stockwell, Postmaster. 



DILLON, 



A post office of Tazewell county, in a town- 
ship of the same name. 

Given J. Dotle, Postmaster. 



DIMMICK, 

A post village of La Salle county, about 5 
miles north from La Salle. 
Archibald Long, jr., Postmaster. 



DIXON, 

The county seat of Lee county, is pleasantly 
situated on the banks of Rock river, where 
the Illinois Central railroad connects with 
the Fulton and Iowa Central branch of the 
Galena road, 98 miles west from Chicago. 
Until 1830, the whole district around Dixon 
was in possession of the Winnebago Indians, 
but in that year, John Dixon, Esq., purchased 
the land on which Dixon now stands, of Gov- 
ernment. In 1837, Dixon was made the 
county seat, and in 1840 a court house was 
erected. Though possessing superior advan- 
tages, the place seems to have advanced but 
slowly until the opening of the railroads. 
In 1845 her population was only 250, and 
only doubled in the ensuing 4 years. Since 
that time the increase has been rapid, and 
the wealth of the city at the present day will 
compare favorably with that of other cities 
of the state. The beauty of the surrounding 
scenery, the healthiness of the climate and 
the rich agricultural land adjacent, added to 
the excellent water power, have induced 
many of the large capitalists to avail them- 
selves of all these advantages from which 
they have reaped stores of wealth. 

On the south bank are two extensive flour- 
ing mills, known as the Dixon Mills, and 
owned by Messrs. C. Godfrey & Sons, and 
a large foundry and machine shop, belonging 
to R. P. Robinson, Esq. Within the limits 
of the city there is also another large steam 
flour mill, J. & J. Daley proprietors, and the 
steam foundry of J. Dement & Co., who are 
also largely engaged in the manufacture of 
plows. These buildings are built of stone, 
four and five stories high, and in constant 
operation. There are also two large saw 
mills, and a starch factory, besides several 
smaller manufacturing establishments of va- 
rious kinds. Dixon is laid out at right angles, 
her streets even and regular, and ornamented 
with beautiful shade trees. The general 
appearance of the city is very prepossessing 
with its mound like hills and verdant vales, 
and its fine groves stretching away on almost 
every side. 

Rock river is here spanned by three good 
bridges, two of which are of wood, the third, 
over which the railroad crosses, is of more 
substantial material, having stone abutments 
and pillars with iron spanners. The river at 
this point is 800 feet wide with 8 feet fall. 
Add to the other advantages, that of a direct 
railway communication east, west, north and 
south, and Dixon becomes one of the most 
interesting of our western cities. There are 
many fine churches and public buildings of 
note ; among the latter is Dixon Collegiate 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



73 



Institute, a splendid brick building, located 
on an eminence overlooking the town and 
commanding a view of the river «nd country 
about. Its accommodations are sufficient 
for 350 students, affording them instruction 
in the higher English branches and classics. 

A weekly paper is published here, called 
the Republican and Telegraph, under, con- 
trol of Messrs. Shaw & Beckwith, editors and 
proprietors ; and two banking establishments. 
A large and commodious hall, capable of 
seating 600 persons, has recently been fitted 
up for concerts and dramatic entertainments, 
under the control of S. B. Bancroft, Esq. 
There are three good hotels, Na-chu-sa, the 
Mansion and Washington Houses ; the first 
of which is first class. Free carriages run 
from these hotels to the cars on arrival and 
departure of trains. Population, 5,500. 

E. B. Baker, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Abbott & Smith, starch factory. 

Abbott N. W,, physician and surgeon. 

Adams J. O, boot and shoemaker. 

Alexander, Howell & Co., agricultural imple- 
ments, seeds, etc. 

ALEXANDER, HOWELL & CO., HARD- 
WARE, GALENA ST. 

Alexander, Howell & Co., tin, copper and 
sheet iron makers. 

BAILY H. M., WATCH MAKER AND JEW- 
ELER. 

Baker E. B., Postmaster. 

BANCROFT SAMUEL B., JEWELRY, 
WATCHES AND SILVER WARE, 5 
Exchange Block. 

Benjamin A. A., saddles and harness. 

Billow Frederick, hardware. 

Bishop C, mason and plasterer. 

Boardman J. S. E., clerk of court. 

BRODHEAD J. & CO., DRUGGISTS AND 
CONFECTIONERS, Main st. 

J. BRODHEAD & CO. 



DIXON, LEE CO., ILL. 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 



Sold Wholesale by 

C. H. Beckwith, 60 Randolph St., 
CHICAGO, ILL., 



Brookner Christopher, saw mill and door 
factory. 

Brown John, collector. 

Brown John, mason and plasterer. 

BURTON J. H., REAL ESTATE, COLLECT- 
ING AND INS. AGT., Main st. 

Cahn Joseph, clothing, Galena st. 

CHENEY & CO.,RESTAURANT, CONFEC- 
TIONERY, Galena st. 



BURITT W. A., BAKER AND CONFEC- 
TIONER, Galena st. 

DALEY J. & J.. PROPRIETORS OF DIXON 
STEAM FLOUR MILLS. 

DAVIS J. W., GROCERIES, Main st. 

DEMENT J. & CO., MANUFACTURERS 
OF THE PITT PLOW, Air Line and 
Cent. Depot. 

DEMENT J. & CO., PROPRIETORS OF 
DIXON FOUNDRY AND MACHINE 
SHOP. 

DICKSON MRS., MILLINERY AND FAN- 
CY GOODS. 

Dunphee H. M., artist. 

EDSALL & SHEFFIELD, ATTORNEYS 
AT LAW, Galena st. 

ELY & RICE, CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS 
AND FURNISHING GOODS, Main st. 

Eustace Hon. J. V., judge of circuit court. 

EXCHANGE HALL, S. B. Bancroft, prop. 

GODFREY C. & SONS, PROPRIETORS OF 
DIXON MILLS. 

Hall H. D., clothing, etc. 

Hare L. H., proprietor of Dixon corn mills 
and dealer in flour, feed and produce. 

HAWLEY J. A., SC. COMMISSIONER. 

HEATON & ATHERTON, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

HEATON & BARNES, PATENT AGENTS. 

Heitmann H., cigars and tobacco. 

HERNCK GEO. L., HARDWARE, AGRI- 
CULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, etc, Main 

HOLDRIDGE & LERANWAY, HOMEO- 
PATHIC PHYSICIANS AND SUR- 
GEONS. 

HOLLISTER J.,SURGEON DENTIST, Main 
street. 

HOPE E., BUTCHER AND STOCK DEAL- 
ER, Main street. 

Johnson W. C. & Bro., groceries and provis- 
ions, Galena st. 

JONES J. L. & CO., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC, Water st. 

Julien Anton, hair dresser and dealer in per- 
fumery. 

Kelsey H. O., saddles and harness. 

LERANWAY CHAS. N., COUNSELOR 
AT LAW AND MASTER IN CHAN- 
CERY. 

Leranway C. N., notary public and justice of 
the peace. 

Leranway C. N., real estate and collecting 
agent. 

Lilley T. L., boots, shoes and rubbers. 

Lowery John, tobacco and cigars. 

Mclntvre Perkins, mattresses, Lounges, etc. 

McKAY A., HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND 
SHOES. 

McKenney F. O, livery stable. 

McKenney James, groceries and provisions. 

MACKAY & WOOD, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW, Main street, 

MALLONY N. E., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

MARTIN A. G., LIVERY AND SALE STA- 
BLE, Main st. 

Maxwell Alonzo, architect and builder. 



74 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Mead. James O, books and stationery. 

Myers I. C, carpenter and joiner. 

Nash J. B., druggist. 

Nash J. B., supervisor. 

NOBLE S. & CO., REAL ESTATE AND 
COLLECTING AGENTS. 

Petersberger E., clothing, Main st. 

PINKHAM A. J., NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Price & Byington, dry goods and clothing. 

Raynolds Chas., Baker. 

Raynolds C. J., dentist. 

Remmus H. W., prop. ofWashington House. 

ROBERTSON, EELLS & CO., BANKERS 
AND EXCHANGE DEALERS. 

ROBINSON R. P., FOUNDRY AND MA- 
CHINE SHOP. 

ROBINSON R. P., MANUFACTURER OF 
YOUNG AMERICA CORN AND COB 
MILL. 

Seymour & Lyman, dry goods. 

Sheffield Wm. E., commissioner for N. Y. 

SMITH CHAS. M., LIVERY STABLE, 
Galena st. 

SMITH L. M., PROPRIETOR MANSION 
HOUSE, Hennepin st. 

Stedman A. C, real estate dealer. 

Stedman & Butler, real estate brokers. 

STEWART B. H, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS, Main st. 

STILES ELIAS B., EXCHANGE BROKER. 

STILES E. B., EXCHANGE, COLLECTION 
AND BANKING OFFICE. 

STILES E. B., LAND AGENT AND NE- 
GOTIATOR OF LOANS. 

STILES S. C, SADDLES AND HARNESS, 
vv fttjGr st 

TOMLIN C. W., BOOTS AND SHOES, 
Water st. 

Townsend and Sheffield, drugs, paints and 
oils. 

Truman E. D., real estate dealer. 

Ulrey J. M., marble and stone workers. 

UTLEY, MORSE & BENJAMIN, HIDES, 
LEATHER, FINDINGS AND SAD- 
DLERY HARDWARE, Main st. 

Van Epps, Ashley & Smith, hats, caps, cloth- 
ing, etc. 

VAN EPPS, ASHLEY & SMITH, DRY 
GOODS, Exchange block. 

WADSWORTH W. M. L., CITY UNDER- 
TAKER, cor Main and Peoria sts. 

Wheeler Ozias, sheriff. 

Wicks & Crawford, artists. 

WILLIAMS S. S., REAL ESTATE AGENT, 
MONEY BROKER & INSURANCE 
AGENT, Galena st. 

WOOD & BOARDMAN, DRY GOODS, 
GROCERIES, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 

Wooding E. D., blacksmith. 

Woodyatt R., groceries and provisions. 



DODDSVILLE, 



A post village of McDonough county. 
Geo. H. Young, Postmaster. 



DOGTOOTH, 

A post office of Alexander county. 
Jefferson Martin, Postmaster. 



DOGWOOD, 

A post office of Randolph county. 
J. C. Simpson, Postmaster. 



DOLSON, 

A post village of Clark county. 
John B. Beadles, Postmaster. 



DOOLEY'S FARM, 



A post office of McLean county. 
Wm. Dooley, Postmaster. 



DORRANCE, 

A post office of Stark county. 
Chauncy D. Fuller, Postmaster. 



DORSET, 

A post village of De Kalb county, 66 miles 
west by south from Chicago. 

Alexander McNasii, Postma3ter. 



DOUGLASVILLE, 

A post village of Pike county, on the Mis- 
sissippi river, about 100 miles above St. Louis. 
Wm. Bowers, Postmaster. 



DOVER, 

A post village of Bureau county, 144 miles 
north from Springfield. It is on the line of 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad, 
104 miles from Chicago. 
Wm. B. Hanford, Postmaster. 



DOWLING, 

A post office of Macon county. 
Wm. Dowling, Postmaster. 



DOWNER'S GROVE, 

A post village of Du Page county, 24 miles 
west-south-west from Chicago. 
James Depue, Postmaster. 



DEUMMOND, 



A post office of Henderson county. 
Ephraim Hammack, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIKECTOKY. 



15 



DEUEY, 

A post village of Rock Island county on the 
east shore of the Mississippi river, a few miles 
below Rock Island. 
James C. Kimbrel, Postmaster. 



DUDLEY, 



A post village of Edgar county, on the 
line of the Terre Haute and Alton rail- 
road, 159 miles from St. Louis and 193 miles 
from Chicago by rail. 

Thomas J. Langeord, Postmaster. 



DUG OUT, 



A post office of Henderson county. 
James M. Robinson, Postmaster. 



DUSTCART ON, 



A post office of White county. 
Richard Langford, Postmaster. 



DUNDEE, 

A post village in Kane county, township of 
Dundee, situated on the Fox river and Fox 
River Valley railroad, and contains several 
grist mills, carriage shops and several stores, 
a number of churches, etc., is 35 miles north- 
west of Chicago and 5 miles north of Elgin. 
Population, 1,500. 

E. S. Hollister, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Basworth J. C. & F. S., dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 

BROXIX G. S., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

CRABTREE H. N. & BRO., lumber dealers, 
coal, produce. 

Edwards E. H. C, general store. 

Goff P. H. D.,M.D. 

HAASE LOUIS, grist mill. 

Hibbard J. L., broom factory. 

HODGE SS & WILLMARTH, dealers in dry 
goods, groceries, etc. 

Hou J. II., grocer. 

Perry F. E., butcher. 

Rober C, cabinet and chair factory. 

Sherman William, hardware, stoves, etc. 

TORREXCE H. G., groceries, drugs and per- 
fumery. 

Vening E. W., attorney at law. 

Walker P. E., harness shop. 

Whipple W. E., Dundee Hotel. 



DUNHAM, 

A post township in the west part of 
McHenry county. 

Wilson Randall, Postmaster 



DUNLEITH, 

A flourishing city of Jo Daviess county, 
on the east bank of the Mississippi river, 
and the northern terminus of the Illinois 
Central railroad. At this point boats for 
the Upper Mississippi connect with the rail- 
road, which, during the season of navigation, 
make it a place of consequence. It is also 
connected by a ferry with Dubuque and trains 
running west over the Dubuque and Pacific 
railroad into central Iowa. Population, about 
2,000. 

James Robinson, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bratt X. M., hardware and stove dealers. 

Buesemer J., proprietor Tremont House. 

Connolly E., boot and shoemaker, Sinsinawa 
avenue. 

Crighton J., physician and surgeon, office Sin- 
sinawa avenue, near the landing. 

Curtie James, proprietor Tremont House. 

Enos M. T., livery stable keeper, Menomence 
street. 

Fox W. B., physician and surgeon, office on 
Sinsinawa avenue, between Second and 
Third streets. 

Fox W. B., city drug store. 

Goodale Mrs., milliner,cor Will and Third sts. 

Holdorf F., dry goods, clothing and hardware. 

Lundy W. M., boot and shoe shop. 

Merry C. H., coal dealer, office Warner House. 

Mertes X., proprietor of Eldorado House. 

Odell R. E., notarv public, east end of Argyle. 

PAUL & FLYXX, EDITORS AXD PRO- 
PRIETORS OF THE "DAILY ADVER- 
TISER," Office corner Sinsinawa avenue. 

Pierce J. B., proprietor Argyle House. 

Read W.B., coal dealer, office east end Argyle 
House. 

Rumbold T. F., physician and surgeon, Sin- 
sinawa avenue between Third and Fourth 
streets. 

Siedhof & Boyrer, importers of liquors and 
cigars, Argyle House. 

Smith J., proprietor of the Bates House. 

Thomson John, merchant tailor and dealer in 
furnishing goods. 



DU PAGE COUNTY, 

Is situated in the north-east part of the state, 
and has an area of 340 square miles. It is 
drained by the east and west branches of 
the Du Page river. The surface is nearly 
level and the soil highly productive. A 
large portion of the county is prairie. Wheat, 
corn, oats and hay are the staples. It con- 
tains a large number of churches and several 
printing offices. The Illinois and Michigan 
canal passes along the south-east border, and 
the county is intersected by the Galena and 
Chicago Union railroad. At the western 
part of the county this road unites with the 
Burlington and Quincy, and Chicago, Fulton 



76 



G. W. HAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 



and Iowa lines. In 1857, the amount of 
property returned by the assessors was: 
Real estate, $1,963,685 ; personal property, 
$899,700; making a total of $2,863,385. 
The returns being only fifty per cent, of the 
actual value would make the true amount of 
property in the county, $5,726,770. Capital, 
Naperville. Population, about 14,500. 



DTJ PAGE, 



A post village of Will county in the township 
of the same name, on Du Page river, 14 miles 
north from Joliet. 

A. C. Paxson, Postmaster. 



DU QUOIN, 

A thriving post village of Perry county, on the 
line of the Illinois Central railroad. The 
town is supported by its immense beds of 
coal, which are considered inexhaustible. 
The railroad company have also large ma- 
chine shops here, which give employment 
to a number of hands. The coal got at this 
place is about the best and purest which is 
found in the state, burning freely and steadily, 
giving an abundance of heat, requires but 
little tending and burns up thoroughly to 
ashes, leaving none of the refuse so common 
to inferior articles of this fuel. Population, 
1,200. 
Chester A. Keyes, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BartlettR. W., blacksmithing and plow mak- 
ing. 

Briggs & Co., meat market. 

Brookings C. H., physician and surgeon. 

Burgess T. H., physician and surgeon. 

Easley F. P., tailor. 

Frizell W., staple and fancy dry goods. 

Fuller & Tijon, general merchants. 

Gesner J., bakery and oyster depot. 

Gordon D. C, watch maker and jeweler. 

Hammack & Welden, attorneys and counsel- 
ors at law. 

Hoffman & Clayton, stoves and tin ware. 

Johnson H. W., architect, builder and con- 
tractor. 

Keyes C. A., dealer in real estate, lime, etc. 

Littleton George H., proprietor Littleton 
House. 

McClure George Y., dry goods and varieties. 

Maugold J. G, lumber. 

Meserole & Knox, dry goods, clothing, cloaks, 
mantillas, etc. 

Mitchell A. J., insurance agent. 

Mason A. W., treasurer Illinois Central Iron 
and Coal Mining Co. 

Neighbours William R„ clothing, hats and 
caps. 

Smith G. S. & Co., dry goods, clothing, fur- 
niture, etc. 



Spotts Samuel, architect, builder and con- 
tractor. 

Stovin J. Carville, supt. Tetley coal mine. 

Trescott A. A. & Co., furniture, agricultural 
implements, etc. 

Watkins Paul, editor and publisher Mining 
Journal. 

Watkins Paul, insurance and land agent. 

Welden E. A., proprietor Du Quoin House. 

Wheatley Isaac L., blacksmith. 

Winn J. P., dry goods and groceries. 



DURHAM, 

A post office in Hancock county. 
John M. Squire, Postmaster. 



DWIGHT, 

A flourishing post village of Livingston coun- 
ty, on the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 74 miles from Chicago, and 211 miles 
from St. Louis. Was incorporated in 1854, 
has a church costing $300, and one public 
school house costing $3,500. Population, 250. 
David McWilliams, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Chillcott Elihu, blacksmith. 

Eaton John, wagon maker. 

Ferris Daniel D., merchant. 

Hagarty J. H, physician. 

Lutz Simeon, blacksmith. 

McWilliams David, merchant. 

Rockwell Joseph W., wagon maker. 



EAGLE, 

A post office of La Salle county, in the town, 
ship of the same name, on Vermilion river 
south-east from La Salle. 
Isaac Painter, Postmaster. 



EAGLE CLIFFS, 

A post village of Monroe county, in the west 
part. 

S. M. Miles, Jr., Postmaster. 



EAGLE POINT, 

A small post village of Ogle county, about 
100 miles north from Peoria. 
M. Crary, Jr., Postmaster. 



EARL, 



A flourishing village of La Salle county, on 
the line of the C, B. & Q. R. R., 77 miles 
south of west from Chicago. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



11 



EAST CAMBRIDGE, 

A small post village of Henry county, near 
the central part. 
Wm, Daggett, Postmaster. 



EAST CONCORD, 

A post village of Bureau county. 
T. C. Dow, Postmaster. 



EAST PAWPAW, 

A post office of Lee county. 

Andrew H. Breese, Postmaster. 



EAST WHEATLAND, 

A post office of Will county, in the north- 
west part. 
Amasa S. Thomas, Postmaster. 



EATON, 



A post office of Crawford county. 
John Eaton, Postmaster. 



EDGAR COUNTY 

Is situated in the east part of the state, bor 
dering on Indiana, a few miles from the Wa- 
bash river. Area, about 600 square miles. 
It is drained by Brulette and Clear creeks, 
affluents of the Wabash river, and by Little 
Embarras river. The surface is generally 
regular, and soil excellent. The county con- 
tains extensive prairies, and, in some parts, 
is well timbered. Corn, wheat, oats, pork, 
wool and butter, are the staples. It contains 
several fine churches, two or three printing 
offices, and is well supplied with public and 
private schools, at which the attendance is 
quite large. Named in honor of Col. John 
Edgar, one of the earliest settlers of the state. 
Capital, Paris. Population, about 14,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS: 

Circuit Judge, A. B. Austin. 
County Clerk, J. W. S. Alexander. 
County Treasurer, John H. Connelly. 
County Surveyor, B. F. Miller. 



EDGEWOOD, 

A thriving little village of Effingham county, 
on the line of the Illinois Central (Chicago 
branch) railroad, 217 miles from Chicago. 
Like most of the new towns on the lines of 
the various railroads, this is fast increasing in 
size and importance. 



EDGINGTON, 

A post village of Rock Island county, near 
the center, and about 20 miles south-west 
from Rock Island city. 

Edward Burrall, Jr., Postmaster. 



EDWARDS COUNTY 

Is located in the east-south-east part of the 
state, and has an area of 200 square miles. 
The Wabash river touches its south-east ex- 
tremity, the Little Wabash flows through the 
western part, and Bon Pas creek forms ks 
eastern boundary. The surface presents a 
succession of rolling prairies and forests. The 
soil is good. Corn, oats, hay and pork, are 
the staples. The county contains some 20 
churches, of the various denominations, and 
has several very fine schools, which are well 
attended. A plank road extends from the 
Wabash river to Albion, the county seat. 
Named in honor of Ninian Edwards, once 
governor of the territory of Illinois. Popu- 
lation, 5,750. 



EDWARDS STATION, 

A flourishing post village of Peoria county, 
on the hue of the Peoria and Oquawka rail- 
road, 13 miles west from Peoria, and 150 
miles south-west fronijChicago. 
E. D. Edwards, Postmaster. 



EDWARDSVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Madison 
county, is pleasantly situated on the Cohokia 
creek, 74 miles south by west from Spring- 
field, and in the midst of a highly productive 
district. Distance from St. Louis, about 15 
miles ; from Chicago, 295 miles. A United 
States land office is located there. The vil- 
lage contains several churches and an acad- 
emy. 

Thos. J. Prickett, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Anderson J. M., civil engineer and surveyor, 

Bickelhaupt George, bakery and confection- 
ery. 

Bitter Alexander, saddles and harness. 

Boyd & Terry, tailors. 

Coventry & Dunnagan, dry goods, groceries, 
hardware, etc. 

Hobson J., drugs and medicines. 

Gillespie J. & D., atrorneys and counselors 
at law. 

Gillespie M., insurance and land agent. 

Gillespie & Robinson, dry goods, groceries, 
clothing, etc. 

Krafft F. T., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Lewellen R. H., Ocean Wave saloon. 

McCorkle Jas. L., undertaker. 



Y8 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Metcalf A. W., insurance agent. 

Newsham T. J., architect and contractor. 

O'Hara Mrs. &' Miss, millinery and fancy 
goods. 

Robinson Miss Endema, millinery and fancy 
goods. 

Ruegger Edward, physician. 

Sloss J. H., editor and proprietor Madison 
Advertiser. 

Sloss & Rutherford, attorneys at law and so- 
licitors in chancery. 

Smith H. R., physician. 

Smith S., plow manufactory. 

Spillman J. F., physician and surgeon. 

Stock Louis, guns, etc. 

Thompson Seth M., stage proprietor. 

Taxhom Charles, stoves and tinware. 

West Edward M., insurance agent. 

Whaling & McCorkell, groceries. 

Whaling William, stage contractor. 

Wheeler W. E., civil engineer and county 
surveyor. 

Wielandy J. F., attorney and counselor at 
law and notary public. 



EFFINGHAM COUNTY 

Is situated toward the south-east part of the 
state, and contains about 500 square miles. 
It is drained by the Little Wabash river. 
The surface is nearly level, and about equally 
divided into prairie and woodland. The soil 
is fertile. Grain and wool are the staples. 
Mines of copper, iron and lead exist to a 
considerable extent. The county is intersect- 
ed by the Chicago branch of the Illinois Cen- 
tral railroad. Excellent water power is ob- 
tained from the Little Wabash. Capital, Ew- 
ington. Population, about 7,800. 



COUNTY OFFICERS: 

County Judge, N. E. Tarrant. 
Associate Judges, T. J. Gillinwales, H. H. 
Huels. 

County Clerk, D. Rinehart. 

Circuit Clerk, John S Kellet. 

County Treasurer, A. B. Kagey. 

SJwrijf, 0. L. Kelley. 

School Commissioner, John B. Carpenter. 



EFFINGHAM, 



A village in the county of the same name, 
and on the line of the Chicago branch of the 
Illinois Central railroad. Is increasing rap- 
idlv. 



ELA, 

A post township in the south part of Lake 
county, on the line of the St. Paul and Fond 
du Lac railroad. Population, about 1,200. 
Chas. Quentin, Postmaster. 



ELBRIDGE, 

A post village of Edgar county, 10 miles S. 
E. from Paris, is surrounded by fine farming 
lands, a portion of which are under cultiva- 
tion. 

Thos. McDonald, Postmaster. 



ELDARA, 



A small post village of Pike county, near the 
Mississippi river. 

Samuel Lippincott, Postmaster. 



ELEROY, 



A thriving little village of Stephenson coun- 
ty, on the line of the Illinois Central railroad, 
8 miles west from Freeport, and 129 miles 
west from Chicago. 



ELGIN 



Is a delightfully situated city of Kane county, 
on both banks of the Fox river, 42 miles 
north-west from Chicago, and is one of the 
most important business points in the county. 
At this place the Galena and Chicago Union 
and Fox River Valley railroads unite. Elgin 
was settled by Mr. Gifford, of New York, 
who located there with his family in the fall 
of 1835. Additions were soon made to their 
small number, by other hardy adventurers, 
principally, however, relatives of Mr. Gif- 
ford's familv. 

In the winter of 1836, the "Pioneer Mill" 
was built, which consisted of a huge log, dug 
out at one end, like a mortar. Above this 
was a long handled pestle, attached to a spring 
pole. The grain was thrown into this mor- 
tar, and there pounded into meal. Mr. Gif- 
ford, the proprietor, gave free use of his mill 
to the neighbors, merely saying to them, 
" you are welcome to use the mill, but must 
not ask me to pound." 

In the winter of 1835, a log cabin was put 
up, which is still standing, and is known a3 
the " Culvert tavern stand," and in the fall 
of the same year a charter was granted Mr. 
Gifford, for astate road leading from Chicago 
to Galena, through Elgin, he being appoint- 
ed one of the commissioners to survey and 
locate it. The first frame building erected 
there was in 1838. 

Elgin prides herself in her school build- 
ings, which are among the finest in the coun- 
try. Elgin Academy, under the charge of 
Robert Blenkiron, with two male and two fe- 
male assistants, is fast gaining an enviable 
popularity. Beside this, there are many 
others, both of a public and private character, 
all well sustained. Population, 4,000. 

Edward S. Wilcox, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



T9 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ADAMS B., druggist and apothecary. 

Adams E. W., dry goods. 

ADAMS G. B, dealer in watches, clocks, 
jewelry, silver ware and fancy goods. 

BARKER WILLIAM, watch maker and jew- 
eler. 

Bashinski Louis, clothing store. 

Brown M. P., groceries. 

Burritt B., justice of peace. 

CALVERT J. S., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

CHARKE & SMITH, lumber, manufacturers 
of doors, sash and window blinds. 

Coehle C, Elgin hotel. 

Coffee P. H., cooper. 

Colby E. F., attorney at law. 

Cole D. M., shoe dealer. 

Cook E., clothing store. 

Davidson 0., banker. 

Peerman F., dry goods and groceries. 

Fenurk Joseph, merchant tailor. 

Gantt Dr. E. W. 

Gifford E., attorney and counselor at law, 
school commissioner. 

Gifford J. H., forwarding and commission 
merchant. 

Hadlock Alfred, threshing machine mnfr. 

Harvy G. P. & Co., forwarding and commis- 
sion. 

Himes H., groceries. 

HUBBARD W. G., dry goods and groceries. 

Jones Elisha, dealer in hardware. 

JOSLYN E. ft, ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Kelsy E. A., glove manufactory. 

Kimball & Howard, Waverly House. 

Kimball E. A., heavy and shelf hardware. 

KIMBALL G. W., cabinet warehouse. 

Kimball Wm. C, grist mill. 

KING JOHN, counselor at law. 

Knott James, groceries. 

Lawrence, Malony & Co., distillers. 

Lights Frederick, merchant tailor. 

McBRIDE T., lumber, coal and produce 
merchant. 

MALLITT WALTER, CARRIAGE AND 
ORNAMENTAL PAINTING, BAN- 
NERS, POLITICAL FLAGS, ETC. 

Mantz Charles, cabinet shop. 

Matson & Fenwick, blacksmiths. 

MERRILL G. H., SUPT. F. R. V. R. R. 

PADELFORD R. W., CLERK COMMON 
PLEAS, CITY CLERK, AND DA- 
GUERREIAN ARTIST. 

Paiper A. 

PAPST JOSEPH, PROPRIETOR CHICAGO 
HOTEL. 

Pay ton J., groceries and provisions. 

Poverdasher John, saloon. 

PRATT P. B., PHYSICIAN, SURGEON, 
DENTIST. 

Raymond G. B. & Co., hats and caps. 

RENWICK & CHAPPELL, CARRIAGE 
MANUFACTORY. 

Rvan E., general store. 

SAUNDERS WILLIAM, JR., general gro- 
cery and provision store. 



Shaw, City Hotel. 

Sherman Henry, drug store. 

SMITH W. S., hardware, cutlery. 

Stafford McOskev, merchant tailor. 

STILES S. C, MACHINIST AND MANU- 
FACTURER OF AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS. 

Strong Markus, cabinet shop. 

SYLEA P., manufacturer of washing ma- 
chines, churns, etc. 

TAYLOR JAMES S., JUSTICE OF PEACE, 
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT 
LAW. 

TRUESDELL & KESLER, surgeon dentists. 

Van Nostrand P., cabinet ware room. 

Vestine L. B., dry goods. 

WALDRON J., attorney at law, notary 
public, etc. 

Wallace J., bookstore. 

Ward L. G. & G. M., marble factory. 

Ward S. L., harness shop. 

WILCOX JOHN S., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Yarwood L. H. & Co., dry goods. 



ELIDA. 

A village in township of the same name, 
situated in the southern part of Winnebago 
county, about 100 miles west from Chicago. 
Population, about 600. 
Wm. Spencer, Postmaster. 



ELIZA, 



A small post village of Mercer county, about 
5 miles east from the Mississippi river. 
David F. Noble, Postmaster. 



ELIZABETH, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, is 
pleasantly situated on Apple river, 18 miles 
from Galena and about 160 from Chicago. 
Its importance is mainly derived from the 
rich lead mines with which it is surrounded. 
Population, about 700. 

Abraham Wilcox, Postmaster. 



ELIZABETHTOWK", 

A flourishing post village, capital of Hardin 
county, on the Ohio river, 219 miles south- 
south-east from Springfield. 
John E. Mott, Postmaster. 

Turner James B., attorney at law. 



ELK GROVE, 

A post office of Cook county, near the line 
of the St. Paul and Fond du Lac railroad, 
about 25 miles north-west from Chicago. 
Caleb Lamb, Postmaster. 



80 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



ELK HART CITY, 

A thriving post village of Logan county, on 
the line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago 
railroad, 170 miles from Chicago and 115 
from St. Louis. This place is rapidly advanc- 
ing in wealth and population, being situated 
in a highly fertile district, and having direct 
access to the two great commercial cities of 
the west. 

W. Rankin, Postmaster. 



ELEHOEN, 
A post village of Washington county, on an 
affluent of the Kaskaskia river, about 40 miles 
south-east from St. Louis. 

Rollin S. Fillmore, Postmaster. 



ELKHOEN GROVE, 
A post village of Carroll county, in the south- 
eastern part, 15 miles south-east from the 
county seat. 
Calvin Tucker, Postmaster. 



ELKTON, 

A post village of Crawford county, 130 miles 
south-west from Springfield. 
Jonx Rathbun, Postmaster. 



ELLIOTTSTOWN, 

A post office of Effingham county, about 210 
miles from Chicago. 

Lewis J. Field, Postmaster. 



ELLIS GROVE, 

A post office of Randolph county, about 50 
miles east of south from St. Louis. 
Geo. S. Ellis, Postmaster. 



ELLISON, 

A post office of Warren county, about 20 
miles east from the Mississippi river. 
Alfred B. Yoho, Postmaster. 



ELLISVILLE, 

A post village of Fulton county, on Spoon 
river, about 75 miles north-west from Spring- 
field. 
Anson Smith, Postmaster. 



ELM GROVE, 

A post village of Adams county, in the 
north-east part, near the line of the North- 
ern Cross railroad, and about 30 miles east 
from the Mississippi river. 
John Spense, Postmaster. 



ELMIRA, 

A post village of Stark county, in the north- 
east part, about 135 miles from Chicago, and 
within a few miles of the Chicago, Burling- 
ton and Quincy railroad. 
Thos. Ltle, Postmaster. 



ELMORE, 



A post office of Peoria county. 
Jason Wilkins, Postmaster. 



ELM POINT, 

A post office of Bond county, 60 miles south 
from Springfield. 

Wm. Paisley, Postmaster. 



ELM TREE, 



A post village of Hancock county, about 100 
miles west-north-west from Springfield. 
Wm. S. Wright, Postmaster. 



ELM WOOD, 



A post village of Peoria county, in the west- 
ern part, on the Peoria and Oquawka rail- 
road, 27 miles west from Peoria, 
Anson S. Andrews, Postmaster. 



ELPASO, 



A small but thriving village in Woodford 
county, on the line of the Illinois Central 
railroad, about 10 mile3 north from Bloom- 
ington, and 119 miles south-west from Chi- 
cago, formerly called Peoria Junction. 



ELVINA, 



A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
Thos. Prowse, Postmaster. 



ELWOOD, 

Is a thriving village of Will county, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 48 miles from Chicago. It is a place 
of some considerable trade, and the farmers 
are mostly wealthy. The population of the 
town of Jackson, of which Elwood forms a 
part, is about 1,500. 
Wm. Turner, Postmaster. 



ELYSIUM, 

A post village of McHenry county, 50 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 
C. W. McClure, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



81 



EMBAERAS RIVER STATION, 

A small station in Coles county, on the line 
of the Terre Haute, Alton and St. Louis 
railroad, about 15 miles east from Mattoon. 



EMERALD POINT, 

A post village of Morgan county. 
Joseph Hays, Postmaster. 



EMINENCE, 

A post village of Logan county, near the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 40 miles north-north-east from Spring- 
field. 

John Haws, Postmaster. 



EMMA, 



A post village of White county, about 1^ 
miles north-east from the Little Wabash 
river. 
Wm. L. Garrison, Postmaster. 



EMMETT, 



A post village of Lake county. 
David Jonks, Postmaster. 



EMPIRE, 



A post office of Whiteside county. 
Joel Harvey, Postmaster. 



ENDOfi, 

A post village of Will county, in the east 
part. 
Eben W. Beach, Postmaster. 



ENGLISH PRAIRIE, 

A post village of McHenry county, 50 miles 
north-west from Chicago, in the north- 
western part of the county. 
Harvey Wilson, Postmaster. 



ENON, 

A post village of Bureau county, near the 
center, about 7 miles north-west from the 
county seat. 
Apollos W. Ballard, Postmaster. 



ENSENADA, 



A post office of Marion county. 
W. C. Alvis, Postmaster. 

6 



ENTERPRISE, 

A post village of Wayne county, on the Elm 
creek, 55 miles south-east from Vandalia. 
H. W. Fainsworth, Postmaster. 



EQUALITY, 

A post village, capital of Gallatin county, 
on Saline creek, 14 miles west by north from 
the Ohio river, and 187 miles south-south- 
east from Springfield. The manufacture of 
salt is carried on to some extent in the 
vicinity. A proposed line of railroad from 
Vincennes, Indiana, to Mound City, Illinois, 
will intersect the village. 

W. II. Crawford, Postmaster. 



ERIE, 

A post village of Whiteside county, on Rock 
river, 76 miles north-north-west from Peoria. 
N. D. Barnum, Postmaster. 



ERIN, 

A post village of McHenry county, 64 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 

Peter McFarland, Postmaster. 



ERIN, 

A township in the west part of Stephenson 
county. Population, about 1,100. 



ESSEX, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
Charles Foot, Postmaster. 



EUREKA, 

A post village of Woodford county, on the 
Peoria and Oquawka railroad, 140 miles 
south-west from Chicago, and 150 miles north- 
east from St. Louis. Eureka College, a 
flourishing institution, with about 250 stu- 
dents, is situated at this place, within 1^ miles 
of the depot. Population, 500. 
J. L. Springate, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Baird H. C, harness and saddle maker. 

Burton J. R., lumber. 

Clark & Dennis, dry goods. 

Darst John, farmer. 

Graham William, groceries. 

Jones J. J., dry goods. 

Lenord Eli, grain dealer. 

Major & Co., proprietors flouring mill. 

Myers E. B., farmer. 

Major Joseph, farmer. 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



Myer A. M., hotel keeper. 
Oatman J. R., grain dealer. 
SPRINGATE J. L., PHYSICIAN 
DRUGGIST. 



AND 



EVANS' MILL, 



A post office of Morgan county. 
James B.' Seymour, Postmaster. 



EVANSTON", 



A beautiful village of Cook county, on the 
shore of lake Michigan, and on the line of 
the Chicago and Milwaukee railroad, 12 miles 
from the former city. The place has been 
built up principally by the enterprise of 
wealthy merchants and business men from 
Chicago, who have residences there. 
James B. Colvin, Postmaster. 



EVANSVILLE, 



A post village of Randolph county, on the 
Kaskaskia river, 135 miles south from Spring- 
field. 
J. Chesxutwood, Postmaster. 



EWING, 



A post office of Franklin county, in the 
southern part. 
Bennett Scarborough, Postmaster. 



EWINGTON, 

A thriving post village, capital of Effingham 
county, on the Little Wabash river, 82 miles 
south-east from Springfield. The water power 
there is excellent. The proposed Atlantic 
and Mississippi railroad passes through this 
place. Population, 250. 
D. Rinehart, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bacon, Hyde & Co., drugs, medicines, paints, 
oils, glass, etc. 

Caldwell B. D., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

COOPER WILLIAM B., editor and pub- 
lisher of Effingham Pioneer. 

Fisher W. S. N., physician and surgeon. 

Funkhauser P. & P. L., merchants. 

Kagay B. F., attorney and counselor at law. 

Leerone John, physician. 

RINEHART D., MERCHANT. 

Stephenson & Cooper, attorneys at law and 
land agents. 



EXETER, 

A post village of Scott county, 50 miles west 



from Springfield, and near the line of the 
Great Western railroad. 
James Neely, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Boyland R. J , farmer. 

Breevort John, farmer. 

Brown Asa, farmer. 

Limbarger George, farmer. 

Noel Gabriel, farmer. 

Pritchard William, justice of the peace. 

SNOAD HENRY, JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 
Snyder Benjamin, farmer. 
Spafford S. M., merchant. 



FAIRFIELD, 

A flourishing post village, capital of Wayne 
county, 120 miles south of east from St. 
Louis, and about 200 from Chicago. It con- 
tains a handsome court house and many other 
fine buildings. Population, 1,500. 
T. L. Cooper. Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc . 

Baer B., general merchant. 
Barkley J. G., justice of peace. ■ 
Bcecher C. A., attorney. 
Boggs R. L., physician and druggist. 
Bon ham T. T. & E., general merchants. 
Bucher E., judge and attorney at law. 
Clark J. & Co., groceries. 
COOPER T. L. & CO., GENERAL MER- 
CHANTS. 
Cooper Wm. M., physician and druggist. 
Cope J. D., druggist. 
Fitzgerrat J., general merchant. 
George F. & Co., general merchants. 
Hall Jacob, general merchant. 
Hanna R. P., attorney at law. 
Hooper S., justice of peace. 
Johnson E. A., general merchant. 
Medlar R., groceries, 
Trousdale J., attorney at law. 
Turney J. J. R., physician and druggist. 
Turney L. J. S., attorney at law. 
Wilson S. J. R , justice of peace. 



FAIRVIEW, 



A post village of Fulton county, 280 miles 
from St. Louis and 220 miles from Chicago. 
Is in the midst of a fertile district and enjoys 
a good amount of business. Population, 450. 
J. V. D. B. Van Doren, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Alcott Henry, farmer. 
Anderson A., farmer. 
Anderson Jas., farmer. 



GAZETTEER AND .BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



S3 



Anderson Wm., pastor of Dutch Reformed 
church. 

Burrow A., groceries. 

Curry T. W., pastor of Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Curtis & Taylor, dry goods and groceries. 

Davis Jas., farmer. 

Davis Richard, farmer. 

Downin Jacob S., farmer. 

Ellis Jas., farmer. 

Hagerman C. D., drugs, medicines, etc. 

Hartough H. H., farmer. 

Lewis Geo. W., hotel keeper. 

Martin Jas. W., physician. 

Miner Wm. V., farmer. 

Morse T. M., farmer. 

Negly Jacob, farmer. 

Negley Jas. B., farmer. 

Parks Jas., farmer. 

Polhemus Saul G., farmer. 

Pumyea Mrs. C. S., farmer. 

Rumsey S. B., farmer. 

Smith John, farmer. 

Ten Eyek Peter, farmer. 

Tuttle John, farmer. 

Van Arsdale P. B., farmer. 

Van Derveer Wm. F., farmer. 

VAN DOREN J. V. D. B., POSTMASTER. 

Voorhees John G., farmer. 

Voorhees R. S. & Co., dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 

Wilson Abm. D., pastor of Dutch Reformed 
church. 

Wilson & Brother, dry goods and groceries. 

Wright Wm., physician. 

Wyckoff J. & S. F., dry goods and groceries. 



FAIRVILLE, 

A post office of La Salle county. 
Ceorge W. Norton, Postmaster. 



FARINA, 

A station on the line of the Illinois Central 
railroad (Chicago branch), in Fayette county, 
227 miles south from Chicago. It is fast 
being settled by people of industrious habits, 
chiefly from the east. 



FAIRWEATHER, 

A post office of Adams county. 
Abraham High, Postmaster. 



FARLOW'S GROVE, 

A post village of Mercer county, on Edwards 
river, about 20 miles south from Rock Island. 
John II. Park, Postmaster. 



FARMER'S FARM, 

A post office of Iroquois county. 
William Stump, Postmaster. 



FARMER'S HALL, 

A post village of Knox county, 50 miles 
west-north-west from Peoria. 
John W. Stevens, Postmaster. 



FARMINGTON, 

A beautiful and thriving post village of Ful- 
ton county, near the line of the Peoria and 
Oquawka railroad, 24 miles west from Peoria. 
It is situated in an undulating, fertile country, 
which is finely diversified by woodlands and 
prairies. 
John W. Russell, Postmaster. 



FARM RIDGE, 

A post village of La Salle county, 55 miles 
north-east from Peoria. 

Elmer Baldwin, Postmaster. 



FAYETTE COUNTY 

Is situated in the south central part of Illi- 
nois, and has an area of 640 square miles. 
The Kaskaskia river flows through the county 
in a south-westerly direction, being joined in 
its passage by numerous creeks. The sur- 
face is generally level but diversified by 
prairies and woodland ; some of the first are 
quite dense. The soil is highly productive. 
Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, beans, cattle and 
swine are the staples. The county contains 
numerous churches, a seminary of learning 
and other public buildings, while its streams 
furnish abundance of water power for mill- 
ing and manufacturing purposes. It is 
intersected by the Illinois Central railroad, 
which has tended greatly to increase ita 
prosperity. It is one of the oldest counties 
in the state. Capital, Vandalia. Population, 
about 10,500. 



FAYETTE, 



A post village of Greene county, 50 miles 
south-west from Springfield. 
Thomas Hughes, Postmaster. 



FAYETTEVILLE, 

A post village of St. Clair county, on the 
Kaskaskia river, 28 miles south-east from St. 
Louis. 

Charles Frederick, Postmaster. 



FERDINAND, 



A post village of Mercer county, in the north- 
west part. 

John H. Elwell, Postmaster. 



84 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



PIATT, 

A post office of Fulton county. 
Peter Wheeler, Postmaster. 



FIDELITY, 



A post office of Jersey county. 
Quin M. Hausklns, Postmaster. 



FIELDON, 

A post village of Jersey county, in the north- 
west part, about 60 miles north-west from 
St. Louis. Population, about 600. 
J. G. Spencer, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades : Etc- 

Burch Barnet, farmer. 

Close J. J., merchant. 

Felter P., farmer. 

Felter W. W., merchant. 

Medford James, farmer. 

Piper J., merchant. 

Spencer A. C, farmer. 

SPENCER J. G., MERCHANT. 

Winans N. T., physician and surgeon. 



FILLMORE, 

A post village of Montgomery county, 14 
miles north-west from Yandalia, and about 
the same distance south-east from the county 
seat. 
Jonathan B. Lane, Postmaster. 



FINCASTLE, 

A post office of Clark county. 
John W. Morgan, Postmaster. 



FITZ HENRY, 

A post office of Ogle county. 
Freeman Woodcock, Postmaster. 



FLAT ROCK, 



A post office of Crawford county. 
Wm. Maxwell, Postmaster. 



FLINT, 

A post office of Pike county. 
Geo. Alexander, Postmaster. 



FLORA, 

A post village of Clay county, on the line of 
the Ohio and Mississippi railroad, 96 miles 
east from St. Louis. 
Havillah G. Gunn, Postmaster. 



FLORENCE, 

A flourishing post village of Pike county, on 
the right bank of the Illinois river, about 10 
miles east from Pittsfield, the county seat. 
It has a fine steamboat landing. 
Thillis Peckenpaugh, Postmaster. 



FLORIDA, 

A post office of Putnam county. 
Christian Cassell, Postmaster. 



FORESTON, 

A thriving post village in the township of 
the same name, in Ogle county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad, about 100 
miles from Chicago, and 260 from St. Louis. 
The country around the village is new, but is 
fast being settled by a hardy set of men, who 
are making great efforts to develop its re- 
sources. Two fine hotels are to be found 
here, the American and the Albion houses. 
Population of village, 300; of township, 500. 
Samuel Mitchell, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Albion House, Wm. Sloggett, proprietor. 

Allen & Rogers, grain and lumber dealers. 

American House, Watson Kennedy, proprie- 
tor. 

Beebee N. W., farmer. 

Campbell A., farmer. 

Door & Swett, grain dealers. 

Door H., dry goods and groceries. 

Heller & Toms, grain and lumber dealers. 

Hewett & Emick, grain dealers. 

Hewett & Emick, groceries and queensware. 

Hewett G. W., farmer. 

Heller H., drv goods and groceries. 

MITCHELL "SAMUEL, POSTMASTER. 

Rhinehart D. & J. C, dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 

Rowland Andrew, farmer. 

Sager A., hardware. 



FORKSVILLE, 

A post village of Lake county, in the western 
central part, about 50 miles north-north-west 
from Chicago. 

Clark Gale, Postmaster. 



FOSTER'S, 

A post village of Marion county, in the 
northern part, about 15 miles south-south- 
east from Vandalia. 

Hardy Foster, Postmaster. 



FORT HILL, 

A post village of Lake county, near the cen- 
tral part, about 45 miles north-north-west 
from Chicago. 

Geo. Thompson, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER A1STD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



85 



FOUNTAIN GREEK", 

A flourishing post village of Hancock county, 
in the eastern part, 10 miles north-east from 
the county seat. 

Stephen G. Ferris, Postmaster. 



FOUR MILE GROVE, 

A post office of Lee county. 
Robert Hopkins, Postmaster. 



FOUR MILE PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Fayette county. 
Lorenzo D. Mowrey, Postmaster. 



FOX LAKE, 



A post office of Lake county. 
Wm. H. Hall, Postmaster. 



FRANCONIA, 



A post office of Richland county. 
Lewis Morrison, Postmaster. 



FRANKFORT, 



A station on the line of railroad connecting 
the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago road, at 
Joliet, with the Michigan Southern road, at 
a point in Indiana 



FRANKFORT, 



A thriving post village of Franklin county, 
formerly the county seat. Distance from 
Springfield, 160 miles, south by east. 
Milton S. Clark, Postmaster. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 400 square miles. It is wa- 
tered by Big Muddy river and Salina creek. 
The country is heavily timbered, and the soil 
fertile. Its staples are corn, wheat and oats. 
Tobacco and cotton are cultivated to some 
extent. There are in it some 20 churches, 
several printing offices, and the means of ed- 
ucation are of a liberal character. Capital, 
Benton. Population, about 9,800. 



FRANKLIN, 



A post village of Morgan county, in the 
southern part, 12 miles southeast from Jack- 
sonville. 

Harry Reinbach, Postmaster. 



FRANKLIN, 

A station on trie line of the Great Western, 
railroad, in Morgan county, 8 miles east from 
Jacksonville, 214 miles from Chicago, and 
123 miles from St. Louis. 



FRANKLIN, 

A village of De Witt county, on Salt creek, 
about 5 miles south-east from Clinton, the 
countv seat. 



FRANKLIN, 



A station on the Fulton and Iowa, or Dixon 
Air Line railroad, and on the boundary line 
between Ogle county on the north, and Lee 
county onthe south, "lOl miles from Chicago. 
Is rapidly increasing in population and wealth. 



FRANKLIN GROVE, 

A post village of Lee county on Franklin 
creek, near line of Fulton and" Iowa railroad. 
Population, 600. 
John C. Black, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Trades, Professions, Etc. 

BLACK JOHN C. POSTMASTER AND 
DEALER IX BOOKS AND STATION- 
ERY. 

Clisbee C, hotel. 

Durkey C, merchant. 

Hewitt Geo. W., physician. 

Hughs Josiah, hotel. 

Laforge G. M., merchant. 

Lahman Christian, farmer. 

Lahman D. D., merchant. 

Lincoln H. J., merchant. 

Minor T. L., justice of peace. 

Roe W. G, physician. 

Twombley J., farmer. 

Whitney A. R., nurserymun. 



FREDERICKSVILLE, 

A post village of Schuyler county, in the 
south-east portion, near the Illinois river. 
James P. Vail, Postmaster. 



FREDONIA, 

A post village of Williamson county, in the 
north-western part, on Muddy river, about 15 
miles north-west from Marion, the countv seat. 
Phillip J. Russell, Postmaster. 



FREEDOM, 

A post village of La Salle county, in the town- 
ship of the same name,on Little Indian creek, 
about 12 miles north from La Salle. 
Norman Smith Postmaster. 



86 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



FREELAND, 

A post office of DeKalb county. 



PEEEMANTON, 

A post village of Effingham county, on the 
National road, and near the Chicago branch 
of the Illinois Central railroad, 5 miles west 
from Ewington, the county seat. Is situated 
in the midst of a highly fertile prairie. 
John C. Defebaugh, Postmaster. 



FREEPORT. 

The city of Freeport stands on the southern 
bank of the Pecatonica river, a branch of 
Rock river, in a line directly west of Wauke- 
gan, 16 miles from the Wisconsin State line, 
120 miles from Chicago, 102 miles from Ra- 
cine, 67 miles from Dubuque, and 35 miles 
from Savanna, on the Mississippi river. It 
is one of the best business points in northern 
Illinois, west of Chicago; commanding the 
trade of alargeand fertile section of country, 
comprising Stephenson county, and portions 
of Carroll, Ogle and Jo Daviess counties, 
Illinois and Green counties, Wisconsin — all 
a magnificent farming section. The amount 
of wheat annually shipped from Freeport is 
enormous. It is one of the greatest grain 
shipping stations in northern Illinois. It is 
this business which has given it the start it 
has obtained, and centered here other branch- 
es of business, all of which now aid to con- 
tinue its growth and insure it a permanent 
prosperity. It has the advantage of excel- 
lent railroad connections — better than those 
of any other town in the northern tier of 
counties. It is situated at the junction of 
the Illinois Central railroad with the Galena 
and Chicago Union, the latter having its ter- 
minus here. The Racine and Mississippi 
railroad intersects the other roads at this 
point, affording a direct communication with 
Milwaukee and the north, and with central 
Iowa on the west. The gross amount of 
the railroad business done at Freeport during 
1856 (before the Racine road was opened), 
was $330,677.27, as the books of the rail- 
road companies show. This will give some 
idea of the position of Freeport as a railroad 
town. 

In manufacturing interests, it is not as old 
as some other places, but its railroad facilities 
and nearness to the coal fields of Illinois, are 
advantages which are being appreciated. P. 
Manny & Co., have alarge manufactory here, 
where they make the popular Pell Manny's 
Reaper and Self-Raker, one of the best ma- 
chines in use, and the Manny Hay Press, and 
Sub Soil Plow. There is a large foundry 
connected with it, and a Sickle and Sickle 
Guard manufactory. The Sickle Guard is 
a new patent of Mr. Manny's, and bids fair 
to become of general use. 



There is a Threshing Machine manufactory 
here, a Plow factory, an Iron foundry, a Brass 
foundry, a Sash, Door and Blind and Furni- 
ture factory, a Planing mill, a steam Flouring 
mill, one or two Flouring and Saw mills driv- 
en by water power, a Soap and Candle fac- 
tory, a Fanning mill establishment, a Corn 
mill, a Barrel factory, Marble Works, a ma- 
chine shop, several Wagon factories, half a 
dozen lumber yards, etc. 

The city is lighted with gas, the gas works 
having been built in 1856, and of a size cal- 
culated for the future growth of the place. 

Among the new buildings recently erected 
here, is the Brewster House, one of the first 
hotel edifices in the west. The main street 
of the city has been McAdamized the past 
season, at considerable expense. It is a val- 
uable improvement. 

There are nine church societies in the 
place, and eight houses of worship, as follows: 
Baptist, two Presbyterian, Episcopal, Meth- 
odist, German Reformed, Evangelical Meth- 
odist, and Roman Catholic. The Associate 
Presbyterians have no church edifice yet. 
There are several Masonic bodies, a lodge of 
Odd Fellows, two Fire Companies, a Young 
Men's Association, and a Young Men's Ly- 
ceum, which is in a flourishing condition. 

The schools of Freeport are noted for 
their excellence. They are on what is termed 
the "graded" plan, being free to all, and 
afford all the advantages of an academical 
and collegiate education. There are seven 
schools now in operation, all under one gen- 
eral head, in which the scholars are graded 
according to their degree of advancement. 
There are four newspapers published here, 
three English and one German. The Free- 
port Journal, published by C. K. Judson and 
C. W. McCluer. The Freeport Bulletin, by 
W. T. Giles and J. K. Scroggs. The Far- 
mer and Advertiser, by J. Richards, and the 
Antzeiger, by Wm. Wagner. Population, 
6,000. 
F. W. Braavlet, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Atkinson & Robinson, lumber, coal, etc. 
Bailey Jas. M., attorney and counselor. 
BAKER W. W., commission and produce 

merchant. 
Bigelow J. A., dry goods, etc. 
Black B. F., dry goods, etc. 
Brawley F. W., postmaster. 
Brewster Jas. M., dry goods. 
Brewster M., teacher of music. 
Brewster D. L., groceries. 
BREWSTER 0. W., musical instruments, 

pianos, etc, Hyde's block. 
Bright Hiram, attorney and solicitor, and 

notary public. 
Brown J. E., books and stationery. 
Brownlee L., boots and shoes. 
Brubacher, Kenegy & Co., lumber, coal, etc. 
BUCKLEY WM. M,, county judge. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



87 



Buckman Z. S., saloon. 

BUES F., groceries and liquors, cor Van 
Buren and Galena sts. 

Burchard Horatio C, police magistrate. 

Burkhart G. & Bro., clothing. 

Burnside A., veterinary surgeon and farrier. 

Burrell John, grocer. 

Carlipp A. & G., watch makers and jewelers. 

Carson J. P., livery stable. 

Carter M., groceries and liquors. 

CHURCHILL, MAVERICK & BARTLETT, 
hardware, 9 exchange block. 

CITY HOTEL, Weaver & Childs, Proprietors, 
near Public Square. 

Clark Edward, liquors. 

CLARK JOHN A , ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

CLAYTON G. M., paints, oils, glass, paper 
hangings, etc, Stephenson st, 

Callman John, gunsmith. 

CRAIN J. A., attorney at law. 

Danel S. A., groceries and provisions. 

Davis G. I., boots and shoes. 

Davis Wm., weaver. 

DEFOREST, HYDE & CO., bankers. 

Doan Henry, blacksmith. 

DATSON J., produce broker and commission 
merchant. 

DuPuy E. O, physician and surgeon. 

Dunirger John, vinegar manufacturer. 

Egan Thos., groceries, etc. 

Egbert Van Slooten, groceries, etc. 

EMMERT & BURRELL, drugs, paints, etc. 

DUGLE & STROHM. hardware, 1 exchange 
block. 

EXCHANGE HOTEL, Little & Ferguson, 
Galena street. 

Farmers' and Mechanics' House, J. Masses, 
Proprietor. 

Farwell S. B., attorney at law. 

Ford & Housel, watches and jewelry. 

FRONING PHILIP, apothecary, cor Galena 
and Van Buren sts. 

FURST & CO., furniture warehouse, 6 ex- 
change block. 

GEIGER J. & T., groceries and provisions, 
Galena st. 

Gettennv W., lumber, coal, etc. 

GILES & SCROGGS, PUBLISHERS OF 
FREEPORT BULLETIN. Having a 
large and excellent variety of Job Type, 
they are prepared to do all kinds of 
Printing, with neatness and dispatch, 
and on reasonable terms. 

Goodhue T. P., attorney at law. 

Griswold H. W., groceries and provisions. 

GUNSHUL GILBERT, SICKLE MANU- 
FACTURER AND IRON PLANER, 
UNDER REAPER FACTORY. 

Hallensleben & Beckenbach, drv goods, etc, 
2 Hyde's block. 

HARNISH M., confectionery, fruits, etc, 
Stephenson st. 

Harris S. B., accountant and collector. 

Harvey J. J., groceries, fruit, etc. 

HELLER EDWARD, hats, caps, and furs, 
near Freeport bank. 

Iletzell 0., jeweler. 



Hicks Geo. A. & Co., harnesses, trunks, etc. 

Himes J., cooper. 

Holdemran & Co., Freeport city mills. 

Hunt Rich., botanic physician 

HURD & BARTLETT, groceries, provisions, 
etc, cor Galena and exchange sts. 

Hurlburt K. T., dentist, over Stephenson 
county bank. 

Jackson Mrs., bonnet rooms. 

JOHNSON C. H., wines and liquors, cor 
Galena and Van Buren sts. 

Kenegy, Selhauer & Co., saloon. 

Kevstone House, R. Hills, Proprietor. 

KINGSLEY & FLETCHER, dentists, 1 ex- 
change block. 

Kooler F. P., meat market. 

Krohn Jacb, tobacco and cigars. 

LANE R., FOUNDRY AND MACHINE 
SHOP. 

Leman C, saddles and harnesses. 

Lockhart & Ocobock, flour, feed, etc. 

LONY J. & SON, liquors, groceries, etc, 
Stephenson st. 

McHall & Irvin, wagon makers. 

Mack & Barber, produce. 

MANNY & CO., MANUFACTURERS OF 
PATENT ADJUSTABLE SELF-RAK- 
ING REAPER AND MOWER. 

Martin C, physician and surgeon. 

Meachan U. D., attorney at law. 

MEECH HORACE, EATING HOUSE. 

Miller & Irvin, boots and shoes. 

MILLER & STONER, livery stable, cor of 
Public Square. 

Moore A Dakin, drugs and medicines. 

Moore Oscar, watch maker. 

Mueller H., gunsmith. 

Myers & Powell, groceries, etc. 

Newcomer A. C, carpenter. 

O'Connell John, groceries, etc. 

O'Hara George E., dry goods, etc. 

Ormsbee T. & Co., auction and commission. 

PELCK R., gunmaker, etc, Van Buren st. 

Penniman H. H., gas fitter. 



PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE, 

JACOB MEYER, Proprietor, 

Cor, of Van Buren and Stephenson 
Streets, 

(Opposite the Court House,) 

FREEPORT, ILL. 



PRALLE LEOPOLD, wines and liquors, cor 
Galena and Van Buren sts. 

Prentice N. F., homeopathic physician. 

Prior C. W., daguerreian artist. 

Reitzell, Irwin & Co., forwarding and com- 
mission merchants. 

Rhodes W. H. & P., meat market. 



88 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



RICHARDS J., JOB PRINTER AND 
PUBLISHER OF FARMER AND 
ADVERTISER. 

Rigard Jacob, Freeport Mills. 

Rohkar C. & H., bakers. 

Rohrer & De Walt, dry goods. 

RUNDLETT L. P., BOOTS AND SHOES, 
No. 3 JEWELERS' BLOCK. 

Sankey Samuel, attorney at law and justice 
of the peace 

Sechrist William, merchant tailor. 

Seem David, attorney at law. 

SELDNER A., clothing, Stephenson st. 

SICKAFOOSE G. W., dry goods, etc. 

SMITH J. BRIGHT, attorney at law. 

Snyder & Wade, furniture. 

Sonneborn & Bro., clothing. 

Spencer James D., groceries, etc. 

Spitler John P., boots and shoes. 

Spratler J. M., baker. 

Stanton D. B., groceries and provisions. 

STEPHENSON COUNTY BANK, JAMES 
MITCHELL & CO. 

Stephenson Co. Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 
A. W, Rice, president, 

STICKNEY L. W., boots and shoes, 3 Ex- 
change Block. 

Stine William & Bro., clothing, etc. 

Stone A. H., groceries and provisions. 

Stoneman J. C, hardware, stoves, etc. 

SUNDERLAND D. H, president of Farmers' 
Insurance Co., 2 Bank Block. 

STREET & HUBBARD, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

TAYLOR & ATKINS, collection, law and 
insurance office. 

Tavlor & Rubel, leather and findings. 

TAYLOR HENRY H., agricultural ware- 
house. 

Tipperv J., blacksmith. 

TOUSLEE GEORGE N., hardware, stoves, 
etc, opp Brewster House. 

TROWBRIDGE & BROTHER, feed and 
produce. 

Trowbridge L, B., gloves and mittens. 

TURNER, BURCHARD & BARTON, at- 
torneys at law and dealers in real estate. 

WAGNER WILLIAM, PROP. OF ENG- 
LISH AND GERMAN JOB PRINTING 
OFFICE, AND PUBLISHER OF THE 
DEUTSCHER ANZEIGER, OPP. 
BREWSTER HOUSE. 

Wahler H, brass founder. 

Walbrecht George, tobacco and cigars. 

Ward P., blacksmith. 

Washburn & Randall, marble works. 

Waterhouse & Hart, carpenters and builders. 

Wetzel J. P., saddles and harness. 

WHEELER AND EMMERT, NURSERY- 
MEN. 

Wheeler J. P., homeopathic physician. 

Widener J. & A. M., blacksmiths. 

Wilcox, Lvm & Co., lumber. 

WILLIAMS D. W. C, daguerreian artist, 5 
Exchange Block. 

Williams S. B., homeopathic physician and 
surgeon. 



WISE A. H., produce and commission mer- 
chant, and agent for Manny's reaper 
and mower. 

Wright S., agent for American Express Co. 

Wurts A. S., news dealer. 

WURTS G., physician, druggist, etc. 

ZAPF EDWARD & CO., bakers, Galena st. 



FREMONT CENTER, 

A post town of Lake county, 35 miles from 
Chicago, in a north-west direction. The 
population is made up principally of wealthy 
farmers. The people seem to be healthy and 
honest, as not a physician or lawyer is to be 
found in it. It contains two churches and 
several stores. Population, 850. 
Isaac H. Smith, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Adams C. G, pastor Congregational church. 
Ainsley J., farmer. 
Ames Henry, farmer, assessor and justice of 

the peace. 
Bartlett Charles, farmer. 
Battsford R., farmer. 
Cowdrey R., farmer. 
Dean Edward D., merchant and farmer. 
Farnsworth R., farmer and commissioner of 

highways. 
Fenwick William, farmer. 
Gould William, farmer. 
Lusk W. J., farmer. 
Lyons Robert, farmer and commissioner of 

highways. 
Maynard Ruel D., farmer and town clerk. 
Murray John, farmer. 
Osgood R., farmer. 
Partridge A. B , farmer. 
Payne S. E,, farmer. 

Payne Thomas H., nurseryman and farmer. 
Putnam A., farmer. 
Ragan J. G., farmer. 
SMITH ISAAC H., POSTMASTER AND 

MERCHANT. 
Swan H. E., farmer. 

Swan Hurlbut, ex-member of legislature. 
Swan S. H, farmer and commissioner of 

highways. 
Thomas Joel B., farmer and supervisor. 
Thornton William P., farmer and collector. 
Trumbull H. S., pastor Methodist church. 



FRENCH CREEK, 

A post office of Knox county. 

Ephrai.m A. Elsworth, Postmaster. 



FRENCH VILLAGE, 

A post village of St. Clair county, 7 or 8 
miles south-east from St. Louis. A railroad 
from the latter place to the coal mines passes 
through this village. 

Michael Mash, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



89 



FRIENDS GROVE, 

A post office of Wabash county. 
\Vm. Deputy, Postmaster. 



FRIENDSHIP, 

A post village of McDonough county. 
William Allison, Postmaster, 



FRIENDSVILLE. 

A post village of Wabash county, on an 
affluent of Wabash river, about 8 miles north 
by west from Mount Carmel, the county seat. 
Wm. R. Williamson, Postmaster. 



FRUIT HILL, 



A post office of Shelby county. 
Samuel Nye, Postmaster. 



FULLER'S POINT, 

A post village of Coles county, TO miles east 
by south from Springfield. It is situated in 
the midst of a fertile prairie. 
Joseph Keller, Postmaster. 



FULTON COUNTY 

Is situated in the western part of the state, 
and has an area of 870 square miles. It is 
bounded on the south-east by the Illinois 
river, and is intersected by Spoon river. Put- 
nam's, Copperas and Otter creeks also extend 
through a portion of it, leading into the 
Illinois. The surface is undulating and di- 
versified by prairies and forests ; the latter 
were originally of considerable extent. The 
soil is exceedingly fertile, and a great portion 
is under cultivation. Corn, wheat, oats, pork, 
butter, wool, etc., are the staples. It contains 
about 40 churches, several newspaper offices, 
and has over 4,000 pupils attending public 
schools. Coal mines exist to a great extent 
and have been successfully operated. Ample 
water power i* furnished by Spoon river, 
which is well improved. The banks of the 
rivers and creeks are well timbered. Pro- 
duce is exported by way of the Illinois river. 
A railroad is projected, which is intended to 
intersect the county east and west, connect- 
ing the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, and the 
Peoria and Oquawka railroad runs near the 
northern border of the county. Capital, 
Lewiston. Population, about 30,000. 



FULTON, 

A village of Fulton county, on Spoon river, 
about 40 miles south-west from Peoria. 



FULTON CITY 

Is pleasantly situated in Whiteside county, 
on the Mississippi river, 136 miles west from 
Chicago, 40 miles north from Rock Island, 
and about the same distance south from 
Galena. It is the western terminus of the 
Chicago, Fulton and Iowa railroad line. 
There are here three churches — Presby- 
terian, Cougregationalist and Baptist — all 
handsome structures ; two large hotels — 
Dement House, an elegant stone building, 
costing $100,000, and Phelps House, by 
Gage & White, who are exceedingly popular 
with the traveling public. Three ferry 
boats run from this point to Lyons and Clin- 
ton, on the Iowa side of the river. The 
Clinton boats connect with the Chicago, 
Iowa and Nebraska railroad. One of the 
finest buildings in the city is the Academy 
or Union School building, which has recently 
been brought into use. It commands a 
beautiful view of the city, Mississippi river, 
and surrounding country. The school just 
established is already in a very prosperous 
and flattering condition. There are also at 
Fulton City three saw mills, beside many 
other large manufactories for various pur- 
poses, all of which are kept in constant opera- 
tion. 
John J. Jones, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams Wm., restaurant. 

Bally John, books and stationery. 

Barber — , physician and surgeon, 

Bassett Wm., physician. 

Benton A. W, druggist and apothecary. 

Blackford & Green, meat market, Buse st, 

BLAKE LYMAN, forwarding and commis- 
sion. 

BRADFORD, BARR & FLACK, PRO- 
PRIETORS FULTON CITY MILLS. 

BRIDGES & CO., groceries. 

Bridgwater E., shaving saloon. 

Broadhead James, blacksmith. 

Citv Hotel, A. J. Fish, proprietor. 

COGGSWELL M. W., boots, shoes and 
leather. 

COWLES ORRIN, agent watches, clocks, 
etc, Base st. 

Cummings J. C, eclectic physician. 

CURTISS WM. & CO., dry goods, clothing, 
etc, Base street, near Cherry. 

DAVIES E. H., dry goods, Base street, 
between Broadway and Wall. 

DODGE D E., wines, liquors and cigars, 
River st. 

Emmeret & Miller, steam saw mills. 

Estabrook & Virgil, livery stable. 

Fellows H. E., justice of peace. 

Fields Wm., photographic artist. 

FULTON CITY BANK, SMITH, ROOT & 
CO. 

Fulton House, D. Oliver, proprietor. 

Gawgenbeg Chas., baker. 



90 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Gerrish B. S., forwarding and commission. 

Gillett C. J., hardware. 

GOLDMAN PHILIP, agent clothing, etc, 
Wall st. 

GREGORY AMOS W., attorney at law. 

Grinnold II. M., dry goods, etc. 

GRISWOLD C. A., physician and surgeon, 
Base st. 

GROAT C. S., attorney at law. 

Havens E. H., produce and commission. 

HIBBARD JULIUS E., attorney at law and 
notary public, and commissioner of 
deeds. 

Jones John J., postmaster. 

KINNEY 0. S., architect, Caswell block, 
Base st. 

LAIGHTON OCTAVE, BOOK AND JOB 
PRINTER AND PUBLISHER OF 
FULTON CITY ADVERTISER, CHER- 
RY STREET, NEAR RAILROAD 
DEPOT. 

LEWIS STEPHEN D., attorney at law. 

Lowrey J. H., grain dealer. 

Marcellus P., eating house. 

Meacham M. F., insurance agent. 

Mersereau & Wheeler, groceries and provis- 
ions. 

MISCHE A. & CO., tobacco and cigars, 
Bay st. 

MORSE J. C, stoves, tin, copper and sheet 
iron ware, Base st. 

Myers R. B., groceries. 

Page & McCartney, attorneys at law. 

PARKER S. P., pianos and musical instru- 
ments, opposite Dement House. 

Peters C. A., physician and surgeon. 

Phelps Geo. S. & Co., boots and shoes. 



FULTON CITY, ILL,, 



GAGE & WHITE, PROPRIETORS. 

This house is new and spacious, neatly fur- 
nished, and is now open to the 
traveling public. 

Free Carriages to and from the Boats and Cars. 



ROBINSON HOUSE, B. Robinson proprie- 
tor, near depot. 

Rawley Jerome, groceries, etc. 

Shattuck E., butcher and dealer in cattle. 

SMITH & GOODLANDER, FURNITURE, 
WALL STREET, NEAR BASE. 

SMITH GEO. T., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

SNYDER & CO., STORAGE, FORWARD- 
ING AND COMMISSION MER- 
CHANTS, LEVEE. 



SPTO1E ft ©:#8g 

Storage, Jwtoarbiitg & €mmmm 

3VEEK,CI3:-A.ISrTS, 

Union Express Company's AgentSj 

AXD STEAMBOAT AGENTS, 

On the Levee, adjoining R. R. Freight Depot. 

REFERENCES : 

J. W. Bass & Co., St. Paul; Albert Kerby & Co , 
Chicago; Wakeley & Johnson, N. Y.; F.E.Webb, 
La Crosse ; Win. L. Ewing & Co., St. Louis ; James 
M. Cox, Fulton City. 

Stow W. A., wagon maker. 

THOMPSON D. W., clothing and furnish- 
ing goods, cor Base and Wall sts. 

Todd H. M., steam saw mill, sash and blind 
factory. 

Trask P., drugs, paints, oils, etc. 

Uncle Peter, groceries and provisions, Base 
street. 

WEBB N. F. & CO., steam grain elevator, 
on Levee. 

WELLES BROTHERS, hardware, cutlery 
dealers, and agents American Express 
Co., Base st. 

WISWELL, VAUGHN & CO., dry goods. 

Woodward B. F. & Co., dry goods, etc. 

Woodward Mrs. C, millinery. 



GAGE'S LAKE, 

A post village in Warren township, Lake 
county, near the line between Warren and 
Avon. A post office was established there 
in 1847. The place derives its name from 
four beautiful lakes near it. Distance from 
Chicago, 38 miles N.W. The population is 
made up of farmers, who are mostly " well to 
do " in the world. 
Amos Wright, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Brodway James T. 

Druny Alexander. 

Fay John G. A. 

Gage John. 

Jones Willard. 

Kellogg A. S. 

Newton Owen. 

Whitman A. D. 

Whitman James. 

Whitney Havelia. 



GALENA. 



The city of Galena, capital of Jo Daviess 
county, is situated on Galena river, about 8 
miles from the Mississippi, 450 miles north 
from St. Louis, and 191 W.N.W. from Chi- 
cago. Thompson's Letters describe it thus : 
• " The river on whose rocky shelf this city 
is built, is more properly an arm of the Mis- 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



91 



sissippi river, setting up between lofty bluffs, 
around whose base it winds with pictur- 
esque effect. The streets rise one above 
another, and communicate with each other 
by flights of steps, so that the houses on the 
higher streets, are perched like an eagle's 
eyrie over-looking the rest and commanding 
an extensive prospect. Pleasant churches 
meet the eye, on the first ledge or terrace 
above the levee, and private residences, 
wearing an aspect of neatness and comfort, 
adorn each successive height." 

The wealth and importance of Galena, is 
due mainly to the immense rich mines of 
lead which exist in and about the city in 
every direction. The number of men em- 
ployed in the mining business, is about 3,000. 
A number of furnaces are in almost constant 
operation, two of which (Hughlets') turn 
out 15,000 pounds daily. Not only does the 
lead of her own city find shipment here, but 
for miles around, this is made the central 
market. The amount shipped in 1857, was 
20,000,000 pounds. As a commercial point, 
this city is every year gaining in importance, 
it being the terminus of lines of boats which 
ply regularly between here and the various 
points on the upper Mississippi ; the business 
of these lines is immense. 

The tonnage of Galena is 4,962 tons. Num- 
ber of cargoes arrived during 1S57, 590. 
Amount of exports during the same year, 
20,000,000 pounds pig lead, 226,000 bushels 
wheat, 300,000 bushels potatoes, 20,000 bar- 
rels flour, 34,700 barrels of salt provisions, 
besides large quantities of other articles. 

The Illinois Central railroad also runs 
through this city, by means of which, and 
the Galena and Chicago Union road, she is 
put in direct connection with the latter city. 
Another line of road designed to connect 
Galena with various business points in south- 
ern "Wisconsin, is being built, giving an east- 
ern route through that state. 

The city is surrounded by numerous streams 
of water, affording power to some twelve or 
fifteen mills, the products of which are 
brought to Galena for shipment. There are 
also in the city, three saw mills, and a large 
steam mill. The public and private buildiDgs 
are built almost entirely of brick, and are 
uniformly neat in their appearance. The 
church edifices are all neat, not gaudy, and 
bespeak an air of quiet not often met with 
in cities of this size. There are twelve, viz. : 
One Episcopal, three Presbyterian, two Meth- 
odist Episcopal, two Baptist, one colored 
Methodist, one German Lutheran, and two 
Roman Catholic. The educational facilities 
of the city are as yet confined to the public 
schools. A new seminary is being built, in 
which will be a higher order of instruction, 
and where superior advantages will be pre- 
sented. The number of pupils at present in 
attendance at the public schools is 1,004. A 
new U. S. Hospital is being built at an ex- 
pense of $30,000, and the foundations of a 



Custom House and Post Office have been 
laid ; this building will cost about $70,000. 
Among the many new buildings erected 
during the past year, is a new passenger 
house, by the Illinois Central railroad com- 
pany, which is an ornament to the city, and 
does away with a want which has long been 
felt by the citizens. The principal hotels 
are the De Soto House, Tyler House and 
City Hotel. Stages leave these latter for 
all parts of Wisconsin. 

There are two newspaper offices here, the 
Advertiser, and Courier, both having weekly 
issues ; one chartered bank, and several pri- 
vate banking institutions. There are in the 
city, seven ale breweries, three large leather 
finishing establishments, three soap and can- 
dle factories, two carriage factories, a large 
plow and agricultural implement factory, two 
iron foundries, two machine shops, five wagon 
manufactories, two furniture factories, a large 
pottery for the manufacture of earthen ware, 
six lumber yards and numerous brick and 
lime kilns. Population, 14,000. 

B. B. Howard, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
APIX H., PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL 

PAINTER, HILL ST. 
Bailev W. & Son, groceries and provisions. 
BARRACK JAMES, LUMBER, LEVEE. 
Barrett & Barker, groceries, etc. 
Bean T.. drv goods. 
BEEBE E. H., MERCHANT, LEVEE. 
Bennett & Kempter, confectionery. 
Bennett John, fruit. 
Bergman F. E. & Co., furniture. 
Benningham & Bro., dry goods and groceries. 
Berneis Isaac, dry goods. 
Blackman & Stillman, boots and shoes. 
Bertior M. F., dep. elk. circuit court. 
Bostwick W. O, attorney at law. 
Boynton A. N., watch maker and jeweler. 
Branch J. B., dentist. 
Brendel John, hats and caps. 
Brenizer A. E., stoves, tinware, etc. 
Brohaney A., groceries and provisions. 
Brohaney M., groceries and provisions. 
BROOKES J., BOOKS AND STATIONERS, 

98 MAIN ST. 
Brown H. B. W., wagon and carriage maker. 
Buchanan, Eastman & Co., lumber. 
Burns Michael, collector. 
Burrichter J. A, groceries, liquors, etc. 
BUTCHER R., stoves and tinware. 
Bvrne House, P. Byrne, Proprietor. 
CALDERWOOD J. C, LIVERY AND SALE 

STABLE, 69 COMMERCE ST. 
Campbell Geo. H., groceries. 
CAMPBELL J. W., ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

AND JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 
CAMPBELL J. W., REAL ESTATE AND 

COLLECTING AGENT, 88 MAIN ST. 
Carey Wm., attorney at law. 
Carter Jas. & Co., bankers. 
Chandler H. H., dry goods. 



92 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Chase W. W., private boarding house. 

Claren John, groceries and provisions. 

Cloyde 0., mattress maker. 

Coatsworth J. & Son, watches and jewelry. 

Cohen A., clothing. 

Collins E. A., Jones & Co., leather. 

Conrad Chas. , merchant tailor. 

Coomb B., justice of the peace. 

Convith H. P., dry goods, etc. 

Cawith N. & Co., bankers. 

Crawford S. & Co., drugs, etc. 

CROOKS & SANFORD, CARRIAGE 

WOODS, 79 Main st. 
CROOKS & SANFORD, HIDES AND 

SKIXS, 79 Main st. 
CROOKS & SANFORD, LEATHER AND 
SADDLERY HARDWARE & FIND- 
INGS, 79 MAIN STREET. 
Cummings A. L., attorney at law. 
Curley & Mahoney, groceries, etc. 
Curley & O'Mara, groceries, etc. 
DAVIS WM., CITY SEXTON. 
Dean J. & Co., auctioneers and brokers. 
DE SOTO HOUSE, J. A. STROCKEY &C0., 

PROPRIETORS, Main st. 
Dodge & Benty, drugs, etc. 
Donnelly T. F. & Co., boot store. 
Dowling Nicholas, iron and steel. 
Dox J. P., blacksmith. 
Drum T. & S., furniture. 
Dye R., cabinet maker. 
EBERHARDT & KLETT, MERCHANT 

TAILORS, 110 MAIN ST. 
Eddowes John, notary public and com. of 

deeds. 
FARRAR W., GUNS AND SPORTSMEN'S 

APPARATUS, 199 MAIN ST. 
Farell Luke, groceries and provisions. 
Faulke S. A., dry and fancy goods. 
Felt B. F., groceries and provisions. 
Felt L. S. & Co., dry goods, etc. 
Ferguson Geo., hardware, cutlerv, etc. 
FIDDICK W. & J., DRY GOODS, ETC, 156 

MAIN ST. 
FOLTZ H. W., CARRIAGE AND WAGON 
FACTORY, COR HIGH AND FRANK- 
LIN STS. 
Foltz H. W., city collector. 
Foster & Stahl, drv goods. 
FRENCH D. A., CITY TREASURER. 
FREY JOHN, BILLIARD SALOON, 134 

MAIN ST. 
Friche Henry, watches and jewelry. 
Fuller, Smith & Bishop, groceries, etc. 
Gaffner John, boots and shoes. 
GALENA, DUBUQUE, DUNLEITH AND 
MINNESOTA PACKET COMPANY, 
J. R. JONES, SECRETARY. 
Galena Ins. Co., W. H. Snyder, Sec. 
Gallagher J. A., city marshal. 
Galvin D. & J., groceries. 
GAMMILL WM., GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS, BROADWAY. 
Gardner J. C, county surveyor. 
Garner W. G., watches and jewelry. 
GELSTEN T. H, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS, 168 MAIN ST. 



GORMAN JOHN P., BOOTS AND SHOES, 
112 MAIN ST 

Graham E. & Co., furniture. 

GRANT J. R., LEATHER AND SADDLERY 
HARDWARE, MAIN ST. 

Grasser John, Wisconsin Hotel. 

GREEN E. T., agt. Illinois and Mississippi 
Telegraph Co. 

Grummer Julius, harnesses, etc. 

HAINES A. M., DRY GOODS, 160 MAIN 
STREET. 

Harris R. S. & Co., forwarding and commission 

HAYS & DINSMORE, GRAIN, FLOUR 
AND FEED, 141 MAIN ST. 

Hellman John II., grocer and commission. 

Hempstead C. S., attorney at law. 

Hempstead C. W., physician and surgeon. 

Hodge B. 0., groceries. 

Howard B. B., attorney at law and notary 
public. 

Healey W. butcher. 

Husted L., dry goods, etc. 

JACKSON RICH. H., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY. 

James John, liverv stable and hotel. 

JEFFRIES & ROGERS, PROPRIETORS 
U. S. HOTEL, 187 MAIN ST. 

JOHNSON G. G., DAGUERREOTYPE MA- 
TERIALS, 90 MAIN ST. 

JOHNSON G. G., DAGUERREOTYPIST, 
90 MAIN ST. 

Johnson M. Y., attorney at law. 
i Jones Elijah, physician and surgeon. 

KACHELSKI F. C , druggist. 

Keahler J., butcher. 

KEARNS JOHN, GROCERIES & PROVIS- 
IONS, 82 MAIN ST. 

Klingel & Quan, groceries. 

Lasher S., proprietor Tyler House. 

Liddy P., dry goods and groceries. 

LIVERMORE T. A., DENTIST, 98 MAIN 
STREET. 

LONG M. H., LUMBER, COR WATER & 
WASHINGTON STS. 

Lorrain & Co., grocery and commission. 

LUMLEY WILLIAM, CONFECTIONERY, 
ETC, 115 MAIN ST. 

McCloskey H. F., grocer and commission. 

McCombe Miss, millinerv. 

McGINNIS H. B., ATTORNEY & COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW, 172 MAIN ST. 

McLellan R. H, attorney at law. 

McMaster S. W., commission and forwarding 
merchant. 

McNeill H., drugs. 

Mahan James, proprietor New York House, 

MALTBY JASPER A., GUNS & AMMU- 
NITION, 184 MAIN ST. 

Marble & Smith, carpenters and joiners. 

Martin J. & Sons, groceries. 

Marvin M., attorney at law. 

MAUPIN T. J., COUNTY TREASURER. 

Maxeiner J. W., boots and shoes. 

Maxeiner T. W., merchant tailor. 

Mayer L. A., clothing. 

Mensel J. A., stoves and tinware. 

Merrick Mrs., millinery. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



93 



MERRILL H. T., INSURANCE AGENT, 
91 MAIN ST. 

Meyer Fred, St. Paul House. 

Miller II. F., saddles, harness, etc. 

MINER S, K., SHERIFF. 

Mitchell G. M., city clerk. 

Monte John, restaurant. 

Mooney P., blacksmith. 

MORELLO P., FRUITS & PROVISIONS, 

146 Main st. 
Murtice N., associate judge of county. 
NEWELL &BROWNELL, PROPRIETORS 
CITY HOTEL, COR MAIN & PERRY 
STREETS. 
Newhall A., drugs, etc. 
NEWSON JOHN A., AGENT FOR COUN- 
CIL HILL MILLS, 115 BROADWAY. 
Noble J. D., hats, caps, and furs. 
Packard J. A. & Co., dry goods. 
Park H. C, justice of peace. 
Park H. C, groceries and provisions. 
PARSONS H. C, AGENT AMERICAN EX- 
PRESS CO., 102 MAIN ST. 
Perkins C. R., saddles, harness, etc. 
PfiffnerjL & J., wines, brandies and cigars. 
Platteville Powder Co., Laflins, Smith & Co. 
Piatt J. D., judge of probate. 
Porter & Spratt, dry goods. 
Porter H. H., groceries. 
Potts J. G., justice of peace. 
RAWLINS J. A., ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

COR MAIN & WILL STS. 
Richardson G., gents' boot maker. 
Richmond S. L., attorney at law. 
Ripley, Brown & Co., crockery and glass 

ware. 
Ritter J., groceries and provisions. 
Roberts II. & T., butchers. 
ROBERTSON THOMAS H., ATTORNEY 

AT LAW. 
Rodolph Barkhard, cutler and locksmith. 
Rood James, grocer and commission. 
Rosenbrough R. L., marble. 
ROSENTHAL ct BRO., CLOTHING, 46 

LEVEE. 
Rosenthal A., physician and surgeon. 
ROSENTHAL M., CLOTHING, 95 De Soto 

block. 
ROWLEY WM. R., CLERK OF CIRCUIT 
COURT AND EX-OFFICIO RECOR- 
DER. 
Ryan W. & J. M., groceries, provisions, etc 
Solomon Edward, clothing. 
Sanders & Liming, dry goods, etc. 
Sanders C. E,, groceries. 
Sander George, groceries and flour. 
SCHAEFER JOHN, BAKER, 241 MAIN 

STREET. 
Schmohl J. G., millinery. 
Seal Richard, county clerk. 
Shea & Murphy, groceries and provisions. 
Sheldon B. R., judge circuit court. 
Shissler Louis, attornev at law. 
SIMON H., CLOTHING, ETC., 116 MAIN 

STREET, 
Sleeper & Charles auctioneers and commis- 
mission merchants. 



SLEEPER N., AUCTION & COMMISSION, 
140 MAIN ST. 

Smith B., livery stable. 

Smith John E., watch maker and jeweler. 

Smith J. T., barber and hair dresser. 

SOULARD JAMES G., LAND DEALER, 
100 MAIN ST. 

STROCKEY F. A., MAYOR OF CITY. 

STONE S. K, CLOTHING, 146 AND 167 
MAIN ST. 

SWIFT S. W., ORNAMENTAL PAINTER, 
88 MAIN ST. 

Taylor Samuel, groceries and provisions. 

Tellye John, groceries and provisions. 

Temple & Waller, groceries, hides and wool. 

Thorwath J., boot and shoe maker. 

Toussaint A., tin plate worker. 

Trego & Woodruff, hardware, cutlery, etc. 

Truex E. H., drugs, etc. 

Turner E. W., notary public. 

Tyrrell S., associate judge of county. 

VAN EMBDEN LUDWIG, GENTS' FUR- 
NISHING GOODS, ETC, 161 MAIN 
STREET. 

Venable W. W., saddles, harness, etc. 

Vincent Robert, proprietor Gear House. 

WADLEIGH M., CITY SURVEYOR, OF- 
FICE OVER MARKET. 

WAGONER JOSEPH N., BOOKS, STA- 
TIONERY, AND WALL PAPER, 94 
MAIN ST. 

WAINEY E., BILLIARD SALOON, MAIN 
STREET. 

Washburn E. B., attorney at law and mem- 
ber of congress. 

Watson Andrew, proprietor of Commercial 
Hotel. 

Weigley W., attorney at law. 

Whitney & Witham, groceries and provis- 
ions. 

WIERICH & BOLLINGER, DRUGGISTS, 
100 MAIN ST. 

WILLIS W. B. & CO., GROCERY, FOR- 
WARDING AND COMMISSION, 80 
MAIN ST. . 

WOOD J., TOWNSHIP TREASURER. 

Yalland D , groceries and provisions. 



GALESBURG. 



This flourishing city is situated in the 
north-east part of Knox county, 5 miles from 
Knoxville, the county seat, and 168 miles 
west-south-west from Chicago, at the junction 
of the Chicago and Burlington, Northern 
Cross, and Peoria and Oquawka railroads, 
giving it direct communication with the Mis- 
sissippi and Illinois rivers, and the great cen- 
tral market of the west, Chicago. Charters 
have already been granted for two other 
railroads, viz.: The Galesburg and Muscatine, 
and the Rock Island and St. Louis, both of 
which will, when completed, connect at this 
point with those already in operation. The 
city is built on what was once " bounty 
land," being an elevated prairie, whose fine 



94 



G. W. IIAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



streams flow into the Illinois river on the 
east, and the Mississippi river on the west. 
On the north is Henderson's Grove, and on 
the west, Cedar creek timber belt, both of 
which add greatly to the otherwise beautiful 
appearance of the city. The inhabitants are, 
to a great extent capitalists from the east, 
who have been attracted here by the beauty 
of the location, the salubrity of the climate, 
and the superior facilities presented for car- 
rying on their various business enterprises 
with profit. It was settled in 1S37, but did 
not obtain a charter as a city until 20 years 
later (1857). Its advancement during the 
first 15 years after its settlement was slow 
and steady, but in December, 185-1, the first 
train of cars entered its borders, and gave 
new life and energy to everything around. 
In educational advantages, Galesburg ranks 
among the first of our western cities outside 
of Chicago, there being two colleges and a 
university, viz.: Knox College, Knox College 
for females, and Lombard University. The 
first of these was chartered in 1837, and 
formed the nucleus around which have cen- 
tered others of a similar character. It has 
an endowment of $25,000, and has at the 
present time near 600 students, under the 
presidential management of Rev. J. Blanch- 
ard, D.D., aided by 11 professors and tutors. 
Lombard University (Universalist) isof more 
recent date, and is divided into male and fe- 
male departments, under the presidency of 
Rev. O. A. Skinner, for many years a clergy- 
man in Boston, Massachusetts. The female 
department is under the charge of Miss H. 
A. Kendall. The university is named in 
honor of Benjamin Lombard, Esq., the prin- 
cipal patron, who generously contributed 
$20,000 toward its erection. Donations of 
money and land, to the amount of nearly 
$80,000, have also been received from other 
friends of the institution. It is supported by 
the sale of scholarships, $70,000 of which 
have already been disposed of. Besides 
these higher institutions of learning, there 
are a number of private and public schools, 
where the various English brandies are 
taught. The principal hotels are the Hen- 
shaw, Galesburg, Bonny, Kellogg and Tre- 
mont Houses, and City Hotel. All these are 
considered first class. 

The city has two newspaper offices, two 
steam flouring mills, a steam sash and door 
factory, a steam saw and planing mill, and an 
agricultural implement factory, also operated 
by steam ; a large foundry, machine shop, 
furniture manufactory, etc. 

There is one chartered bank, besides seve- 
ral private banking institutions, an insurance 
company, and several agencies for foreign 
companies. The mercantile business of the 
city is large, several firms doing to the 
amount of from $70,000 to $100,000 annual- 
ly. The colleges, hotels, and other public 
buildings are of brick, built after the most 
approved modern styles, and are objects of 



interest which readily present themselves to 
the eye of the stranger. The streets are 
laid out at right angles, are wide and com- 
modious, and kept in good repair. 

The health of the city is noted, surpassing 
that of almost any other city of the same size 
in the west. Population, about 7,000. 

G. C. Lamphere, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
ANDBERG J. P., DEALER IX FURNI- 
TURE. 
ANDREWS WILLIAM, ATTORNEY AT 

LAW. 
Babcock H. W. & Co., farm implements. 
Babcock & Wood, dry goods. 
BABCOCK DR. J. A. & J. S. E., COR 

PUBLIC SQUARE. 
Bancroft G. O, proprietor Bancroft House, 

opp depot. 
Bartholomew H. M., jeweler, Main st. 
Bartlett & Judson, furniture. 
BEAGLE JAMES, PROPRIETOR CITY 

HOTEL. 
REED & ABBOTT, HARDWARE AND 

CUTLERY. 
Belden George & Co., general produce and 

commission merchants. 
Belknap & Chamberlin, lumber, lath and 

shingles, north of depot. 
Bell T. M., cabinet maker. 
BISSTOL & BRO. (CHARLES), HARNESS, 

STOYES, LEATHER, ETC, MAIN 

STREET. 
Bolsford C. C, cabinet furniture, etc. 
Boone A. T., watch maker. 
Boyd A. D., grocer and produce. 
Brambell & Coy J. J., clothing, Main st. 
Brigg3 Newton, machinist and engine builder. 
BRINKERHOFF D. W., BOOTS AND 

SHOES. 
BROWN S. W. & CO., REAL ESTATE. 
BROWNS — , CORN PLANTER. 
BUGAR & AGDIN, DRY GOODS MER- 
CHANTS, W. SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 
BUSLOW CHARLES & BRO., BOOTS 

AND SHOES. 
CARPENTER A. N., BUILDERS. 
CHALMAS & CO., MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Chamberlain G. A., painter. 
CHAPMAN S. BURGERS, BOTANIC PHY- 
SICIAN. 
CHILLE & MORSE, GROCERS. 
Clark G. F., grocer and provisions, Main st. 
Clark John, tailor. 
CLESE8RO W. G., BAKERY, CHERRY 

STREET. 
COBLUTH D. D. & CO., BAKERY, MAIN 

STREET. 
CODDING E., AMBROTYPIST, MAIN 

STREET. 
Cogswell Harvey, saddle and harness maker, 

Cherry st. 
CLOTON C. S. & SON, DRY GOODS, 

MAIN ST. 
COLTON C. D., CELEBRATED PLOWS, 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



95 



Oomstock & Co., stoves, tinware, etc. 

COOK M. D., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

COVERN A. II., lumber yard. 

Covert D. S., attorney at law. 

Crocker F. 0., groceries and provisions. 

Curtiss S. T., steam dyeing. 

Daily , plough maker. 

DANNAKER & DAUGHERTY, DRY 
GOODS, MAIN STREET. 

Daugherty H. T., shot guns, rifles, etc. 

DAVES E. F, SURGEON DENTIST, MAIN 
STREET. 

DELAND J. S., DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Dielerich & Graham, grocery. 

DISVROW H., CHINA AND GLASS 
WARE, MAIN t-T. 

Dilbear S. T., land dealer. 

DORMAN J. P., LIFE AND MARINE 
INSURANCE AGENT. 

DUNN A. F. & CO., BANKERS. 

DUNN, CHEESBERG & CO., GROCERIES 
AND PROVISIONS, MAIN ST. 

Easters H., lumber, shingles, etc. 

Farr Mrs C. A , millinery and fancv goods. 

FIELD H., SECY. HOME INSURANCE 
CO., MAIN AND CHERRY STS. 

FROST J. P. & CO., CITY FOUNDRY. 

FROST T. G., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

Fuller L. II., door, sash and blind factory. 

GORDON, J. R., CLOTHING, MAIN ST. 

GROSE S. V. 0., BOOTS AND SHOES. 

HALE, ROWELL & CO., AUCTION AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, Main st. 

HAMILTON C. M., DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES, MAIN ST. 

Hammond R. & Co., grocers. 

HAMMOND AUGUSTUS, ATTORNEY 
AND COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

Hanson W. & Co., lumber merchants. 

HARRISON THOMAS, ATTORNEY AT 
LAW. 

Hastings Alonzo, books, stationery, etc, 
Main st. 

HAZARD & ARNOLD, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

HAZLET JAMES, PRODUCE AND COM- 
MISSION MERCHANT, NEAR RAIL- 
ROAD DEPOT. 

HERMANCE & SLATER, PROPS. GALES- 
BURG HOUSE, MAIN AND CHERRY 
STREETS. 

Hickeu J. P., machine blacksmith. 

Higley E. D., confectionery, Cherry st. 

Hinsey Robert, bakery. 

Horseington S. B., grocer. 

Hubbard J., wagon maker. 

HURD H. S., REAL ESTATE DEALER. 

HURLBURTS J. C. W., NEWS AND 
STATIONERY, 2 POST OFFICE 
BLOCK. 

Hydes Branch, clothing. 

Jackson John, barber and hair dresser, Main 

JAMES S. T.', MILLINERY AND FANCY 
GOODS, MAIN ST. 



GALESBURG, ILLINOIS. * 



D. HENSHAW, Proprietor. 



This House is now open to the Traveling 
Public, having been recently 

ENLARGED AND REFURNISHED THROUGHOUT. 

Every attention shown to guests to render 
their stay agreeable. 



A BUSS Is always In attendance to convey Pas- 
sengers to and from the Cars free. 

The Proprietor aims to give his Patrons good 

rooms, good feed, good beds and a 

moderate bill. 

JORDAN & HILL, MILLERS. 

Knapp C. M., West side Public Square. 

KNAPP HELSEY & BRO., BONNEY 
HOUSE. 

KUHN & COLVILLE, BOOKBINDERS 
AND STATIONERS, PUBLIC SQUARE. 

Lamphere G. C, notarv public and postmaster 

LANPHERE & RANSON, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

LAWRENCE C. M., MACHINIST. 

LONGER S. C, POLICE MAGISTRATE 
FOR THE CITY. 

LOVE JAMES, CHINA, GLASS AND 
CUTLERY WARE OF EVERY DE- 
SCRIPTION, 

McCURDY A. T., DOCTOR. 

McQueen T. N., grocer, produce dealer. 

Mars & Gimble, sash, doors, etc. 

Marvel W. H., grocer and produce dealer, 
near the depot. 

Mason A. C, attorney at law. 

MATHEWS C. H., DRY GOODS, MAIN 
STREET. 

MATTESON & PALMER, DRUGS, ETC. 

Mayer A., clothing and tailor. 

Mav John, grocery and provisions. 

MELLER S. B., DEALER IN MUSICAL 
INSTRUNENTS, S. E. COR PUBLIC 
SQUARE. 

Merrill Isaac, boots and shoes, hats and caps, 
Main st. 

METTLETON & DRUMMOND, LAND 
AGENT, OVER REED & CO.'S BANK- 
ING HOUSE. 

Mickey T. & Co., banking. 

Morehouse & Stamp, marble works. 

NICHOLS OWEN, LIVERY AND EX- 
CHANGE. 

ODOM J. P., HOUSE PAINTER. 

Paine J. H., hair dresser. 

Peluson J. & Co., merchant tailors. 

POND Z., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 
AND GENERAL COLLECTION AGT. 



96 



a. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



POST P. S. & E., LUMBER, LATH, ETC. 

PRENTICE & ALLEN, BUTCHERS. 

PROUD DAVID, FARMER & BUTCHER. 

Pryne F., blacksmith. 

PULLY WILLIAM, CONFECTIONER, 
BOORIS AV. 

RAYMOND D. C, GROCER AND PRO- 
VISIONS. 

READ J. C, AGENT AMERICAN AND 
U. S. EXPRESS COS. 

SAGE & ROAD, DRY GOODS. 

SANBORN D., AGENT HARTFORD AND 
HOME INSURANCE COS. 

Sanderson L. & Son, dry goods. 

SANDERS & ANDREWS, PROPRIETORS 
KELLOGG HOUSE. 

SHELDON & JOSIAH, LAND DEALERS. 

Sherman J. H., proprietor Free Democrat. 

SHORT J. L., NOTARY PUBLIC AND 
LAND AGENT. 

Short W. G. & H. W., coach and saddlery 
hardware, Main st. 

Simon & Mitchel, merchant tailors. 

SMITH & EICHELBERGER, GROCERS, 
MAIN ST. 

Squire H. W., clothier. 

STAYMAN DR. J., NURSERYMAN. 

STEBBINS H. & CO., STEAM MILLS. 

Stevens & Lunibard, real estate agents. 

Stewart, Mower & Co., land agents. 

Stoddard E. D. & S. D., carriage makers and 
painters. 

Stoddard W. D., blacksmith. 

TALDEN J., DRY GOODS, MAIN ST. 

TAYLOR M. H., PHYSICIAN, BROAD 
STREET. 

Thompson J. A. & Co., watch makers. 

Van Blareom Mrs., A. C, millinery goods. 

Vanhorn P., dry goods, cor Main and Prai- 
rie streets. 

Walkee T. H., saddle and harness maker. 

Ward, Barrett & Co., forwarding merchants. 

Washburn & Brinckerhoff, butchers. 

Watkins & Beather, grocers and oil mer- 
chants. 

Weltner C. & A. Jr., grocers. 

White, Becker & Co., grain dealers, Boodus 
avenue. 

WHITE CHAUNCEY, DRUGS AND MED- 
ICINES, BROAD ST. 

WIJOU & LOVE, LUMBER, LATH AND 
SHINGLES. 

WILBER W., CARRIAGE MAKER. 

WILEY A. C, POLICE MAGISTRATE, 
DUNEIE'S BUILDING. 

WILLSIN H. & J., LIVERY STABLE, 
MAIN ST. 

Wisner & Taylor, clothing manufactory, Main 
street. 

Woodbridge & Lawrence, hardware, etc. 

WOODWARD P., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

GALLATIA, 

A post office of Salina county, in the north- 
eastern part of the state. 

Oscar F. Deryi.v, Postmaster. 



GALLATIN COUNTY 

Is situated in the S.S.E. part of the state and 
has an area of 310 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by the north and south forks of Salina 
creek, an affluent of the Ohio river. The 
surface -was once covered with extensive 
forests. 

A railroad has been laid out, connecting 
Vincennes, Indiana, with the Ohio river iu 
the southern boundary of the state, called the 
Vincennes and Paducah railroad, which also 
passes through the N. W. part of the coun- 
ty. The soil h fertile, and a good part 
is under cultivation. Horses, cattle, swine, 
lumber and salt, are the chief articles of ex- 
port. Tobacco is also grown to some consid- 
erable extent. It contains several churches 
and newspaper offices, and has about 800 pu- 
pils attending public schools. Salt is pre- 
pared on the banks of the Salina creek. It 
is one of the oldest counties of the state, 
having been organized about the year 1812, 
named in honor of Albert Gallatin. Capital, 
Equality. Population, about 8,500. 



GALLOWAY, 

A post village of La Salle county, on Ver- 
milion river, 115 miles N.N.E. from Spring- 
field, and about 12 miles S.E. from La Salle. 
Francis Galloway, Postmaster. 



GALTJM, 

A post village of Perry county, on the line of 
the proposed Belleville and Murphreysboro, 
railroad, 144 miles south from Springfield. 
James P. Bumell, Postmaster. 



GALVA 

Is a place of considerable importance, situat- 
ed in Henry county on the highest point of 
land between Lake Michigan and the Missis- 
sippi river, at the junction of the Chicago, 
Burlington and Quincy, and Western Air Line 
Jacksonville and Savannah railroads, 144 
miles from Chicago, and about equidistant 
from the Mississippi and Illinois rivers. It 
is surrounded by a most luxurious farming 
country, and is noted as a grain market. 
Three years ago not a house could be seen 
within the present limits of the corporation. 
Subsequent to the opening of the railroad a 
town was laid out, lots offered for sale, and in 
October, 1854, the first house was erected. 
With astonishing rapidity the town has ac- 
quired numbers and wealth, and during the 
business portion of the season it presents a 
decidedly lively appearance. Over one hun- 
dred buildings have been erected during the 
past year, all of the most substantial charac- 
ter ; among them is a large steam flouring 
mill. Water can easily be obtained, and in 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



97 



ome portions of the town living springs arcs 
found. Wood and coal are easily obtained, 
large quantities of the latter being found 
within a short distance of the village. The 
greater portion of the prairie in the vicinity 
is under cultivation, though there is yet 
enough remaining unbroken to induce a large 
emigration to this point. The climate is ex- 
tremely healthy, the annual bills of mortality 
being much less than in eastern towns of the 
same size and number of inhabitants. 

The cause of education is well cared for, 
the town possessing a fine large school house 
occupied by the Gr.lv a (graded) public school 
with about two hundred students, under the 
charge of an able corps of teachers. Another 
public school house is to be erected the 
coming season, the present one being insuffi- 
cient to accommodate all who may wish to 
attend. 

There are here four organized churches, 
namely, Baptists, Methodists, Congregational- 
ists and Presbyterians, — the three former 
have good houses of worship, and it is ex- 
pected that another will be built this year for 
the use of the latter church. There are also 
two good hotels and other buildings of a 
public character well worthy of mention. A 
weekly newspaper is printed here called the 
Galva Watchman. The town was founded 
by the Messrs. Wileys. Population, 2,000. 

George Farr, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Austin Miss Mary M., millinery and dress 
goods. 

Ayers John A., dry goods, hardware, etc. 

Babcock A. D., physician, surgeon and dealer 
in drugs, medicines, etc. 

Bailey & Bros., proprietors of flouriDg mill. 

Bailey I. C. Jr., cashier of bank. 

Barnard 0. J., farmer, 

Bartley S. K., carpenter. 

Beecher B. J., farmer. 

Beecher I. M., farmer. 

Bennett John I., attorney at law. 

Bigelow H., attorney at law, solicitor in chan- 
cery and notary public. 

Billings H. F., proprietor Wiley House. 

Bishop J. U, coal dealer. 

Bonham Jas., farmer. 

Burnham Miss Mary E., teacher. 

Burnham N, bakery. 

Bush F. J., livery stable. 

Butler I. C, restaurant. 

Carson A. D., livery stable. 

CASS LEWIS W., AGRICULTURAL 
STORE. 

Castle Frederick, mason. 

Chaffee A. H., farmer. 

Cholett Francis, carpenter. 

Cholett Jonathan, carpenter. 

Clark & Huey, drugs and medicines. 

Clark C. M., physician and surgeon. 

Clark H. H., with L. W. Cass, agricultural 
store. 



Clark J. C, farmer. 

Coteral & Leming, farmers. 

Crawford & Walker, blacksmiths. 

Cronan & Shupp, merchant tailors. 

Crowfoot A., printer. 

Curtis A. J., furniture. 

Dack Wm., mason. 

Davis C. E,, with Hathaway, lumber dealer. 

Dickenson H. L., carpenter. 

Drury N, farmer. 

Edwards D. F., principal of high school. 

Emery Jacob, town trustee. 

Farr George, insurance agent. 

Fuller Charles, with express office. 

Fuller E., railroad agent, 

Gettey Thomas and Charles, farmers. 

Gillett David, carpenter. 

Gorden Henry, with L. W. Cass, agricultural 
store. 

Gross A., clergyman. 

Guthrie C. T., blacksmith. 

Hamblin & Son, stoves, tinware, etc. 

Hathaway A. T., lumber dealer. 

Hill Edward, farmer. 

Hill George, farmer. 

Hodgman R., merchant. 

Howe Miss Sarah, music teacher. 

Hulsted E., farmer. 

Husted George, farmer. 

Husted Ira, farmer. 

Johnson & Remington, bankers. 

Johnson Olef, president of Swedish colony. 

Kelsey Norton, merchant. 

Knox J. L., stoves, cutlery and hardware. 

Langdon John, proprietor Galva House. 

Maddox Samuel, justice of peace. 

Merrill & Stockholm, farmers. 

Miller E. D., carpenter. 

Miller F., merchant. 

Miller J. M. A., farmer. 

Nixon J. B., books and stationery. 

Norton David, justice of peace. 

Ogden H. L., carpenter. 

Ogden M. B., carpenter. 

Peirce N., clerk and constable. 

Price J. L., merchant. 

Quick E., watch and clock repairer. 

Riddle Lyman 0., farmer. 

Robbins, Goold & Co., dry goods, groceries, 

etc. 
Robinson C, dry goods, groceries, etc. 
Rogers E., blacksmith. 
Rosenthal J. & Co., clothing, etc. 
Shertliff Chas., justice of peace. 
Shoup S. & Co., dry goods, clothing, hard- 
ware, groceries, etc. 
SMITH & HARL, PROPRIETORS OF 

GALVA WATCHMAN. 
Smith Geo., carpenter. 
Smith S. E., harness shop. 
Soaper & Bro., merchants. 
SWEDISH COLONY, FARMERS. 
Sweetland F. A., dentist. 
Sweetland Mrs. M. E., millinery and dress 

making. 
Thompson John F., farmer. 
Ward H. D., produce dealer. 



98 



G. W. nAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Wheeler Frederick A., lumber, lime, cement, 

etc. 
Whitehead Thomas, nurseryman. 
White Jarvis, carpenter.. 
Whittlesey S. H., physician and surgeon. 
Wiley D. L., real estate dealer. 
WILEY J. M. & WM. L., REAL ESTATE 

DEALERS. 
Wiley T. Jr., recorder of Henry county. 
Wright S. G., clergyman. 
Yocum & Funk, dry goods, groceries, etc. 



GARDEN PLAIN, 

A post village of Whiteside county, in the 
west part, a few miles south of the Chicago 
and Fulton railroad, about 125 miles west from 
Chicago. 
James A. Sweet, Postmaster. 



GARDEN PRAIRIE. 

A post village of Boone county, on the line 
of the Galena & Chicago Union railroad, 72 
miles west from Chicago. 

Cyrcs H. Avery, Postmaster. 



GARDNER, 



A growing village of Grundy county, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton & Chicago rail- 
road, 66 miles south-west from Chicago, and 
217 from St. Louis. 
Abraham Gleason, Postmaster. 



GARD'S POINT. 



A post office of Wabash county. 
Barton P. Baker, Postmaster. 



GENESEO 



GAP GROVE, 

A post village of Lee county, on a branch of 
Elkhorn creek, about five miles west from 
Dixon. 

Wm. W. Tilton, Postmaster. 



GENESEE GROVE, 

A post village of Whiteside county, in the 
north part, on a branch of Little Rock river, 
about 120 miles north of west from Chicago. 
John T. Crum, Postmaster. 



Is an important and flourishing town in Henry 
county, on the Chicago & Rock Island rail- 
road, about 23 miles east from Rock Island. 
It is beautifully situated in one of the richest 
portions of the state, in an agricultural point 



of view, and is one of the first grain depots 
outside of Chicago. The inhabitants are 
mostly from the east. It has been noted for 
the excellence of its educational facilities, 
the intelligence and morality of its citizens. 
There are several large manufacturing estab- 
lishments in the town, two newspaper offices, 
seven churches, several good hotels, etc. 
Population, about 2,000. 

Henry McArthcr, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Adams Henry, baker. 

Albro Henrv, grocer. 

ALLAN J. M., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Amsden R. B.. farmer. 

Ainsworth C. & Son, dry goods. 

Anderson A. M., hardware. 

Blackstone W. P., merchant. 

Blake J. D., confectioner. 

Boice J. R., sjrocer. 

BRACKEN JAMES, eating house. 

Bryant & Steele, boots and shoes. 

Cook W. P., book store. 

Cowles Geo., groceries, provisions, etc. 

CROOK T. D., proprietor Howard House. 

(See adv't, next page.) 
DEEM & CO., proprietors flouring mill. 
Dean A. M., undertaker. 
Flagget Mrs. Mary, Millinery. 
FURLON W. S. & CO., harness, etc. 



i!G Mil, 

©IV MAW STREET, 

G-El^TESEO, ILL. 

A. MILLER, PROPRIETOR. 



CARRIAGE TO AND FROM THE HOUSE FREE OF CHARGE. 



This House is situated in the business part of the 
town, and has recently been enlarged and newly 
furnished. 



Grundy Geo., blacksmith. 

Gustus John, shoemaker. 

Hammond Joseph, gunsmith. 

Herman & Waterman, clothing. 

HOSFORD J. M., attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Hutchins J. S., furniture store. 
HYATT I. S., EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 

OF THE GENESEO REPUBLIC. 
IRELAND J. C, attorney and counselor at 

law. 
James Wm., meat market. 
Kendall & Crawford, variety store. 
Lewis G. H. & Co., grocers. 
Libbey Dr. J. L., dentist. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



99 




T.D. CROOK, PROPRIETOR. 



Guests and their baggage conveyed to and 
from the House free. 



Lyman M. J., physician. 

Mc Arthur H., postmaster. 

McGINLY & CLAWSON, proprietors Star 
mills. 

Manington J., ambrotypist. 

Mead A. J., druggist. 

MORGAN GEO., CARPENTER, JOINER 
AND ARCHITECT. 

NOURSE, WINGATE, BLAIR & CO., 
bankers. 

TERRY & BRO., GROCERS, ETC. 

PERRY, SPAULDING & CO., Proprietors 
Bank of Geneseo. 

Sleight L. C, wagon maker. 

Sleight, Wells & Co., dry goods. 

SMITH & SOWERS, manufacturers of boots 
and shoes. 

Stern Matthias, proprietor American House. 

Stewart & Bro., lumber merchants. 

Stewart L. F., insurance. 

Stough 0. J., insurance agent. 

Thomas H., merchant. 

Thompson G. W., shaving and hair dressing. 

Tilton J. C, jewelry. 

Turner 0., dealer in real estate. 

VAN WINKLE A., forwarding and com- 
mission merchants. 

VAN WINKLE & HAZIN, with R. R. 

Vernon John, tailor. 

Wales A., meat market. 

Waverly House, by Kimball & Howard. 

Wells Geo., merchant. 

Whitney & Reed, stoves 

Wilcox & Beveridge, meat market. 



GENEVA, 

The capital of Kane county, is situated on 
both sides of Fox river, and on the line of 
the Chicago, Fulton & Iowa railroad, 35 miles 
west from Chicago. The first claim to the 
land on which the town now stands, was 
made by Daniel S. H. Haight, Esq., in the 
spring of 1834. The name was adopted at 
the suggestion of Dr. Dyer, a prominent 
citizen of Chicago. In early times, in the 
county, when the spirit of rivalry was most 
prevalent between Geneva and its neighbor, 
St. Charles, the former was known by the 
name of Gnaie-bone, in derision, people in 
those days having little idea that these thriv- 
ing towns would ever amount to much. 



How they were mistaken the present wealth 
and prosperity give sufficient evidence. 
Geneva was made the county seat in 1836, 
and laid out in the spring of 1837. It con- 
tains a court house and other public build- 
ings of note ; the former costing upward of 
§60,000, and will compare favorably with any 
in the state. There are two bridges across 
the river at this point, one of which, the 
railroad bridge, cost $30,000 ; the other is 
designed to accommodate the business of the 
town, and has incurred an expense of $14,000 
in its erection. The Kane county bank is 
also located at Geneva. Manufacturing is 
carried on to a great extent, there being a 
large grist mill, mower and reaper factory, 
etc. This reaper manufactory has between 
thirty and forty thousand dollars invested in 
buildings, tools, etc. A weekly paper iB 
published here, called the Kane County 
Advertiser, Wilson & Cockroft, proprietors. 
Population, 2,000. 
TnoMAS A. Scott, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Alexander J., wagon maker and blacksmith. 

Anderson S., merchant tailor. 

Antciff Thomas, meat market. 

Carter John & Bro., boots and shoes. 

Cook J. A., hardware. 

Crary Elias, justice of peace. 

DANFORD E. & CO., manufacturers of 

Danford's double sickle mower and 

reaper. 
Evans & Co., hardware, stoves, etc. 
Fletcher Samuel., watch and clock repairer. 
Geneva House, J. B. Raymond, proprietor. 
Glass A. W., general merchant. 
Herrington A. M., attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Kelley John, groceries. 
Leems A. & Co., boots and shoes. 
Lepete & Peterson, sash, doors and blinds. 
MAYBORNE & SMITH, attorneys and 

counselors at law, and general collecting 

agents. 
Middleton Thomas, merchant tailor. 
MOORE A. B., proprietor of Geneva flour 

mills. 
Patten C, dry goods, groceries, etc. 
Poor Thos. W, livery and sale stable. 
Rathbone W., groceries. 
Scott T. A., postmaster. 
Skip with G. S., groceries, provisions, etc. 
Smith W. A., notary public. 
Tinsley Ed., meat market. 
Todd S. H., justice of peace. 
Webster W. G., livery stable and harness 

maker. 
Wells C. B., attorney and counselor at law, 

and insurance agent. 
WEST & MOORE, BANKERS. 
Whitaker Wm., furniture. 
Williams Joseph, blacksmith. 



100 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



WILSON & COCKEOFT, JOB PRINTERS 
AND STEREOTYPERS, AND PUB- 
LISHERS OF KANE COUNTY AD- 
VERTISER. 

WORSLE Y TIMOTHY, dry goods, groceries, 
etc. 



GENOA, 

A small post village of DeKalb county, in 
the north-east part, on a branch of the Kish- 
waukee river, about 60 miles north-west 
from Chicago. 
William H. Allen, Postmaster. 



GEORGE'S CREEK, 

A post village of Massac county, in the ex- 
treme north-east part, about 120 miles south- 
east from St. Louis. 

Wm. J. Simpson, Postmaster. 



GEORGETOWN, 

A nourishing post town of Vermilion county, 
on the edge of Grand Prairie, near Little 
Vermilion river, 1 miles from the Indiana 
state line, and 8 miles from the Great West- 
ern railroad. It is distant from St. Louis 
200 miles and from Chicago 130 miles. The 
village is noted for its healthy location. 
Georgetown seminary, a thriving institution, 
is located here. Population, about 1,000. 
J. K. Ritchie, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Baldwin J. W., farmer. 
Balch H. J. E., physician. 
Canaday & Haworth, farmers. 
Cassaday B. & Co., dry goods and groceries. 
Cooper John, farmer. 
Cowen P., justice of peace. 
Craig W. D., physician. 
Davis & Balch, drugs, etc, 
Fairbanks G. W., clergyman. 
Frazier A. & Co., dry goods and groceries. 
Galyon Thos. N., farmer. 
Hawes A. M. O, physician. 
Haworth Dillen, farmer. 
Henderson & Holloway, dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 
Hessler & Ankrum, dry goods and groceries. 
Hill H. H., physician. 

Lesseure A. & Bro., dry goods and groceries. 
McKee E. A., wagon maker. 
Moore Wm. M., stoves and tinware. 



GERMANTOWN, 

A post office of Clinton county. 
Herman Middendorff, Postmaster. 



GILEAD, 

A post village of Calhoun county, about mid- 
way between the Mississippi and Illinois 
rivers, 60 miles west of north from St. Louis ; 
was formerly the county seat. 
Daniel T. Simpson, Postmaster. 



GILLESPIE, 

Is a thriving post village of Macoupin county, 
on the line of the Terre Haute and Alton 
railroad, about 20 miles from Hillsboro. This 
village has sprung up on the open prairie 
since the building of the railroad, and bids 
fair to become a point of some importance. 
There are here two good hotels, a large two 
story building, used for the various pur- 
poses of church, school house, town hall, 
odd fellows' h all and justices' court, several 
stores, etc. There are also in the village, 
lodges of masons and good templars. Popu- 
lation, 600. 

S. D. Blake, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Allen J. II., hotel keeper. 

Baldwin C. P., clergyman. 

BLAKE S. D., MERCHANT. 

Cardwell J. W., physician. 

Clark J. F., grain dealer. 

Crutchfield J P., justice of peace. > 

Dorsey B. L., farmer. 

Dorsey R. E., farmer. 

Gamage Rev., clergyman. 

Gutheri S. S., merchant. 

Holmes Henry, farmer. 

Huddlestun Daniel, farmer. 

Martin S. D., hotel keeper. 

Osborn Isaac, physician. 

Peter S. B., merchant. 

Ralls John, merchant. 

Randall E. B. & Co., merchants. 

Richards Wm., farmer. 

Richardson A. J., farmer. 

Small Benj., farmer. 

Snapp & Dillen, wagon makers. 

Sloan R. T., attorney at law. 

Vermillion House, J. Yapp, proprietor. 

Weckle F. F., boots and shoes. 

Yapp Jacob, saddles and harness. 



GILMAN, 

A new town of Iroquois county, at the 
crossing of Peoria and Logansport and Chi- 
cago branch of Illinois Central railroads, 81 
miles from Chicago, and about the same dis- 
tance east from Peoria ; laid out in Septem- 
ber, 1857, since which the place has grown 
at a rapid rate, several fine buildings have 
already been erected, and contracts entered 
into for the erection, the coming season, of a 
large hotel and store, a sash and blind fac- 



GAZETTEER ATND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



101 



tory, a flouring mill, and a large grain ware- 
house, besides a number of private residences. 
A post office is to be established here, as 
soon as the necessary arrangements can be 
completed ; at present, mails are received 
at Onarga, three miles south. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 
CROSS GEO. W., MERCHANT. 
Esty M. M. & Co., proprietors of hotel. 
Fenner David, eating house. 
Lynch M., boarding house. 
Tisdale James, eating house. 



GILMER, 

A post village of Lake county, near Diamond 
Lake, a few miles from the line of the Chi- 
cago, St. Paul and Fond du Lac railroad. 
Joel B. Thomas, Postmaster. 



GIRARD, 

A thriving post village of Macoupin county, 
on the line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chi- 
cago railroad, 214 miles from Chicago and 
71 from St. Louis. Considerable business is 
done at this point, and the appearance of 
the place is rapidly improving. 
Horace F. Bridges, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Collins & Sears, dry goods, clothing, etc. 

Crichfield A. R., surgeon dentist. 

DAGGETT F. H. & CO:, DRY GOODS, 
DRUGS AND MEDICINES. 

Dodds A. S., physician. 

Eastham W. E., furniture, hardware, etc. 

Eastwood J. M., blacksmith. 

Emery Z. J., tinware and stoves. 

Horn Nathan F., produce dealer. 

Jones E. & Brother, drv goods. 

KENDALL WILLIAM, saddles and har- 
ness. 

Marshall & Jones, physicians and surgeons. 

MAYFIELD A., dry goods and general store. 

MAYFIELD A. S., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, CLOTHING, ETC. 

MEDCALF J. D., DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES. 

Michaels James, dry goods and queensware. 

MICK W. E. DAGUERREIAN ARTIST. 

Rafferty Joseph, proprietor of Girard house. 

Randall M. & Co., nurserymen. 

SOLOMON ASHER, dry goods, groceries, 
etc. 



GLASGOW, 

A post village of Scott county, near the 
southern central part, 40 miles south-west 
from Springfield, 75 north from St. Louis, 
and about 235 miles south-west from Chica- 



go ; it is situated in the midst of a finely 
timbered country, and is rapidly increasing 
in numbers and enterprise ; there are here 
two saw mills, one flouring mill, and wool 
carding machine, two blacksmith shops, two 
cooper shops, one wagon maker shop, four 
carpenter shops, two stores, one grocery, etc. 
Population 200. 

A. H. Hetherington, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Blair Robert, justice of peace. 

Clanton James, farmer. 

Crumby E., merchant. 

McLaughlin Wm., farmer. 

Mirus F. A., physician. 

Nelson L., farmer. 

Rankin David, miller. 

Sharp Watson, constable. 

Steel James, miller. 

Young & Whiteside, merchants. 



GLENWOOD 



Is a new town recently laid out in Morgan 
county, on the line of the Jacksonville, 
Alton and St. Louis railroad, about 12 miles 
south of the former place. It possesses a 
beautiful site, with inexhaustible beds of 
coal, stone, abundant timber, and other 
building material, in the immediate vicinity. 
Important improvements are constantly 
being carried on, with a view to make this a 
point of interest to those about locating in 
the West. 

GODFREY, 

A post village of Madison county. 
Timothy Turner, Postmaster. 



GOLCONDA, 

A post village, capital of Pope county, on 
the Ohio river, at the mouth of Lusk creek, 
220 miles south-south-east from Springfield. 
A brick court house adds to the beauty 
of the place. Considerable business is done 
at this point. 

J. M. Boicotjrt, Postmaster. 

Smith Thomas H., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

GOLDEN'S POINT, 

A post office of Hancock county. 
John S. Currey, Postmaster. 



GOODING'S GROVE, 

A post village of Will county, 25 miles south- 
west from Chicago. 

Samuel Blount, Postmaster 



102 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



GRAFTON, 

A post village of Jersey county, on the Mis' 
sissippi river, about 85 miles south-west 
from Springfield. Population, about 350. 
Wm. H. Allen, Postmaster. 



Lorimer A., merchant tailor. 
Yeitch J. B., physician and surgeon. 



GRAND COTE PRAIRIE, 

A post village of Perry county, in the north- 
western part, 65 miles south south-west from 
Vandalia. 

John C. Huet, Postmaster. 



GRAND DETOUR, 

A thriving post village of Ogle county, on 
Rock river, about 10 miles north-east from 
Dixon. Population, about 580. 
Horace H. Paine, Postmaster. 



GRAND PIER, 



A post office of Pope county. 
John W. Herod, Postmaster. 



GRAND PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Kankakee county. • 
Job Williams, Postmaster. 



GRAND TOWER, 



A post office of Jackson county. 
Benningsen Boone, Postmaster. 



GRAND VIEW, 

A post village in the township of the same 
name, in Edgar county, 12 miles south-west 
from Paris, the county seat. 
Joel S. Carkt, Postmaster. 



GRANVILLE, 

A post village of Putnam county, in the 
northern part, about 5 miles east from the 
Illinois river. 

Wm. A. Pennell, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Coleman George, blacksmith and wheel- 
wright. 
Pennell W. A., insurance and land agent. 
Reed Geo. J. & Co., dry goods, groceries, etc. 



GRAYVILLE 

Is a neat little town of White county, on 
the Wabash river. The site on which the 
town is built is very beautiful, and the citi- 
zens display no little pride in its general im- 
provement. The town contains three 
churches and two printing offices, from 
which are issued the Herald and the Journal, 
both weeklies. A fine academy building has 
been put up the past year, which is truly an 
ornament to the town. 

Amzi A. White, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Annable Samuel, nurseryman. 

Caldwell J. M., proprietor Grayville House. 

Clarke J. Edward, daguerreotypist. 

Coles J. F. & Co., livery stable. 

Coulter J. S., sashes, doors and blinds. 

Crawford W. H., clothing. 

Garrick P. E., physician and druggist. 

Gilbert W. H., sash, doors and blinds. 

Golden S. C, physician. 

Gray W. W., produce dealer. 

Hamilton J. H., dry goods, books and sta- 
tionery. 

Helm M. A., real estate dealer. 

Horrall W. A., eclectic physician. 

Hunter J., proprietor of Hunter's Hotel. 

Kenner A. R., dry goods, groceries, hard- 
ware, etc. 

Lescher Joseph, furniture. 

Manley Frank C, publisher of Grayville 
Herald. 

Martin & Buckly, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Mitchell E. V., physician and surgeon. 

Montgomery T. J: & J. C, stage proprietors. 

Orange S. J., furniture dealer, justice of 
peace and notary public. 

Prunty & Woodward, groceries and hard- 
ware. 

Routh Jeremiah, lumber. 

Spring Lindsay, livery and sale stable. 

Steele Arthur, dry goods, clothing, etc. 

Tanquary Mrs. M. J., millinery. 

Warrick T. P. & Co., dry goods, groceries, 
hardware, etc. 

White A. A., notary public and justice of 
peace. 

Williams J. B., forwarding and commission. 



GREENBUSH, 

A thriving post village of Warren county, 
about 87 miles north-west from Springfield. 
Lewis L. Ury, Postmaster. 



GREENE COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-south-west part of the 
state, and has an area of 500 square miles. 
The Illinois river, navigable by steamboats, 
forms its entire boundary on the west and 
Macoupin creek on the south. It is drained 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



103 



by Apple creek. The surface is undulating, 
and the soil highly productive and well cul- 
tivated. The county contains a large pro- 
portion of timbered land and several beauti- 
ful upland prairies of small extent, Corn, 
wheat, oats, hay, potatoes and pork are the 
staples. Fruit is also cultivated to a con- 
siderable extent. It contains about forty 
churches and several newspaper offices. 
Coal is also found in the county in abund- 
ance. The county is intersected by the 
Jacksonville and Carrollton railroad, which 
is being built. Capital, Carrollton. Popula- 
tion, about 14,500. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Circuit Judge, D. M. Woodson. 
County Judge, C. D. Hodges. 
Circuit Clerk, A. Spencer. 
County Clerk, F. P. Vedder. 
Sheriff, L. J. Patterson. 
County Treasurer, W. L. Greene. 



GREENDALE, 



A post office of Marion county. 
John W. Eblen, Postmaster. 



GREENFIELD, 



A post village of Greene county, in a town- 
ship of the same name, 60 miles south-west 
from Springfield. 

Ephriam M. Gilmore, Postmaster. 



GREEN GARDEN, 



A post office of Will county, 
Noah Johnson, Postmaster. 



GREEN RIDGE, 



A post office of Knox county. 
Asa Greenwood, Postmaster. 



GREEN RIVER, 

A post village of Henry county, on Green 
river, 70 miles north-west from Peoria. 
Joseph A. Sawyer, Postmaster. 



GREENUP, 

A fine post village, capital of Cumberland 
county, on the Embarras river, at the cross- 
ing of the National road, 111 miles east- 
south-east from Springfield. The Atlantic 
and Mississippi railroad is located through 
the village. 

C. C. Starkweather, Postmaster. 



GREENVALE, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, 22 miles 
north-west from Freeport. 
David Clay, Postmaster. 



GREENVILLE, 

A neat and thriving post village, capital of 
Bond county, on the east fork of Shoal 
creek, on the National road and near the 
line of the proposed Atlantic and Mississippi 
railroad. It has a fine court house, and 
many other buildings worthy of notice ; 
among them is Almira college, of brick, three 
stories in height, and of large proportions. 
It is intended for females exclusively and was 
named in honor of Mrs. Almira Morse, of 
this town, who donated $6,000 toward its 
establishment ; the entire cost will be about 
$35,000. The business of the village is 
quite large, and the inhabitants energetic 
and industrious. 

Samuel H. Crocker, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Brooks & Allen, physicians and surgeons. 
Brown, Stewart & Co., drugs, paints, oils, 

books, stationery, etc. 
ALEXANDER J. F. & J. J. H., publishers of 

the American Conner. 
Castle & Tooley, provisions, etc. 
Chittenden M. B. & Co., dry goods, hard- 
ware, clothing, etc. 
Elam & Law, carriages, plows and corn 

planters. 
Francisco E., homeopathic physician and 

dentist. 
Hutchinson & Evans Misses, millinery and 

fancy goods. 
Kelsoe John P., wagon maker. 
Lester J. L., attorney at law, notary public 

and land agent. 
Marston W., teacher of penmanship. 
Moore S. P., attorney and counselor at law. 
Morse & Bros., dry goods, boots and shoes, 

groceries, etc. 
Osgood W. O., drugs, medicines, paints, oils, 

jewelry, etc. 
Osgood Mrs. W. O., milliner and dress maker- 
Roberts E. P., watch and clock repairer. 
Sargent M. L., proprietor of Sargent House. 
Slaughter & Floyd, physicians and surgeons. 
Smith Theodore, stoves and hardware. 
Sprague A., surgeon. 
Sprague R. C, physician and surgeon. 
Stevenson Samuel, attorney at law. 
Stewart & Causey, nurserymen. 



GREENWOOD, 

A post village of McHenry county, on the 
Nippersink creek, about sixty miles north- 
west from Chicago. 

James Simmons, Postmaster. 



104 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



GRIGGSVILLE, 

A neat thriving post village of Pike county, 
about 5 miles west from the Illinois river and 
a few miles from the line of the proposed 
Quincy and Jacksonville railroad. Popula- 
tion, about 1,200. 

Jacob Parsons, Postmaster. 



GRINDSTONE, 

A post village of McDonough county, on 
Grindstone creek. 

Alfred L. Gray, Postmaster. 



GRISWOLD, 



A post village of Hamilton county, in the 
southern part, 8i miles south-south-east from 
Yandalia. 

Gilbert Griswold, Postmaster. 



GROUSE, 

A post village of Kane county, on Black- 
berry creek, 50 miles west from Chicago. 
Newell W. Thompson, Postmaster: 



GROVE LAND, 



A post village of Tazewell county, near the 
Illinois river, 60 miles north by east from 
Springfield. 
John Griffith, Postmaster. 



GRUNDY COUNTY 

Is situated in the east-north-east part of the 
state, and has an area of 4550 square miles. 
It is traversed by the Illinois river, which is 
formed in the north-east part of the county, 
by the union of the Kankakee and Des 
Plaines ; and also drained by Mason's river. 
The county is intersected by the Illinois and 
Michigan canal and the Chicago and Rock 
Island railroad, the St. Louis, Alton and 
Chicago railroad also crosses the south-east 
corner. The surface is generally level and 
the soil highly fertile. In some parts timber 
is scarce. Corn, wheat, oats and hay are the 
staples. It contains several churches, and 
has about six hundred pupils attending pub- 
lic schools. Stone coal has been found to 
some extent in portions of the county. The 
county is named in honor of Hon. Felix 
Grundy, a former senator from Tennessee? 
and attorney general of the United States. 
Capital, Morris. Population, about 5,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Hon. C. Grant. 
County Clerk, Perrt A. Armstrong. 



Circuit Clerk, Wm. A. Kiersted. 
County Treasurer, Robt. Longworth. 
County Surveyor, Samuel Ewen, 
School Commissioner, Geo. Fisher. 
Coroner, Jas. B. Jones. 
Sheriff, A. C. D. Wallace. 



GUILFORD, 

A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
Ebenezer Baldwin, Postmaster. 



GUILFORD, 

A small village of Calhoun county, on the 
west bank of the Illinois river, about 90 
miles south-west from Springfield. 



HADLEY, 

A post village of Will county, in the north- 
east part, 28 miles from Chicago. 
John Pratt, Postmaster. 



HADLEY STATION, 

A post office of Lawrence county, on the 
line of the Ohio and Mississippi railroad, 21 
miles west from Vincennes, Ind. 
Squire R. Robinson, Postmaster. 



HAGLEY, 

A post office of Cass county. 
Samuel Craven, Postmaster. 



HAINESVILLE, 

A thriving post village of Lake county, 15 
miles from Waukegan ; a plank road forms 
connection between the two places. 
Daniel H. Ingalls, Postmaster. 



HALE, 

A post office of Ogle county. 
Joshua White, Postmaster. 



HALFDAY, 



A small post village of Lake county, 28 miles 
north from Chicago. Population, about 350. 
Moses Hubbard, Postmaster. 



HALL, 



A post office of Franklin county. 
Jacob S. Clark, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



105 



HAMBURG, 

A post village of Calhoun county, on the 
Mississippi river, 88 miles south-west from 
Springfield. It possesses a good steamboat 
landing, and is a place of considerable 
business. 
Nehemiah J. Woodin, Postmaster. 



HAMILTON COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 395 square miles ; it is drained 
by the Skillet fork of Little Wabash river, 
and the north fork of Saline creek. The 
county consists of part prairie and part tim- 
bered land ; the soil is fertile ; corn, oats, 
hay and pork, are the principal staples ; it 
contains several churches, and has about 
1,700 pupils attending public schools. Capi- 
tal, McLeansborough. Population, about 
9,500. 



HAMILTON, 

A post office of Hancock County. 
John S. Cox, Postmaster. 



HAMLET, 



A post office of Mercer county. 
Graham Lee, Postmaster. 



HAMPSHIRE, 

A post village of Kane county, on the road 
from Chicago to Galena, 58 miles west-north- 
west from the former. 
Hezekiah P. Williams, Postmaster. 



HAMPTON, 

A post village of Rock Island county, on the 
Mississippi river, 168 miles west of south 
from Chicago. 

Loranus L. Bretton, Postmaster. 



HANCOCK COUNTY 

Is situated in the extreme western part of 
the state, bordering on Missouri and Iowa; 
the Mississippi river forms its western boun- 
dary; it js also drained by Crooked creek, an 
affluent of the Illinois river ; the surface is 
undulating, and diversified by beautiful 
prairies and tracts of timber, the soil is ex- 
ceedingly rich and well improved ; corn, 
wheat, oats, hay, pork and butter, are the 
staples. It contains about 20 churches, 
several newspaper offices, and has about 
2,S00 pupils attending public schools. The 



county contains large quantities of coal aDd 
limestone. The Northern Cross railroad to 
Quincy, crosses the south-east corner. Capi- 
tal, Carthage. Population, 17,400. 



HANOVER, 



A post village of Jo Daviess county, on 
Apple creek, 20 miles south-east from Gaiena; 
has good water power, which is extensively 
used for milling purposes. 

Sherman S. Rose, Postmaster. 



HARDIN COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, bor- 
dering on Kentucky, and is one of the 
smallest counties in the state, having an area 
of only 260 square miles; the Ohio river 
forms the southern boundary, the soil is pro- 
ductive. Corn oats, cattle and swine, are the 
staples; it contains some 15 or 20 churches, 
and has over 800 pupils attending public 
schools ; the Cave-in-rock well, known to 
navigators on the Ohio river, is situated in 
this county. Hardin once formed a part of 
Pope county. Capital, Elizabethtown. Popu- 
lation, about 4,000. 



HARDIN, 

A post village, capital of Calhoun county, 
on the west bank of the Illinois river, 85 
miles south-west from Springfield, is a place 
of considerable importance. 
Benj. F. Childs, Postmaster. 



HARDINSVILLE, 

A post office of Crawford county. 
David Dtar, Postmaster. 



HARLEM, 

A post village of Winnebago county, in the 
township of the same name, and is near the 
eastern boundry of the county. 
Chauncey Wilder, Postmaster. 



HARLEM, 

A township in the central part of Stephen- 
son county. 



HARMONY, 



A post village of McHenry county, 55 miles 
north-west from Chicago ; it is near the line 
of the Chicago and Galena railroad. 
Calvin H. Shapley, Postmaster 



106 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



HARRISBURG, 

A new post village of Sabine county, situated 
in the midst of fine timbered lands, an inex- 
haustible supply of coal, and abundance of 
salt. 
Jo. Robinson, Postmaster. 



HARRIS GROVE, 

A post office of Jefferson county. 
Thompson Augler, Postmaster. 



HARRISON, 

A post village of Winnebago counnty, in a 
township of the same name, 100 miles north- 
west from Chicago. 
Peter C. VanSlycke, Postmaster. 



HARRIS ON VILLE, 

A post village of Monroe county, on the 
Mississippi river, about 28 miles below St. 
Louis. 

Noah B. Harlow, Postmaster. 



HARTLAND, 



A post village of McHenry county, about 60 
miles north-west from Chicago. 
Matthew J. Conklin, Postmaster. 



HAVANA, 

A thriving post village, capital of Mason 
county, is pleasantly situated on the east 
bank of Illinois river, opposite the mouth of 
Spoon river, 218 miles from Chicago; the 
site is elevated, and the landing convenient ; 
large amounts of produce are annually shipped 
from here, by way of the Illinois river; a 
railroad is soon to be built, connecting the 
Peoria and Oquawka railroad, with the Great 
Western, at Jacksonville, and passing through 
this place. Population, about 2,500. 
Orlando H. Wright, Postmaster. 



HAWTHORN, 



A post office of McDonough county. 
Wm. P. Blandin, Postmaster. 



HAZLE DELL, 

A post office of Cumberland county. 
John B. Kelly, Postmaster. 



HEATHLAND, 

A post office of Henry county. 
Isaac Paden, Postmaster. 



HEBRON, 

A post village of McHenry county, in the 
township of the same name, 60 miles north- 
west from Chicago, near the line of the Fox 
River Valley railroad. 

Samuel W. Brown, Postmaster. 



HECKERj 



A post office of Monroe county. 
Augustus Rittmeyer, Postmaster. 



HELENA, 

A post office of Peoria county. 
Thomas Mooney, Postmaster. 



HEMLO. 



A post office of Whiteside County. 
Asa M. Abbott, Postmaster. 



HENDERSON COUNTY 

Is situated in the west part of the state, 'bor- 
dering on Iowa, and has an area of 540 
square miles; the Mississippi river forms the 
western boundary, and it is intersected by 
Henderson river, and by Honey and Elison 
creeks ; the surface is diversified by prairies 
and woodlands, the soil is fertile; corn, 
wheat, oats, potatoes and hay, are the staples. 
The county contains about a dozen churches, 
and one or two newspaper offices ; there are 
about 900 pupils attending public schools. 
Beds of stone coal and limestone are found 
in the county ; it is intersected by the Chica- 
go, Burlington and Quincy railroad. Until 
1841, this formed part of Warren county. 
Capital, Oquawka. Population, about 6000. 



HENDERSON, 

A thriving post village of Knox county, 52 
miles north-west from Peoria. 
Edwin T. Ellett, Postmaster. 



HENNEPIN, 

A thriving post village, capital of Putnam 
county, on the left bank of the Illinois river, 
115 miles north from Springfield. Steamboats 
navigate the river between its mouth and 
Hennepin, in all seasons except winter ; it 
has an active business in shipping produce, 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



107 



the value of which is estimated at about one 
million dollars annually. 

Chester Eddv, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Barmore Walter B., meat market. 

Baxendale W. & G., groceries, tobacco and 
cigars. 

Clotz & Kirner, brewers. 

Dore P., groceries. 

DUNCAN J. E., proprietor Hennepin Tri- 
bune. 

Eddy C. & W., dry goods, clothing, etc. 

Feltes Peter & Co., groceries. 

Grable J. F., justice of peace. 

Greiner & Bro., bakery. 

Guyselman John, groceries. 

Kline E., guns, pistols, etc. 

Lewis D., watch and clock maker. 

Margison J. L., blacksmith. 

Mioihan & Simpson, forwarding and com- 
mission. 

Noxon A. C, drugs and medicines. 

Panchaud J. C, physician and surgeon, 

Pulsifer E. F., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Schooler Hugh N., insurance agent. 

Shilz Matthias, boot and shoe maker. 

Speer A. V., wagon shop. 

Taber B. C, physician, surgeon and druggist. 

Towle C. P., saddles and harness. 

Treerwiler C, blacksmith and wagon maker. 

Turner Oakes, insurance agent. 

Wardlaw W. D., lumber. 



HENRY COUNTY, 

Is situated in the north-west part of the 
state, a few miles from the Mississippi river, 
and has an area of 830 square miles. It is 
drained by Rock and Green rivers, and by 
Edwards creek, the surface is undulating, and 
diversified with prairies and forests ; the soil 
is fertile ; corn, wheat, oats and pork, are the 
staples. It has about 7 50 pupils attending 
the public schools. The county contains ex- 
tensive beds of stone coal ; it is intersected 
by the Chicago and Rock Island railroad ; 
the Burlington road also crosses it on the 
south-east corner. Organized in 1837. 
Capital, Cambridge. Population, about 5,500. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, M. B. Potter. 

" Clerk, D. Bonar. 

" Treasurer, J. A. Pratt. 

" Surveyor, E. Benedict. 
School Commissioner, S. G. Wright. 



HENRY. 



The location is high and healthy, on the wes* 
side of the river ; it is about equally distant 
between Peoria and La Salle (60 miles), and 
is increasing very rapidly in population, busi- 
ness and wealth. The place contains several 
educational institutions, and besides a very 
excellent graded public school, contains 
within its limits the college buildings of the 
North Illinois Institute, and the Henry Female 
Seminary, both institutions liberally endowed 
and patronized. The city contains about 15 
dry goods stores, 1 iron foundry, 3 lumber 
yards ; a charter has been granted for a 
bridge across the Illinois river at this place, 
which will be soon in progress ; it is at the 
head of low water navigation from St. Louis, 
and shipped last year, by rail and river, over 
600,000 bushels of grain. The Henry 
Courier, a weekly newspaper, is liberally sus- 
tained here. Population in 1848, 407; by 
census in 1856, 1,664; at this time estimated 
at 2000. 
Phineas M. Janney, Postmaster. 



The city of Henry is situated in Marshall 
county, on the Illinois river, and the Peoria 
branch of the Chicago and R. I. railroad. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Baker J. G. & C. P., drugs, medicines, 

groceries, etc. 
Barnard John, merchant. 
Becker & Mateer, grocers. 
Boice J. R., attorney at law. 
Buttles G. W., merchant. 
Ellis S. F., proprietor Henry House. 
Evertts Charles, drug and book store. 
Fish T. M., operator of Illinois and Miss. 

telegraph. 
Green & Co. S. L., bankers and exchange 

dealers. 
Hall J. H., groceries. 
HOUGLAND & CO., PROPRIETORS 

GRANITE MILLS. 
Hynshaw S. O, jeweler. 
Jones J. L. & J. H., merchants. 
Lloyd & Bro., dry goods and groceries. 
Lloyd R., land agent. 
Lombard House, Swan & Robinson. 
McCurdy J. O, groceries and provisions. 
Moles Wm., dry goods, clothing, etc. 
MOTTER DR,' GEO., surgeon dentist. 
Myers D. W., agent U. S. express co. 
Pool A. M., merchant. 
Porrell & Co. A. H., dry goods. 
POTTER O. R., dry goods. 
RUGGLES R. H., publisher Courier. 
Skinkle Jacob J., hardware. 
Smith Wm. B., manufacturer. 
Snyder Louis, saddles and harness. 
WARREN & BRO., dry goods. 



HERMITAGE, 



A post village of Coles county, 70 miles east 
by south from Springfield. 

Thomas Kernet, Postmaster. 



108 



G. W. JIAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



HERMON, 

A post office of Knox count}'. 
Amos P. Coffman, Postmaster. 



HERSHEY'S MILL, 

A post office of Lawrence county. 
John Hershey, Postmaster. 



HICKORY, 

A post village of Lake county, 50 mile3 north- 
north-west from Chicago. 
Chester Ames, Postmaster. 



HICKORY CREEK, 

A post village of Fayette county, about 80 
miles south-south-east from Springfield. 
Berry Edwards, Postmaster. 



HICKORY GROVE, 

A post office of Massac county. 
Wm. J. Thompson, Postmaster. 



HICKORY HILL, 

A post village of Marion county, 44 miles 
south-east lay south from Vandalia. 
Wm. F. Meader, Postmaster. 



HICKORY POINT, 

A post office of Livingston county. 
William Manlove, Postmaster. 



HICKS' MILLS, 



A post office of De Kalb county. 
Geo. A. Gillis, Postmaster. 



HIDALGO, 



A post office of Jasper county. 
John Rice, Postmaster. 



HIGGINSVILLE, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
Alfred Magness, Postmaster. 



HIGHLAND, 



A post office of Madison county. 
John R. Blattner, Postmaster. 



HIGHLAND PRAIRIE, 

A post village of McHenry county 68 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 
Daniel Miles, Postmaster. 



HIGH POINT, 



A post office of Mercer county. 
Geo. Scott, Postmaster. 



HIGH PRAIRIE, 

A post office of La Salle county. 
Ransom Baker, Postmaster. 



HILLSBORO, 

A thriving village, capital of Montgomery 
county, on a fork of Shoal creek and on the 
line of the Terre Haute and Alton railroad, 
64 miles south from Springfield. The growth 
of the place has not been rapid, but on the 
contrary, slow and steadily she has worked 
her way along to her present position. Dur- 
ing the past year many improvements have 
been made, giving additional beauty to its 
whole appearance. 

Aaron H. Rountree, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc, 

Brewer Wm. H., dry goods, clothing, boots 

and shoes, etc. 
Davis & Kingsbury, attorneys at law. 
Davis Robert W., insurance agent and clerk 

circuit court. 
Grubbs S. M., drugs medicines, etc. 
Gunning J. C, steam plow factory. 
Haskell A. S., physician and surgeon. 
Hayward John S., real estate dealer. 
Hillis J. S., physician and surgeon. 
Hunt Harry B., carriage factory. 
Jackson David B., insurance agent. 
Jones J. Hanson, daguerreotypist. 
KITCHELL & GILLMORE," proprietors of 

Montgomery County Herald. 
Kitchell John W, attorney at law. 
Marshall W. P., physician and surgeon. 
Munn B. M., attorney and counselor at law. 
Palmer & Pitman, attorneys at law. 
Roberts R. M., pastor Presbyterian Church. 
Rolston J. A., merchant tailor. 
Sturtevant Thomas, dry goods, hardware, 

drugs and groceries. 
Simmons P. G. W., livery stable. 
Simmons Wesley, proprietor Simmons House. 
Stewart John R., stoves and tinware. 
Sammons & Whitten, dry goods, groceries, 

hardware, etc. 
Washburn & Fink, physicians and surgeons. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



109 



HILLSGROVE, 

A post village of McDonough county, in the 
western part, 12 miles south-west from Mc- 
Combe. 
Chas. G. Gilchrist, Postmaster. 



HITESVILLE, 



A post village of Coles county, in the south- 
easterly part, 100 miles east-south-east from 
Springfield, and about 10 from Charlestown, 
the county seat. 

Nicholas S. Wiley, Postmaster. 



HOLDERMAN'S GROVE, 

A post office of Kendall county. 
Brownell Wing, Postmaster. 



H0LL0WAYVILLE, 



A post office of Bureau county. 
B. S. Cash, Postmaster. 



HOMER, 

A post office of Champaign county. 
William Waples, Postmaster. 



HOOVER'S POINT, 



A post office of Macoupin county. 
Lewis Johnson, Postmaster. 



HOPE, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Fayette D. Rexford, Postmaster. 



HOPEDALE, 

A post office of Tazewell county. 
Tnos. II. Orendorff, Postmaster. 



HOPEWELL, 



A post office of Macon county. 
Allen Travis, Postmaster. 



HOPKINS' GROVE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
C. C. Hopkins, Postmaster. 



HOPPER'S MILLS, 

A post office of Henderson county. 
L. Hopper, Postmaster. 



HORNSBY, 

A post office of Macoupin county. 
Addison Hardin, Postmaster. 



HORSE CREEK, 

A post office of Will county. 
John J. Smiley, Postmaster. 



HOUSTON, 

A post village of Adams county. 
John Rice, Postmaster. 



HOUSTON, 

A village of Bond county, near the line of 
the Terre Haute and Alton railroad, *70 miles 
south from Springfield. 



HOWARD, 

A post township in the north-east part of 
Winnebago county. 

John R. Herring, Postmaster. 



HOWARD'S POINT, 

A post office of Fayette county. 
James H. Young, Postmaster. 



HOWARDSVILLE, 

A post village of Stephenson county, 210 
miles north from Springfield. 
Martin Howard, Postmaster. 



HUDSON, 

A post village of McLean county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad, 9 miles north 
from Bloomington, 

James H. Cox, Postmaster. 



HULLSF0RD, 

A post office of Knox county. 
Freeman L. West, Postmaster. 



HUNTER, 

A post village of Boone county, in the north- 
west part. 
Frederick P. Ham, Postmaster. 



HUNTLEY'S GROVE, 

A beautiful post village of McHenry county, 
on the railroad from Chicago to Galena, 55 
miles west-north-west from the former place. 
Peter S. Miller, Postmaster. 



110 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



HUNTSVILLE, 

A post village of Schuyler county, on the 
route from Springfield to Warsaw, 80 miles 
west-north-west from the former place. 
Alvin G. Bacon, Postmaster. 



HURRICANE, 



A post office of Montgomery county. 
Robert White, Postmaster. 



• HTJTSONVILLE, 

A post village of Crawford county, on the 
Wabash river, 130 miles east south-east from 
Springfield. A railroad is projected along the 
Wabash to pass througli this place. 
Wji. L. Draper, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bland T. A., physician and surgeon. 
Boatright Wm. P., proprietor Hutson Hotel. 
Callahan E., justice of the peace. 
Draper & Moore, general merchants. 
Harness A. P., dry goods, clothing, etc. 
Howe Wm., surgeon dentist. 
Preston & Bros., general merchants. 
RUBOTTOM W. F., proprietor of Crawford 

Banner. 
White J. S. & J. M., drugs and groceries. 



ILLINOIS CITY, 

A post village of Rock Island county, near 
the south-west part, about 5 miles from the 
Mississippi river. 

Matthew F. Felix, Postmaster. 



ILLINOISTOWN, 

A post village of St. Clair county, on the 
Mississippi river, opposite St. Louis. It is a 
place of considerable business, being the 
point of ferryage for passengers over the St. 
Louis, Alton and Chicago, and Terre Haute 
and Alton railroads. 

Andrew Wettig, Postmaster. 



ILLIOPOLIS, 



A village on the line of the Great Western 
railroad, in Sangamon county, 22 miles east 
from Springfield. 



INDEPENDENCE, 

A post office of McLean county. 
Isaac Vanordstraxd, Postmaster. 



INDIAN GROVE, 

A post village in the south-east part of Liv- 
ingston county, 94 miles north-east from 
Springfield. 
John Darnall, Postmaster. 



INDIANOLA, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
William Jones, Postmaster. 



INDIAN PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
Alfred S. Hargraye, Postmaster. 



INDUSTRY, 



A post office of McDonough county. 
Joel Pennington, Postmaster. 



ING-RAHAM PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Clay county. 
Osman Pixley, Postmaster. 



IONE, 

A post office of Effingham county. 
Aaron W. Henry, Postmaster. 



IONIA, 



A post office of Warren county. 
Luther C. Hibbard, Postmaster. 



IOWA, 

A post village of Perry county, in the south- 
easterly part of the state, and near the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad. 
Marion D. Hoge, Postmaster. 



IPAVA, 



A post office of Fulton county. 
J. T. McWhirt, Postmaster. 



IRA, 

A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
Adams Simmons, Postmaster. 



IROQUOIS COUNTY 

Is situated in the east part of the state, bor- 
dering on Indiana, and has an area of 1,435 
square miles. It is drained by the Kankakee 
and Iroquois rivers, which unite in the north 



GAZETTEEE AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Ill 



part of the county. The surface is level, and 
consists principally of prairie land. The soil 
is fertile, and well adapted to grain and 
grass. The county is intersected by the 
Chicago branch of the Illinois Central rail- 
road. 

Two other lines are proposed, which, 
when completed, will pass through this 
county, viz. : The Wabash Valley, and the 
eastern extension of the Peoria and Oquaw- 
ka railroads. 

It contains several churches, and has a 
liberal number of pupils attending public 
school*. Two newspapers are also publish- 
ed in the county. Capital, Middleport. Pop- 
ulation, about 8,000, 



IROQUOIS, 

A post village of Iroquois county, on a river 
of the same name, about 90 miles south from 
Chicago. The Illinois Central (Chicago 
branch) railroad passes near this place. It 
has fine water power, which is well improved. 
Peter Frownfelter, Postmaster. 



IRVING 



Is a beautiful thriving village of Montgomery 
county, 6 miles east from Hillsboro, and on 
the line of the Terre Haute and Alton rail- 
road. The first house was built here about 
two years ago, since which time the place 
has been rapidly improving, and now num- 
bers about 250 inhabitants. The town is 
laid out on the edge of a broad level prairie. 
There is here three stores, a drug store, two 
blacksmith shops, and one hotel. A steam 
saw mill, owned by Messrs. Roberts & Rags- 
dale, and several new buildings, are in pro- 
cess of erection. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Black & Wiley, merchants. 

Cox John, druggist. 

Heuestis & Berry, merchants. 

Pctra Dr., physician. 

Roberts & Ragsdale, steam mills. 

Winn Mr. merchant and hotel keeper. 



ISLAND CREEK, 



A post office of Jasper county. 
Albert G. Caldwell, Postmaster. 



IVESDALE, 

A village, of Champaign county, on the line 
of the Great Western railroad, 27 miles east 
from Decatur, and 149 miles west of south 
from Chicago. 



JACKSON COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, bor- 
dering on Missouri, and has an area of 645 
square miles. It is bounded on the south- 
west by the Mississippi river, intersected by 
Big Muddy river, and also drained by Beau- 
coup and other creeks. The surface is di- 
versified. Fountain Bluff, an eminence re- 
markable for its form, which rises 400 feet in 
height, is situated in the south-west part. 
Extensive mines of coal have been found on 
the banks of Big Muddy river. Salt is also 
obtained from springs in the vicinity of the 
same stream. The county is intersected by 
the Illinois Central and Belleville and Mur- 
phrysboro railroads. The latter is only part 
completed. 

Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, pork and cat- 
tle, are the staples. Capital, Murphrysboro. 
Population, 8,500. 



JACKSON, 

A post village of Stephenson county, in the 
southern central part, 140 miles west-north- 
west from Chicago. 

Peter T. Ellis, Postmaster. 



JACKSONVILLE 

Is a flourishing town, the capital of Morgan 
county, on the line of the Great Western 
railroad, 34 miles west from Springfield, and 
222 from Chicago. It is also the central 
point of three other railroads, viz. : Jackson- 
ville, Alton and St. Louis, Tonica and Peters- 
burg, and the Illinois River railroads. All 
these roads have been put under contract, 
and will be completed at an early day. 
Jacksonville will then be the center of a 
greater number of railroads than any other 
inland town in the state, and cannot fail to 
become one of her largest cities. One other 
road is now being built, between Camp Point 
and the Illinois river, which, though it does 
not terminate here, will be an important 
feeder to the Great Western, now in opera- 
tion, and complete the connection with the 
Mississippi at Quincy, and turn a large tide 
of freight and travel in this direction, which 
otherwise would seek other channels. 

The situation is beautiful, being in the 
midst of an undulating and fertile prairie, in 
the vicinity of Mauvaisterre creek, an afflu- 
ent of the Illinois river. This place has 
been denominated " The school house of 
Illinois," owing to the large number of its 
educational and charitable institutions, among 
which are Illinois College, the state asylums 
for the blind, the insane, and the deaf and 
dumb, a female academy, under the direction 
of the Methodists, and several other acade- 
mies. The state asylums occupy relatively 
three sides of a quadrangle around the town, 
each about a mile from its centre. Illinois 



112 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



College occupies a beautiful and commanding 
situation, and is one of the best and most 
flourishing in the state. It was founded in 
1830, and has a fine library, numbering up- 
ward of 4,000 volumes. 

Everywhere around the town may be seen 
the evidences of care and industry, and the 
well tilled farms which surround it on every 
Bide attest co the thrift of the owners. 

Sajicel Hunt, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Alderman & Tornlinson, merchant tailors. 
Allen & Van Winkle, dry goods, etc. 
Allen Thomas, bakery. 
Anderson J. S., cabinet ware rooms. 
Ayers & Co., drugs and medicines. 
AYERS, CAMPBELL & CO., bankers. 
Ayers D. W., proprietor Ayers' Hotel. 



IfiltS 9 HOT! 

D. W. AYRES, Proprietor. 



NEAR N.W. COR. PUBLIC SQUARE 

Jacksonville, 111. 



2^" Free Buss to and from the Cars. .^JFJ 

Bancraft J. H. & H., dry goods, groceries, 

BARBOUR L., ATTORNEY AT LAW & 
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY. 

Benedict A., marble works [see advt). 



JACKSONVILLE MARBLE WORKS 




jAl. 33 3S 3NT JES X> X C 



DEALER IN 



ITALIAN AND AMERICAN MONUMENTS 

GEAYE STONES, ETC. 



All Orders will be Promptly Filled and Beautifully Executed. 



BRANDON WILLIAM, cabinet manufac- 
turer. 

CAPPS J. & CO., manufacturers of tweeds, 
satinetts, yarn, etc. 

CASSELL & JOHNSON, DRY GOODS. 

CATLIN & CO., books, stationery, and mu- 
sical instruments. 

Catlin Joel, express agent. 

CHERRY JOSEPH, saddles and harness. 

Cobb Samuel, carriage shop. 

COBBS W. A., MANUFACTURER AND 
DEALER IN BOOTS AND SHOES. 

CORCORAN & AUSTIN, GROCERIES 
AND PROVISIONS. 



Cutshaw A. M., stair builder. 
Dalton Charles, justice of peace. 
Davenport J. & Co., flour and feed store. 
DAWSON R. D., ATTORNEY AT LAW 

AND GENERAL LAND AGENT. 
DAWSON, SIBLEY & WILSON, PLOW 

MANUFACTURERS, AND SOLE 

MANUFACTUR'S OF THE DOUBLE 

CORN PLOW 
DE LA HAY J. J., PHYSICIAN AND 

SURGEON. 
DONOVAN SAMUEL, carpenter. 
Edger Wm. G., physician. 
Elliot & Brown, bankers. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



113 



EPLER CYRUS, ATTORNEY AT LAW. 
Foreman & Eads, dry goods and clothing. 
Fox G. W., proprietor Mansion House. 
Galbraith & CasselJ, stoves and tinware. 
Gaiter & Striker, gents' furnishing goods. 
Goodrich & Co., merchant tailors. 
GOODWIN & MARTIN, DAGUERREIAN 

GALLERY. 
Green James, justice of peace. 
Graves S. L., fbundery. 
Hall W. T., carriage painter. 
HAMILTON E., CONFECTIONER AND 

B \KFR 
HAMILTON WM. SENIOR, DRUGS AND 

MEDICINES, WHOLESALE. 
Hardin C, clerk circuit court. 
Hatfield Louis, dry goods. 
HAYDEN EDWIN, wagons and carriages. 
Hockenhull R., drugs, hardware, etc. 
Hocking Richard, boots and shoes. 
Howard W., cooperage. 
Hunt Capt., postmaster. 



JACKSONVILLE FOUNDRY 



MACHINE SHOP. 



HAMMOND & CO., 

PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS 

Of Sugar Mills, for grinding the Chinese 

Sugar Cane ; also, all kinds of Castings, 

Steam and Fire Engines, Circular 

Saw Mills, Horse Powers, Corn 

Shelters, Wind Mills for 

primping, etc., Reaping and 

Morning Machines, Heating Apparatus, 

etc., etc. 

All orders promptly filled 



GERTHFIOA-TES. 

I, having used the "HAMMOND & CO.'S 
SUGAR MILL," believe it to be fully as 
good as represented. During its working, I 
made from sixty to seventy gallons of syrup 
per day, requiring only the power of one 
horse and the labor of one man and boy. 
The speed might be increased so as to make 
one hundred gallons of syrup per day, with 
the same labor. 

A. ROCKWELL. 

Jacksonville, III., Jan. 5th, 1858. 

JOHNSON & RICHARDS, stoves and tin 
ware. 

KEENER & LEE, WAGONS AND CAR- 
RIAGES. 

Kibbe & Lathrop, dry goods. 

Lax E. C, dry goods. 

8 



Lincon E. & Co., groceries, etc. 
LITTON & CRESS, dry goods, etc. 
McDonald, King & Dewy, dry goods. 
Massey, King, Neely & Co., lumber. 
Matthews & Woodworth, hardware. 
MAYO W. M., clocks, watches, jewelry, etc. 
METCALF ELIAS, constable. 
MEYER & KNOLLINSBURG, cigars. 
MITCHELL J. C, sash and blinds. 
MORRISON J. L. & C. M., ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW. 
O'Connell John, stoves and tinware. 
Peck & Swift, hardware, etc. 
PIERSON & LYONS, marble works. 
Pilcher J. D., dry goods. 
RATICOR WILLIAM, groceries. 
Rice Henry, clothing and furnishing goods. 
Robb David, dry goods, etc. 
ROBERTS C. D. & CO., BOOKS AND 

STATIONERY. 
ROGERS B. F., boots and shoes. 
Rosenbeck M., clothing. 
RUSSELL E. & W., dry goods. 
SAGE & EDGARTON, DRY GOODS AND 

GROCERIES. 
Sanderson J. & Co., cabinet rooms 
SAUNDERSON & WILKINSON, LUMBER. 
SAWYER C. K., dentist. 
Scott G. C, dry goods, etc. 
SELBY JOHN, GROCERIES AND CON- 
FECTIONERIES, WHOLESALE AND 

RETAIL. 
SELBY PAUL, editor and publisher of 

Moran Journal. 
Shirley & Retter, dental surgeons. 
SHIRLEY G. Y., homeopathic physician and 

surgeon. 
Simons C. H., dry goods and groceries. 
Smith & Crowell, dry goods, etc. 
SMITH D. A. & F. W., ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW. 
Smith Wm., queensware, etc. 
SPATES & UPHAM, groceries. 
STACY J. D. & CO., SADDLES AND 

HARNESS. 
STANLEY B. F., OCULIST. 
STEWART M., millinery aud fancy goods. 
Stephenson B. F., dry goods. 
Storrer William, dry goods. 
STRONG J. W., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 
STRYKER HENRY, JR., ATTORNEY AT 

LAW AND NOTARY PUBLIC. 
SUMNER & WRIGHT, lumber. 
SUTTON STEPHEN, JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
Thompson L. M., physcian. 
Trebue & Chambers, grocers. 
Trotter W. D. R., books and stationery. 
WEIL & BROTHERS, clothing. 
West G. A., marble workers. 
WILSON J. S., daguerreian artist. 



JAMESTOWN 



A post village of Clinton county. 
Spencer Shepard, Postmaster. 



114 



(1. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



JASPER COUNTY 

Is situated in the south-east part of the state, 
and has an area of 440 square miles. It is 
intersected by Embarras river, an affluent of 
the Wabash. The surface is level or nearly 
so, and in some places quite flat. It contains 
some very fertile prairies. Corn, wheat, 
oats, cattle and swine are the staples. It 
contains several fine churches, and has 
about SfiO pupils attending public schools. 
Capital, Newton. Population, 4,800. 



JASPER, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
John Howell, Postmaster. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 530 square miles. It is drained 
by the head streams of Big Muddy river, 
flowing in a southerly direction. The 
Massac & Sangamon railroad will, when con- 
pleted, intersect the county and give a direct 
thoroughfare to the various markets of the 
west. The county is composed of prairie 
and woodland. The soil is fertile. Corn, 
oats, cattle and swine are the products. It 
contains one newspaper office, about thirty 
churches, and has over 2,500 pupils attend- 
ing public schools. Capital, Mt. Yernon. 
Population, about 11,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Count)/ Judge and cx-officio Judge of Probate, 

John R. Satterfield. 
County Clerk, Wm. Dodds. 
Circuit Clerk, J. S. Bogan. 
Clerk of Supreme Court, N. Johnson. 
County Treasurer, J. Q. A. Bat. 
County Surveyor, A. M. Grant. 
Sheriff, James Westcott. 
County Justices ) Willol'ghby Adams. 

of Peace, \ S. W. Carpenter. 
School Commissioner, J. H. Page. 



JEFFERSON, 

A post village of Cook county, on the Chica- 
go, St. Paul and Fond du Lac railroad, 14 
miles from Chicago. 

Amos I. Snell, Postmaster. 



JEFFERSON'S CORNERS, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 
Chas. C. Reynolds, Postmaster. 



JERICHO, 

A post village of Kane county, on the south- 
ern part. 

Eldad M. Calkins, Postmaster. 



JERSEY COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-south-west part of the 
state, bordering on Missouri, and has an area 
of about 350 square miles ; it is situated at 
the confluence of the Illinois and Mississ- 
ippi rivers, the former of which forms the 
western bqundary, and the latter the south- 
ern ; Macoupin creek washes the northern 
border, the county consists of prarie and 
woodland, the soil is good. The St. Louis, 
Alton and Chicago railroad passes near the 
south-east corner, and the Jacksonville and 
Carrolton railroad intersects it. Corn, wheat, 
oats and pork, are the staples ; it contains 
about 20 churches, 1 newspaper office, and 
has over 1,200 pupils attending public 
schools ; capital, Jerseyville. Population, 
9,700. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, O. P. Powell. 

, ■ . T j { R. R. Ely, 
Associate Judges, j Wj[ WlL ' LIAMS _ 

Circuit Clerk, T. L. McGill. 
County Clerk, Andrew' Jackson. 
Comity Treasurer, John F. Smith. 
Sheriff, Benj. Wedding. 
School Commissioner, H. H. Howard. 



JERSEY LANDING, 

A post village of Jersey county. 
Jas. Semple, Postmaster. 



JERSEY PRAIRIE, 

A post village of Cass county, in the southern 
central part, 45 miles from Springfield. 
Moses Hainsfurtiier, Postmaster. 



JERSEYVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Jersey 
county, is situated on the line of the Jackson- 
ville, Alton and St. Louis railroad, on a 
prairie 71 miles south-west from Springfield, 
and about 10 miles from the Mississippi river; 
it contains a court house and a newspaper 
office. 

Chas. H. Jackson, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bagley & Hurd, dry goods, clothing, hats, 

caps, boots, shoes, etc. 
Beekman & Schattgen, marketmen and stock 

dealers. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



115 



Bell J. P., buggies and wagons. 

Bertman F., cloths and ready-made clothing. 

Bird G., groceries. 

Blackburn A. M., banker. 

Bramlett Mrs. G., milliner and dressmaker. 

Brewster L. A., physician. 

Chase Henry M:, county surveyor. 

Foote C. H., preceptor of temperance hall 
academy. 

Hamilton J. 0. & Co., drugs, medicines, 
paints, oils, etc. 

Herdman & Bro., dry goods, etc. 

Hogeland & Hill, wagons and buggies. 

Hopson & Wyckoff, agricultural implements. 

Howard H. II., attorney at law. 

Hutchinson W. T., physician. 

Jarboe & Bro., dry goods, boots and shoes, 
etc. 

Keith Win., cabinet warehouse. 

Kellogg James, commission and forwarding 

Knapp A. L. & R. M , attorneys and coun- 
selors at law. 

Knapp C. H. & Co., dry goods and clothing. 

Leigh & Son, bakers, confectioners, etc. 

Lindley H. N., architect and builder. 

Magill S. L., proprietor Jerseyville mills. 

Miles G. S., surgeon dentist. 

Miner M. B., attorney at law. 

Morean A. B., drugs, books, stationery, etc. 

Morean Alex. B., dry goods, hats, caps, and 
clothing. 

Morean & Squier, proprietors of empire flour 
mill. 

Richards & Taylor, carpenters and builders. 

Richards T. J., boots and shoes. 

Rue A. & A., lumber. 

Sawford J. E., meat market. 

SMITH AUGUSTUS, ed. and proprietor of 
Prairie State. 

Tolman Cyrus, nurseryman. 

Vanhome A. K, physician and surgeon. 

YanPelt & Co., groceries, provisions, drugs, 
medicines, etc. 

Wemple & Comrie, glove manufactory. 

Wharton & Christopher, machinists and 
founders. 

"White J. L., physician and surgeon. 

Whitenaek J. E., constable and general col- 
lector. 

Wyckaff D. G., dry goods, hardware, etc. 



throughout the county, which are success- 
fully worked, affording an immense source of 
revenue ; copper is also found in some por- 
tions. The county is intersected by the Illi- 
nois Central railroad ; one or two other lines 
of road are in process of building. Named 
in honor of Colonel Joseph Hamilton Daviess, 
who fell in the battle of Tippecanoe. Capi- 
tal, Galena. Population, about 28,000. 



JO DAVIESS COUNTY. 

This county forms the north-west extremity 
of the state, bordering on Iowa and Wiscon- 
sin, and has an area of 650 square miles ; 
the Mississippi river forms its south-west 
boundary, Le Fevre and Apple rivers flow 
through the county; it is also drained by 
Plum river and Rush Creek, the surface is 
uneven and in some parts hilly ; the soil is 
generally good ; wheat, corn, oats, hay and 
lead are the staples. It contains a large 
number of fine churches, several newspaper 
offices, and has over 3,000 pupils attending 
public schools ; rich mines of lead exist 



JOHNSON COUNTY, 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 300 square miles ; it is drained 
by Cash river and Big Bay Creek ; the sur- 
face is generally level, and soil fertile. Corn, 
oats and pork are the staples. It contains 
several churches, and has about *750 pupils 
attending public schools. Capital, Vienna. 
Population, about 7,000. 



JOHNSON, 



A post office of McDonough county. 
Salem Woods, Postmaster. 



JOHNSON'S MILLS, 

A post village of Clark county, on the north 
fork of Embarras river, 115 east-south-east 
from Springfield. 

Zach. J. Crouch, Postmaster. 



JOHNSTON, 



A post village of Cumberland county, in the 
northern central part, a few miles east of the 
Illinois Central railroad (Chicago branch). 
J. H. Johnston, Postmaster. 



JOLIET. 



A city in the township of the same name, 
and the capital of Will county, situated on 
the Des Plaines river, the Illinois and Michi- 
gan canal, the Chicago and Rock Island, and 
the Chicago, Alton and St. Louis railroads, 
40 miles from Chicago ; the northern Indi- 
ana and Joliet railroad, and the Joliet and 
j Mendota railroad also terminate here. 

It contains, beside the county fiuildings, 
six fine churches, seven or eight large ware- 
houses, eight large hotels, two sp'endid 
school houses, two newspaper offices, a fine 
and commodious city hall, eight or ten fine 
blocks of stores, built of brick and stone, 
one chartered bank, and several private 
boarding houses; a gas company has been 
organized here, who will erect extensive 
works in the spring. 

The new state penitentiary is located near 
the city, and when completed will not be 
excelled by any similar institution in the 



116 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



United States. The outer walls will inclose 
a square of eight hundred feet, or about 15 
acres, all the buildings within the inclosure 
will be massive stone structures, the material 
being taken from the ground purchased by 
the commissioners. Water of an excellent 
quality is supplied to the prison, from a spring 
which gushes from the base of a cliff some 
hundred rods distant. 

It also contains two flouring mills, one saw 
mill and five or six quite extensive lumber 
yards. The stone quarries in this place are 
inexhaustible, yielding annually immense 
quantities of beautiful blue and white stone, 
unequaled by any in the state for building 
purposes, and are an invaluable source of 
wealth. It is surrounded by a rich and 
beautiful country, and may be considered one 
of the best locations in the state for manu- 
facturing purposes, as it has a water power 
unsurpassed by any place in the west. It is 
favorably situated for health, and its com- 
mercial advantages are superior. Popula- 
tion, between 7,000 and 8,000. 

CalvixZarly, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adle & White, painters. 

Alcraft J. E., dentist. 

Beaumont J., paints, oils, glassj etc. 

Besthart Bernard, clothing. 

Biller John E., proprietor Jefferson Hall. 

Bissell's Hotel, P. Bissell proprietor. 

Blackman G. W. & Co., fruits, tobacco and 

BLACKWELL & KIMBALL, FURNITURE, 

JEFFERSON ST. 
BORE LAND & HAWKINS, grocers, Bluff 

BOWEN & GROVER, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW, OPPOSITE 
COURT HOUSE. 

Bray E. M., drugs, medicines, etc. 

Brooks & Co., hardware. 

BROWN J. H., drugs, medicines, etc, cor 
Jefferson and Joliet sts. 

CAGWIN T. P., crockery and glassware, 
Jefferson st. 

Carpenter E. R. E., dentist. 

CONYIS & TOURTELOTTE, ADVOCATES 
AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, JEF- 
FERSON ST. 

Coplin Mrs. E., daguerreian artist. 

Davis J. W. H., physician and surgeon. 

DEALEY E., cabinet ware rooms and under- 
taker. 

DEMOND D. D. & T. E., WATCHES, JEW- 
ELRY AND FANCY GOODS, BLUFF 
STREET. 

DENTON B. F., DRY GOODS, JEFFERSON 
STREET. 

Divany & Kelly, liquors. 

Ducan R. C, dry goods. 

Field Levi, clothing. 

FISH & ADAM, lumber, doors, sash, etc. 

FOSTER H. L., homeopathic physician. 



FOX O., BOOKS AND STATIONERY AND 
HAT MAKER, JEFFERSON ST. 

Ganson W. H., groceries. 

HARDY OTIS, lumber. 

HEATH W. J., police magistrate. 

HECHT CHRISTIAN, furniture, Bluff st. 

Heise A. W., physician. 

HILDEBRANT ' & HACKLEY, ATTOR- 
NEYS AT LAW. 

Hoffman Frank, groceries. 

HOLLISTER & HAWSE, lumber, doors 
and sash. 

Houk, Hyde & Co., millers. 

Ives J. L., merchant tailor. 

Joliet Bank. 

Jones W. T., machine shop. 

KENNEY T. J., watches and jewelry, Jef- 
ferson st. 

Lowden R. D., Exchange Hotel. 

McAvoy Mrs., groceries. 

McROBERTS & GOODSPEED, ATTOR- 
NEYS, COUNSELORS AND SOLI- 
CITORS IN CHANCERY, JEFFER- 
SON ST. 

Mack, Bros. & Co., clothing. 

Mack Firman, boots and shoes. 

Mack Firman, tanner. 

MEAD A. B., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, JEFFERSON ST. 

Mills J. H., hardware. 

Milspaugh S. S., dry goods. 

National Hotel, W. Adams proprietor. 

O'CONNER P., wines and liquors, and pass- 
age agent. 

Osgood & Hibbard, dry goods. 

Osgood Uri, attorney and counselor at law. 

Page C. P., china, crockery, etc. 

PARKS & ELWOOD, ATTORNEYS, 
COUNSELORS AND SOLICITORS. 

Quinn M. W., groceries, etc. 

REECE J. H., physician and oculist, Bluff 
street. 

Reichert J., dry goods, etc. 

Rosinham U. B., clothing. 

St. Clair J. P., physician. 

Savage & Warren, books and stationery. 

SCANETT & FINNERTY, GROCERIES 
AND PROVISIONS. 

SCHWALM FRANCIS, DEALER IN 
BUILDING AND OTHER STONE. 

Sebastian Michael, cabinet rooms. 

SHAW F. B. & E. B., boots, shoes ^nd fur- 
nishing goods. 

Shrader H., harness and saddles. 

SLEEPER D. C, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS, JEFFERSON ST. 

SMITH & GOODELL, MERCHANTS' AND 
DROVERS' BANK. 

Smith Capt., police magistrate. 

STONE S W., GROCERIES. 

STORRS R. & G. W., LUMBER. 

Strong & Barrett, hardware and stoves. 

Thomson & Allen, dentists. 

Verlev J. D., watch and clock maker. 

Wallace G. M., boots and shoes. 

Ward G. H., marble works. 

Webster J. N, grocer. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



11T 



Weber John, clothing. 

WHEELER E., lumber, Bluff st. 

WHITE & LOWE, REAL ESTATE 

BROKERS AND LAND AGENTS. 
Williams J. C, merchant tailor. 
WOOD W. C, notary public, commissioner 

of deeds and insurance agent. 
Worrell Charles, dry goods. 
Zearley Calvin, Postmaster. 



JONESBORO 

Is a city, capital of Union county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railro°.d. 150 miles south 
from Springfield, 333 from Chicago, and 10 
from the Mississippi river. It is pleasantly 
situated on high and undulating ground in a 
beautiful and fertile district, and in the 
midst of varied and romantic scenery. It is 
well supplied with pure water and contains 
extensive beds of coal, iron ore, lead, and 
porcelain clay. Population, 2,000. 
Charles M. Willard, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Brooks Jas. O., physician. 

Caspar Peter H, farmer. 

Condon S. S., physician. 

Crowe!! Charles, farmer. 

Cruse Adam, farmer. 

Davidson W., attorney at law. 

Davis W. farmer. 

Dishow H. & Son, merchants. 

Dougherty John & Son, attorneys at law. 

Prick C. & Son, general merchants. 

Goodman M. M., physician. 

Grear John & Co., merchants. 

Green Wm., farmer. 

Hacker H. C, physician. 

Willard Willis, farmer. 

Hacker Wm. A., attorney at law. 

Hileman Jacob, farmer. 

Hileman Thos., farmer. 

Hunsaker George, farmer. 

Jones O. P. & Co., merchants. 

Miller David, farmer. 

Naill J. E., merchant. 

Parks S. G., attorney at law. 

Parks S. K., physician. 

Prove J. J., merchant. 

Smith J. H, attorney at law. 

Toler S., physician. 

Trees Calet, farmer. 

Wilcox S. P., farmer. 

Willard & Co., general merchandise and 

produce. 
WILLARD CHARLES M., farmer. 
Willard W. H, farmer. 



JONES' CREEK, 

A post village of Randolph county, in the ex- 
treme southern part, a few miles from the 
Mississippi river. 
James Dean, Postmaster. 



JORDAN, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
Edward Foster, Postmaster. 



JORDAN'S GROVE, 

A post office of Randolph county. 
William Week, Postmaster. 



KANE COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-eastern portion of 
the state, and has an area of 540 square 
miles. Until the spring of 1836, it was 
under the jurisdiction of La Salle county ; 
in that year it was organized as a separate 
county and the county seat located at Geneva. 
The county contains 345,000 acres ; about 
2,500 of which are covered with excellent 
timber, and the remainder consists of rich 
rolling prairies. These are interpersed with 
groves of timber sufficient in amount to 
furnish a good supply for almost every town 
in the county. The soil is very rich and 
deep, yielding abundant crops of grain and 
fruits. The county is watered by Fox river, 
which runs the whole length of the eastern 
part ; it also contains a beautiful sheet of 
water called Nelson's lake, and several small 
streams which are tributary to Fox river. 
The first courthouse and jail was commenced 
in 1837. These buildings have now been 
superseded by new and better ones, the 
present edifice costing about $60,000. The 
county is intersected by different lines of 
railroad, viz.: Burlington & Quincy, Galena 
& Chicago Union, Fulton & Iowa and Fox 
River Valley. Named in honor of Elias K. 
Kane, United States senator from this state. 
Capital, Geneva. Population, about 30,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 
County Judge, Daniel Eastman. 
County Clerk, John Greene. 
Circuit Clerk and Recorder, Paul R. Wright. 
Coroner, Wm. Conant. 
Sheriff, Geo. E. Corwin. 
School Commissioner, David Higgins. 



KANE, 

A post village of Greene county. 
Lester B. Tilley, Postmaster. 



KANESVILLE, 

A post village of Kane county. 
Bela A. Coy, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Ames Charles, road commissioner and farmer. 
Bunker John, assessor and farmer. 



118 



G. W. II A WES ILLINOIS STATE 



CoyB. A. & Co., merchants. 
Ford Hezekiah, merchant. 
Lee R. W., road commissioner and farmer. 
Lewis James, justice of peace and farmer. 
McNair Samuel, physician. 
Potter M. F., physician. 
Rennington Henry, merchant. 
Ward Alfred, town clerk and farmer. 
Woodward P. B., constable and farmer. 
Young Francis S., road commissioner and 
farmer. 



KANKAKEE COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-eastern part of the 
state, between the counties of Iroquois and 
Will, and bordering on the state of Indiana, 
and has an area of about GOO square miles. It 
is watered by the Kankakee river and its trib- 
utaries. The surface is generally level and 
is principally prairie Along the bank of 
the river fine groves are occassional!} 7 met 
with. Soil excellent and well improved. 
The county is intersected by the Illinois 
Central railroad (Chicago branch). There 
is within its borders an abundance of build- 
ing material, and water for manufacturing 
purposes. Capital, Kankakee. Population, 
about 15,000. 



KANKAKEE CITY, 

Capital of Kankakee county, is situated on 
the right bank of Kankakee river at the point 
where the Chicago branch of the Illinois 
Central railroad crosses that stream. 

[Xote. — Arrangements were made with 
one of the citizens, to furnish the statistics 
of this city, but owing to a neglect on his 
part to do so, we are unable to give them 
satisfactorily]. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

AMES A., SURGEON DENTIST. 
Ashley Rodney, furniture, etc. 
Beede Thomas, dry goods and groceries. 
BRISTOL W. H.', editor and publisher of 

Kankakee Democrat. 
BROSETTE HOTEL, N. Brosette, proprietor. 
Brosette N, baker. 
BURR G. W., DRY GOODS GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS. 
BUTTS WM. & CO., LUMBER, SASH AND 

DOORS. 
DALE J., DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

CROCKERY, ETC., COURT ST. 
Doutre McLeon, attorney and counselor at 

law. 
Durham, Dean & Dickson, dry goods, gro- 
ceries, etc. 
DURHAM H. K, DRY GOODS, BOOTS, 

SHOES AND GROCERIES. 
Eldred & Co., lumber, doors, sash, etc. 



FLUKE J., BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER 
AND FINDINGS. 

FLAGG J. II., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

GOLDSMITH HIRAM, GROCERIES, PRO- 
VISIONS AND COMMISSION. 

GROVE CITY HOUSE, A. DIAMOND, 
PROPRIETOR. 

HITT & CLARKE, LUMBER, SASH, 
DOORS, IRON, ETC. 

HOGLEN G. W. & BRO., LUMBER, SASH, 
DOORS, ETC. 

HORN GEO. L., SASH, DOOR AND BLIND 
FACTORY. 

HUNT & THOMAS, ARCHITECTS, EX- 
CHANGE BLOCK. 

JAMISON THOMAS, general agent and in- 
telligence office. 

KANKAKEE GAZETTE, D. S. Parker, 
proprietor. 

KANKAKEE DEMOCRAT, W. H. Bristol, 
proprietor. 

KENIWORTH E. D., merchant tailor and 
millinery, Court street. 

KERR THOMAS, HARDWARE, STOVES, 
ETC. 

Knecht & Walker, merchant tailor. 

KNOTT C. W. & CO., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, CLOTHING, ETC., COURT 
STREET. 

Lamb K., lumber merchant. 

MACK J. M., PHYSICIAN AMD SUR- 
GEON. 

MINCHROD & EPPSTEIN, CLOTHING, 
FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

MURRAY HOUSE, B. Hawkins, proprietor, 
Court street. 

MURRAY R. N., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND SOLICITOR, COURT ST. 

NICHOLS L, MARBLE WORKER. 

PARKER D. S., editor and publisher of 
Kankakee Gazette. 

PERRY A. S. & CO., BANKERS AND 
BROKERS 

Redding A., eclectic physician and surgeon. 

RIPLEY J. & L, HARDWARE, STOVES 
AND FURNACES. 

ST. NICHOLAS SALOON, J. G. VEILL & 
CO., PROPRIETORS. 

SAVILLE WM. JR., VETERINARY SUR- 
GEON. 

SIBLEY J. A. & D. E., HARDWARE, 
GLASS, ETC. 

SIZER E. A., DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, 
HATS, CAPS, ETC. 

SMITH SHEPARD P., AMBROTYPES, 
DAGUERREOTYPES, ETC. 

STARR WM, AGENT, SADDLES AND 
HARNESS. 

SWANNELL F., DRY GOODS, BOOTS, 
SHOES AND GROCERIES, COURT 
STREET. 

SWANNELL W. G., DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
LIQUORS, ETC. 

THAYER M. A. & CO., STOVES, HARD- 
WARE, ETC., EAST AV. 

TOWER H.F., BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 
G Empire block. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



119 



TUPPER A. B., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

VAUGHN C. M., JUSTICE OF PEACE, 
LAND AND COLLECTING AGENT. 

WHITCOMB WM., BOOTS, SHOES, 
LEATHER AND FINDINGS. 

WHITTENHALL D. S., LUMBER, SASH, 
DOORS, BLINDS, ETC. 

Wilber P. & J., boots, shoes, ready made 
clothing, etc. 

WILLIAMS J. W., DRY GOODS, GROCER- 
IES, CROCKERY, ETC. 



KANSAS, 
A post village of Edgar county. 
Wm. F. Boyer, Postmaster. 



KAPPA, 

A post village of Woodford county, on 
the line of the Illinois Central railroad, 
thirteen miles north from Bloomington. In 
1856 it had 21,600 acres of wheat and 35,220 
acres of corn under cultivation. Population 
in 1856, 208. 

Frederick Niergarth, Postmaster. 



KASKASKIA, 

A beautiful post village of Randolph county. 
Is situated on the -west, bank of the Kaskaskia 
river, about two miles east from the Missis- 
sippi, and 142 south from Springfield. It is 
the oldest town in the state, having been 
settled by the French about the year 1673. 
It was the first capital of the territory and 
remained so until 1818. The river on which 
it is located is navigable for some distance. 
Philip W. Unger, Postmaster. 



KEENVILLE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
John Keen, Postmaster. 



KEITHSBURG 

Is a thriving post village of Mercer county, 
on the Mississippi, 150 miles north-west from 
Springfield. Immense amounts of grain and 
produce are shipped from this point. The 
location is very fine, affording an excellent 
steamboat landing. The soil in and about 
the village is considered the finest in the 
state. It contains a large number of stores, 
two good hotels, the Calhoun and Matthew 
houses, several churches and other buildings 
of note. A larger amount of grain is ship 
ped from this point yearly, than from any 
other town four times its size between St. 
Pauls and New Orleans. Population, about 
2,000. 
Edward Moran, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Ball Luther T , attorney at law. 

Calhoun H. G., insurance agent, notary public 

and justice of peace. 
CALHOUN W. B., PROPRIETOR OF 

KEITHSBURG OBSERVER. 
Coonrod Philio, blacksmith. 
Elrick J. W. /tailor. 
Elrick J. W., daguerreian artist. 
Evans & Humphrey, saddles and harness. 
Hardin & Glover, groceries and provisions. 
Harvey Joseph, drugs and medicines. 
Hazelton H. G., agent hardware and stoves. 
Hollingsworth C. S., homeopathic physician. 
Hughes P. T., groceries and liquors. 
Insley & Bro., restaurant. 
Insley C. J. & Bro., groceries and produce. 
Gayle Wm. & Co., hardware, cutlery, etc. 
Gore Philip, dry goods, clothing, etc. 
Kay C. M., attorney at law. 
Keith Dan., groceries, etc. 
Matlock & Butterfield, drugs, etc. 
Matthews' Hotel, J. Tyler, proprietor. 
Noble J. A., forwarding and commission 

merchant. 
O'Brien Mark J., painter, glazier, and paper 

hanger. 
Pepper John C, attorney at law and solicitor 

in chancery. 
Rife A., dry goods, groceries, crockery, etc. 
Sheriff & Willett, dry goods, etc. 
Stephenson Thomas, watch maker. 
Taliaferro B. C, attorney at law, collector, 

and land agent. 
Ungles W. U, commission and storage. 
Ungles W. J., insurance agent and public 

administrator. 
Weidner J. M., blacksmith. 
Whiting G. W., boots and shoes. 
Whiting Mrs. W., millinery. 
Willett Isaac, dry goods, etc. 



KENDALL COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-east part of the state, 
and has an area of 325 square miles. It is 
intersected by Fox river, which flows south- 
westward, and also drained by the sources of 
Au Sable river. The surface is undulating 
prairie, diversified with fine groves of tim- 
ber. The soil is highly productive. It con- 
tains about 20 churches, and has over 4,000 
pupils attending public schools. Good build- 
ing stone is found in some sections of the 
county. Fox river affords ample water pow- 
er for milling and manufacturing purposes. 
The Burlington and Quincy railroad crosses 
the northern portion of the state. Capita 1 , 
Oswego. Population, about 10,500. 



KENDALL, 



A post office of Kendall county. 
Jeremiah Shepard, Postmaster. 



120 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



KENT, 

A post office of Stephenson county. 
Abram Reber, Postmaster. 



KENTUCKY, 



A post office of Vermilion county. 
John Canney, Postmaster. 



KEWANEE, 

A thriving post village of Henry county, on 
the line of the Burlington and Quincy rail- 
road, 136 miles south of west from Chicago, 
and 74 miles from the Mississippi river. It 
possesses a large trade, which is constantly 
being increased by accessions of wealth and 
enterprise from the east. Two papers are 
published here, the Henry County Dial, and 
the Kewanee Advertiser. There are also 5 
churches, viz. : St. John's Episcopal, Con- 
gregational, Baptist, Methodist Episcopal, 
and Protestant Methodist ; a Masonic lodge, 
one of Odd Fellows, and one of the order of 
Good Templars. 

The buildings, public and private, are all 
built after the most approved modern style, 
and reflect great credit upon the owners and 
builders. 

A large steam flouring mill is in operation, 
which turns out a large quantity of superior 
flour, a portion of which is shipped to foreign 
markets. Other branches of manufacturing 
are carried on to a considerable extent. 

C. Bassett, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Austin & Bro., drugs, etc. 

Austin G. M., physician and surgeon. 

Bacon J. M. & Co., grain dealers and propri- 
etors of steam mills. 

Bauer & Statz, market. 

BISHOP L. D., PUBLISHER OF HENRY 
COUNTY DIAL. 

Chandler Rev., pastor Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Church E. S., painter. 

Cleveland Dr., physician. 

Crompton W., pastor Protestant Methodist 
church. 

Cutter C. N., real estate. 

Cutter , N. Y. Store, dry goods, etc. 

Davenport Chas. W., real estate and collect- 
ing agent. 

Easton Mark L., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

Eddy & Baker, watches, jewelry, and silver 
ware. 

Elliott George D., saddles and harness. 

Erieson E., saddles, harness, etc. 

Fitch T. D., physician and surgeon. 

Foote & Gilbert, lumber. 



Foote Geo. W., homeopathic physician. 

Foskett H. B., pastor Baptist church. 

Goodrich W. R., bakery. 

Hamilton Alfred J , grain and commission. 

Hardy M. J., clothing and furnishing goods. 

HOLCOMB ETHAN A, ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR. 

HOWARD & LAY, LUMBER. 

Howard J. S., furniture. 

Howe J. H , attorney and counselor at law, 
and insurance agent. 

JENKINS & PIERCE, HARDWARE AND 
STOVES. 

Kewanee House, E. V. Bronson, proprietor. 

LITTLE, PERKINS & CO., DRY GOODS, 
CLOTHING, ETC. 

Loomis Francis, justice of peace. 

Luce E. W., daguerreian artist. 

McDonough & Couch, dry goods. 

McEvoy & McConnell, sash, door and blind 
factory. 

McGilliard J. S , groceries. 

Matthews E., groceries. 

Mehew J., boots and shoes. 

Montgomery J. W., produce. 

Morse James B., grain, produce, lime and 
cement. 

Morse, Loomis & Co., commission and pro- 
duce. 

PARKER H. C, AGENT OF WESTERN 
VALLEY INSURANCE CO. 

Parrish & Faulkner, dry goods, groceries, 
etc. 

Peters G. E., pastor St. John's Episcopal 
church. 

Phillips T. H., real estate and loan agent. 

PIERCE C. H., PASTOR CONGREGA- 
TIONAL CHURCH. 

PINNEY & BROTHER, GROCERIES & 
PROVISIONS. 

Pratt k Brother, forwarding and commission. 

Prescott Geo. D. B., piano fortes. 

Preston, Powers & Co., Bank of Kewanee. 

Preston R. S. & Sons, hardware and stoves. 

Rollins J. B., steam planing mill. 

SCHRIVER J. D., DRY GOODS. 

Smith S. A., dry goods, etc. 

Stevens Win. W. & Co., coal dealers. 

Sykes Austin, justice of the peace and col- 
lecting agent. 

THOMPSON JOHN & BRO., PRODUCE & 
COMMISSION. 

Thornton A, Jr., produce and commission. 



KEYSBTJRG, 

A post village of Pike county, 1*7 miles soutn- 
west from Springfield. 

Daniel A. Shaw, Postmaster. 



KEYESPORT, 

A post village of Clinton county. 
Thos. Keyes, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



121 



KICKAPOO, 

A post village of Peoria county, 12 miles 
north-west from Peoria. It is situated on the 
border of a fertile prairie. Population, 
about 600. 
Richard F. Seabury, Postmaster. 



KILLBUCK, 

A post village of Ogle county, 85 miles west- 
north-west from Chicago. 

Nathan K. Ross, Postmaster. 



KINDERHOOK, 

A post village of Pike county, 90 miles west 
by south from Springfield. 
Henry Orr, Postmaster. 



KINGSBURY, 



A post office of Whiteside county. 
Sarah A. Miller, Postmaster. 



KING'S MILLS, 

A post office of Kane county. 
Nelson Walker, Postmaster. 



KINGSTON", 



A post village of De Kalb county, in a town- 
ship of the same name, near Sycamore river, 
about 200 miles north-north-east from 
Springfield. 
Geo. H. Hill, Postmaster. 



KINGSTON, 



A village of Adams county, on the line of 
the Bureau Valley extension railroad. 



KINGSTON, 

A thriving village of Peoria county, on the 
right bank of the Illinois river, 20 miles 
below Peoria city. It has an active business 
in coal, large quantities of which are pro- 
cured in the vicinity. The post office is 
called Kingston Mines. 



KINGSTON MINES, 

(See Kingston above). 
Samuel Hutchinson, Postmaster. 



KISHWAUKEE, 

A post village of Winnebago county, on 



Rock river, 90 miles west-north-west from 
Springfield. 

Samuel M. Benedict, Postmaster. 



KNOX COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-north-west part of the 
state, and has an area of 840 square miles. 
It is intersected by the Burlington and Quincy 
and Peoria and Owquawka railroads and 
Spoon river, and is drained by Pope and other 
creeks. The surface is undulating and soil 
very productive. A large portion of the 
county consists of prairies, alternating with 
timber. Wheat, corn, oats, wool and pork are 
the staples. It contains about 20 churches, 3 
colleges, several newspaper offices, and has 
about 3,000 pupils attending public, and 
about 600 attending other schools. The 
county contains beds of coal of considerable 
extent. Spoon river furnishes excellent- 
water power. Capital, Knoxville. Popu 
lation, 28,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Leander Douglass. 
Circuit Clerk and Recorder, C. Arms. 
County Clerk, J.'S. Winter. 
Sheriff, E. W. Eake. 



KNOXVILLE. 



This city is the capital of Knox county, is 
situated on the Illinois river and on the line 
of the Peoria and Oquawka railroad, 5 miles 
south-east from Galesburg, and 45 miles from 
Peoria. The place was settled in 1835, but 
did not obtain its charter as a city until 1853. 
It is laid out at right angles on an elevated 
prairie, in a flourishing and productive agri- 
cultural district, surrounded by thick groves 
of wood and timber, which serve to protect 
it from the strong winds which usually blow 
across the open prairie lands, and tends 
greatly to enhance the beauty of the situation. 
Mines of coal of a superior quality underlie 
the city, and an abundance of stone for build- 
ing purposes can be found within a con- 
venient distance. Lime and brick are also 
manufactured to a considerable extent. The 
city has not been marked by that rapid 
growth incident to most of the western 
cities and towns; not, however, from any lack 
of natural advantages so much as from a dis- 
position among her inhabitants to confine 
themselves to old customs, thus allowing the 
more enterprising of the neighboring towns 
and villages to push forward every means of 
acquiring wealth, and placing themselves far 
in advance. In educational advantages Knox- 
ville is not behind most of our western towns 
and cities of the same size, having a fine 
union school and four district schools, which 
are all well attended. There are also five 



122 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



churches in the city, ha\ ing neat and com- 
modious places of worship. The county 
buildings are all substantial structures, in 
keeping with the character of her people. 
The court house and clerks' offices are of 
brick, the former being built after the 
Grecian order of architecture, with a portico 
in front, supported by four massive stone 
pillars. The business houses of the city are 
chiefly built of brick. The manufactures of 
the city are a large steam flouring mill, a 
steam wagon factory, a plow factory, besides 
others of minor importance. A weekly paper 
is also published here, called the Knox lie- 
publican. The principal hotel is the Centre 
House, a fine building, under good manage- 
ment and conveniently situated to accommo- 
date the traveling public. The soil in the 
vicinity is remarkable for its richness, and the 
city needs only an increase of enterprise in 
the development of its resources to render 
this a prominent point of interest in the 
west. Population, 1,800. 

H. G. Reynolds, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 
ACKERMAN JACOB, boot and shoemaker. 
ADAMS CHAUNCEY K., REAL ESTATE, 

INSURANCE AND GENERAL AGT. 
ARMS CEPHAS, CLERK OF CIRCUIT 

COURT. 
Brewer J. S., chemist and druggist. 
Cambridge S., boot and shoe maker. 
Cams J. W., clothing and tailoring. 
CENTER HOTEL, W. H. BUFFORD, Jr., 

& CO., PROPRIETORS. (See advt.) 



(CEWS1 HeTBSos 

KNOXVILLE, 

W. H. BUFFORD, Jr., & Co., 

Proprietors. 



This House has just been built at the railroad 
platform, and will be found the most con- 
venient to persons staying over at Knoxville, 
who will find it to their interest to patronize 
this house. 



Colvin O, forwarding and commission. 

DOUGLASS & CRAIG, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

Duncan I., phvsician and druggist. 

EADS & PRICE, DRY GOODS, BOOTS 
AND SHOES, ETC., N. SIDE PUB- 
LIC SQUARE. 

EIKER & CO., PROPRIETORS OF KNOX- 
VILLE FLOURING MILLS. 

Everett J. G., pastor of Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



EWING, ALEXANDER & CO., DRY 
GOODS, ETC. 

EWING & TAYLOR, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

GILSON JOHN M., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

Grots E. L., attorney at law. 

Halsted J. W, physician and surgeon. 

Harmon & Hale, attorneys at law. 

HOGG ALEXANDER, MERCHANT TAI- 
LOR. 

HUNT S. M., BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Jackson J., mayor. 

Johnston I., dry goods. 

Johnson Rev., pastor of Baptist church. 

JONES BROS., LUMBER, SASH, DOORS 
AND BUILDERS. 

Keightley H. N, attorney at law and notary 
public. 

Lander William, cabinet maker. 

Linquist N. P., groceries and provisions. 

McGOWAN WILLIAM, JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE AND COUNTY TREASERER. 

Massy L., police magistrate. 

Moore Miss S. A., milliner and dress maker. 

Morev B. M., bakery. 

MUIR THOMAS, dry goods, etc. 

Negley E., physician and surgeon. 

North Harvey, watch and clock maker. 

Oldman Rev., pastor of Lutheran church. 

Parmenter & Hamilton, boot and shoe makers. 

Philips E. L., physician and surgeon. 

Raynolds & Gross, attorneys at law. 

Reynolds H. G., postmaster. 

Richards W. H, saddle and harness maker. 

Ritter T., harness maker. 

Rule P., pastor Congregational church. 

Runkle C. & Co., bankers and exchange 
dealers. 

Sanford R. H, attorney at law. 

Shepherd Mrs. Eliza, teacher of music. 

SMITH & HALE, BANKERS. 

Smith Miles, tin and hardware. 

Spalding P. O, architect, 

Steen U. E., baker and confectioner. 

Thompson G., groceries and provisions. 

TINGLE HENRY, groceries and provisions. 

TURNER L. H, STOVES AND TINWARE. 

Tyler Aaron, jr, attorney at law. 

TYLER & SANFORD, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

Vail J. S., pastor of First Presbyterian 
church. 

Wallace M., groceries and provisions. 

Waterbury O, pastor of Second Presby- 
terian church. 

WestR., house and sign painter. 

Whilton W. H, dry goods, etc. 

WINTER & COLGAN, DRUGS, BOOKS 
AND STATIONERY. 

Winter J. S., city clerk. 

Wolsey Wright, groceries and bakery. 



KOSSUTH, 

A post village of Boone county, 90 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 
Henry Fish, jr., Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



123 



KYTE RIVER, 

A post village of Ogle count)', 90 miles west 
by north from Chicago. 

Alaxson D. Clark, Postmaster. 



LACEY, 

A post village of De Kalb county, 10 miles 
west-north-west from Chicago. 
Henry F. Merrill, Postmaster. 



LACLAIR, 

A post village of De Kalb county, 10 miles 
west-south-west fiom Chicago. 
Tim. Gable, Postmaster. 



LACON, 

The county seat of Marshall county, is situa- 
ted on the east bank of Illinois river, thirty- 
five miles south from La Salle and thirty 
north from Peoria. The town was laid out 
in 1831 and was originally called Columbia. 
In 1836 extensive additions were made to 
its limits and in the succeeding year the 
name was changed to Lacon. In 1840 the 
number of inhabitants did not exceed 200, 
and -in 1850 about 600. By far the larger 
portion of the inhabitants are Americans, 
New Englanders and their descendants. 
The foreigners are chiefly Irish and Germans. 
The principal business carried on here is that 
of pork and beef packing : in the winter of 
1856-7 it amounted to over $230,000. The 
grain trade is also very extensive, and the 
total estimate of the trade and commerce of 
the city for 1856 was $1,500,0(10. There is 
here a large packing house costing $20,000, 
2 large flouring mills costing from $70,000 
to $80,000. It also contains three handsome 
churches — Presbyterian, Methodist, and 
Baptist — one of the finest court houses in 
the state, a large and elegant public school 
building, erected for "Lee school" purposes, 
at an expense of $8,000; a jail, the outer 
walls of which are built of brick and the 
partition walls between the cells of massive 
blocks of Athens marble, costing $17,000; 
ten dry goods and grocery stores, two drug 
stores, two clothing stores, two hotels, one 
large plow factory and agricultural ware- 
house, one carriage shop, three lumber 
yards, two newspapers — Gazette and Intelli- 
gencer — and the usual supply of ministers, 
lawyers, doctors, milliners, blacksmiths, car- 
penters, masons, shoe makers, daguerreian 
artists, etc. A few years since Lacon was 
invested with city corporate powers. Its 
commercial advantages are superior, lying 
as it does on the banks of a navigable 
stream, and but one mile from a branch of 
the Rock Island railroad. The American 
Central railway, now partly graded, crosses 



the northern limits of the town. This road, 
when completed, will connect the seaboard 
cities of the east, with Council Bluffs, in the 
far west. The surrounding country is unsur- 
passed for fertility and productiveness, and is 
inhabited by an industrious, intelligent, and 
thrifty rural population. Population, about 
2,000. | 

Jas. W. Maxwell, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Anskee & Markis, butcher, Main st. 
Baldwin B. T., agricultural implements. 
BANGS MARK, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

OFFICE OVER THE BANKING 

HOUSE. 
BEAL ROBERT, drugs and medicines. 
Benson J. S., jeweler. 
Blackstone G. F., hardware, corner Main and 

Fifth St. 
CONTLET J. D., merchant tailor, Main st. 
CRANE W. L., banker, Fifth st. 
DAVIS GEO., physician, Fifth st. 
FISCHER, DEAN & CO., BEEF AND 

PORK PACKERS, PRODUCE AND 

LUMBER DEALERS, CORNER FIFTH 

AND MAIN STS. 
FISCHER, STEVENS & CO., PRODUCE 

MERCHANTS, MAIN ST. 
FISHER WM., PHEONIX MILLS. 
Ford Allen M., Illinois Gazette. 
GIBBONS & MILLER, ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW, MAIN ST. 
Headley Wm. W., saddle and harness maker, 

Main st. 
HASKELL BENJAMIN, ATTORNEY AT 

LAW 
HASTINGS & CHAPMAN, stoves, Main 

street. 
Hummel Jacob, baking and eating, Main st. 
HUTCHINS & GREENLEAF, DRY 

GOODS, GROCERIES, ETC., MAIN 

STREET. 

hilsey & son, john, proprietors 

marshall house. 
McClelland, jeweler. 

McHeon Andrew, cabinet maker, Main st. 
MADELY CHAS. E., grocer, Main street, 

one door from Fifth. 
Martin James D., livery stable, Washington 

MAXWELL J. W., BOOKSELLER, ETC , 
CORxVER FIFTH AND WASHINGTON 
STREETS. 

Morris J., Intelligencer, Fifth and Main sts. 

OBLINGER & BLODGETT, hardware, Fifth 
street. 

Owens David, tailor. 

PALMER & MARRELL, merchandise. Main 
and Fifth sts. 

PERRY & DODGE, model mills. 

PIPIN JOHN, lumber merchant, Washing- 
ton st. 

Reichmond & Burnes, attorney at law, Fifth 
street. 

Riley Thomas, oyster saloon, Main st. 



124 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



ST. CLAIR B. F., blacksmith, Washington 
street. 

Sharon N., boots and shoes, Fifth st. 

Steiner & Co., clothing depot, Main st. 

SWEGER AARON, furniture, Fifth st. 

THOMAS J. A., DENTIST. 

THOMPSON C. F., CARRIAGE AND WA- 
GON MANUFACTORY, COR MAIN 
AND NINTH STS. 

THOMPSON SAMUEL, DRY GOODS, 
COR FIFTH AND MAIN STS. 

Wellman & Bro., clothing, Fifth st. 

WALKER & WILEY, HOUSE, SIGN, 
AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTERS, 
MAIN ST. 

WILKINS F. P., confectionery, Main st. 



LAENNA, 

A post office town of Logan county. 
Chas. S. Jones, Postmaster. 



LAFAYETTE, 

A post village of Stark county. 
Tnos. W. Ross, Postmaster. 



LA GRANGE BLFFF, 

A post village of Brown county, on the Illi" 
'nois river, 65 miles west by north from 
Springfield, 
H. F. C. Johnson, Postmaster. 



LA HARPE, 

A post village of Hancock county, 110 miles 
north-west from Springfield. 

Henry C. Coxlson, Postmaster. 



LAKE COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-east part of the state, 
bordering on Wisconsin, and has an area of 
390 square miles. Lake Michigan forms its 
entire boundary on the east. The Des Plaines 
and Fox rivers flow through the county. It 
contains about 50 small lakes, the average 
extent of which is about one square mile. 
Some of them are, however, very deep. 
They are Supplied with springs of clear wa- 
ter, and stocked with a variety of fish. The 
surface is generally level, and is diversified 
by prairies and groves of timber land. The 
soil is very deep and rich, with sub-strata of 
gravel and clay, and is remarkable for fertil- 
ity and durability. Wheat, corn, oats, hay 
and butter, are the staples. It contains sev- 
eral very fine churches, two newspaper offi- 
ces, and has about 3,000 pupils attending 
public schools, and about 250 attending other 
schools. 

The eastern border of the county is inter- 
sected by the Chicago and Milwaukee rail- 



road. The Chicago, St. Paul and Fond du 
Lac road crosses the south-western corner. 
Organized in 1839. Capital, Waukegan. 
Population, about 20,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS: 

County Judge, John L. Turner. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, A. B. Cotes. 
County Clerk, Jas. C. Biddlecom. 
County Treasurer, Thos. Fellows. 
County Surveyor, O. G. Bisley. 
Sheriff, P. Munson. 
School Commissioner, Francis E. Clarke. 



LAKE, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Ashar Bonham, Postmaster. 



LAKE CREEK, 



A post office of Will county. 
, Postmaster. 



LAKE ZURICH, 

A post village of Lake county, 35 miles north- 
north-west from Chicago. This place is -cele- 
brated for having been the residence of Seth 
Paine, of " Banker " notoriety. It was here 
that his Stable of Humanity was located. 
Alex. Fortune, Postmaster. 



LAMB'S POINT, 



A post office of Madison county. 
Wji. J. Rosberry, Postmaster. 



LAMBURGH, 

A post office of Iroquois county. 
Jas. Lamb, Postmaster. 



LAMOILLE, 

A post village of Bureau county, on Bureau 
creek, 154 miles north by east from Spring- 
field, near the line of the Burlington and 
Quincy railroad. 
Henry H. Holbrook, Postmaster. 



LANCASTER, 

A post office of Cass county. 
Samuel Christy, Postmaster. 

LANE DEPOT, 

A post village of Ogle county, on the line of 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



125 



the Fulton and Iowa railroad, 75 miles north 
west from Chicago. 

David B. Stiles, Postmaster. 



LANE'S CROSS ROADS, 

A post office of Hamilton county. 
Fielding Broyles, Postmaster. 



LAONA. 



A post village of Winnebago county, 110 
north-north-west from Chicago. 
Wm. Randall, Postmaster. 



LA PRAIRIE, 

A station on the Quincy and Chicago rail- 
road. 



LA PRAIRIE CENTER, 

A post office of Marshall county. 
Leroy H. Wetmore, Postmaster. 



LARKINSBURG, 

A post office of Clay county. 
Wit. Aldredge, Postmaster. 



LA SALLE COUNTY 

Is situated in the north central part of the 
state, and has an area of 1,050 square miles. 
It is intersected by the Illinois river, flowing 
from east to west, and also drained by Fox 
and Vermilion rivers, and by Indian creek. 
The surface is undulating, diversified by 
prairies and wood lands, the former being the 
most extensive. The soil is exceedingly rich 
and well cultivated. Corn, wheat, oats, hay 
and coal, are the staples. It contains a 
large number of churches, several newspaper 
offices, and has over 3,000 pupils attending 
public schools. 

The county is also intersected by the Illi- 
nois and Michigan canal, by the Illinois Cen- 
tral and Chicago and Rock Island railroads. 
The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy rail- 
road also crosses the northern portion. It 
was settled by white people in 1822, and was 
organized as a county in 1831, the popula- 
tion at that time being about 300. In early 
clays this was embraced in Fayette county, of 
which Vandalia was the county town, and 
still earlier, it was within the scope of terri- 
tory claimed by Randolph county, state of 
Virginia, and Kaskaskia was the county 
town. This county abounds in coal mines, 
which afford an immense revenue, and the 
product has become, of late years, almost the 
staple article of trade. Many of the original 



settlers of the county are still living within 
its limits. 

The name was given in honor of M. La 
Salle, one of the first explorers of Illinois. 
Capital, Ottawa. Population, about 38,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judye, Champlain. 

County Clerk, Ptiilo Lindley. 
County Treasurer, Samuel R. Lewis. 
School Commissiorier, Wells Waite. 
Surveyor, W. F. Whitmore. 
Sheriff, Eri L. Waterman. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, J. F. Nash. 



LA SALLE. 



The city of La Salle is situated in the county 
of the same name, at the head of navigation 
on the Illinois river, where the Illinois Cen- 
tral intersects with the Rock Island railroad, 
16 miles from Ottawa, the county seat, 114 
from Springfield and 98 west-south-west from 
Chicago. La Salle is one of the most im- 
portant commercial and mining points on the 
river, which is navigable to here for steam- 
boats of considerable size. The number of 
arrivals during the year 1857 were 327, 
bringing cargoes of the various kinds of 
merchandise, while the exports were 230,000 
bushels of wheat, 172,000 bushels of corn, 
75,000 bushels of oats, 16,200 hogs, 11,100 
barrels of salted provisions, 157,000 bushels 
of potatoes, 600 tons of lime and 260,000 
tons of coal. The city abounds in this 
latter staple ; eight mines being now in oper- 
ation, in which are employed about 1,000 
men, and yeilding from 100 to 400 tons daily. 

The La Salle Coal Mining Basin, in which 
is operating the Little Rock Coal Mining Co., 
forms the northern boundary of the coal 
fields of the state, is intersected by the rail- 
roads above mentioned, and is the terminus 
of the Illinois and Michigan canal, which 
unites with the Illinois river at this point. 
The coal procured at these mines are of good 
quality and admiiably adapted to manufac 
turing purposes, and the cheap rate at which 
it is afforded place it in competition with that 
of eastern mines. The immense quantities 
to be found here, and the increasing demand 
for it, has also rendered necessary a large 
increase of capital and labor, which is esti- 
mated at 40 per cent, per annum. The river 
at La Salle is 900 feet in width, and is span- 
ed by a substantial bridge, having 20 arches 
of 45 feet span each, supported by massive 
stone pillars and abutments. The cars pass 
over this bridge in their transits east and 
west. Manufacturing is carried on here to a 
great extent, and embracing almost all 
branches ; among which are two large brew- 
eries, making 12,000 barrels of beer annually, 
five extensive brick yards, four lime kilns, a 



126 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



steam flouring mill, having six run of stones, 
turning out 2,400 barrels of flour weekly, a 
planing mill, a large foundry and machine 
shop, a saleratus factory, a rectifying distil- 
lery, a soap and candle factory, etc., etc. 

In the summer of 1857 a company was 
organized for the purpose of manufacturing 
flint glass, and buildings erected in the city. 
These buildings are three in number, aud 
make an imposing appearance, the largest 
being 56 by 89 feet, is to be used for melting 
and blowing ; the next is 30 by 64, and is 
designed to be used as a cutting shop, the 
machinery to be driven by a six horse power 
engine ; the other is 20 by 100 feet, and will 
be used to manufacture their crucibles in, 
etc. The mechanical department is under 
the direction of Jean Pierre Colne, who was 
fifteen years assistant manager in the largest 
glass manufactory in France, that of Boccarat, 
in which was employed about 1,400 hands. 

The healthy situation and other natural 
advantages of La Salle, its easy communi- 
cation south and west by either railroad or 
river, and the great abundance and low price 
of coal and sand of a superior quality, will 
tend greatly to insure the success of this 
new enterprise in our state. 

In educational advantages this city is not 
behind others of her size, having a collegiate 
seminary belonging to the Catholics, and a 
Protestant seminary, this latter costing about 
$11,000, and is capable of accommodating 
350 students; besides these there are five 
district schools, which are well attended. 
There are five churches, viz. : One Episco- 
palian, one Baptist, one Roman Catholic, one 
Congregationalist and one Methodist, all of 
which are fine buildings, adding much to the 
beauty of the city. There are also several 
banking establishments, two newspaper offices 
having weekly issues. The Hardy House, 
the only hotel of note, is a large and com- 
modious building, occupying a central posi- 
tion. The city is built on a bluff ri-ing from 
the river, affording an excellent view of 
great beauty, extending as far as Peru. Tak- 
ing into consideration the vast amount of 
mineral wealth which underlies the city and 
surrounding district, the facilities for trans- 
portation to and from other points, and the 
healthiness of the climate, this may justly be 
considered one of the most prominent points 
of interest in the west. 

La Salle is separated from Peru only by 
an imaginary line, which, were it done away 
with, and the two cities united in one com- 
mon interest, would tend greatly to the 
advancement of both, making one of the 
first cities of the west — one in name and one 
in interest. We doubt not such a movement 
would meet with general favor from the 
citizens of both places. Population, 4,400. 

J. H. McFarkon, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Trades, Professions, Etc. 
Adams & Brown, dry goods. 



ADAMS O. N., MANAGER OF LITTLE 
ROCK MINING CO. 

AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSE, L. E. 
PARSONS, PROPRIETOR. 

ALEXANDER F. J., WATCHES AND 
JEWELRY, MAIN ST. 

Allen J., groceries and provisions. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, A. McPHEDRAU, 
PROPRIETOR, COR MAIN AND 
BUCKLAND STS. 

Amsler George, boot and shoe maker. 

Anderson W., ornamental painter. 

ANTHONY A., PROPRIETOR HARDY 
HOUSE, COR FIRST AND WRIGHT 
STS. (Seeadvt.) 

AYLESWORTH R., TIN, COPPER AND 
IRON PLATE WORKER, MAIN ST. 

Baldwin Heman, banker. 

BLANCHARD M.., attorney at law. 

BLISH J., Jr., rectifier, dealer in wines, 
brandies, etc., Main st. 

BO WEN E. A., boots, shoes and clothing, 
and agent for N. A Keronene Oil Co. 

BO WEN G. E., dry goods, etc., Main st. 

Bowen E. A., drv goods, etc, Main st. 

BRIGGS WILLIAM D., physician and sur- 
geon. 

BROWN JOHN, LIVERY AND SALE 
STABLE, GOODWIN ST. 

BREG FRANCIS, PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, MAIN ST. 

Buck George II., groceries, ship chandlery, 
liquors, etc. 

Bull E. F., notarv public. 

CANON & MILLER, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW, MAIN ST. 

CHAPMAN H. B., GROCERIES, PRO- 
VISIONS, ETC., COR MAIN AND 
GOODING STS. 

Clancy John, butcher. 

Cody R., groceries, liquors, etc. 

Coniin & Bro., commission merchants and 
dealers in lumber. 

Connell Mrs. A., millinery and fancy goods. 

Cornell W. H., cigar maker. 

CRUICKSHANK ALEXANDER, BANKER 

Dale & McKay, dry goods. 

Darling A. E., dry goods, glass ware, etc. 

Day William, lumber. 

Deigan James, groceries and provisions. 

DUNLOP ANDREW, BAKER AND CON- 
FECTIONER, MAIN ST., LA SALLE. 

Eliel Louis, clothing and furnishing goods. 

Fallon Thomas, groceries and provisions. 

Farrall Jonathan H., saddles and harness. 

GILLETT & CO., CITY DRUG STORE, 
FIRST ST. 

Godfrey A. C, groceries and provisions. 

Godfrey H. M., physician and surgeon. 

Goldman Louis, clothing and furnishing. 

GOULD WILLARD, CONFECTIONERY 
AND FANCY GOODS. 

HALL LYMAN, PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, OFFICE AT CITY HALL. 

HATCH & CARLTON, GROCERIES AND 
COMMISSION, MAIN ST. 

HAVER J., FURNITURE, FIRST ST. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



127 



A ?8> ffil W 

tki 18$, U2J !L£ 



A. ANTHONY, Proprietor, 

Corner of First and Wright Sts., 

CITY OF LA SALLE. 



This Ilouse, having been recently refitted 
and furnished anew, is now open to the 
public, who will find every attention, and 
first class accommodation. 



A carriage passes this Ilouse to meet 



all cars 



HIGGINS JOHN & BRO., GROCERIES 
AND TRODUCE, COR MAIN AND 
GOODING STS. 

IIITT ISAAC R., LAND AND REAL 
ESTATE AGENT. 

Hough & Bascom, attorneys at law. 

Hough D. L., notary public. 

JENKINS & BLANCHARD, ATTORNEYS 
AT LAW, MAIN ST. 

JENKINS D. P., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

KEELER, BENNIGIN & CO., LA SALLE 
IRON WORKS, ON THE STEAM- 
BOAT BASIN. 

KILAUFF PATRICK, JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE, NOTARY, ALDERMAN AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. 

KING GEORGE W., GROCERIES, FOR- 
WARDING AND COMMISSION, MAIN 
ST. 

LANING & BENNETT, EAGLE IRON 
STORE, COR FIRST AND JOLIET 
STS. 

LARKIN L. B., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON, MAIN ST. 

Lawson A. G., physician and surgeon. 

Linen Jeremiah, groceries and provisions. 

McFarran J. H., postmaster. 

McGIRR ARTHUR, REAL ESTATE AND 
INSURANCE AGENT. 

McPHEDRAN A., PROPRIETOR AMERI- 
CAN HOUSE. 

McVEAN DUNCAN, MERCHANT TAILOR 
AND CLOTHING. 

Malone John, groceries and provisions. 

Mann J., barber and hair dresser. 

MERRILL & FOSTER, SADDLES AND 
HARNESS, MAIN ST. 

MOFFATT E. R., POLICE MAGISTRATE 
AND EX-OFF1GIO JUSTICE OF 
THE PEACE. 

MOONEY & BRO., GREAT WESTERN 
CLOTHING HOUSE, NEAR HARDY 
HOUSE. 

Murphy Dennis, dry goods, etc. 



Noeker Auz., forwarding and commission. 
Norton Samuel M., forwarding and com- 
mission. 
Norton S. B., lumber. 

O'BRIEN KENNEDY, HIDES AND LEA- 
THER, MAIN ST. 
O'CONNER MARTIN, PRODUCE, CANAL 

ST. 
O'HALLORAN J., GROCERIES AND 

PROVISIONS, MAIN ST. 
O'Reilly James, groceries and provisions. 
Orsinger Geo., confectioner and baker. 
Owen Miss A., millinery and fancy goods. 
Parkhurst L., proprietor La Salle Hour mills. 
Parks Miss C. M., daguerreian artist. 
PARKS R. G., GRAIN MERCHANT AND 

STEAMBOAT AGENT, OFFICE ON 

STEAMBOAT BASIN. 
PARSONS L. E., FORWARDING AND 

COMMISSION. 
PERKINS I., ORNAMENTAL MARBLE* 

WORKER, FIRST ST. 
PORTLETHWAITE & CO., DRUGS", 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, MAIN 

ST. 
Prescott M. H. Jr., boots, shoes and leather. 
PRINDIVILLE M., GROCERIES AND 

PROVISIONS, MAIN ST. 
Quinn John, butcher. 
Reidy John L , groceries and provisions. 
Rosenberg Chas. S., dry goods, clothing, etc. 
SANGER C. M. & CO., DRUGS, PAINTS, 

OILS, ETC., COR FIRST & WRIGHT 

STREETS. 
SISSON EDWARD, SOAP AND CANDLE 

MANUFACTURER, WATER ST. 
SISSON F., MANUFACTURING AND 

RECTIFYING DISTILLER, WATER 

STREET. 
Sisson Freeborn, notary public. 
Spence P., ambrotype artist. 
Strain & Bull, attorneys at law. 
Strout Mrs. S., millinery and fancy goods. 
Swarthout J. F., boots and shoes, tobacco, 

snuff" and cigars. 
TODD W. & J. & CO., GROCERIES AND 

COMMISSION. 
Treat F. B., hardware, cutlery and manufac- 
turer of tin and copper ware. 
WARFIELD A. W., PHYSICIAN AND 

SURGEON, MAIN ST. 
Welsh Thomas, groceries and provisions. 
Welch Wm. W., physician and surgeon. 
WIXOM JUSTIN D., CROCERIES, 

WOODEN WARE, ETC., FIRST ST. 
WRIGHT & HOWLAND, LUMBER AND 

COMMISSION, CANAL ST. 
Zimmermann C, groceries and boarding. 



LAWNDALE, 

A post village of Logan county, on the line 
of the St. Louis, Alton & Chicago rail- 
road, 153 miles south-west from Chicago. 
Gilbert Carpenter, Postmaster. 



128 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



LAWN RIDGE, 

A post office of Marshall county. 
Chas. Stone, Postmaster. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY 

Is situated in the east-south-east part of the 
state, and has an area of 325 square miles. 
The Wabash river forms the eastern bound- 
ary, and the county is intersected by the 
Embarrass river, which flows into the Wa- 
bash. The surface is uneven and in some 
parts is fertile, in others it is low and unpro- 
ductive. Corn, wheat, oats, cattle and 
swine are the staples. The county is also 
intersected by the Ohio & Mississippi rail- 
road. It contains a number of churches and 
one newspaper office, and has about 2,000 
pupils attending public schools. Capital, 
Lawrenceville. Population, about 8,000. 



LAWRENCEVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Lawrence 
county, on the west bank of Embarrass 
river and on the line of the Ohio and Missis- 
sippi railroad, 10 miles west from Yincennes, 
Indiana. Is pleasantly situated and enjoys a 
good amount of trade. It contains the 
county buildings, and others of a business 
character. 
Edward Thorn, Postmaster. 



LEBANON, 

A post village of St. Clair county, on the 
line of the Ohio and Mississippi railroad, 20 
miles east from St. Louis. It has a high and 
beautiful situation and is surrounded by a 
rich farming district. McKendree college of 
this place, under the direction of the Metho- 
dists, was founded in 1835, and ha3 a library of 
7,000 volumes. 
Peter Joseph Osterhaus, Postmaster. 



LEE COUNTY 



Is situated in the north part of the state, and 
has an area of 700 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by Rock river, and drained by Green 
river and Bureau creek. The surface is 
nearly level and the soil excellent. The 
county is principally prairie land, some groves 
of timber being found in portions of it. 
Corn, wheat and oats being the staples. It 
contains several fine churches, and numerous 
printing offices from which are issued daily 
and weekly papers. The county is intersected 
by the Illinois Central railroad and the Fulton 
and Iowa line crosses the northern portion 
of it. Named in honor of Gen. Lee, of 
revolutionary memory. Capital, Dixon. 
Population, 13,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, D. Wettt. 
Circuit Judge, J. W. Eustace. 
Clerk of Circuit Court and Recorder, G. 
E. Haskell. 

SJteriff, O. Wheeler. 

County Treasurer, F. B. Little. 

Constable, J. Sears. 



LEE. 

A post office of Ogle county. 

Galertia Balvkrson, Postmaster. 



LEE CENTRE, 

A thriving post village of Lee county, in the 
township of the same name, about 100 miles 
west from Chicago. 
Daniel Frost, Postmaster. 



LEESVILLE, 



A post village of Boone county. 
Wm. Lee, Postmaster. 



LEMONT, 

A post township in the extreme south-west 
part of Cook county. Population, about 
400. 

II. M Singer, Postmaster. 



LENA, 

A post village of Stephenson county, on the 
line of the Illinois Central railroad, 134 miles 
north of west from Chicago. 
Fred. Reber, Postmaster. 



LENOX, 

A post office of Warren county. 
John Sherwin, Postmaster. 



LENSBURG, 

A post office of St. Clair county. 
Peter Baumann, Postmaster. 



L'ERABLE, 



A post office of Iroquois county. 
Peter Spink, Postmaster. 



LE ROY, 



A post office of McLean county. 
Samuel A. Moore, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



129 



LEWISTON, 

A beautiful post village, capital of Fulton 
county, 55 miles north-west from Springfield 
and four miles east from Spoon river. Bitu- 
minous coal is found in great abundance in the 
vicinity. Lewiston contains several churches 
and has good school facilities, which are 
well improved. 

Geo. McLeran, Postmaster. 



LEXINGTON, 

A post village of McLean county, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 111 miles south-west from Chicago. Is 
a place of considerable business. 
James Fell, Postmaster. 



LEYDEN, 

A post township of Cook county, on Des 
Plaines river about ten miles west from 
Chicago. 
Matthew L. DuNLAr, Postmaster. 



LEYDEN CENTRE, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Wm. Emerson, Postmaster. 



LIBERTY, 

A post village of Adams county, about 15 
miles south-east from Quincy. 
James R. Horrerton, Postmaster. 



LIBERTYVILLE, 

A post village of Lake county, 34 miles 
north from Chicago. Is a thriving place and 
has a good amount of trade and manufactures. 
Population, about 600. 

Horace Butler, Postmaster. 



LILLECASH, 



A post village of Will county, in the north- 
east part. 
Joshua Hallock, Postmaster. 



LIMA, 

A post village in the north-west part of 
Adams county, 100 miles west-north-west 
from Springfield. 

James P. Archer, Postmaster. 



LIMESTONE, 

A village of Will county, on the Iroquois 
river, 60 miles west-south-west from Chicago. 



LINCOLN, 

A thriving post village, capital of Logan 
county, on the line of the St. Louis, Alton 
and Chicago railroad, 159 miles west of south 
from Chicago. Has several churches and 
one newspaper office. 

Robt. Leslie, Postmaster. 



Alphabstical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Auer Philip, bakery. 

Austin E. L., attorney at law and land agent. 

Barnum & Randal, marble works. 

Becker & Keil, furniture. 

Bryan & Metcalf, drugs and medicines. 

Cummings J. E., attorney at law, notary 

public and insurance agent. 
Fisk Franklin, notary public and justice of 

peace. 
Foster House, N. H. Foster, proprietor. 
Elkin G., physician and surgeon. 
Grable A., daguerreian artist. 
Inman Ezekiel, constable. 
Larison Jas. M., clothing. 
LINCOLN HERALD, Chas. L. Wheeler, 

proprietor. 
Lincoln House, D. M. Jackson, proprietor. 
Lincoln Lodge I. O. O. F. Hall, Chicago st. 
Logan, Cox & Co., dry goods, groceries, etc. 
McCoy Isaiah T., justice of peace. 
McElhenny M. W., justice of peace. 
Magee H, eclectic physician. 
Marble John, furniture. 
Parks Samuel C, attorney at law. 
Rodolph J. T., constable. 
Russell Jas. H., constable. 
Sims & Lanphear, physicians and surgeons. 
Smith Samuel, dry goods, groceries, etc. 
Stillman G. F., proprietor of steam flouring 

mill, and dealer in groceries, hardware, 

etc. 
Truby John, watches and jewelry. 
WHEELER CHARLES L., PROPRIETOR 

LINCOLN HERALD. 
Whitmore E. & Co., blacksmiths. 
Young Wm. H., attorney and counselor at 

law, and land agent. 



LINDENWOOD, 

A post village of Ogle county, in the east 
part. 

Daniel Gifford, Postmaster. 



LISBON, 

A thriving post village, in a township of the' 
same name, in Kendall county, is situated on 
an extensive and fertile prairie, 51 miles S. 
W. from Chicago. It has a fine academy, 
which is well sustained. The business of the 
place is considerable. Population, about 
750. 

John B. More, Postmaster. 



130 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



LISLE, 

A post village of Du Page county. 
Joux Thompson, Postmaster. 



LITCHFIELD, 



A neat thriving village of Montgomery 
county, on the line of the Terre Haute and 
Alton railroad, 53 miles from St. Louis. In 
1854, the place contained only one house 
and a blacksmith shop, but by the united en- 
terprise of the settlers and the liberality of 
the railroad company, it has acquired an im- 
portance of which they may well be proud. 
The streets are regularly laid out, the houses 
well built, some of them being really elegant 
edifices. There are two substantial brick 
churches, three or four hotels, the principal 
of which is the Montgomery House, ten or 
twelve stores, all doing a good business. A 
printing office, etc. 

The railroad company have a round house, 
blacksmith and machine shop, which give 
employment to about 150 persons. The 
round house has places for 13 engines. The 
blacksmith shop is 40 by 60 feet, with 8 for- 
ges. The machine shop is 60 by about 200 
feet. There is also a building 30 feet square, 
used as a stationary engine room. These 
building3 are all substantially built, of good 
brick, upon solid stone foundations. Other 
improvements are being made, with a view 
to place this village on a footing with older 
and more advanced portions of the state. 

JonN P. Bayless, Postmaster. 



LITTLE DETROIT, 

A post village of Tazewell county, on the 
Illinois river, about 5 miles north-east from 
Peoria. 
David A. Coutch, Postmaster. 



LITTLE MUDDY, 

A post village of Franklin county, in the 
western part. 

John Kirkpatrick, Postmaster. 



LITTLE ROCK, 

A beautiful post village of Kendall county, 
57 miles west by south from Chicago. Con- 
tains several stores. The Burlington and 
Quincy railroad runs near the village. 
* Abraham Stitt, Postmaster. 



LITTLETON, 

A post village of Schuyler county, 66 miles 
north-west from Springfield. 

Tolbert Crawford, Postmaster. 



LITTLE YORK, 

A post village of Warren county, 110 miles 
from Springfield. 

Isaac Hopper, Postmaster, 



LIVERPOOL, 

A post village of Fulton county, on the Illi- 
nois river, 38 miles below Peoria. It has a 
fine steamboat landing, and also a plank road 
extending some distance towards the north 
central part of the county. The land in the 
vicinity is highly productive. Stone coal is 
found to some considerable extent. 
Geo. Pritchard, Postmaster. 



LIVINGSTON COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-east central part of 
the state, and has an area of 1,000 square 
miles. It is drained by the sources of Ver- 
milion and Mason rivers, affluents of the 
Illinois. The surface is level, and soil fertile, 
and well adapted to corn and grass. Small 
tracts of timber land are occasionally met 
with, but the principal part is prairie. The 
St. Louis, Alton and Chicago railroad crosses 
the central portion of the county, and has 
been the means of adding greatly to its 
wealth and prosperity. It contains several 
churches, and has about 650 pupils attending 
public schools. Stone coal is found along 
the Vermilion river, and sand and lime stone 
in sufficient quantities for building purposes. 
Capital, Pontiac. Population, 5,800. 



LIVINGSTON, 



A post village of Clark county, on a small 
creek, an affluent of the Wabash river, about 
14 miles west from Terre Haute, Ind. 
Elza M. Hanks, Postmaster. 



LOAMMI, 



A post office of Sangamon county. 
Wm. Colours, Postmaster. 



LOCKHART, 

A post office of Macon county. 
Amos Ganson, Postmaster. 



LOCKPORT, 

A handsome post village of Lockport town- 
ship, Will county, on the Des Plaines river, 
the Illinois and Michigan canal, and on the 
line of the Chicago and Joliet railroad, about 
30 miles south-west from Chicago. It is a 
place of active business, possessing extensive 
water power, and quarries of good building 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



131 



stone. ' The place is rapidly advancing in 
wealth and population, and the recent open- 
ing of the railroad through it will tend great- 
ly to add to its present prosperity. 
Patrick O'Mara, Postmaster. 

Lane & Loonier, steam plow manufactory. 
Rafferty N. S., clothing. 



LODI, 

A post village of Clark county. 
Samuel Williams, Postmaster. 



LODI STATION, 

A post village of Kane county, on the line 
of the Fulton and Iowa railroad, 50 miles west 
from Chicago. Is a place of considerable 
business. Large amounts of grain are an- 
nually shipped from this place. 
W. H. Robinson, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

ARMSTRONG J. M., general merchant. 

Babcock W. S., carpenter. 

Bear H. H., merchant tailor. 

Beaverly John, carpenter. 

Bordman William, constable. 

BRADLEY HENRY, LUMBER MER- 
CHANT. 

Brooks George, carpenter. 

BROWN WM. J., ATTORNEY & COUN- 
SELOR. 

Burns William, shoe maker. 

Butler James, constable. 

Chase E. C, carpenter. 

COLE H., WAGON MA.KER. 

Crane Z., carpenter. 

Derwin Peter, blacksmith. 

Ermon James S., painter. 

FAY, VETERINARY SURGEON. 

FILLMORE BENJAMIN, CARPENTER, 

Fletcher Amos, carpenter. 

Gait & Burdict, general merchants. 

Gardner & Beals, blacksmiths. 

Gray John, farmer. 

Gray Joseph, farmer. 

Hall H. B., farmer. 

Hall Ira, livery man. 

Hallwick Alexander, farmer. 

Hardy John, harness maker. 

Hardy W. P., harness maker. 

Hathawav D. E., painter. 

HATHORN JOHN, REAL ESTATE 
DEALER. 

Heath L., real estate. 

Henry John, carpenter. 

Holt William, mason. 

Howard Charles, farmer. 

Hunt George, carpenter. 

Huss Frank, 'cabinet maker. 

Jenkins J. W., merchant. 

Jenkins G. F., mason. 



Lakin Noah, justice of the peace. 

Lewis S., merchant. 

Lightner N., carpenter. 

Lyon W., merchant. 

McGRUFF BERNARD, BLACKSMITH. 

McGruff James, blacksmith. 

MATTESON LORY, REAL ESTATE 

DEALER. 
Miller Mitchel, blacksmith. 
Millington John, carpenter. 
North Nathan, carriage maker. 
North Rev. H. N., congregational minister. 
O'Denniss Oliver, carpenter. 
Ormsby John, carpenter. 
Pabst A., shoe maker. 
Pulf J., carpenter. 
Rise H., carpenter. 
Robertson B. L., shoe maker. 
Robertson E. P., shoe maker. 
ROBINSON W. H., JUSTICE OF PEACE 

AND POSTMASTER. 
Slate G. W., mason. 
SMITH R. S., WAGON MAKER. 
SOLAN A., GENERAL GROCER. 
Stewart & Puff, blacksmiths. 
STRANG DR. J. B., PHYSICIAN. 
Tracy John, harness maker. 
Tuller S., general grocer. 
Webster 0. S., lawyer. 
White S., grain dealer. 
WILLCOX REV., BAPTIST MINISTER. 
Williams J. R., carpenter. 
WOODARD W. C, CARPENTER AND 

BUILDER. 
Woodman Joseph, farmer. 



LOGAN, 

A post village of Edgar county. 
S. C. Wilkins, Postmaster. 



LONDON CITY 

A post village of Fayette county, 14 miles 
north-east from Vandalia. 

Benj. M. Backensto, Postmaster. 



LODA 



Is a new town, situated in Iroquois county, 
on the Chicago branch of the Illinois Central 
railroad, 99 miles south from Chicago. In 
1855 there was not a dwelling nor an inhab- 
itant in the place. The town is located on 
the most elevated land between Chicago and 
Cairo, the soil of which is very rich, and of 
great depth. A large steam flouring mill 
was erected last year, capable of turning out 
300 barrels of flour daily. There is one 
newspaper published here, called the Garden 
State. Population, 650. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc . 
BRISTOL H. G, DRY GOODS AND GRO- 
CERIES. 



132 



G. W. IIAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



COLEMAN BROS. & FULLER, CARPEN- 
TERS & BUILDERS. 

Dore S. C, land a°;ent. 

FISHER W. G., PAINTER, GLAZIER, & 
PAPER HANGER. 

GOODELL A., LAND AGENT OF I. C. R. 
R., AND DEALER IN DRY GOODS, 
HARDWARE, ETC. 

Hacklev S., lumber. 

HUESTIS J., DRY GOODS, HARDWARE, 
& GROCERIES. 

LYNN JAMES, BOOT & SHOE MAKER. 

MAR YE E. A., LAND AGENT. 

NEWELL T. & CO., LUMBER. 

Nicholson Joshua T., painter. 

RANKIN A. L., AGENT OF SAND RIDGE 
NURSERY. 

Roger & Davis, blacksmiths. 

Shotwell J. & E., land agents. 

Springer G. M., hardware, etc. 

Vedder H. B. W., millinery and dress mak- 
ing. 



LOCUST GROVE, 



A small village of Kendall county, near Bris- 
tol station. 



WALLERS W. H, 
NESS MAN. 



GENERAL BUSI- 



LOG-AN COUNTY 

Is situated near the centre of the state, and 
has an area of 625 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by Salt Creek, an affluent of Sanga- 
mon river, and also drained by Kickapoo and 
Sugar creeks. The surface is level and is 
mostly destitute of forests; the soil is fertile. 
Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, and pork are the 
staples. Several creeks in the county are 
bordered with narrow strips of timber, and 
the deficiency of wood in other parts is made 
up by an abundance of stone and coal. The 
St. Louis, Alton and Chicago railroads inter- 
sect the county. Capital, Lincoln. Popu- 
lation, 9,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Judge of Circuit Court, David Davis. 

County Judge, Reuben B. Swing. 

~ . -r ,. ( Thomas Nolan, 
County Justices, j SnKLDQS p ARKS 

County Cleric, John T. Jenkins. 
Circuit Cleric and Recorder, Joseph C. Web- 
ster. 
Coroner, N. H. Foster. 
Sheriff, George Musick. 
County Surveyor, Washington Skinner. 
County Treasurer, Benjamin E. Clark. 
School Commissioner, David D. James. 



LONG BRANCH, 

A post office of Saline county. 
James L. Kennedy, Postmaster. 






LONG GROVE, 

A post village in the southern part of Lake 
county, 30 miles north-west from Chicago. 
Chas. Stempel, Postmaster. 



LONG JOHN, 

A post village of Will county, in the north 
ern part, 33 miles south-west from Chicago. 
Geo. R. Dyer, Postmaster. 



LONG POINT, 

A post village of Livingston county, 10i 
miles north-north-east from Springfield. 
Absalom Hallam, Postmaster. 



LONG POINT GROVE, 

A post village in the township of Long Point, 
in Cumberland county. 

John S. Morrison, Postmaster. 



LOOKING GLASS, 

A post village of Clinton county, in the south- 
western part, 100 miles south from Spring- 
field. 

Laurence Geiger, Postmaster. 



LORAN, 

A post village of Stephenson county in the 
south-west part. 
Jacob S. Lashell, Postmaster. 



LOUISA, 

A post village of Stephenson county, in the 
north-west portion, 135 miles west-north-west 
from Chicaco. 

J. B. Nixon, Postmaster. 



LOUISVILLE, 



A post village of Clay county, on the Little 
Wabash river, 110 miles south-east from 
Springfield. 
Benj. G. Sullivan, Postmaster. 



L0VINGT0N, 

A post village of Moultrie county, in the north 
central part. 

Stephen Cannon, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



133 



LOWELL, 

A post village of La Salle county, on Vermil- 
ion river, near the north-west part of the 
county. 
William Seelt, Postmaster. 



LOW POINT, 



A post office of Woodford county. 
Wm. Dodds, Fostmaster. 



LYNDON, 

A thriving post village of Whiteside county, 
on Rock river, about '150 miles north from 
Springfield. 
L. E. B. Holt, Postmaster. 



LYNSVILLE, 



A post office of Cook county. 
Robert Vial, Postmaster. 



LYNVILLE, 

A post village of Morgan county, in the west 
central part. 
Andrew M. Emerick, Postmaster. 



LYONS, 

A post township of Cook county, in the west 
central part, about 20 miles south-west from 
Chicago. 

William Lunn, Postmaster. 



LYTTLESVILLE, 

A post office of McLean county. 
Wm. Fulton, Jr., Postmaster. 



McCLEARY'S BLUFF, 

A post village of Wabash county, about 3 
miles west from the Wabash river. 
Joseph C. Orth, Postmaster. 



McCONNELL'S GROVE, 

A post village of Stephenson county, 140 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
Chester W. Nash, Postmaster. 



Mcdonough county 

Is situated in the west part of the state, and 
has an area of 575 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by Crooked creek, an affluent of the 
Illinois river, and drained by Downing's 



Fork, Turkey, and Grindstone creeks. The 
surface is moderately uneven; the soil is 
highly productive. The greater part of the 
county is prairie land. Corn, wheat, oats, 
hay, pork, and potatoes are the staples. It 
contains about twenty churches and has over 
twenty-five hundred pupils attending public 
schools. It is traversed by the Chicago and 
Quincy railroad. Along many of the streams 
fine groves of timber are found. Capital, 
Macomb. Population, about 14,500. 



McGARY, 



A post office of Hancock county. 
James Westfall, Postmaster. 



HcHENRY COUNTY 

Is situated in the north-north-east part of 
the state, bordering on Wisconsin, and has 
an area of 620 square miles. Fox river flows 
through the eastern part of the county from 
north to south. It is also drained by the 
Kishwaukee river, and by Nippersink and 
Piskashaw creeks. The surface is nearly 
level, and is diversified with fertile prairies 
and fine groves of timber. Wheat, corn, 
oats, wool, pork, and butter are the staples. 
It contains about 20 churches and has over 
6,000 pupils attending public schools. The 
county is underlaid with limestone, and is 
intersected by the Galena and Chicago, Fox 
River Valley, Chicago and St. Paul, and 
Fond Du Lac railroads. Capital, Woodstock. 
Population, about 23,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Hon. Theodore D. Murphy. 
Counti/ Clerk, William H. Stewart. 
Circuit Clerk and Recorder, George T. 

Kasson. 
Treasurer, Samuel Richardson. 
Sheriff, John Eddy. 
School Commissioner, Alvin Brown. 
County Surveyor, John Brink. 



McHENRY, 

A thriving post village of McHenry county, 
on Fox river, 55 miles north-west from Chi- 
cago. 
Richard Bishop, Postmaster. 



McLEAN COUNTY 

Is situated in the central part of the state, 
and has an area of 1260 square miles. The 
county originally embraced an area of 42 by 
58 miles, since which time portions of it 
have been taken off to form the counties of 
Livingston, Woodford, and De Witt, leaving 



134 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



it in its present form. It was formed in 
1831 through the efforts and under the su- 
pervision of James Allen, Esq., who donated 
30 acres of land as a county seat, and the 
same on which the city of Bloomington now 
stands. The present court house waa erected 
in 1836, previous to which time the various 
courts of the county were held in a small 
room in Mr. Allen's cabin. The county is 
drained by Mackinaw, Kickapoo, Salt, and 
Sugar creeks, all rising within its limits. 
The surface consists mostly of open plains or 
prairies, the soil is deep and very fertile, 
producing naturally an abundance of grass, 
and a great variety of most beautiful flowers. 
Corn, wheat, oats, hay, and pork are the 
staples. It contains a large number of 
churches, the state normal institution, two 
colleges, and several schools of a higher 
order, beside those denominated public. A 
number of newspapers arc also issued within 
its limits. There are about 2,200 pupils 
attending the various schools and colleges. 
Beds of stone coal, and building stone are 
found in several places. The county is in- 
tersected by the St. Louis, Alton and Chi- 
cago, and Illinois railroads, which cross one 
another at Bloomington. Named in honor of 
Hon. John McLean, member of congress. 
Population, about 26,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Counti/ Judge, A. J. Merrimax. 

County Clerk, W. C. Hobbs. 

Clerk County Court, W. McCullough. 

Sheriff, J. H. Morse. 

County Treasurer, W. Thomas. 

County Surveyor, W. L. Hokr. 



McLEANSBOBO, 



A post village, capital of Hamilton county, 
160 miles south-south-east from Springfield. 
It contains, besides the county buildings, sev- 
eral fine stores. 
Abm. Irvax, Postmaster. 

Sullenger A. T., marble manufactory. 
Vise Cary S., attorney at law. 



MACKINAW, 

A post village of Tazewell county, 55 miles 
north-north-east from Springfield. 

Christopher O. Neville, Postmaster. 



MACOMB. 

The city of Macomb, the county seat of 
McDonough county, is situated on the Quincy 
branch of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 
railroad, 80 miles north-west from Springfield 



and 220 miles south-west from Chicago. It 
was located by the commissioners in 1831, 
but until 1850 its progress was slow, the 
population, at that time, not exceeding 800, 
having few institutions of a public character, 
but since then a new impulse has been given 
to the place, which is now one of considerable 
importance. It is laid out on a beautiful 
rolling prairie, the streets corresponding to 
the cardinal points of the compass, and the 
scenery is diversified by plane and woodland. 
The land in the vicinity is watered by sev- 
eral' small creeks, on whose banks are belts 
of fine woodland and timber. The soil is very 
rich and well cultivated. The manufactures 
of the city are of considerable importance, 
and comprise a large woolen factory, an 
extensive machine shop, three flour mills, 
two steam saw-mills, two cabinet ware fac- 
tories and two blacksmith shops. There are 
also two plow and agricultural implement 
manufactories doing a large amount of busi- 
ness. The city contains six churches of 
various denominations, a college, and four 
district schools, all well attended. The build- 
ings are mostly built of brick after the most 
approved modern style, and are of themselves 
ornaments to the city. The principal hotels 
are the Randolph, American, and French 
Houses ; the first has recently been erected, 
is large and commodious, and will compare 
favorably with those of larger cities and 
towns in the state. There are also two news- 
paper offices having weekly issues, namely, 
McComb Eagle and Me Comb Enterprize. 
Tins city is one of the largest shipping 
points on the line of the railroad. Popula- 
tion, 2,900. 

J. W. Westfall, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BAILEY WM. W., DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANT. 

BALEY, VAN VLECK & WELLS, AT- 
TORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT 
LAW. 

BAYNE W. F., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

Beard Thomas, dealer in hardware. 

BRITHINGHAM T. H., STATION WARE- 
HOUSE, WEST SIDE. 

Brown J. R., clothing dealer. 

BURR & HOWELL, DEALERS IN HARD- 
WARE, SADDLERY, MECHANIC'S 
TOOLS AND CUTLERY. 

CAMPBELL JAMES M., oldest clergyman 
of Macomb county. 

Cannon S. G., saddle and harness maker. 

Chandler T., county judge of McDonough 
countv. 

CLARK G. F., GROCERY AND PROVIS- 
ION STORE. 

Clark John, watch maker. 

Cottrell & Bro., hardware and stoves, south- 
east corner of public square. 

DECKERD & FULTGER, BOOT AND 
SHOE MANUFACTORY. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



135 



Durr Joseph, boots and shoes. 

Elliee & Rice, druggists. 

Ervin W. & H., dry goods and general mer- 
chants. 

FARWELL G. L., COUNTY CONSTABLE. 

French S., proprietor of French &Co.'s livery 
stables. 

Grantham Isaac, county clerk of McDonough 
county. 

HAIL WM. S., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 
AND POLICE JUSTICE OF THE 
CITY. 

HAMES C. A., BOOT AND SHOE MANU- 
FACTURER. 

HARKER WILLIAM, ARCHITECT AND 
BUILDING CONTRACTOR. 

Head Wm. T., clerk of the circuit court of 
McDonough countv. 

HENTON J. L., GRAIN AND PRODUCE 
MERCHANT. 

HENTON JOHN L., DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANT. 

Hoskinson A. E., saddler. 

Hunt S. R., surveyor of McDonough county. 

Johnson Luther, dry goods and general mer- 
chant. 

JONES W. H., PROFESSOR OF PENMAN- 
SHIP. 

Kiefer Charles, clothing store. 

KNAPPENLERGER, TREASURER AND 
COLLECTOR OF McDONOUGH CO. 

LIPE F. D. & CO., GROCERS AND GEN- 
ERAL MERCHANTS. 

McElrath T. & J., furniture manufacturers 
and dealers. 

Mclean, Randolph & co., land 

BROKERS AND GENERAL AGENTS. 

Mohford & Ervin, hats, caps, boots and shoes. 

MURPHY A. H., AMBROTYPE ARTIST. 

Paige G. W. Jr., deputy surveyor. 

PALMER J. R., SURGEON AND DENTIST. 

Parrott & Lawson, dry goods aud general 
merchants. 

PENNINGTON J., PROPRIETOR OF THE 
AMERICAN HOUSE. 

RANDOLPH & CO., BANKERS AND EX- 
CHANGE BROKERS. 

RANDOLPH W. H., PROPRIETOR OF 
RANDOLPH HOUSE. 

RAY & WRITHROW, DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANTS. 

Russel J. L., grocer and provision dealer. 

SHUTE & JONES, Empire restaurant, west 
side. 

SMITH & CO.. DEALERS IN GROCERIES 
N AND PROVISIONS. 

SMITH J. W. & CO., DEALERS IN DRUGS, 
MEDICINES, PAINTS, ETC. 

Smith G. W. & Co., groceries and provisions, 
west side public square. 

SPENCER, RICHARDSON & CO., 
BUTCHERS AND CATTLE DEAL- 
ERS. 

TAYLOR GEO. A, SHERIFF OF McDON- 
OUGH COUNTY. 

THOMPSON L. C, ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Tinsley N. P., dry goods and general merch't. 



Turley & Dolone, Pearl mills. 

Walker J. D., physician and surgeon. 

Waters L. II., attorney at law. 

WELLS J. M. & CO., DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANTS. 

Wetherhold & Hall, leather and hide dealers. 

Wetherhold 0. P. & Co., dry goods and gen- 
eral merchants. 

WYCKOFF S. B., BOOKS AND STATION- 
ERY. 



MACON CGUE'TY 



Is situated in the central part of the state, 
and has an area of 500 square miles. It ia 
intersected by the north branch of the San- 
gamon river, dividing it into nearly equal 
parts. Also, by the Great Western and Illi- 
nois Central railroads. In 1829, the number 
of inhabitants was short of 800, and in 1840, 
3,233, about one-tenth of whom resided at 
Decatur, the county seat. Making still 
further progress, in 1S50 the population had 
increased to 3,988. About the year 1852, 
this part of the state, exhumed from the 
tomb of Egyptian darkness in which it had 
so long lain buried, was wholly changed in 
its aspect by the opening of railroads in this 
section, and settlers came pouring in upon 
the splendid rolling prairies, gifted with tim- 
ber and watered by never failing streams; 
and soon the smoke curling from cabin 
chimneys all through the length and breadth 
of Macon's four million acres of land, told 
that the arms of civilization had found a 
resting place. The fall of 1853 witnessed 
the completion of the Great Western rail- 
road from Springfield to Decatur, and the 
following spring the arrival of the cars on 
the new laid track of the Illinois Central.' 
The statistics of the next five years show a 
marked change for the better ; the population 
in 1855, amounting to about 9,000, and the 
real and personal estate valued at over 
$2,000,000, and the manufacturing interest 
which had sprung up, showing that the 
county had risen from its Rip Van Winkle 
sleep and was about to make its mark among 
the caunties of the west. The surface is gen- 
erally level, and consists of prairies diversi- 
fied with small tracts of timber. The soil is 
highly productive ; corn, wheat, oats, potatoes 
and pork are the staples. It contains a large 
number of fine churches, and has over 1,000 
pupils attending public schools. Several 
newspapers are published in the county. 
Capital, Decatur. Population, 11,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, John Ricketts. 
. . , _ 7 ) Jacob Spangler. 
Associate Judges, J- M & Camer0N- 

Clerk of Circuit Court, Jas. Q. A. Odor. 
Deputy Cleric of Circuit Court, Theodore 
W. Freese. 



136 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS ' STATE 



Deputy Clerk of Court, Samuel Rea. 
Sheriff, Edminston McClellan. 
Assessor and Treasurer, Wm. Cantrill. 



MACON, 

A post office of Bureau county, in the south 
part of the county. 
Chas. Lee, Postmaster. 



MACOUPIN COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-south-west part of the 
state, and has an area of 800 square miles. 
It is drained by Macoupin, Otter and Cahokia 
creeks, from the first of which the name is 
derived. The surface is moderately uneven 
and soil fertile. Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, 
pork and butter are the staples. It contains 
a large number of churches, and has over 
2,500 pupils attending public schools. The 
county is intersected by the St Louis, Alton 
& Chicago and the Terre Haute & Alton rail- 
roads. In early days the county bore the 
name of Black Hawk Hunting Ground. 
Then over our beautiful prairies bounded the 
deer in fearless freedom and in countless 
numbers, untorn by the white man's hound 
and unscared by his murderous rifle, and 
through our forests prowled the sluggish 
bear, undisturbed in savage solitude. They 
subsisted on a root, called by the Indians 
"macopin," signifying "bear's root;" here 
we have the origin of the name of the 
county. It was organized in 1829, from por- 
tions of Greene, Sangamon and Madison 
counties, and in that spring the first county 
court, consisting of three persons, held its 
first session in a private dwelling. The 
appearance of the county, the value and 
condition of the soil then differed from the 
soil and county now, as widely as a valley 
differs from a mountain. One of the first 
white men who settled in the county was 
named Hall, whose descendants are among 
the most worthy citizens of the county. 
Capital, Carlinsville. Population, about 
19,600. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Circuit Judge, E. Y. Rice. 

County Judge, Lewis Solomon. 

Associate Justices, Messrs. Cloud and Rice. 

Circuit Clerk, A. McKina Dubois. 

County Clerk, Enoch Wall. 

Sheriff, Milton McCluee. 

Surveyor, F. A. Chapman. 



MADISON COUNTY 

Is situated in the south-west part of the state, 
on the Mississippi river, opposite the mouth 
of the Missouri and nearly opposite the city 
of St. Louis. It is intersected by the Cahokia 



creek and drained by Silver creek and its 
branches. The surface is elevated and undu- 
lating, diversified by prairies and woodlands. 
The river bottom below Alton is several miles 
wide, and bounded on the east by a bluff 
which rises from 100 to 300 feet. The soil 
is remarkably fertile and is extensively culti- 
vated. Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, pork and 
butter are the staples. There are in the 
county over 4,000 pupils attending public 
schools, and about 300 attending academies 
or other schools. The county contains a very 
large number of churches and several news- 
paper offices. It is intersected by the St. 
Louis, Alton & Chicago and Terre Haute & 
Alton railroads. Capital, Edwardsville. 
Population, about 35,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 
County Judge, M. G. Dale. 
Associate Justices, Geo. R. Stocker, Elias 

Morgan. 
Clerk of Comity Court, Jonx A. Prickett. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, Tnos. O. Springer. 
Sheriff, Z. B. Job. 

Treasurer and Assessor, Benj. D. Berry. 
Surveyor, Wm. E. Wheeler. 
School Commissioner, John Weaver. 



MAGNOLIA, 

A post village in the south part of Putnam 
county, 100 miles north by east from Spring- 
field. 

Luther C. Morrill, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Dittman G. W., auctioneer. 

Foster Henry, harness and saddlery. 

Irwin Robert, notary public. 

Lundy B. Clarke, physician and surgeon, 

ONG" JEREMIAH, PROPRIETOR OF 

MAGNOLIA HOTEL. 
Quaiutance Joel, saddlery and harness. 
Rankin William, plasterer and finisher. 
Thornton J. T. & J. F., drugs, paints, oils, 

etc. 
Van Yinkel & Quaintance, plow makers and 

blacksmiths. 



MAHOMET, 

A post village in the north-west part of 
Champaigne county, on the north fork of San- 
gamon river, 80 miles east-north-east from 
Springfield. 
Robert P. Carson, Postmaster. 



MAINE, 

A post township of Cook county, on the line 
of the Chicago, St. Paul and Fond du Lac 
railroad. 

Wm. Johnson, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



137 



MAINVILLE, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Wit Ellis, Postmaster. 



MALUGIN GROVE, 

A post village in the east central part of Lee 
county, 90 miles west from Chicago. 
Wm. T. Morgax, Postmaster. 



MANCHESTER, 



A post village in the south of Scott county, 
45 miles south-west by west from Spring- 
field. 

Newell S. Leigutox, Postmaster. 



MANSFIELD, 

A post village in the central part of Ken- 
dall county, about 75 miles south-west from 
Chicago. 
George Hollenbeck, Postmaster. 



MANTENO, 

Is a young and thriving post village of Kan- 
kakee county, on the line cf the Chicago 
branch of the Illinois Central railroad, 46 
miles from Chicago. It is one of the best 
grain markets in the vicinity. The railroad 
company have a large warehouse, and there 
are two others in private hands. The village 
contains several stores and shops, and houses 
are being built in every direction. 
Joseph E. Labiue, Postmaster. 



MAPLE GROVE, 

A post office of Edwards county. 
Robert Marshall, Postmaster. 



MAGTJON, 

A thriving post village of Knox county, on 
Spoon river, about 100 miles north-north- 
west from Springfield. Valuable water power 
is found here, and the village contains several 
stores and other places of business. 
Allex Hamrick, Postmaster. 



MARCELLION, 

A post village in the north-west part of 
Adams county, near Bear creek. 
E. L. F. Timble, Postmaster. 



MARCY, 

A post office of Franklin county. 
Harrell Lemme, Postmaster. 



MARENGO, 

A flourishing post village of McHenry county, 
on the line of the Galena and Chicago Union 
railroad, 66 miles west-north-west from the 
latter place. The place has within the last 
few years increased very rapidly, and is one 
of the most prominent points on the line of 
the road. There is a fine school located here, 
called the Marengo Collegiate Institute, lo- 
cated under the direction of the Presbytery 
of Chicago, having a liberal supply of pro- 
fessors and teachers. 

Richard Bishop, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bagley J. H. & Co., nurserymen. 

Barnes & Schilling, baking. 

Bogenreif & Parker, blacksmithiDg. 

Buck H. A., physician. 

Bulard J. H. & Son, watches and jewelrv. 

BURNSIDE EDWARD, proprietor Marengo 

Journal. 
Clark W. H. H., family supplies. 
Coon & Rogers, attorneys at law. 
Deitz Jacob, steam saw mill. 
Dow & Jackson, watches, jewelry, etc. 
Edwards J. 0., dry goods, etc. 
Green J. W., physician and surgeon. 
HART EDWARD P., DRY GOODS AND 

GROCERIES. 
Henry P., dentist. 

Hooker & Cline, wagons and agricultural im- 
plements. 
Hyde S. P., storage and commission. 
Jenks S., drugs, books and stationery. 
LANG WORTHY A. C, AGENT FOR 

BURK'S PATENT FENCE WIRE. 
Lansing & Sherry, bankers and insurance 

agents. 
Mansfield A. G., stoves and hardware. 
MARENGO JOURNAL, Edward Burnside, 

proprietor. 
Means James, architect and builder. 
Parker & Patrick, furniture. 
PARTRIDGE & PULLEN, DRY GOODS, 

BOOTS & SHOES, ETC. 
PATRICK R. M., DRUGS, PAINTS, OILS, 

FTC 
PAYNTEE S. M., ATTORNEY AND 

COUNSELOR, AND REAL ESTATE 

AGENT. 
Richardson I. H., phvsician and surgeon. 
ROGERS 0. S., MARBLE WORKER. 
Rogers, Woodard & Glass, nurserymen. 
Safford F. & N. S.*dry goods, clothing, etc. 
Simons A. G., lumber, doors, sash and blinds. 
Skinner H. G., surveyor. 
Skinner E. H, proprietor Woodbine nursery. 
SMITH WILLIAM T., dry goods, etc 
SPENCER HOUSE, A. & C. M. BROUGH- 

TON, PROPRIETORS. 
SPENCER L. D. & SON, LUMBER, SASH, 

DOORS AND BLINDS. 
Sullivan M., painter. 
Tyler James A., architect and builder. 



138 



G. W. II AWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Vail E. P. & E. J., dry goods and groceries. 
Wells W. C, daguerreian artist. 



MARGARETTA, 



A post village of Clarke county, in the north 
centre part, 110 miles east by south from 
Springfield. 

Wm. B. Marrs, Postmaster. 



MARIETTA, 



A post village in the west central part of 
Fulton county, about 14 miles south-west 
from Lewiston, the county seat. 
Richard Osborn, Postmaster. 



MARINE, 



Apost village of Madison county, about 22 
miles east by south from Albion. " 
John Ellison, Postmaster. 



MARVIN COUNTY, 

Is situated in the south central part of the 
state, and has an area of 530 square miles. 
It is drained by the Skillet fork of Little 
Wabash river, and by Crooked and other 
creeks. The county includes a portion of 
the Grand Prairie, and is partly covered with 
forest. The general surface is undulating; 
the soil excellent. Corn, wheat, oats, pota- 
toes and fine fruit flourish, and the prairies 
afford excellent pasturing for cattle. Castor 
beans are cultivated to some considerable ex- 
tent. It contains several churches, and has 
over 1,000 pupils attending public schools. 
Both the main line and the Chicago branch 
of the Illinois Central railroad, and also the 
Ohio and Mississippi railroad traverse the 
county. Capital, Salem. Population, about 
9,000. 



MARION, 

A thriving post village, capital of Williamson 
county, near the central part, 172 miles south 
by east from Springfield. It was laid out in 
1839. 
Joseph Hopper, Post/Raster. 



Louden John T., attorney and counselor at 
law. 



MARISSA, 



A post village of St. Clair county, 40 miles 
south-east from St. Louis. 
Wm. WniTE, Postmaster. 



MAROA, 

A post village in the north central part of 
Macon county, on the line of the Illinois 
Central railroad, 13 miles north from Decatur. 
John- Crocker, Postmaster. 



MARSEILLES, 

A post village of La Salle county, on the 
Illinois river and canal, 76 miles by water 
from Chicago. It is a prominent shipping 
point for grain, etc. Coal is found in the 
vicinity. 

Albert Buttep.kield, Postmaster. 



MARSHALL COUNTY, 

Is situated in the north central part of the 
state, and has an area of 443 square miles. 
It is intersected by the Illinois river (navi- 
gable by steamboats), and also drained by 
Sand and Crow creeks. The surface is nearly 
level, and is diversified by prairies and wood- 
lands. The soil is fertile. Corn, wheat, oats, 
hay and potatoes are the staples. It con- 
tains a large number of very fine churches, 
several newspaper offices, and has over 1,500 
pupils attending public schools. The town 
of Henry, in this county boasts of having 
several of the best schools and institutions 
of learning in the state, all of which are in a 
most flourishing condition. Among them 
are the North Illinois Institute, under charge 
of Professor G. B. McElroy and M. B. Gatf, 
formerly of Madison College, Penn., assisted 
by Miss E. A. Perley, a graduate of the 
Graham Female Seminary, Me. The college 
building used by the Institute is a large three 
story brick edifice, and contains a well se- 
lected library of over two thousand volumes, 
with apparatus for illustrations in astronomy, 
mathematics, philosophy, etc. In the same 
town is the Henry Female Seminary, an old 
and popular institution, under the supervision 
of the Kev. H. G. Pendleton, assisted by an 
efficient corps of teachers. The county is 
partly underlaid with stone coal. Capital, 
Lacon. Population, about 11,500. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Probate Judge, G. L. Fort. 
County Clerk, Washington E. Cook. 
Circuit Clerk, James Wescott. 
Deputy Clerk of County Court, D. G. War- 
ren. 
Sheriff, H. S. Crane. 
County Treasurer, Samuel Maxwell. 
Surveyor, M. McStimson. 
School Commissioner, James Miller. 



MARSHALL, 

A post village, capital of Clark county, on 
the line of the Atlantic and Mississippi rail- 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



139 



road, 130 miles east-south-east from Spring- 
field. 

Tnos. J. Starr, Postmaster. 



MARTHA FURNACE, 

A post village of Hardin county, near the 
eastern part, 5 miles from the Ohio river. 
Edward Shaw, Postmaster. 



MARTINSBURG, 

A village of Iroquois county, on the Chicago 
branch of the Illinois Central railroad, 8 
miles north from Middleport. It is situated 
in the midst of a rolling, rich, healthy, and 
beautiful prairie. 



Martin & Becket, dry goods, groceries, etc. 



MARTINSBURGH, 

A post village of Pike county, about 5 miles 
east from the Mississippi river. 
Wm. M. Gooden, Postmaster. 



MARTINSVILLE, 

A post village of Clark county, on the line 
of the Atlantic and Mississippi railroad, 84 
miles east by north from Yandalia. 
Geo. W. Hollixgshead, Postmaster. 



MASCOUTAH, 

A post village of St. Clair county, near Silver 
creek, a branch of Kaskaskia river, 25 miles 
east-south-east from St. Louis. It contains 
several churches and a large steam flouring 
mill. 

Julius Seeve, Postmaster. 



MASON COUNTY 



Is situated in the west central part of the 
state, and has an area of 540 square miles. 
The Illinois and Sangamon rivers form its 
boundaries in the north, west and south, and 
unite at its western extremity. The surface 
is generally level and liable to submersion at 
extraordinary high stages of water.; the soil 
is very productive. Corn, wheat, oats, pota- 
toes and pork are the staples. It contains 
several churches and has about 600 pupils 
attending public schools. Stone coal is found 
in the county in great abundance. The Illi- 
nois river furnishes an easy access to the 
northern and southern markets. Capital, 
Bath. Population, about 9,000. 



MASSAC COUNTY 

One of the smallest counties of the state, is 
situated on the extreme south-eastern part, 
and has an area of about 240 square miles. 
The Ohio river forms the southern boundary, 
and it is drained by several small creeks 
which take their rise in the county and flow 
southward into ' the Ohio. The surface is 
partly covered with forests; the soil of the 
river" bottoms is fertile. Corn, oats, cattle 
and pork are the staples. The county con- 
tains several churches and has a liberal nuui- 4 
ber of pupils attending public schools. Sev- 
eral railroads are proposed to intersect the 
county, among which are the Vincennes and 
Paducah, Belleville and Murphreysboro, and 
Massac and Sangamon lines. Capital, Me- 
tropolitan City. Population, 7,800. 



MATT00N, 

A post village of Coles county, at the in- 
tersection of the Illinois Central (Chicago 
branch) and the Terre Haute, Alton and St. 
Louis railroad, 172 miles from Chicago and 
130 miles from St. Louis. During the last 
year over one hundred and fifty houses have 
been built, here ; among them is a large brick 
church (Methodist), a fine hotel, and a very 
large business house. A male and female 
academy is located here under judicious 
management. Population, 1,200. 
David J. Connolly, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades. Etc 

ALLISON J. L., real estate agent. 

Casto W. E., clothing. 

Connolly D. J., dry goods etc. 

Connolly D. J. postmaster. 

CUNNINGHAM J. R., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

DORA J. W. & F. B., physicians and sur- 
geons. 

Dordu & Wortham, dry goods, etc. 

Tallin H. & Co., marble factory. 

Ferguson E. M., daguerreian artist. 

FORLINE & BRO., DRY GOODS, HARD- 
WARE AND VARIETIES. 

FRANCIS E., DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 
ETC 

HARRIS OLIVER P., ATTORNEY AT 
LAW AND COLLECTING AGENT. 

Hickcock J. H., dry goods, queenswarc, etc. 

Hirsh S., clothing. 

HOUGHTON R. W., PUBLISHER OF 
" MATTOON NATIONAL GAZETTE." 

JENNINGS J. & CO., grain, flour, salt, etc. 

Knickerbocker P. J., sash, doors and blinds. 

McFadden R. H., furniture. 

Mills & Duncan, dry goods. 

Monroe & Co., dry goods, etc. 

Morris W. E., physician. 

Norvell F. A., saddles and harness. 

Pennsylvania House, Thomas McKee. 



140 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



PICKFORD JOHN, WATCHES, JEWEL- 
RY, ETC. 

Pile & Chapman, drugs and medicines. 

Riely Andrew, groceries. 

Simms H., drugs and medicines. 

True E. W. & J. M., general merchandise. 

True L. W., dry goods. 

VANDEYORT HOUSE, SMITH & VANDE- 
YORT, PROPRIETORS. - 

Wood R,, groceries. 

WOOLCOTT H. E., stoves and tinware. 

WOOLLEY J. H., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Woolley J. II., groceries and confectionery. 



MAULDING'S MILLS, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
John F. S. Hopkins, Postmaster. 



MAY HILL, 



A post office of Lee county. 

Stephen Richardson, .Postmaster. 



MAYSVILLE, 

A post village of Clay county, on the border 
of Twelve Mile prairie, and on the line of the 
Ohio and Mississippi railroad, near the Little 
Wabash river, 122 miles south-east from 
Springfield. Was formerly the county seat. 
Daniel L. McCawley, Postmaster." 



MAZON, 

A post village of Grundy county, on Mazon 
river, about 12 miles south from" Morris, the 
county seat. 

Hiram Fuller, Postmaster. 



MECHANICSBUKG, 

A post village of Sangamon county, 15 miles 
east from Springfield. It is located on the 
line of the Great Western railroad, and is a 
thriving place. 

Morris Bird, Postmaster. 



MEDINA, 



A post village of Winnebago county, in the 
north-western part, about 100 miles north- 
west by north from Chicago. 
Samuel Pillsbury, Postmaster. 



MELROSE, 



A post village of Clark county, in the south 
central part, about 6 miles west from the 
Wabash river. 
David J. Riffe, Postmaster. 



MENARD COUNTY 

Is situated in the west central part of the 
state, and has an area of 300 square miles. 
The Sangamon river flows through the coun- 
ty from south to north, and afterward forms 
part of its northern boundary. Salt creek 
also flows along the northern "border, until it 
enters that river. The surface is level, and 
the soil productive. Corn, wheat, oats and 
pork, are the staples. It contains about 20 
churches, and has over 800 pupils attending 
public schools. Named in honor of Pierre 
Menard, a distinguished French pioneer. 
Capital, Petersburg. Population, 10,500. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, C. J. F. Clark. 
Associate Justices, D. J. Hutcherson, Rob- 
ert Clary. 

County Clerk, Cornelius Rourke. 

Circuit Clerk, A. K. Riggin. 

Coroner, F. G. Davis. 

Sheriff, J. B. Goldsby. 

Assessor and Treasurer, John Tice. 

School Commissioner, J. H. Pillsbury. 

Surveyor, W. F. West. 



MEND0N, 

A post village of Adams county, in the north- 
west part, about 5 miles west from the Quin- 
cy railroad. 
John L. Arnold, Postmaster. 



MEND0TA 



Is a thriving place in the north-west corner 
of La Salle county, on the line of the Chica- 
go, Burlington and Quincy railroad, at the 
point where that road forms a junction with 
the Illinois Central, 22 miles north-west from 
Ottawa, the county seat, and 16 miles north 
from La Salle. The town is built near the 
centre of a rich rolling prairie having a 
healthy climate, good water, and an abun- 
dant supply of wood and coal, and surround- 
ed by beautiful groves of wood and tim- 
ber. The soil is excellent. It was not 
laid out until 1853, though settled at an 
earlier day. As a seat of learning Mendota 
takes a most decided preeminance over any 
town of its size in the state, having two 
colleges and numerous public and private 
schools. The college buildings are fine brick 
structures, and have extensive grounds con- 
nected with them, donated by prominent 
men of the place. There are also four 
churches in the town. Manufacturing is 
carried on to a considerable extent, the most 
prominent establishment being the city flour- 
ing mills, said to be the finest in the state, 
and capable of turning out 1,200 barrels of 
flour per week. Besides this there is a large 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



141 



machine shop, five blacksmith shops, an exten- 
sive sash, door and blind factory, etc. Two 
weekly papers are published here, the Men- 
dota Press and the Mendota Express (Ger- 
man). Connected with the railroad depot is 
a fine hotel. 

Beside the railroad already completed two 
or three others are being built which will 
add materially to the business and interests of 
the town. 

E. S. Mudgett, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ANDREWS & CHAMBERS, STOVES, 

SHEET IRON, ETC. 
ARICK & ANDERSON, GRAIN AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 
August & Thanhouser, cPothing. 
AMGTJSTINE & BRO., DRY GOODS, 

HARDWARE. 
Ballou E. M., surgeon. 
Beecher George, shoemaker. 
Bassett A. B., artist. 
Bettendorf M., grocer. 
Berustein S. & Bro. 
Best J. E., lumber dealer. 
Birming J., baker. 

BLACKSTONE & PENTAN, PROPRIE- 
TORS OF THE CITY MILLS AND 

PRODUCE MERCHANTS. 
BLANCHARD G. L., STATIONERY. 
Boeddger F., tobacco and cigars. 
Burt & Treat, groceries. 
CHARLES OTTO, JEWELLER. 
CHURCH & HOUGHTON, DRUGGISTS. 
CLARK H. L. LUMBER DEALER. 
Cook E. P., physician. 
Collett & Buckhart, cabinet ware. 
Crooker J. C, notary public. 
DLEBIN J. W., CLOTHING, BOOTS 

AND SHOES. 
Dana S. E., agent C. B. & Q. R. R. 
Dawson James, tinsmith. 
Dawson R. N., stoves, etc. 
DIESTERWEG & COPFER, DRY GOODS 

AND HARDWARE. 
DODGE D. A. & CO., grocers. 
Dodt F., gunsmith. 

EDWARDS & SHIPLEY, BLACKSMITHS. 
Edwards F. II., physician. 
Farnburg Solomon, clothing store. 
Folty J. P., dentist. 
Frank D., dry goods and clothing. 
FREEMAN WILLIAM, BAKERY. 
FRENCH E. C, JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE AND NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Fuller S., dealer in produce. 
Gillman J. B., notary public. 
Gross Robert, watchmaker and jeweller. 
HASTING, ADAMS & CO., DRY GOODS. 
Hay George P., merchant tailor. 
Higgins C. M., boots and shoes. 
HOWARD M. F., FORWARDING AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANT. 
Humiston S. D. & L. S., dry goods. 



HELSEY L., LAND AND COLLECTING 
AGENT. 

JOHNSTON C. H., DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
ETC. 

KENWORTHY J., WAGON AND CAR- 
RIAGE MAKER. 

LAMB G. H., PROPRIETOR OF LAMB'S 
HOTEL. 

LONGTON GEO., BUTCHER. 

McFARLAND J. B., LAND AGENT. 

Martin M. A., milliner. 

MOORE S. M., LAND AGENT. 

MORRISON S., LUMBER, LATH, SHIN- 
GLES, ETC. 

Mudgett E. S., attorney at law and postmas- 
ter. 

Mekles Mower, baker. 



Y 



J. ABLE, PROPRIETOR. 



This House has just been enlarged and 
furnished anew at a coet of $35,000. The 
accommodation is not to be surpassed west 
of New York City. 



Porter P. L., deputy sheriff. 

Pilkington & Co., druggists. 

PORTER P. L., DEPUTY SHERIFF. 

POST II. J., HARNESS MANUFAC- 
TURER. 

PRESTON W. P., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

Pryce J. II., boot and shoe maker. 

REED JACOB, PROPRIETOR OF REED'S 
HOTEL. 

RUSH C. H., JEWELER. 

Scott & Co., dry goods, boots, shoes, etc. 

Smith & Clyne, harness makers. 

Smith S. J., druggist. 

Stinton S. B., attorney at law. 

Stone & Latham, groceries. 

TANKER J. M., DRY GOODS MER- 
CHANT. 

Waldo E. Y., bookseller and stationery. 

WARSTEY JOSEPH, FARMER. 

WEST SAMUEL, LUMBER DEALER. 

Wheeler G. A., groceries. 

WILKNART CHARLES, harness maker. 

Wilson Thomas, provision dealer. 

WELTEON & CO., COAL, LIME AND 
SALT MERCHANTS. 

Winans & Stratton, undertakers. 

Winchester H. F., general dealers. 

WINLESS JOHN, AUCTION AND COM- 
MISSION MERCHANT. 



142 



Q. W. HATVES ILLINOIS STATE 



MERCER COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-north-west part of the 
state, bordering on Iowa, and has an area of 
500 square miles. The Mississippi river 
forms its boundary on the west and it is in- 
tersected by Edward's and Pape's creeks. 
The surface is moderately uneven, and the 
soil good. A great portion of the county 
consists of prairie land. Corn, wheat, oats, 
potatoes and pork are the staples. It con- 
tains a number of churches, two newspaper 
offices, and has about 800 pupils attending 
public schools. The county is underlaid 
with beds of stone coal. The county seat 
was formerly at Keithsbury. Capital, Aledo. 
Population, about 12,500. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, J. M. Matlock. 
County Clerk, John Ramsey. 
Circuit Clerk, Harvey S. Senter. 
Coroner, Charles Hall. 
Sheriff, Benijah Lloyd, Jr. 
Treasurer, N. Bassett. 
Surveyor, C. S. Richey 
School Commissioner, J. E. Harroun. 



MERCIA, 



A post office of Rook Island county. 
James J. Stansell, Postmaster. 



MEREDOSIA, 



A post village of Morgan county, on the Illi- 
nois river, about 55 miles west from Spring- 
field. It has a steamboat landing and does 
a considerable amonnt of shipping business. 
John Waliiian, Postmaster. 



MERONA, 

A post village of McHenry county, 50 miles 
north-west from Chicago. 

James R. Mack, Postmaster. 



METAM0RE, 

A post village of Woodford county, about 
80 miles north by east from Springfield. 
Moses P. Page, Postmaster. 



METROPOLIS CITY, 

A post village, capital of Massac county, on 
the Ohio river, 36 miles from its mouth and 
214 miles south by east from Springfield. 

Aaron B. Browne, Postmaster. 



MIDDLE E0RK, 

A vilage of Vermilion countv. 



MIDDLE GROVE, 

A post village in the northern central part of 
Fulton county. 

Timothy W. Morse, Postmaster. 



MIDDLEP0RT, 

A thriving post village, capital of Iroquois 
county, on the Iroquois river, at the junction 
of Sugar creek, 150 miles east-north-east from 
Springfield and about 90 south from Chicago, 
It contains a court house and several stores, 
and is a place of considerable business. Pop- 
ulation, about 2,400. 

Daniel B. Gardner, Postmaster. 



M. & B., DRUGS, MEDI- 
STATIONERY, JEWELRY, 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

American House, Snyder & Lyman, pro- 
prietors. 

ASPINWALL MISS M. M., PRECEPTRESS 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

Banner Lodge (Good Templers), King's build- 
ings. 

BARNCM B. F., CABINET MAKER AND 
UNDERTAKER, 

Blades F., physician and surgeon. 

BOVIE STEPHEN G., attorney at law. 

Bryant H. G, insurance agent. 

FREES WM., HARDWARE, IRON, ETC. 

Harwood E. C, painter and paper hanger. 

HAMMOND E. M., JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

HARWOOD 
CINES, 
ETC. 

Hogle II. W., wagon, carriage and plow man- 
factury. 

Iroquois Lodge (Masons), court house. 

IROQUOIS REPUBLICAN, Robertson and 
Stewart, proprietors. 

Joiner G. B., attorney at law and solicitor in 
chancery. 

Knight & Wright, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

McNeill c. f., justice of the 
peace, land and insurance 

AGENT. 

Widdleport Lodge No. 74, 1. O. O. F., Hogle's 
block. 

Rider Geo. W., Principal of high school. 

ROBERTSON & STEWARD, publishers of 
Iroquois Republican, 

SHEFFIELD E. R., DRUGGIST, PHYSI- 
CIAN AND SURGEON. 

Tupper E., physician and surgeon. 

Walser G. H, attorney at law and solicitor in 
chancery 

WILSON HOUSE, H. O. HENRY, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



143 



MIDDLETOWN, 

A post village of Logan county, on Salt creek, 
22 miles north from Springfield. 
Colby Knapp, Postmaster. 



MIDDLETOWtf, 

A post village of McDonough county, on a 
branch of Crooked creek, an affluent of the 
Illinois river, 10 miles south-south-west from 
Macomb, the county seat. The name of the 
post office is Young. 

John Patrick, Postmaster. 



MIDWAY, 

A post office of Fulton county. 
Robert W. Combes, Postmaster. 



MIER, 

A post office of Wabash county. 
Garriel S. Goldsburg, Postmaster. 



MILES' STATION, 



A post office of Macoupin county. 
Jonathan E. Miles, Postmaster. 



MILFORD, 

A post village of Iroquois county, on Sugar 
creek, about 140 miles east-north-east from 
Springfield, and about 105 miles south from 
Chicago. 
William Gray, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 
Fullinwider & Hogles, druggists. 
Fullinwider J, V., physician and surgeon. 
Hogle L. M.. drugs, medicines, etc. 
Pruit John R., dry goods, etc. 



MILLBTJRff, 



A post village of Lake county in the north- 
ern part. 

John Thayer, Postmaster. 



MILL CREEK, 



A post office of Rock Island county. 
John W. Haynes, Postmaster. 



MILLEDGEVILLE, 

A post village of Carroll county, about 50 
miles south-east from Galena. 
William E. Winters, Postmaster. 



MILLERSBURGH, 

A post village of Mercer county 156 miles 
north west from Springfield. Until 1849 
this was the county seat. 

Hiram W. Thornton, Postmaster. 



MILL GROVE, 

A post office of Stephenson county. 
Charles Watfrman, Postmaster. 



. MILL'S PRAIRIE, 

A post village in the northwestern part of 
Edwards county. 

Thomas Wilkinson, Postmaster. 



MILLSTADT, 

A post village of St. Clair county, on the road 
from Belleville to Waterloo, about 20 miles 
south-east from St. Louis. 

Francis M. Faas, Postmaster. 



MILLVILLE, 



A post village of Jo Daviess county, 21 miles 
east from Galena and about 5 miles south of 
the line of the Illinois central railroad. 
William M. Dorn, Postmaster. 



MILO, 

A post office of Bureau county. 
Isaac Sutherland, Postmaster. 



MILROY, 

A post office of Knox county. 
Thomas Williams, Postmaster. 



MILTON, 

A post village of Pike county, near the Illi- 
nois river. 

Abraham H. Selders, Postmaster. 



MILTON, 

A thriving village of Brown county, in the 
south-eastern part, on McKee's creek, an af- 
fluent of Illinois river. 



MINOTJK, 

A thriving post village of Woodford county, 
on the Illinois Central railroad, 186 miles 
from St. Louis. A railroad station was es- 
tablished here in 1854, and the town laid out 



144 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



by David A. Neale, of Salem, Mass. Owing 
to the salubrity of the climate, the near ac- 
cess to and cheapness of coal, and the lib- 
erality of the railroad land department, this 
section is rapidly filling up with hardy set- 
tlers. The prairie here will vie with any in 
the state for fertility and depth of soil. Sev- 
enty-five thousand bushels of wheat and a 
large quantity of broom-corn were shipped 
from here last season. The village contains 
a neat substantial house for schools and pub- 
lic worship, one hotel, three dry good stores, 
one drug store, one grocery, one boot and 
shoe store, one saddle and harness shop, one 
blacksmith shop, four warehouses, two lum- 
ber yards, and about forty private dwellings. 
Station houses and a large steam flouring 
mill are to be erected the coming season, the 
latter being already half completed. Popu- 
lation, 260. 

Charles Dobsox, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc, 

Christio & Irvine, blacksmiths. 

Dobson 0., dry goods and groceries. 

FERRY A. D., MANUFACTURER OF 
BROOMS AND DEALER IN BROOM 
CORN". 

Foote G, M., boot and shoemaker. 

Garrison J. B., physician. 

Goodrich C. W., lumber, flour, salt, etc. 

Ledge wood Carrithers, dry goods and gro- 
ceries, 

Macy Jonathan, proprietor Minouk House. 

Mitchell T., physician. 

Payne A. L., dry goods and groceries. 

Reeder T. B. & J. H., dry goods and groce- 
ries. 

Reedy L. G., forwarding and commission 
merchant. 

Work Samuel, station and land agent. 



MINOOKA, 

Is a thriving village of Grundy county, in the 
extreme north- eastern corner, on the line of 
the Chicago and Rock Island railroad, 51 
miles south-west from Chicago. 
Christopher Tucker, Postmaster. 



MISSION" POINT, 

A post villlage of La Salle county, in the 
north-eastern part. 

Ebenezer Nefe, Postmaster. 



MODE, 

A post office of Shelby county. 
Elisha Robt, Postmaster. 



MOKENA, 

A post village of Will county, on the line of 
the Chicago and Rock Island railroad 29 
miles south-east from Chicago. 

Silas Grenell, Postmaster. 



MOLINE, 

Is a thriving post village of Rock Island 
county, on the line of the Chicago and Rock 
Island railroad, 179 miles south of west from 
Chicago, and on the Mississippi river at the 
point where the railroad first touches it. Its 
commercial advantages are very superior, 
but it is celebrated chiefly as a manufactur- 
ing town, and has already gained the title of 
the "Lowell of the West." The river at this 
point is divided by an island, three miles 
long, and from sixteen mile3 above to three 
below the town extend the " Upper Rapids," 
as they are called. A dam has been built 
across from the Illinois shore to the head of 
the island, thus affording one of the very 
best water powers in the whole western 
country. A stock company has been formed 
with a view to turn this power to account. 
Prominent among other manufacturing estab- 
lishments is Deare's Plow manufactory. A 
large number of other manufactories and 
mills are in successful operation, and exten- 
sive improvements are continually going for- 
ward. Only a few miles distant are large 
coal fields, which will eventually become a 
source of revenue. The inhabitants are prin- 
cipally from the east, and the town is noted 
for its morality and good society. There are 
here five religious societies and a literary 
association, all in a flourishing condition. 
There is also a school building, erected in 
1856, at an expense of $12,000, the school 
now occupying it numbers about 500 stu- 
dents, and has an able corps of teachers. 
A weekly paper is published here, called the 
Independent, which has attained a wide circu- 
lation. Beside other business houses there 
are two banking houses here. The future of 
Moline is destined to be one of unprecedented 
importance as a manufacturing town, the 
enterprise of its inhabitants being a sure 
guarantee. Population, 3,000. 

Absalom B. Williams, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ABBOTT H. L., duguerreian artist. 

Baker F., homeopathic physician and sur- 
geon. 

Battis J. W., groceries. 

BERLIGHEMER SAMPSON, clothing. 

Candee & Swan, chain pumps and fixtures. 

Chamberlain & Dean, lumber. 

CHAMBERLAIN A. F., drugs, medicines 
and groceries. 

CHAPMAN JAMES, law, collecting and in- 
surance office. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



145 



Darling & Edwards, wagon makers and black- 
smiths. 

DEERE JOHN & CO., MANUFACTURERS 
OF PLOWS, CULTIVATORS AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

GENERALLY. 

Dimock & Gould, tub and pail manufacturers. 

Dunn & Mansur, builders, hardware, etc. 

Erbst & Geisler, groceries, provisions, etc. 

Ericson & Nelson, groceries. 

Estes J. M., blacksmith. 

FORD H. C, police magistrate. 

Gunnell L. & Co., groceries and provisions. 

Geiger Thomas, barber. 

GOULD, DIMOCK & CO., exchange and 
banking. 

Gould D. W, insurence agent. 

Gould J. M., Postmaster. 

GRAHAM & WEBSTER, JOB PRINTERS 
AND PUBLISHERS OF " MOLINE 
INDEPENDENT." 

Graham & Webster, attorneys and counselors, 
real estate and collecting agents. 

GRAHAM R. H., NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Heald Wm. & Co., iron founders and machin- 
ists. 

Hitchcock Calvin, manufacturers and dealers 
in boots and shoes. 

HODGES S. P. & CO., stoves, tin, sheet 
iron and copper ware. 

Hume S. T., physician and surgeon. 

Island House, M. J. Taylor, proprietor. 

Jones Daniel, forwarding and shipping. 

Keator & Skinner, steam saw-mills. 

McAllister W. A., St. Nicholas saloon. 

McConnel S. M., harness and saddles. 

McCullough R. & Co., chair makers. 

MAPES E.. JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

Marshall & Drury, bankers. 

Moline House, E. S. Waterman, proprietor. 

Moline Paper Mills, S. W. Wheelock, pro- 
prietor. 

Morrison R., eclectic phvsician and surgeon. 

MORTON & WEINEL," stoves and tinware. 

Nourse Horatio G., fanning mills, etc. 

NOURSE WM. A., hot air furnaces, stoves 
and tinware. 

O'KERBERG ERICK, watches and jewelry. 

Osborn P., wagon gear and barrell heading. 

PERSHING H. H, MEAT MARKET. 

Pitts, Gilbert & Pitts, lumber. 

Proudfoot Mrs., millinery. 

Rank C. & Bro., boots and shoes. 

Richards & Thomas, druggists, booksellers 
and stationers. 

Salter H. F., physician and surgoon. 

Sears, Wood & Co., lumber, and bedstead 
factory. 

Shaw, A. & T., merchants. 

SHAW & REED, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Shaw Jacob & Co., dry goods and groceries. 

Sibley S. A., eclectic physician and surgeon. 

Sickles H. F. & Bro., merchant millers. 

SMITH HENRY L., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNCELOR AT LAW, SOLICITOR 
IN CHANCERY, REAL ESTATE 
AND COLLECTING AGENT. 

10 



Smith J. S. , merchant tailor. 

South Geo., jeweller. 

Stanley Chas. S., job carpenter. 

Toundiow & Murfin, bakers and grocers. 

Wagner George, baker. 

White S. II., lumber. 



MOMENCE, 

A post village of Kankakee county, on Kan- 
kakee river, about 50 miles south from Chi- 
cago. 

Geo. W. Vankirk, Postmaster. 



Kankakee Valley House, Seth Wells, pro- 
prietor. 



MONEE, 

A thriving village of Will county on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad (Chicago 
branch), 34 miles south from Chicago. The 
land here is the highest on the line of the 
road, being twenty-two feet above the level 
of Lake Michigan, and five hundred and 
seventeen feet above low water in the Ohio 
river at Cairo. The soil is particularly 
adapted for grass, vegetables and oats. 
John A. Schaffer, Postmaster. 



MONMOUTH, 

A post village, capital of Warren county, on 
the line of the Chicago and Burlington rail- 
road, 184 miles south-west from Chicago. It 
is situated in a rich and beautiful prairie, 
under good cultivation, and is a place of con- 
siderable business. It became the county 
seat in 1831. A newspaper called the Mon- 
mouth Atlas is published here. Population, 
about 900. 
Thos. H. Davidson, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adduddell R. G., physician and surgeon. 

Allen, N. V. & M., lumber. 

ALLRED MRS., millinery and fancy goods. 

Armsby & Bro., groceries, furniture, etc. 

Babcock E. C, insurance agent. 

BABCOCK GEO, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC. 

Barck Professor, teacher of music. 

Carr & Quimby, groceries and furniture. 

Chinn Talbert, proprietor of flouring mills. 

CLARK JOHN S., publisher and editor of 
Monmouth Atlas. 

Cleland and Woods, dentists. 

Collins & Son, hardware. 

Collins J. W. & Son, stoves. 

Cunningham J. D., physician and surgeon. 

Davis & Reed, carpenters and builders. 

Earp N. P., auctioneer. 



146 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Elliot V. F., dentist. 

Eagwall E., boot and shoe maker. 

GILBERT & FRYMIRE, DRY GOODS, 
ETC 

GRAHAM WILLIAM, BOOKS AND STA- 
TIONERY. 

Harding & Reed, attorneys at law. 

Henry Geo. W., wagon and carriage factory. 

Henry II. F. & Co., lumber. 

HOENADEL F., CABINET MAKER. 

HOLLOWAY & LUCE, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

JAMISON & McKAMY, STORAGE AND 
COMMISSION. 

KIRKPATRICK A. G., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

Lanphear N., homeopathic physician. 

McCartney J. B., physician and surgeon. 

McDill David, physician and surgeon. 

Madden James G., attorney and counselor at 
law. 

MONMOUTH ATLAS, John S. Clark, pro- 
prietor. 

MORGAN JOHN T., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW AND NOTARY 
PUBLIC. 

Overstreet J. M., physician and surgeon. 

Page & Hubbard, produce and stock dealers. 

Parker & Seiberg, soap and candle manu- 
facturers. 

ROBISON H. C. & BRO., CARPENTERS 
AND BUILDERS, AND DEALERS 
IN SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS, 
ETC. 

Scott E. S., groceries and provisions. 

Scott James W., coal dealer. 

Simpson, Grott & Co., groceries and con- 
fectionery, etc. 

Smith W. F., druggist, land agent, and 
notary puplic. 

SPRIGGS J. S., DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC. 

TARBELL J. & CO., AGENT BURKE'S 
PATENT FENCE WIRE. 

THOMPSON J P., WATCHES AND JEW- 
ELRY. 

Thompson W. J., ambrotypist. 

Van Hinkle & Sheldon, grain dealers. 

Wallace D. A., president of Monmouth Col- 
lege. 

Wallace E. E. & Co., stoves and tinware. 

Ward Thos. J., stoves, furniture and tin- 
ware. 

Woods Geo. D., physician and surgeon. 

WRIGHT WARREN, MERCHANT TAI- 
LOR. 



MONROE COUNTY 

Is situated in the south west part of the state, 
bordering on Missouri, and has an area of 300 
square miles. The Mississippi river forms 
the boundary on the west and south-west; 
the county is also drained by Prairie and 
Eagle creeks. The surface is hilly in the 
west part and nearly level in the east. The 



soil is mostly fertile. Corn, wheat, oats, cat- 
tle and pork are the staples. It contains 
about twenty churches, and has over 1000 
pupils attending public schools. Limestone 
suitable for building purposes is found in 
great abundance. Formed in 1820. Capital, 
Waterloo. Population, about 12,500. 



MONROE CITY, 



A post office of Monroe county. 
Michael Dace, Postmaster. 



MONTEREY, 

A post village of Calhoun county, on the 
Illinois river, about 10 miles south from 
Hardin, the county seat. 

Israel L. Ruland, Postmaster. 



M0NTEZITMA, 

A post village of Pike county, on the Illinois 
river, 58 miles west by south from Spring- 
field. It is a landing-place for steamboats. 
Henry A. Sumwalt, Postmaster. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

Is sitnated in the south-west central part 
of the state, and has an area of 690 square 
miles. It is drained by the east and west 
forks of Shoal creek, an affluent of Kaskas- 
kia river. The surface is undulating and 
partially covered with forests. The soil is 
fertile and under good cultivation. Corn, 
wheat, oats and pork are the staples. It 
contains a number of churches, and has 
about 2000 pupils attending public schools. 
It is intersected by the Terre Haute and 
Alton railroad. The valuation of taxable 
property in the county in 1857 was $3,241,941, 
being an increase of -977,589, on that of the 
previous year. Capital, Hillsboro. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Connty Judge, Hiram Roundtree. 

Associate Justices, 1 T ' ' T ' 

' ( Jefferson Lynn. 

County Clerk, John T. Maddux. 

Assessor and Treasurer, Jas. B. McDavid. 

School Commissioner, J. M, King. 

County Surveyer, D. C. McIver. 



MONTGOMERY, 

A post village of Kane county, on the line 
of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy rail- 
road, 45 miles south-west from Chicago. 
The principal buildings are those belonging 
to the railroad company, the depot being 
built of stone. There is also a sash and 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



147 



blind factory, a foundry and machine shop, 
and a large flouring mill. A fine school 
building has been erected which serves as a 
school house and place of worship. Excel- 
lent water power exists here which is being 
improved to good advantage. Population, 
400. 

R. Gray, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
BAKER G. S. & CO., IRON FOUNDRY. 
Brooks Rev. O, clergyman. 
GRAY R. & CO., " PROPRIETORS OF 

MONTGOMERY MILLS. 
Palmer Bros., sash and blind factory. 



M0NTICELL0, 

A thriving city, capital of Piatt county, near 
the north fork of Sangamon river, about 70 
miles east-north-east from Springfield. Laid 
out in 183S. Population, about 750. 
Jonathan C. Johnson, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, J. B. HANKS, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

BAILEY DAVID, DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

CASSELL & WARD, TIN AND SHEET 
IRON WORKERS. 

Coffin H. G., physician and surgeon. 

Cornpropst David, groceries, carriages, etc. 

Gray J. F., watch and clock repairer. 

Hill & Co., grocers, etc. 

HOLLINGSWORTH JAMES H., GENE- 
RAL MERCHANT. 

Hull & Jones, physicians and surgeons. 

Johnson J. C. & Bro., merchants. 

Kalleher D., boots and shoes. 

Morain Samuel, sheriff. 

Matherspaw Win., proprietor of omnibus 
line. 

Outten J. F., land agent. 

Ricketts & Beard, wagon and plow factory. 

Schroeder W. H., mason. 

Shafer P. Cement, lime, etc. 

STERN S. CLOTHING AND FURNISH- 
ING GOODS. 

Tupper Ansel, attorney at law. 

Young Charles, furniture maker. 



MONTICELLO, 

A thriving village of Madison county, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 256 miles from the latter place and 4 
miles from Alton. Monticello Seminary, an 
excellent institution, is situated here. It 
was founded by Benjamin Godfrey, and cost 
originally $53,000. The chief building, erect- 
ed in 1836-7, is a substantial and neat edifice 
of stone, 110 by 44 feet, and three stories high 



over basement. Recently a wing, 60 by 75 
feet, has been added at a cost of $30,000. 
The building has accomodations for 150 pu- 
pils, and the grounds are sixteen acres in 
extent, beautifully laid out. A fine library 
of about 1000 volumes and a cabinet of min- 
erals, etc. are connected with the institution. 
Opened for scholars in 1853. 



MONUMENT, 



A post office of Pike county. 
David Hollis, Postmaster. 



MOORE'S PRAIRIE, 

A post village of Jefferson county. 
Quincy A. Willbanks, Postmaster. 



MORGAN COUNTY 

Is situated on the south-west central part of 
the state, and has an area of 530 square 
miles. It is partly bounded on the west by 
Illinois river and also drained by Apple, 
Sandy, Mauvaisterre and Indian creeks. 
The slope of the county is toward the west, 
the general surface is level. It consists of 
open plains, slightly undulating and inter- 
sperced with small growth of trees. The 
county is one of the most thickly settled and 
highly cultivated in the state. The soil is 
very deep, free from stones and of remarka- 
ble strength and durability. Corn, wheat, 
oats, hay, fruit, cattle and swine are the 
staples. In 1830 this county produced the 
largest amount of corn of any in the state 
except Sangamon. It contains about 50 
churches, several newspaper offices, has 
over 2,000 pupils attending public schools, 
and about 500 attending academies and 
other institutions of learning. Peaches, 
apples and other fruits flourish in this re- 
gion. Stone coal is found in abundance, 
supplying the place of wood as fuel. The 
Osage Orange, for hedges, is cultivated to a 
great extent and stretches for miles across 
the open prairies. The county is intersected 
by the Great Western railroad. A railroad 
is also being built, called the Jacksonville 
and Carrolton road, connecting the Illinois 
river at Peoria with the Mississippi at Alton. 
The state asylums for the deaf and dumb, 
the blind, and the insane are situated in this 
county. Capital, Jacksonville. Population, 
about 22,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Circuit Judge, David M. Woodson. 

County Judge, Joseph J. Cassell. 

. . . T , ( Geo. B. Waller, 
Associate Justices, j Ajidrkw j Th01 [ PS0Ni 

Circuit Clerk, Chas. Hardin. 



148 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



County Clerk, Matthew Stacy. 

Assessor and Treasurer, Wst. G. Johnson. 

Sheriff, Chas. Sample. 

Surveyor, Wm. G. McPherson. 

School Commissioner, Newton Bateman. 



MORLAN'S GROVE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
John Morlan, Postmaster. 



MORRIS, 



A thriving post village, capital of Grundy 
county, on the Illinois and Michigan canal, 
and on the line of the Chicago and Rock 
Island railroad, 62 miles south-west from 
Chicago. It is the principal shipping point 
for Grundy county. Laid out in 1841. Pop- 
ulation (estimated), 1,200. 
George Fisher, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

ANTIS & HORROM, dry goods, groceries, 
etc. 

ATHERTON B. M., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW, JUSTICE 
OF THE PEACE, AND NOTARY 
PUBLIC. 

Barr & Lupton, produce and commission. 

Baugher Oscar, attorney at law and notary 
public. 

BROWN GEORGE F. produce and commis- 
sion. 

BROWN GEORGE F. & CO., lumber. 

Claflin H., hats, caps and furs. 

Comerford C, groceries, provisions, etc. 

CORNELL & DAILY, NURSERYMEN. 

Day Geo. A., groceries, provisions, etc. 

Dodson & Atwater, stoves and hardware. 

Edwards G. W., boots and shoes. 

Field W. B., daguerreian artist. 

FREEMAN J. A. & J. N,, eel. physician and 
surgeon. 

Gibson & Pike, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Gillett & Plimpton, proprietors Hopkins 
House. 

GOOLD C. H. & H. O, LAND AGENTS 
AND EXCHANGE DEALERS. 

Goold C. H., commissioner of deeds and in- 
surance agent. 

Gray Miss, teacher of music. 

Griswold N. R., dentist. 

GRUNDY COUNTY HERALD, C. E. South- 
ard, proprietor. 

HALE & FREEMAN, crockery and glass 
ware. 

Hale L., physician & surgeon. 

Handy Chas., auctioneer. 

Hanna T. B., phvsician and surgeon. 

HARRIS & TURNER, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW AND SOLICITORS IN CHAN- 
CERY. 

Hart P., groceries and provisions. 



HULBURD E. W. & CO., BANKERS. 

Hulburd E. W., insurance agent. 

Hopkins House, Gillett & Plimpton, proprie- 
tors. 

Hyde E. & Co., lumber. 

INGERSOLL C. B. & CO., PLOW AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENT MAN- 
UFACTORY. 

LE ROY DAVID, DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
ETC. 

Longworth & Ridgway, drugs and medicines. 

McQUISTON MILLER & CO., FOUNDRY 
AND MACHINE SHOP. 

Mavo F. C, watches and jewelry. 

MORNING STAR LODGE (GOOD TEM- 
PLARS), HANNA AND LE ROY'S 
BLOCK. 

NEWPORT J. W., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW, AND SO- 
LICITOR IN CHANCERY. 

Parmalee W. H., drugs, medicines, etc. 

Rainey John, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Ray L. B. & Co., dry goods, etc. 

Reading & Hopkins, attorneys and counselors 
at law, and solicitors in chancery. 

SEELEY & SANDFORD, ATTORNEYS 
AT LAW, SOLICITORS IN CHAN- 
CERY, AND COLLECTING AGENTS. 

Sellick Wm., furniture. 

Singer & Stocker, wines and liquors. 

Skinner J., dentist. 

Smeed Geo., brewer. 

SOUTHARD C. E., proprietor Grundy Co. 
Herald. 

Southworth J. P., attorney at law. 

Stanhope Wm., merchant tailor. 

Strible Valentine, boots and shoes. 

Swarthout G. A., auctioneer.* 

WEBBER J. R., STOVES, HARDWARE 
AND CUTLERY. 

Young Joseph, meat market. 



MORRISTOWN, 

A post village of Henry county, in the north- 
west part, near the line of the Chicago and 
Rock Island railroad, about 15 miles south- 
east from the latter place. 

Alex. McNaughtox, Postmaster. 



MASSVILLE, 

A post village of Peoria county, on the Illi- 
nois river and on the line of the Peoria and 
Bureau Valley railroad, 10 miles north from 
Peoria. 

Jacob Bench, Postmaster. 



MOULTONVILLE, 

A post office of Madison county. 
Stephen R. Wetmore, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



149 



MOULTRIE COUNTY 

Is situated in the south-east central part of 
the state and has an area of 320 square miles. 
It is intersected by Kaskaskia river. The 
county consists partly of prairie and partly of 
timbered land, the soil is fertile and adapted 
to corn, grass, etc. It contains a number of 
fine churches, and has over 500 pupils at- 
tending public schools. The Terre Haute 
and Alton railroad passes along the southern 
border. Capital, Sullivan. Population, about 
7,000. 



MOUND CITY 



Is situated in Pulaski county, near the con- 
fluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 
and between the two. Its climate is mild 
and genial. The city has been laid out but 
about two years since, at which time it con- 
tained only three houses, a depot and two 
store houses. It now contains an extensive 
foundry, a ship yard, marine railway, steam 
pottery, planing mill, furniture manufactory 
a steam mill, and other similar establish- 
ments, besides numerous private dwellings 
and business houses, all in successful opera- 
tion. Its situation is peculiarly favorable to 
the building up of a large and flourishing 
city ; on a high bank of the river, at a 
point from which the States of Missouri and 
Kentucky are in full view ; surrounded on 
all sides by lands of unsurpassed fertility 
and forests of valuable timber with sand for 
glass works in its immediate vicinity, on 
Cache river, entering the Ohio just below, 
and sand-stone for building on the railroad 
thirty miles north in inexhaustible quarries. 
Mound city is no less fortunate in local ad- 
vantages than in geographical position. A 
branch of the Illinois Central railroad termi- 
nates here and improvements of no inconsid- 
erable amount are constantly being carried 
forward. This city is also to be the terminus 
of a line of road connecting it with Yincen- 
nes (Ind). Population, about 1,500. 
Moses M. Rawlixgs, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams R. R., painter. 

Bennett & Eddy, painters and glaziers. 

Bugg G. W. & Co., saloon & restaurant. 

Carpenter S., builder. 

CASEY N. R., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

CLOAK & YARGAN, REAL ESTATE 
AGEXTS. 

EMRIE J. R. & CO., REAL ESTATE 
AGEXTS. 

Frazer A., stoves, tin, sheet iron and copper 
ware. 

Given John, carpenter and builder. 

GREGG A., PHYSICIAX. 

Griswold J., insurance agent. 



HAIXER H., PRESIDENT OF EMPO- 
RIUM REAL ESTATE AXD MANU- 
FACTURIXG COMPAXY. 

Hallerberg A. F., saloon. 

Hawkins J. S., plasterer. 

Hildebrand D., saddles and harness. 

Holmes & Wickwire, carpenters and build- 
ers. 

HOWARD H. C, AGEXT FOR SAWYER 
& CO.'S CEMEXT ROOFING. 

Kelly R. P., physician. 

Koons James, constable. 

Lyle & King, brick manufacturers. 

McCormick A. W., justice of the peace. 

McKnight & Co., hardware. 

MAYFIELD & CRIST, dentists. 

Mecharn James, constable. 

Nelson & Co., forwarding and commission. 

Menninger Win., brewery. 

Osborn & Koons, saloon. 

RAWLINGS FRANK M., ATTORNEY AT 
LAW. AND LAXD BROKER. 

Rawlings M. M., postmaster. 

STAPP WM. PHYSICIAX AXD SUR- 
GEON 

Stockton Mrs. A., millinery and dress mak- 
ing. 

Wall James H., carpenter and builder. 

Wetmore X. D., Jr., auction and commission. 

White Edward H., carpenter and builder. 

Younkin & Mayfield, drugs, books and sta- 
tionery. 



MOUNT AUBURN, 

A post village of Christian county, in the 
northern part, about 5 miles south from the 
line of the Great Western railroad. 
Moses Stafford, Postmaster. 



MOUNT CARMEL, 

A post village, capital of Wabash county, on 
the Wabash river, opposite the mouth of 
White river, 160 miles south-east from 
Springfield. It has a beautiful situation and 
possesses fine advantages for manufacturing, 
having a dam across the river about a mile 
above the village producing an inexhaustible 
water power. The climate is healthy and 
its people active and industrious. Popula- 
tion, about 2,000. 

Wm. Arbcthxot, Postmaster. 



MOUNT CARROLL, 

A thriving post village, the capital of Carroil 
county, on Carroll creek, 210 miles north 
from Springfield. The creek furnishes good 
water power, on which is built a large flour- 
ing mill, and other manufacturing establish- 
ments. There is also here a fine seminary, 
under competent management, from which 
are sent out yearly numbers of young men 



150 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



and women as teachers for the schools of 
the west. Two newspaper offices, one Free 
Mason lodge, one lodge of Odd Fellows, and 
an encampment belonging to the same order. 
Geo. W. Harris, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ARMOUR VOLNEY, CLERK OF CIRCUIT 
COURT, AND LAW AND COLLECT- 
ING AGENT. 

Baird John, Empire saloon. 

Bittner H., daguerrcian artist. 

Blake & Stowell, hardware. 

Bohn J. H., insurance agent. 

Boyers, Strickler & Brotherton, pumps. 

Buckley Thomas L. & Co., foundry and ma- 
chine shop. 

Caledonia Encampment, (I. 0. 0. F.,) No. 
43, Rothchilds & Co.'s block. 

Carroll Lodge, (I. 0. 0. F.,) No. 60, Roth- 
childs & Co.'s block. 

CARROLL COUNTY REPUBLICAN, D. B. 
Emrnert, proprietor. 

Chapman & Irvine, dry goods, etc. 

Christian John B., watches and jewelry. 

Cyrus Lodge (Masonic), No. 188, Miller's 
building. 

Dunn & Hollinger, Exchange saloon. 

Eby S. M., eclectic physician. 

EMMERT D. B., publisher and editor of Re- 
publican. 

Emmert John, hardware, groceries, etc. 

Emmert John P., dry goods and groceries. 

ENGLISH GEO., proprietor Home Intelli- 
gencer. 

Fisher & Palmer, boot and shoe makers and 
dealers. 

Franz &Bro., tailors. 

Halderman N., treasurer Mount Carroll Mu- 
tual Manufacturing and Hydraulic Co. 

HALLETT J. & B. H., AGENTS FOR THE 
SALE OF EVANS & ADAMS' CELE- 
BRATED PLOWS. 

HARRIS GEO. W., JUSTICE OF PEACE 
& NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Hollingsworth M. W., lumber. 

HOME INTELLIGENCER, Geo. English, 
publisher. 

HOSTETTER J. L., editor of Republican. 

Hostetter, Reist k Co., bankers and ex- 
change. 

Jacobs & Pettit, dry goods, etc. 

Lichty A. H., drugs, groceries, etc. 

McAFFEE E. M., HOMEOPATHIC PHY- 
SICIAN & SURGEON. 

MANSION HOUSE, A. Price, proprietor. 

Miles Owen P., insurance agent. 

Mills & Hooker, bankers and exchange. 

Miller B. P., drugs, books and stationery. 

Moser & Gluck, blacksmiths. 

Nelson & Bohn, dry goods, etc. 

PATCH B. L., ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR 
AT LAW & SOLICITOR IN CHAN- 
CERY. 

Pierce W. A. J , livery and sale stables. 

Peterbaugh N., dry goods, etc. 



Sping Miss Sabina C, millinery. 

Stouffer D. H., stoves and hardware. 

Weidman D., cabinet warerooms. 

Wherritt & Moore, tailors. 

Wilson C. S. & Co., dry goods, etc. 

WILSON JOHN, ATTORNEY & COUN- 
SELOR, SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY, 
REAL ESSATE & INSURANCE AGT., 
& BROKER. 

York House, Pratt & Bailey, proprietors. 



MOUNT ERIE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 
Andrew Crew, Postmaster. 



MOUNT HA.WKINS, 

A post village of Perry county, about 10 
miles east from Pinckneyville, on the line of 
the Illinois Central railroad. 
John F. Griffith, Postmaster. 



MOUNT HAWLEY, 

A post village of Peoria county, on Kicka- 
poo creek, about 15 miles north-west from 
Peoria. 

Aaron Hawley, Postmaster. 



MOUNT HOPE, 

A post village in the south-west part of Mc- 
Lean county, near the line of the St. Louis, 
Alton and Chicago railroad, about 15 miles 
south-west from Bloomington. 
John Loxgworth, Postmaster. 



MOUNT KINGSTON, 

A village of Montgomery county, in the 
south-west part, about 10 miles south-west 
from Hillsboro, the county seat. 



MOUNT LEBANON, 

A post village of Iroquois county, in the 
north-eastern part. 



Postmaster. 



MOUNT LIBERTY, 

A post office of Marion county. 
Hugh Gibson, Postmaster. 



MOUNT MEACHAM, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
Ahira G. Meacham, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



151 



MOUNT MORRIS, 

A post village of Ogle county, in the town- 
ship of the same name, 177 miles north from 
Springfield, and 6 miles west from Rock 
river. It contains a fine seminary, which is 
in a flourishing condition, and a newspaper 
office. 
Edward Davis, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BARNES MYRON S., proprietor and editor 
of Independent Watchman. 

BRAYTON & BAKER, GENERAL MER- 
CHANTS. 

Cofrman Bros., dry goods. 

Evans E. B., daguerreian artist. 

Funk Peter, livery stable. 

Hellar & Toms, lumber, plows, etc. 

INDEPENDENT WATCHMAN, Myron S. 
Barnes, proprietor. 

Knodle Peter, jr., constable. 

Little E. W., insurance agent. 

Little H. I. & Co., wagon and buggy makers. 

McNeill Francis A., physician and surgeon. 

Newcomer H. F. & A., furniture. 

Nye J. S., stoves and tinware. 

PETRIE & SHEETS, THRESHING MA- 
CHINES. 

Pope A., books and stationery. 

Potter & Webb, dry goods, etc. 

Routzahn D. O, harness shop. 

Ryon H. N., attorney at law and notarv pub- 
lic. 

Stephens Dr., physician. 

Trine S. G., painter. 

WAGNER D. C. & R., livery stable. 



MOUNT PALATINE, 

A post village of Putnam county, is situated 
on the summit of a high rolling prairie, about 
10 miles south of La Salle, and 4 from Toni- 
ca, on the Illinois Central railroad, in the 
midst of an intelligent agricultural popula- 
tion. Judson College, founded by the Bap- 
tists, is situated here. Efforts are being 
made to convert this into an industrial, or 
agricultural, school. 

Aaron Butler, Postmaster. 



MOUNT PLEASANT, 

A post village of Union county, in the east- 
ern central part, a few miles east from the 
Illinois Central railroad. 
Daniel G. Standard, Postmaster. 



MOUNT PROSPECT, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 
Chas. J. Longsdon, Postmaster. 



MOUNT PULASKI, 

A post village of Logan couuty, in the south 
east part, 25 miles east-north-east from 
Springfield. Was formerly the county seat. 
John Clark, Postmaster. 



MOUNT STERLING, 

A post village, capital of Brown county, 77 
miles west by north from Springfield. It is 
pleasantly situated on the border of a fertile 
prairie, and is fast becoming a place of con- 
siderable note. A line of road running 
through this place, and connecting the Quin- 
cy and Great Western roads, is already pro- 
posed, and will probably be built during the 
present year. 

John P. Nye, Postmaster. 



MOUNT SUMNER, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, 155 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. It is 
near the line of the Illinois Central railroad, 
and the centre of the "old diggings," as they 
are called. 

Geo. A. Paige, Postmaster. 



MOUNT VERNON, 

A post village, capital of Jefferson county, 
135 miles south-south-east from Springfield, 
about 300 from Chicago, and 85 from St. 
Louis It contains a fine court house, seve- 
ral churches, and a large number of stores. 
Population, about 1,000. 
Daniel Kinney, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Allen Samuel H , farmer. 
Anderson W. B., lawyer. 
Baity el D., dry goods. 
Boyles & Brother, drv goods. 
CARPENTER IRA G., wagon maker. 
COLMAN & KLINKER, tinners. 
FLY J. J., FURNITURE DEALER. 
FULLER LEVI, JUSTICE OF PEACE. 
GRANT ROBERT H., JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 
HERDMAN & WALTERS, blacksmiths. 
Hill J. H, clergyman. 
JOHNSON JOHN, M. E. CHURCH. 
KENMORE CHARLES, PRESBYTERIAN 

CLERGYMAN. 
LAING S., DRUG STORE. 
Seaton James, clergyman M. E. Church. 
Mills S.O., dry goods. 
Pado & Son, dry goods. 
PACO & TAYLOR, dry goods. 
PACO HARVEY 8., dry goods. 
Paco James M., dry goods. 
Palmer John R., boot and shoe dealer. 
Parker & Stephens, shoe and boot store. 



152 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



POLLOCK S. M., attorney at law. 

Roper M., farmer. 

Seiraore H. W., merchant tailor. 

TANNER & CASEY, LAWYERS. 

Taylor R. M., grocery dealer. 

THATCHER JOHN, CLERGYMAN M. E. 

CHURCH. 
Thorm W. B., dry goods. 
TROMLEY MICHAEL, gunsmith shop. 
WALKER S. W., CLERGYMAN. 
WATSON JOHN A., JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 



MOUNT ZION, 



A post office of Woodford county. 
James Mitchell, Postmaster. 



MOWEQUEA, 

A post village of Shelby county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad, 55 miles south 
from Bloomington. 

John M. Lowrey, Postmaster. 



MUD CREEK, 

A post office of St. Clair county. 
Henry Koehler, Postmaster. 



MULBERRY GROVE, 

A post village of Bond county, in the north- 
cast part. 

Reps Elam, Postmaster. 



MURPHEYSBORO, 

A post village, capital of Jackson county, on 
Big Muddy river, about 15 miles east from 
the Mississippi, and 178 miles south from 
Springfield. The Belleville and Murpheys- 
boro railroad passes through this place. 
Wm. H. Hord, Postmaster. 



Jenkins & Elston, attorneys at law. 
Morgan, Osburn & Co., dry goods, groceries, 
hardware, drugs, etc. 



MYER'S MILLS, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 
Geo. W. Smith, Postmaster. 



NAAUSAY, 

A post township in the east central part of 
Kendell county. 
Lachlex McLaren, Postmaster. 



NACHAUSA, 

A post office of Lee county. 
Alex. P. Dysart, Postmaster: 



NAPERVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Du Page 
county, oq Du Page river, about 30 miles 
west-south-west from Chicago, 16 miles from 
the Illinois and Michigan canal. It contains 
a court house and a number of churches, a 
bank, and does a large amount of manu- 
facturing, having excellent water power for 
the purpose. The Galena and Chicago Union 
Railroad runs within eight miles of the vil- 
lage, on the north, and the Aurora Branch 
within ten miles on the west. There are 
here six dry goods stores, a hardware store, 
a drug store and two grocery stores, and the 
amount of merchandise sold by them during 
the past year amountad to over $200,000. 
During two months in the fall of 1857, one 
firm alone bought about 53,000 pounds of 
wool, costing over §23,000. Population, 
2,500. 
Robert Naper, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Castle & Naper, dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Cauch R. & C. E., ambrotypists. 

Dailey J. C, proprietor New York House. 

Daniels H. C, physician and druggist. 

Dresler John, furniture. 

Ellsworth L. & Co., proprietors of Du Page 

county nurseries. 
Euclid Chapter No. 13 (Masonic), Masonic 

Hall. 
Euclid Lodge No. 65 (Masonic), Masonic 

Hall. 
EYER E. n., proprietor of News Letter. 
F1NDLEY ANDREW, HARDWARE AND 

IRON. 
GREEN I. G., PRODUCE, ETC. 
HOBSON M. S, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

AND NOTARY PUBLIC. 
J. O. of G. T., Academy Hall. 
Keith Charles W., insurance agent. 
Keith W. F. & Co., groceries and provisions. 
LENT NORMAN, BLACKSMITH. 
Lvman C. H. P., agent for John T. Green. 
MARTIN, WRIGHT & CO., BANKERS. 
Monroe J., restaurant. 
Naperville Lodge, No. 81, I. 0. O. F., 

Academy Hall. 
NAPERVILLE NEWS LETTER, E. H. 

Eyer, proprietor. 
OVERHOLSER D. L., PHYSICIAN AND 

SURGEON. 
Patter R. K, physician and surgeon. 
SCOTT W. & CO., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC. 
Skinner, Haight & Co., dry goods, groceries, 

etc. 
Stevens S. P., drugs and fancy goods. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



153 



Stroubler George, auctioneer. 
Vallette & Cody, attorneys at law and solici- 
tors in chancery. 
Waldfogal Jacob, blacksmith. 
Weaver Joseph, merchant tailor. 



NAPLES. 



This town is situated on the east side of the 
Illinois river, in Scott county, and is the 
the terminus of the G. W. R. R. The Hani- 
bal and St. Joseph Railroad will be com- 
pleted during next summer to this place, as 
also the Camp Point and Quincy, connecting 
by bridge across the Illinois river with the 
G. W. R. R. Distance from St. Louis, 110 
miles ; from Chicago, 270 ; Springfield, the 
capital, 54 by railroad. A daily packet line 
to the former place. 

G. A. Ltndsay, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Abbott Henry, drugs and medicines. 

BARTON HOUSE, BARTON, PROP- 
RIETOR. 

CRITZER & RUARK, DRY GOODS, 
GROCERIES AND FAMILY GOODS. 

Fooshee J. A., wines and liquors. 

Garvin P., dry goods and groceries. 

HAZARD & MITCHELL, DRUGS, MEDI- 
CINES, BOOKS, ETC. 

Hazard & Mitchell, physicians and surgeons. 

KEENER C. F., land, insurance and collect- 
ing agent. 

KEENER T. & F., FORWARDING AND 
COMMISSION. 

McClusky John, proprietor Naples Hotel. 

MITCHELL & LEAR, DEALERS IN DRY 
GOODS, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
DUCE. 

Muck & Carver, dry goods and clothing. 

Parker W. S., dry goods, queensware etc. 

ROYAL, MAVERS & CO., PORK PACK- 
ERS. 



NASHVILLE, 



A post village, capital of Washington county, 
on the Illinois river, 118 miles south by east 
from Springfield. It is situated on a rich 
and beautiful prairie. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Gander H., saddle and harness maker. 

Hosmer A. J., attorney and counselor at law. 

Le Compte T. J., attorney at law. 

Marshall & Hotchkiss, physicians, surgeons 
and druggists. 

Philips & Ross, physicians and surgeons. 

VANCE E. M., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW AND JUSTICE 
OF THE PEACE. 

Watts Amos, attorney and counselor at law 
and solicitor in chancery. 



Woods L. & Co., tin, copper and sheet iron 
worker. 



NAUVOO, 

Is situated in Hancock county, on the Missis- 
sippi river, near the head of the lower rapids, 
220 miles from St. Louis. It was founded 
by the Mormons in 1840, and at one time 
contained about 18,000 inhabitants. The 
situation is one of the most beautiful on the 
river, the ground rising gradually from the 
water to a great height and terminating in 
a broad plain overlooking the surrounding 
country for miles. 

The plain upon which the city was laid 
out was very extensive, the streets being 
broad and crossing one another at right 
angles. The houses were mostly built of 
logs, a few frame ones being occasionally 
met with. Such instances were, however, 
rare. The great object of curiosity and 
interest was the great Mormon temple, a 
gigantic building when compared with those 
around it, being 130 feet long by 90 wide. 
It was built of polished lime stone, and was 
at that time one of the most costly edifices 
of the west. The baptistry was situated in 
the basement, and contained a large stone 
basin, supported by twelve collossal oxen, 
supposed to have been typhical of the twelve 
tribes of Judah. In this vast temple, dedi- 
cated to falsehood and supported by error and 
superstition, was performed those rites and 
ceremonies which have ever characterized 
the Mormon church, and which has made it 
a stepping stone to vice and immorality of 
the grossest character. About the year 1848 
the usurpations of the Mormons had become 
so flagrant, and their influence so demoraliz- 
ing, that a war of extermination was com- 
menced, and by force of arms they were 
compelled to leave the city and state. They 
accordingly crossed the river and located in 
in the territory now called Utah, formerly a 
part of the Mexican province of California 
Alta. After the restoration of peace, they 
formed a temporary state government under 
the style of the state of Deseret. About the 
time of the evacuation of the city by the 
Mormons, the temple was destroyed by fire 
and reduced to ashes. Subsequently a com- 
pany of French Socialists, under M. Cabet, 
purchased the site of the temple and other 
property, and established themselves under 
a form of government little better than that 
which characterized their predecessors. The 
number of these Socialists amounted at one 
time to about 600. 

Nauvoo has an excellent steamboat land- 
ing, and notwithstanding the short length of 
time which has elapsed since its recovery 
from the Mormons, has a population of about 
3,000. 

John Bauer, Postmaster. 



154 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



NEAPOLIS, 

A post office of Shelby county. 
Aaron Hood, Postmaster. 



NELSON HILL, 

A post office of Effingham county. 
Isaac R. Elder, Postmaster. 



NEPONSET, 

A post village of Bureau county, on the line 
of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Rail- 
road, 128 miles south-west from Chicago. 
Joseph Lyford, Postmaster. 



NERADA, 



A post village of Stephenson county, on the 
line of the Galena and Chicago Union Rail- 
road, 114 miles north by west from the latter 
place. 



NEWARK, 

A thriving post village of Kendall county, in 
the western part, about 60 miles west-south- 
west from Chicago, and 2 miles east from 
Fox river. It is situated on a fertile prairie. 



NEW BALTIMORE, 

A post office of Wayne county. 



NEW BEDFORD, 

A post office of Bureau county. 



NEWBERN. 

A post office of Jersey county, in the south- 
ern part, about 5 miles east from the Mis- 
sissippi river. 



NEW BOSTON, 

A thriving post village of Mercer county, on 
the Mississippi river, 156 miles north-west 
from Springfield. It is a place of active 
business, a large amount of grain and pro- 
duce being annually shipped from here. 
The surrounding portions of the county are 
fertile and under good improvement. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Alger & Son, dry goods, etc. 
Bell & Thompson, " 
Ives & Dennison, " 
Thomas Richard, " 



Willits J. C, 
Willets Will, 



NEW BREMEN, 

A post village of Cook county, on the line 
of the Chicago and Rock Island Railroad, 23 
miles south-west from the former place. 



NEW CLYDE, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 



NEWELL, 
A post office of Vermilion county. 



NEW ERIN, 

A post village of Stephenson county, 135 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
Hauson Bacon, Postmaster. 



NEW FRANKLIN, 

A post office of Wayne county. 



NEW GENESEE, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 



NEW HARTFORD, 

A post village of Pike county, about 80 
miles west-south-west from Springfield. 



NEW HAVEN, 

A post village in the township of the same 
name, in Gallatin county, on the Little Wa- 
bash river, about 5 miles from its mouth. 



NEW HEBRON, 

A post village of Crawford county. 



NEW HOPE, 

A post village of Wabash county. 



NEW LANCASTER, 

A post village of Warren county, ou the 
road from Peoria to Burlington. 



NEW LEBANON, 

A post village of De Kalb county, 60 miles 
west-north-west from Chicago. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



155 



NEW LIBERTY, 

A post village of Tope county, on the Ohio 
river. 



NEW FRIAR, 

A post office of Cook county. 



NEWMAN, 

Is a new town, situated in the north-eastern 
part of Coles county, at the head of the 
Beasby Fork, where the state and county 
road crosses the line of the Indiana and 
Illinois Railroad. It is surrounded with the 
finest agricultural land in the state, thickly 
aettled with wealthy, enterprising and in- 
telligent farmers- A large hotel and steam 
mill are being erected. Other improvements 
are in contemplation, and many of these will 
be effected the coming season. 



NEW MASSILLON, 

A post village of Wayne county, on the 
Little Wabash river. It is situated near the 
border of a fertile prairie. 



NEW MAYSVILLE, 

A post office of Pike county. 



NEW MICHIGAN, 

A post office of Livingston county. 



NEW MILFORD, 

A post village in the township of the same 
name, in Winnebago county, on the Kish- 
waukee river, about 7 miles south from Rock- 
ford. It has a fine flowering mill, etc. 



NEW PLATO, 

A post office of Kane county. 



NEWS, 
A post office of Calhoun county. 

NEW SALEM, 

A post office of Pike county. 



NEWTON, 

A post village, capital of Jasper county, on 
the Embarrass river, 130 miles east-south- 
east from Springfield. Is a thriving place. 



NEW VIRGIL, 

A post office of Kane county. 



NEY, 
A post village of De Kalb county. 



NILES, 

A post township of Cook county. 



NILWOOD, 



A thriving new town of Macoupin county, on 
the line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago 
Railroad, 217 miles south-west from Chicago. 
The village is but little over a year old, and 
contains a good hotel, several stores, and a 
large number of neat dwellings. A large 
flouring mill is being built, which will be a 
decided addition to the business of the place. 
Liberal inducements are offered to mechanics 
to purchase lots and build. 



NOBLE, 



A post office of Richland county, on the line 
of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad, about 
40 miles west from Vincennes, Ind. 



NO GROVE, 

A post office of La Salle county. 



NOKOMIS, 

Is situated in Christian county, on the Terre 
Haute, Alton and St. Louis Railroad, 9 miles 
east of Irving and 12 miles west of Pana. 
The town site was laid out in 1856, and now 
contains a large store, a flouring mill with 
three run of burrs, a large boarding house, 
blacksmith shop and other buildings usually 
found in places of the size (except a grocery), 
or, more properly speaking, a groggery, not 
one of these being in existence here. 

As a shipping point, Nokomis should not 
be overlooked, being surrounded to a con- 
siderable extent by superior farming lands, 
which must make this a centre for the de- 
livery of the produce of the county, espe- 
cially that delivered for St. Louis and other 
southern points. 



156 



a. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



NORA, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, on the 
line of the Illinois Central Railroad, 30 
miles east from Galena. 

George B. Stanchfield, Postmaster. 



NORTHFIELD, 



A post township of Cook county. 
Douglas Boyd, Postmaster. 



NORTH FORK. 

A post office of Vermillion county, 125 miles 
east by north from Springfield. 
James R. Steward, Postmaster. 



NORTH HAMPTON, 

A post village of Peoria county, in the north- 
east corner, about 3 miles west from the 
Illinois river, and about 18 north from 
Peoria. 

Reuben B. Hamlin, Postmaster. 



NORTH HENDERSON, 

A post office of Mercer county, 185 miles 
north-west from Springfield. 
Samuel R. Boggs, Postmaster. 



NORTH KINGSTON, 

A post office in the north part of De Kalb 
county. 

Charlss W. Branch, Postmaster. 



NORTH PLATO, 

A post office of Kane connty. 
Freeman Temple, Postmaster. 



NORTH PRAIRIE, 

A post village of Knox county in the north- 
west part. 

John D. Bartlett, Postmaster. 



NORTH VILLE, 

A post village of La Salle county, near 
Fox river, 65 miles south-south-west from 
Chicago. 
William Hughes, Postmaster. 



NORTON, 

A post office of Tazewell county. 
Ira C. Pratt, Postmaster. 



NORWAY, 

A post village of La Salle county, near the 
north-east part. 

Ovee Rosdail, Postmaster. 



NOYSVILLE, 



A post office of Cook county. 
Henry P. Fowler, Postmaster. 



OAK HILL, 

A post village of Lake county, near the west 
shore of Lake Michigan, 32 miles north- 
north-west from Chicago. 

Henry' P. Ostrander, Postmaster. 



OAKLAND, 

A post village of Coles county, 95 miles east 
by south from Springfield. 

Marion P. Chase, Postmaster. 



OAK VILLA, 



A post office of Iroquois county. 
Moses Wilcox, Postmaster. 



OBLONG, 

A post office of Crawford county. 
David W. Odell, Postmaster. 



OCONEE STATION, 

A post village of Shelby county, on the line 
of the Illinois Central railroad, about 25 miles 
north from Vandalia. 

James A. Coplin, Postmaster. 



OCEOLA, 

A post village of Stark county, on Spoon 
river, about 5 miles north from Toulon, the 
county seat. 

Wm. P. Buswell, Postmaster. 



ODELL, 

A thriving post village of Livingston county, 
near the north-east part, and on the line of 
the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago railroad. 
Daniel Smith, Postmaster. 



O'FALLON DEPOT, 

A post village of St. Clair county, on the line 
of the Ohio and Mississippi river. 
Anderson Umbarger, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



157 



OGLE COUNTY 

Is situated in the north part of the state, and 
has an area of 760 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by Rock river, dividing it into nearly 
equal parts, and is also drained by Leaf river, 
and Elkhorn and Pine creeks. The surface 
is undulating, and the soil very fertile. The 
county contains extensive rolling prairies, 
■with a moderate proportion of timber. Corn, 
wheat, oats and hay, are the staples. It 
contains a number of churches, several news- 
paper offices, and has over 3,000 pupils at- 
tending public schools. 

It is intersected by the Galena and Chica- 
go Union railroad. 

Ogle comity was organized in 1837, and 
included within its limits the territory of the 
present Lee county, which was set off in 1839. 
The oldest settled town is Buffalo Grove ; the 
first mill was erected and the first school open- 
ed in 1835. Up to this time the settlers had 
stamped their corn in a wooden mortar, but 
as the number of mouths increased, the de- 
mand for " cracked corn" increased propor- 
tionately, and the old mortar became too te- 
dious a way of procuring food. Accordingly, 
a Mr. Wilson commenced to put up a grist 
mill, which event was hailed with so much 
joy by the settlers, that the men turned out 
with teams and tools, and assisted gratuitous- 
ly in its erection. 

In the year following, 1855, constant ac- 
cessions were being made to the number of 
inhabitants of the county, new towns were 
being formed and new improvements carried 
out, until it has become one of the first 
counties in our state. 

One remarkable feature will be noticed by 
persons who may read the whole history of 
this county — their anxiety and interest in 
the establishment of schools. The seminary 
at Mt. Morris, which is now in successful op- 
eration, was opened in 1840, in a small log 
building, possessing few of the conveniences 
now so easily attained. 

The first record of a county court dates 
January 3, 1837, when the commissioner's 
court was holden at Oregon. The second 
meeting was held at Buffalo Grove, in March 
following, when the county was districted. 
The first circuit court was holden at Dixon, 
in October, 1837, under Judge Stone, who 
acted until the district was divided, when 
Hon. Thomas Ford, afterwards governor, was 
appointed in this (the 9th) district. 

In 1840, the first court house was begun, 
and completed the following year. It was a 
fine two story building, about the same size 
as the present one, and cost upwards of 
818,000. This building was never used, it 
having been set fire to on the night previous 
to the sitting of the court. 

At this time, Ogle and the counties sur- 
rounding were infested with regularly or- 
ganized gangs of blacklegs, horse theives and 
counterfeiters. Their numbers were so nu- 



merous and the bands so well organized that 
it was impossible to convict them. 

At the time of the burning of the court 
house, there were a number of these despera- 
does confined in the jail, awaiting trial. Their 
accomplices accordingly set fire to the court 
house, in the hope that in the hurry and 
confusion incident to their removal toaplace 
of safety, they might make their escape. The 
excitement produced was very great, and at 
the next term of court three of these men 
were tried, convicted, and sentenced to the 
penitentiary ; not, however, without much 
difficulty, as one of their number had manag- 
ed to get upon the jury, and refused to agree 
upon a verdict until the remaining eleven 
threatened to lynch him in the jury room. 
The other prisoners obtained -change of 
venue, and afterward succeeded in breaking 
from the jail where they were confined. The 
people became so exasperated and determin- 
ed, that " regulating companies" were form- 
ed, who inflicted summary punishment upon 
the lawless ruffians who had so long been a 
pest to the country. Some of them they 
banished from the country, and among these 
was a family named Driscoll, consisting of the 
old man and several sons, nearly all of whom 
were escaped convicts from the Ohio peniten- 
tiary. This family determined not to be 
driven off, and, with their confederates, plan- 
ned an attack upon the principal men in the 
ranks of the regulators, which so far succeed- 
ed that a Mr. Campbell was shot dead by 
one of the Driscoll's, while returning home 
from church. 

The same night a messenger reached Ore- 
gon with the news, a company was raised, 
and pursuit of the assassins commenced, and 
before night of the next day they had suc- 
ceeded in securing the old man Driscoll, while 
endeavoring to make his escape. He was 
immediately taken to Oregon, and put in 
charge of the sheriff. 

In the mean time, news of the murder had 
spread far and near, the people turned out 
en masse, and the next day they succeeded in 
capturing two of the old man's sons. It was 
the intention of the people to have left the 
elder Driscoll in the hands of the sheriff, but 
immediately upon learning of the arrest of 
the sons, he was taken by the enraged peo- 
ple and carried to Washington Grove, where 
it was decided he, together with the two 
sons, should be hung. The old man and one 
son was convicted, and the other son was 
acquitted. 

After the examination was concluded, one 
hour was allotted to the prisoners, at the ex- 
piration of which time they were placed, one 
at a time, in a kneeling position, their eyes 
bandaged, and then fired upon by the whole 
company. 

This action effectually put a stop to fur- 
ther depredations. The regulators were af- 
terward tried for murder, and acquitted. 
These were only a few of the difficulties 



158 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



which had to be surmounted by the early set- 
tlers of the north-west. 

Ogle county now takes rank as one of the 
greatest agricultural counties of the state, 
and in point of productiveness, healthiness, 
and location, is perhaps unsurpassed in the 
west. Capital, Oregon City. Population, 
17,800. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Judge of Circuit Court, John V. Eustace. 
Judge of County Court, Vergil A. Bogue. 
Clerk of County Court, Joseph Sears. 
Clerk of Circuit Court and Recorder, Mor- 
timer W. Smith. 

Treasurer, Albert Woodcock. 

Sheriff, Eliphalet R. Tyler. 

Surveyor, Francis Chase. 

School Commissioner, Dr. A. E. Hurd. 

Coroner, Wm. Jackson. 

Master in Chancery, Jos. Sears. 



OGLE, 

A post village of Ogle county, on the line of 
the Fulton and Iowa railroad, 83 miles north 
of west from Chicago. 

Aaron Weeks, Postmaster. 



OGLE STATION, 

A post office of Lee county. 
Henry Stiles, Postmaster. 



OHIO, 

A post township of Bureau county, northern 
part. 

Stephen Wilson, Postmaster. 



OHIO FARM, 

A post village of Kendall county, 50 miles 
south from Chicago. 
John Widney, Postmaster. 



OHIO GROVE, 



A post village of De Kalb county, 53 miles 
west by north from Chicago. 
Homer Roberts, Postmaster. 



OKAW, 

A post village of Washington county, 14 
miles west-north-west from Nashville, the 
county seat. 
J. F. Brockschmidt, Postmaster. 



OLD FARM, 

A post office of Lawrence county. 
Lawson H. Childress, Postmaster. 



OLENA, 



A post village of Henderson county, a few 
miles east from the Mississippi river, and 120 
miles north-west from Springfield. 
Wm. F. Mark, Postmaster. 



OLIVE, 



A post office of Lawrence county. 
Wiley M. Edmondson, Postmaster. 



OLNEY, 

A thriving post village, capital of Richland 
county, on the line of the Ohio and Missis- 
sippi railroad, 118 miles east from St. Louis. 
The improvement of the town has been 
steady, but not rapid, and it has now two 
steam mills, two steam furniture factories, all 
sorts of mechanics, doctors, lawyers, etc. 
The principal business of the place is pack- 
ing, a large amount of which is done yearly. 
During the past season, over 12,000 hogs 
have been packed here. There is also a 
fine large marble factory in operation, and 
doing a good business. In addition to other 
public institutions of the place (to use the 
language of a correspondent), " there are 
four licensed places for selling liquor, where 
the imbibers of sod-corn can help return the 
six hundred dallars license — a mode of col- 
lecting the revenue agreeable both to the 
tax-payers and the sod-corn admirers afore- 
said." Population, 1,500. 
Josiah F. Reed Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc . 

Allen & Brewster, attorneys at law. 

Banckart Geo. A., tailor. 

Bick William M., attorney at law. 

Bick William M., publisher Daily Times. 

BREWSTER A. W., proprietor of Illinois 
House. 

BRILEHART JOHN, proprietor of Union 
House. 

Brown Mrs., milliner and mantua maker. 

BYERS A. L. & R., forwarding and commis- 
sion. 

Cain W. H., painter. 

Clemmons Miss E. M., music teacher. 

Deckerman F,, drugs and medicines. 

Fischell J. B., grocer. 

Fondetsmith J. B., drugs and medicines. 

Gibson I., attorney at law. " 

Gunn H. & Son., dry goods. 

Gunn J. H. & Son, coal dealers. 

Havnie G. W., occulist. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



159 



HAYWARD & KITCHELL, real estate 
agents. 

HAYWARD HORACE, attorney at law, 
office on Main street. 

Heap B. F. & Co., furniture manufacturers. 

Heap G. W., machine shop. 

Hollister James G. & Co., dry goods and gen- 
eral merchants. 

Horrall D. Kenneth, stoves and tinware. 

Howe & Clark, carriage manufactory. 

Johnson D. D., hardware. 

Kitchell A. & E., attorneys at law. 

Luther J. B., boots and shoes, opposite the 
post office. 

Mallory A. L., saddle and harness manufac- 
turer. 

Martin & Brother, clothing and gents' fur- 
nishing. 

Medcalfe W H., doctor. 

Mort & Williams, drugs and medicines. 

NEWELL & WILLIAMS, dry goods, hard- 
ware, and general merchants. 

Olney Lodge, No. 140 (Masonic). 

Page E. B., boarding house. 

Ratclifte E., plasterer. 

RICHLAND CHAPTER (Masonic). 

Richland Lodge, No. 180 (I. 0. 0. F.), over 
Preston's law office. 

Shaw & Robinson, dealersin watches, clocks, 
and musical instruments. 

Shaw P., watches, clocks, and jewelry. 

SHELBY W. T., justice of the peace. 

Stout & Rickett, dealors in marble- 

Weichster J. G., dealer in clothing. 

Whitney Nathan, house painter. 

Williams James, stoves and tinware. 

WILLIAMS & NEWELL, forwarding and 
commission merchants. 

Wilson John M., attorney at law. 



ONEGA, 

A post village of Marion county. 
Robert W. Elder, Postmaster. 



OMPHGENT, 



A post office of Madison county, recently 
established. 



ONARGA, 

A thriving post village of Iroquois county, 
on the line of the Illinois Central Railroad 
(Chicago Branch), 86 miles south from 
Chicago. 
JosEPn Thomas, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Crawford A. N., M.D. and dealer in drugs 
and medicines. 



Durham & Co., groceries. 

Doolittle & Pierce, land agents. 

Graves & Moxon, carriage and wagon manu- 
facturers. 

Knight & Thomas, dry goods and general 
merchants. 

MESSER H. M., LAND AGENT AND 
GENERAL MERCHANT. 

MESSER M. A., JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

Moore William C, dry goods and general 
merchants. 

Onargo House, J. T. Baker & Co., prop- 
rietors. 

PEIRSON WM. P., DEALER IN LUM- 
BER, SHINGLES, DOORS, SASH, 
BLINDS, ETC. 

Pierson William P., furniture and cabinet 
warerooms. 

RAILROAD HOUSE, H. HEATH, PROP- 
RIETOR. 

Rumly &Bro., clothing, boots, shoes, etc. 

THOMAS JOSEPH, postmaster. 

WOOD CHARLES U, COUNSELOR AT 
LAW AND SOLICITOR IN CHANC- 
ERY. 



ONECO, 



A post village in a township of the same 
name, in the north contral part of Stephen- 
son county, 222 miles north from Spring- 
field. 
John D. Beebe, Postmaster. 



ONEIDA, 

A post village of Knox county, on an afflu- 
ent of Spoon river. 

Charles F. Camp, Postmaster. 



ONTARIO, 

A post village in the north-west part of Knox 
county, 13 miles north from Knoxville. 
Ezra Chapman, Postmaster. 



OPHIR, 

A post township of La Salle county, in the 
north central part. 

Edmoxd Doge, Postmaster. 



OQUAWKA, 

A flourishing post village, capital of Hen- 
derson county, on the east bank of the Mis- 
sissippi river, 132 miles north-west from 
Springfield. It is the terminus of the 
Peoria and Oquawka Railroad. The place is 
one of great activity, being a prominent 



160 



G. W. H AWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



shipping point for produce and grain. Has 
one or two newspaper offices. Population, 
about 2,500. 
James Caswell, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc , 

Birdsall C. E., dentist. 

BISSELL & HIGGINS, STOVES AND 
TINWARE. 

Chapin E., saddles, harness and saddlery 
hardware. 

Chenoweth W. S., painter and paper 
hanger. 

Chickering J., furniture and pianos. 

EDWARDS JOHN, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, ETC. 

PANNING Z. D., FURNITURE. 

FULLER J. M., HARDWARE. 

Graham, Wilson & Thompson, dry goods, 
groceries, etc. 

Henderson W. D., notary public. 

Hirt Charles, book binding. 

HOPKINS, HARRINGTON & CO., PROP- 
RIETORS OF STAR MILLS. 

Ind. Order of Grand Templers, McKinney's 
Hall. 

JAMES MRS. E., MILLINERY. 

Jamison F. M., wagons and buggies, and 
agents for Selby's patent grain drill. 

Jamison W. R., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

KNOWLES, RAY & CHAPIN, DRY 
GOODS, GROCERIES, ETC. 

Linell P. S. & Co., saddles and harness. 

McKinney & Son, dry goods, groceries, lum- 
ber, etc. 

MAGIE & MITCHELL, prop'r of Oquaqua 
Plainchalcr. 

Mathews C. B., watches, jewelry, etc. 

Matlock C. G, medicines, etc. 

Moir & Bros., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Nelson A. S., physician and surgeon. 

NELSON, REYNOLDS & CO., DRUGS, 
PAIXTS, OILS, ETC. 

Odendahl Mrs. Ernestine, music teacher. 

OQUAWKA PLAINDEALER, Magie & Mit- 
chell proprietors. 

Patterson J. 0., physician and surgeon. 

Phelps & Rice, dry good3. 

Phelps S. S. & Co., founders and machinists. 

Rapp L. M. & Co., boots and shoes. 

Rice W. C, physician and surgeon. 

Russell & McFarland, steam sash, door and 
blind factory. 

Stewart J. H, attorney at law. 

Strong L., jr., ambrotypist. 

WATERHOUSE E., STOVES AND TIN 
WARE. 

Wiegand William, wagon and carriage fac- 
tory. 

Williams James, blacksmith. 



ORANGE PRAIRIE. 

A post office of Peoria county. 
Enoch Huggins, Postmaster. 



ORANGEVILLE, 

A post office of Stephenson county. 
Wm. Wagexhals, Postmaster. 



OREGON CITY, 

A thriving post village, capital of Ogle county, 
on the right bank of Rock river, 179 miles 
north by east from Springfield. It is hand- 
somely situated between the shore and a 
bluff, which rises in the form of an amphi- 
theatre, at the distance of about a mile, and 
meets the river a little below the town. New 
county buildings have recently been erected 
here. 

Edmuxd P. Sextox, Postmaster. 



Aphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

BEMAN & BARKER, DRY GOODS, 
GROCERIES AND GENERAL STORE. 

Burchell R. C, attorney at law. 

DAVISE WM. S., WAGON AND CAR- 
RIAGE SHOP, (shop, west end of 
bridge). 

DUTCHER E. F., ATTORNEY AND COUN 
SELOR, NO. 26 MAIN ST. 

Campbell & Carpenter, attorneys at law. 

ELIGER MARTIN L., BUILDER, ARCHI- 
TECT & CONTRACTOR. 

FARMERS' HOME, ADAM SCHRYVER. 

FREDERICK ED., WATCHMAKER AND 
REPAIRER. 

Furness Edgar D., harness maker. 

Heaton & Atherton, lawyers. 

LIGHT MILES B., attorney at law. 

MOORE'S HOTEL, MAIN ST. 

PRIDE DAVID S., LAWYER, OFFICE, 
IN THE COURT HOUSE. 

Sears J., jr., attorney at law and solicitor in 
chancery. 

SNOWDEX JOHN, DEALER IN BRANDY, 
GINS, WINES AND WHISKEY. 

Snowden John, druggist and apothecary. 

STEWART & WHEELER, DRY GOODS, 
HATS, CAPS AND CLOTHING. 

WALLACE JOHN F., deputy county sur- 
veyor. 

WOOLLEY ISAAC, COUNTY JUSTICE 
OF THE PEACE. 



ORION, 



A post village of Henry county, in the west 
central part. 

Charles W. Deax, Postmaster. 



ORLAND, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Geo. Cox, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



161 



ORLEANS, 

A post office of Morgan county. 
Robert S. Anderson, Postmaster. 



OSAGE, 



A post village of Franklin county. 
Isaac Snider, Postmaster. 



NATIONAL HOUSE, 

McDOUGAL & SMITH, 

Proprietors, 
OSWEGO, ---... ILLINOIS 



OSTEND, 



A post village of McHenry county. 
Wm. D. Hoege, Postmaster. 



OSWEGO, 

Is an incorporated town, capital of Kendall 
county, on the Fox river, 1A miles from the 
line of the Burlington and Quincy Railroad, 
and 6 miles south from Aurora. It has the 
best water power in this part of the state, 
which is well improved. Manufacturing is 
carried on to considerable extent, there being 
here a large cooperage and wagon factory, 
foundry and machine shop. There are also 
several lime kilns and extensive brick yards, 
from which are furnished superior qualities 
of these building materials. Two good hotels 
are to be found, the National Hotel and the 
Kendall House ; also, five churches and a 
large seminary. A weekly newspaper ia 
published here, called the Kendall County 
Free Press, by II. S. Humphrey. The ad- 
vantages of Oswego are such as to secure to 
her an importance in trade and manufactures 
equal to other and older towns. 
John W. Campton, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Baker G. S. H., iron foundry. 

Barnard P., dry goods and groceries. 

Brooks Rev. C, pastor. 

Campton J. W., postmaster. 

Cay A., dry goods and groceries. 

Class Rev. R. A., Baptist church. 

Cook John, baker. 

Crather J. M., attorney at law. 

Danford C, cooper. 

Drake Rev. Mr., Congregational church. 

Fox C. B., surgeon. 

Gray R. H., proprietor of mills. 

HALL 0. B. AGENT ETNA INSURANCE 

CO. 
Humphrey H. S., editor and proprietor of the 

Kendall County Free Press. 
Let J., dry goods and groceries. 
McDOUGAL & SMITH, PROPRIETORS 

NATIONAL HOTEL. 
MANN & HOPKINS, LI YERYAND SALE 

STABLE. 
MEAD M., DRUGGIST. 
Murphy W., attorney at law. 
Nagle A., tailor. 

11 



The public will find this House all that can 
be desired, where every attention will be 
paid to the comfort of guests. 



A livery stable is connected with this House. 



Palmer & Bro., sash and blinds. 

PARKER & BATEMAN, drugs and chemi- 

PARKER & STEWART, HARDWARE. 
Park 0. G, proprietor of Kendall House. 
Smith A. B. 
i Sropman Wm. & Co., groceries and pro- 
visions. 
SUTHERLAND C. & SON, boots and shoes. 
Thompson Rev. , Presbyterian church. 



OTSEGO, 

A post village of Lake county, 42 miles 
north-north-west from Chicago. 
Horace C. Joslin, Postmaster. 



OTTAWA, 

A flourishing town, capital of La Salle coun- 
ty, is situated on both sides of the Illinois 
river, just below the mouth of Fox river, and 
on the line of the Chicago and Rock Island 
railroad, 88 miles west-south-west from Chi- 
cago. Improvements are being made in 
the rapids of the Illinois river, a few miles 
below the town, which will render it naviga- 
ble for steamboats at all stages of water. 
The Fox river at this point has a fall of 29 
feet, producing a water power which is said 
to surpass any in the state. Ottawa contains 
several churches, 1 bank, 2 newspaper offices 
and a number of large flouring mills and fac- 
tories. Rich beds of coal are found in the 
vicinity. The supreme court for the north 
division of the state is holden here. 
Wm. Osman, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Armour John, grain merchant, corner Fulton 

and Madison sts. 
Avery Miss, millinery, Columbus st. 
Avery J., attorney at law. 
Barnsley Albert, shaving saloon, Public 

Square. 



162 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Bates Chas. W., homeopathist. 

Black R. 0., furniture and cabinet ware, La 

Salle st. 
Brown Henry, blacksmith, Main st. 
Bristol M. B., agent. 
BRISTOL GEO., DEALER IN LUMBER, 

WEST SIDE OF SIDE CUT. 
COGUELIN A. F., sash, doors, blinds, etc. 
Caverly A. W., notary public, La Salle st. 
Chapin E. J., jeweller. 
Cheever S. W., merchant, Main st. 
Child & Co., boots and shoes, Main st. 
Colbum & Co., proprietors Morrison House. 
Crooks S., watchmaker. 
Croley Mrs., Millinery. 
Dickey J., watches, jewelry, etc. 
Douglas k Clark, dry goods. 
Dyer & Osgood, groceries, etc., La Salle st. 
EAMES, ALLEN & CO., BANKERS. 
EARL & SON, S. E., oils, paints, etc. 
Ebert Wm., bakery, Main St. 
EMERSON S. M. attorney at law. 
Faufield M. F , lumber, lath, etc., Madison 

street. 
Fisher A. A., justice of the peace. 
Fisher G. S., insurance agent. 
Fiske & Taylor, clothing, boots, shoes, etc. 
Ford Miss, milliner. 

Fo^e & Hall, reaping machine manufacturer. 
Gedulding H., boot and shoe store, Main st. 




OTTAWA, ILL. 

JOHN SPICER, PROPRIETOR 



Goodrich C. G., surgeon. 

Godfrey P., groceries, Columbus st. 

Gray C. G., attorney at law. 

Gorman John, bakery, Main st. 

Gregg Sarah, millinery goods. 

GRIDLEY COGSWELL & CO., THRASH- 
ING AND MOWING MACHINES. 

Griggs E. Y., druggist. 

Halbert E. G., boots and shoes Main st. 

Halbert, Bean & Cotton, dry goods, north of 
Court House. 

Hanford H, boots and shoes, Main st. 

Harris J. 0., physician. 

Hard C, surgeon, Madison st. 

Haskell & Sample, Exchange Mills. 

King H, planing mill. 

KNIGHT OSCAR, MERCHANT TAILOR. 

Kneufol M„ druggist, Main st. 

larkin Thomas, clothing, madi- 

SON ST. 
Leaky Daniel, boots and shoes. 
Leland & Leland, attorneys at law, Court 

House, 



LOCKWOOD JOHN & CO., DRY GOODS 

AND GROCERIES. 
LUTZ C, BOOK BINDERY. 
McArthur R., drug store, La Salle st. 
McCain A. K., jeweler. 
Magill A. V., grain merchant, Madison st. 
Manley & Dow, hardware. 
Mann Geo., City Mills. 
Meigs J. H., family supplies, La Lalle st. 
MILLS J. W., dry goods, La Salle st. 
Hatherway J. W., physician, corner Main 

and La Salle sts. 
Heron Miss, millinery. 
Hickey T., harness, saddles, trunks, etc. 
HINE E. W. & CO., CORN MILLS. 
HOBERT & BRO., DENTISTS. 
Holland E. & Co., attorneys at law, Court 

House. 
Hoyt F. B., jeweler. 
Jackson & Lockwood, hardware. 
JONES H. W., agent carriage manufactory, 
Jones David P., attorney at law. 
Kimball E. W., stoves, tin, copper, etc. 
King J. M., hides and leather, La Salle st. 
KING & HARD, hardware. 
Miner Miss, milinery. 
Mooney Jacob, clothing, Public square. 
Murphy D. J., groceiers, provisions, etc., 

La Salle st. 
Olson Andrew, painter and glazier, Main st. 
OSBORNE WM., BOOK AND JOB PRIN- 
TER, MADISON ST. 
Pearson & Osburn, groceries and dry goods, 

La Salle st. 
Pierce G. W., merchant, La Salle st. 
Pembrook J., deguarreian artist. 
Prescott M. H. & Co., boots and shoes, No. 2 

Hassac's block. 
PRESCOTT F. C, HATS, CAPS, FURS, 

ETC. 
Putnam A. C. & S. C, drugs, medicines, 

etc. 
PUTNAM A. C, physician. 
Ramsey M. R., liquors, La Salle st. 
Rapp H., glove and mitten store. 
RATHBUN & ORTON, booksellers and sta- 
tioners, Main st. 
Rathburn & Orton, United States Express Co.'s 

agents. 
Rathburn J. E., grocer, La Salle st. 
Raugh L. & Co., clothing. 
Reddick Wm., dry goods, clothing, boots and 

shoes, etc., Public square. 
REED CAPT. J. A., auction and commission 

store. 
Richardson W. E. & E., hide and leather 
Riergue Lawrence, baker and grocer, Main 

street. 

store, La Salle st. 
Rugg G. H., reaper manufacturer. 
RUSSEL PETER, furniture depot, La Salle 

street. 
Sanford C. W., bakery, Columbus st. 
Sanger Lucian P., land agency. 
Schneider G. H., tobacco and cigars, La Salle 

street. 
Schuler, G. L,, dry goods. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



163 



Schutt & Co., Custom Mills. 

Schutt J. & Co., grocers, Main st. 

Sherman J. Beardsley, coal. 

Smallman M. & Co., medicines etc., 

Smith E. B., justice of the peace. 

SMITH WM., dentist. 

Spencer & Earl, crockery and glassware. 

SPICER JOHN, GEIGER HOUSE. 

Stone & Erls, saddles, harness and trunks, 
Columbus st. 

STOUT JOHN, markets, La Salle st. 

STRAWN & POWELL, lumber merchants, 
Main st. 

Sweetzer F. D., reapers, sickles, etc. 

Thompson H., dry goods, etc. 

Thompson D. D., physician. 

THOMSON G. L., druggist. 

THORNE & ZIMMERMAN, CLOTHING, 
3 RERCLICK BLOCK. 

TRUE & WATERMAN, bankers. 

Tucker Henry, Eagle Mills. 

TANDOREN & MORRIS, corn starch man- 
ufacturers. 

WATHER D. & CO., druggists. 

Wallace W. H, L., attorney at law. 

Weiller & Bro., clothiers. 

WHEELER & SIMPSON, bakery, Main st. 

Whitman M. O, grocer, etc., Main st. 

Whitten M., physician, La Salle st. 

Wills James, marble dealer, etc. 

Wood & Doulery, City Market. 

Zammerman & Coles, cabinet makers. 



OTTER CREEK, 

A post village of Jersey couuty, 38 miles 
north-north-west from St. Louis. 
Ben. B. Hamilton, Postmaster. 



OTTO, 

A post village of Fulton county, 5*7 miles 
south by east from Knoxville. 
Wm. Galaher, Postmaster. 



OWANECO, 
A post office of Christian county. 
Joseph P. Durbin, Postmaster. 



OXBOW, 



A post office of Putnam county. 
Eeward W. Guild, Postmaster. 



OXFORD, 

A post village of Henry county, about 20 
miles south-west from Cambridge. 
Wm. Blair, Postmaster. 



PADUA, 

A post office of McLean county. 
James Smith, Postmaster. 



PAINE'S depot, 

A post office of Ogle county. 
James M. Collier, Postmaster. 



PALATINE, 



A post office of Cook county. 
Darus P. Wood, Postmaster. 



PALESTINE, 

A post village, capital of Crawford county, 
two or three miles west from the W^abash 
river, and 155 miles east-south-east from 
Springfield. It is situated on the border of 
a prairie and contains a United States land 
office, also several churches and stores. 
Henry Young, Postmaster. 



PALO ALTO, 



A post office of Hamilton county. 
James King, Postmaster. 



PALOMA, 



A post office of Adams county. 
D. W. Chase, Postmaster. 



PAL OS, 

A post township of Cook county. 
M. A. Powell, Postmaster. 



PANA, 

A post office of Christian county, 
Milan S. Beckwith, Postmaster. 



PANOLA STATION, 

A post office of Woodford county. 
Thomas Patterson, Postmaster. 



PANTHER CREEK, 

A post village of Cass county, about two 
miles south of Sangamon river. 
Thos. M. Canfield, Postmaster. 



PARADISE, 

A post village of Coles county, 80 miles east- 
south-east from Springfield. 
A. H. Chapman, Postmaster. 



164 



G. W. HAWES 1 ILLINOIS STATE 



PARIS, 

A post village, capital of Edgar county, on 
the Terre Haute and Alton railroad, 114 
miles east from Springfield. A newspaper is 
published here. The village is situated on 
the edge of a prairie which is extensively cul- 
tivated. 
Daniel G. Burr, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

COLLINS & BROTHER, DRUGS, MEDI- 
CINES, ETC. 

Dodds & Bros., dry goods. 

Davis H. W., M. D., physician and surgeon. 

Fulton Dr. J. TV., surgeon and dentist. 

Green Amos & James A. Eads, attorneys at 
law. 

HARTLY & VANCE, GROCERIES AND 
PROVISIONS, CONFECTIONERY. 

Ingersoll N. J., jewelry store. 

JENKINS & WINGET, tailors. 

Lindey & J. B. Hannah, attorneys at law. 

Little Thos. B., dealer in hides. 

MOORE WILLIAM, PUBLISHER OF THE 
BULLY BLADE. 

Newell A. druggist, etc. 

READ & BLACKBURN, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

Star Picture Gallery, Howell Henry. 

STEELE & SALE, general land agents. 

SUMMERS CHARLES, NOTARY PUBLIC, 
OFFICE OVER MILLER & RHEA'S 
STORE. 

Sumner Charles, attorney at law. 

Tenbrook John W., nursery, fruit and orna- 
mental trees. 

Tenbrook J., physician and surgeon. 

TRESSLAR M." M., dry goods, hats, caps, 

VANCE A. Y. & CO., FURNITURE, 

CLOCKS AND COFFINS. 
WOZENCRAFT W. A., STOVES, TIN 

AND SHEET IRON WARE. 



PARKERSBURG, 

A post village of Richland county, 135 miles 
south-east from Springfield. 
Levi Wilson, Postmaster. 



PARK'S CORNERS, 

A post office of Boone county. 
John Kerr jr., Postmaster. 



PETOKA, 

A post office of Marion county. 
Geo. A., Walker, Postmaster. 



PAVILLION, 

A post village of Kendall county, about 50 
miles west-south-west from Chicago. 
Henet H. Moulton, Postmaster. 



PAW PAW GROVE, 

A post office of Lee county, about 75 miles 
west-south-west from Chicago. 
Hiram Wood, Postmaster. 



PAYSON, 

A post village of Adams county, 92 miles west 
from Springfield. 

Ben. Collins, Postmaster. 



PEARL, 



A post office of Pike county. 
0. F. Howland, Postmaster. 



PECATONICA 

Is a post village of Winnebago county, on the 
Galena and Chicago Union railroad, 106 miles 
from Chicago and 300 from St. Louis. Pop- 
ulation, 1,500. 

Norton B. Johnson, Postmaster. 



PEKIN, 

A thriving post village of Tazewell county, 
on the left bank of Illinois river, 12 miles 
below Peoria and about 60 miles north from 
Springfield. It is the largest place in the 
county and has an active business. Large 
quantities of produce are shipped here by 
steamboats. Pekin contains a number of 
churches, an academy, two newspapor offices 
and several steam mills. 
Middleton Tackaberry, Postmaster. 



PELLONIA, 



A past office of Massac county. 
Wm. McCawlet, Postmaster. 



PENNSYLVANIA, 

A post office of Rock Island county. 
H. Killing, Postmaster. 



PEORIA COUNTY, 

A county in the north-west central part of 
the state, has an area of 650 square miles. 
The Illinois river and Peoria lake form the 
south-east boundary. It is drained by Spoon 
river and by Hicapoo, Elbow and Copperas 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



165 



creeks. These streams are bordered with 
tracts of timber which are separated from 
one another by beautiful undulating prairies. 
The soil is uniformly and highly productive. 
Corn, wheat, oats, hay, pork aud potatoes 
are the staples. It contains a large number 
of churches, several newspaper offices, and 
has over 4,000 pupils attending public 
schools. Valuable mines of stone coal have 
been opened in the county. The Illinois 
river is navigable for steamboats along the 
border. The county is intersected by the 
Peoria and Oquawka railroad. Organized in 
1825, and named from the tribe of Indians 
who possessed the soil. Capital, Peoria. 
Population, 32,500. 



PEORIA, 

A handsome and flourishing city, capital of 
Peoria county, on the west bank of the Illi- 
nois river at the outlet of Peoria lake, 70 
miles north from Springfield, and 151 south- 
west from Chicago. It is the most populous 
town on the river and one of the most im- 
portant and commercial inland cities of the 
state. Peoria has not hitherto held its true 
position in the list of chief cities of the Prai- 
rie State, either in point of popularity or as 
a manufacturing and commercial town. But 
a better day has dawned upon the city. 
The Peoria & Bureau Valley railroad furnishes 
a connection with the Chicago and Rock 
Island road, and, through that, with all places 
east, north and south, that can be reached 
by railroad. This has been finished for more 
than a year and is doing a large amount of 
business. The Peoria and Oquawka railroad 
is designed to connect the Illinois river at 
Peoria with the Mississippi at Burlington and 
Oquawka. It passes through one of the most 
fertile and best cultivated portions of the 
state. Notwithstanding Peoria has been 
generally overlooked and its advantages 
been unappreciated, it has gradually been 
going forward, and growing into numerical 
and commercial importance. Within the 
last five years its population has doubled. 
It is impossible, with our present limits, to 
give any idea of the rapid improvements 
that Peoria is making as regards the erection 
of buildings. They are springing up on 
every side, and, within the past year, many 
of the first class have been erected. The 
last census report gives $2,221,470 as the 
value of the manufactures of the city for the 
past year, and the sales of the article of lum- 
ber alone, amounted to near a quarter of a 
million of dollars. 

Peter Sweat, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ADAMS H. W. & CO., HARDWARE, IRON, 

SAFES, ETC., 34 WATER ST. 
Aiken Mark M., land agent. 



Allison A., carriage and wagon factory. 

Anker A. P., auctioneer and commission. 

Anderson & Proctor, lumber. 

Angle J. P., dentist. 

Bairi Henry, clothing and furnishing goods. 

Baily Burnard, notary public. 

BAKER S. R., DAGUERREIAN ARTIST, 
6 ADAMS ST. 

Ballenberg L., notions and fancy goods. 

Barker 6. F., groceries. 

BARTLETT A. P., DRY GOODS, 33 MAIN 
STREET. 

Bartlett P. O, groceries. 

Bender P. H., upholsterer. 

Benton Charles, groceries. 

Benton Ira E., drugs, medicines, etc. 

Bishop A., hats, caps and furs. 

BISSELL O. P., YANKEE NOTIONS, 
WASHINGTON ST. 

Boilvin W. C. & Co., forwarding and com- 
mission. 

Bonney C. C, attorney and counselor at law 
and solicitor in chancery. 

Bramson Lewis & Bro., wines, liquors and 

BRANDAMOUR N. B. & CO., wines, li- 
quors, etc., 8 Water st. 

Brass John, dry goods, clothing, etc. 

BRERETON E. P., MERCHANT TAILOR, 
WASHINGTON ST. 

Brooks Henry & Bush, sash, door and blind 
factory. 

BROWN J. R., pianos and musical instru- 
ments, 87 Main st. 

BRYAN & STONE, ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
AND SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY, 
35 MAIN ST. 

Brvsen J. G., drv goods. 

BURNETT S. H. & G., books, stationery 
and blank work. 

BUSHEL A. A., tin roofing, etc., Fulton 
street. 

Bushnell & McKinney, lumber. 

Callendar Geo. H, groceries, flour and nails. 

Calligan D. J. & Co., leather and findings. 

Camblin & Taylor, stoves, tin and sheet iron 
ware. 

Central House, George C. McFadden, pro- 
prietor. 

CLEGG JOSEPH, merchant tailor, 47 Mainst. 

Cole H. S., distiller. 

Cole H. H., photographic artist. 

COLE R. M., photographic artist, 27 Main 
street. 

Comstock J., land agent. 

COTTOM D. J. & J. W., tobacco and cigars, 
4 Fulton st. 

Cowell Brothers, real estate dealers. 

COWELL, J. M., real estate. (See adv't.) 

CULTER & BEASLEY, leather, saddlery, 
hardware and findings, 10 Adams st. 

Cummings E. W., groceries. A 

Currie & Co., dry goods, etc. ft 

Cutler & Evans, iron, nails, stoves, etc. 

DAVIDSON & FEIXSE, attorneys and 
counselors at law, corner Main and 
Washington sts. 



166 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



JOHN M. COWELL, 

REAL ESTATE AGENT, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



Attention given to the examination of 
Titles, payments of Taxes, buying and sell. 
iDg of Land on commission, and all other 
matters incidental to a general land business. 



DAY & CO., dry goods and carpets, 6 

Washington st. 
Day R., tobacco, snuff and cigars, 
Deane Chas. H., clothing and furnishing 

goods. 
DEWEIN & FORD, manufacturers of can- 
dles, lard oil and soaps, rear of 45 Main 

street. 
Dobbins T. S., distiller. 
Doherty William, dry goods. 
Donlevy Owen, notary public and insurance 

agent. 
Doup and Doty, groceries. 
Downing D. H., dry goods. 
DREDGE & LINCOLN, furniture, corner 

Washington and Fulton sts. 
Duer W. T., daguerreian artist. 
DUNN H. & CO., saw and sickle maunfac- 

turers, Washington st. 
Durham & Gelston, carpets. 
Durney L. J. & Co., tobacco and cigars. 
Ellis Benjamin F., groceries, provisions, etc. 
Emmitts Robert, bakery. 
Farrell k Cox, drugs, paints, oils, etc. 
Farrell H. G., drugs and chemicals. 
FAY DAVID, watches and jewelry, 41 Main 

street. 
Field George & Co., proprietors of Farmers' 

mills. 
Fisher Charles, druggist. 
FORD GEORGE, guns and sporting appar- 
atus, Washington st. 
Forsyth & Co., brewers. 
FRANK A., dry goods and notions, 34 

Main st. 
Frederick H. & Co., saddle and harness 

makers. 
FREDERICK JOHN, upholsterers, 6 Adams 

street. 
Freeman V. H., harness, saddles, etc. 
Frohlich William, clothing and furnishing 

goods. 
FULLERTON W. H., upholsterer, Fulton 

street. 
Fulton House, L. Wilson, proprietor. 
Goodell, El wood & Co., bankers. 
Goodheart A., clothing and furnishing goods. 
Gray &: Davis, china, glass, queensware, etc., 

32 Main st. 
Gregg Richard, distiller. 



Gregg W. S,, dry goods, etc. 

Greigg George, lumber merchant. 

Greenleaf Charles, dentist. 

Greenman B. M., marble dealer. 

Griffing R. F., hats, caps and furs. 

Grove & McCoy, attorneys at law. 

GURNEE D. & CO., leather, saddlery, hard- 
ware and trimmings, Fulton st. 

Hall Augustus H., drugs, medicines, etc. 

Hall Lewis, watchmaker and jeweler. 

Hammerslough L. & Co., clothing and furn- 
ishing goods. 

Hancock & McCulloh, lumber. 

Hankinson & Freeman, land agents. 

Harding & Brayton, agricultural warehouse 
and seed store, cor Fulton and Adams 
streets. 

Hargraves J., Yankee notions. 

Hawthorn A., lumber and commission. 

Henderson J. M. & Co., stoves, ranges, etc. 

Heppler A , watchmaker and jewelry. 

Hosier & Tjaden, furniture. 

Hirsh A. & S., fancv goods, jewelry, etc. 

HOLMES E. B., FURNITURE, 60 WATER 
STREET. 

Hopkins H. B., attorney and counselor at law 
and collecting agent. 

HOTCHKISS & HANSELL, hardware, etc., 
13 Main st. 

Hotchkiss J. P. & Co., bankers. 

Hovt J. E., auction and commission. 

KANE & CAMPBELL, marble dealers and 
workers, Fulton st. 

KAUFMAN HENRY, clothing, 10 Water 
street. 

KIMBLE ROBERT, lumber, cor Fayette 
and Water sts. 

Knowlton J. L., groceries and provisions. 

Kuhm & Rogers, groceries and provisions. 

LAURENCE T., paper hangings, 48 Main 
street. 

Lee James A., insurance agent. 

LENHART & SPEERS, boots, shoes, etc., 
53 Main st. 

Lightner, Schipferman & Co., distillers. 

Lottman S. T., groceries, liquors, etc. 

Loucks P. 0., groceries. 

Lyon W. B., groceries, liquors, etc. 

McClallen C. W., Son & Co., books, gloves, 
dry goods, etc. 

McClallan John, dry goods, boots, shoes 
and clothing. 

McClure I. E., lumber. 

McClean & Bryner, leather, saddlery, hard- 
ware and findings. 

Manning & Merriman, attorneys at law. 

Mason William E., dry goods, etc. 

MASSEY F. K. & CO., merchant tailors, 6 
North Adams st. 

Matthias A. L., chemist and apothecary. 

Mawhyrter & French, clothing. 

Mayor Richard, groceries. 

Miles B. F., drugs, chemicals, etc. 

Moore J. & W. C., proprietors of Fayette 
mills. 

Moore J. O, stoves, tin, copper and sheet iron 
ware. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



16? 



Moore William, steam engines and machinery. 

MORSE J. H., jeweler, 56 Main st. 

Moss, Bradley & Co., distillers. 

Mounts C. A. & Co., hats, caps and furs. 

MUDGETT C. B., dry goods. 

MULLEN EDWARD F„ WINES, BRAN- 
DIES AND CIGARS, 2 WATER ST. 

Mulvey F. P., dry goods. 

MYERS T., confectioner, 37 Main st. 

NOTTE HENRY, bookseller and stationer, 
51 Main st. 

Norton A. S., painter and dealer in paints, 
oils, etc. 

Nowland E. F., distiller. 

ODELL & PARKER, dry goods, etc., 15 
Main st. 

Peck H. M., land agent. 

Peoria Commercial College, Davis and Pip- 
lin, proprietors. 

PEORIA MARINE & FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY, 39 MAIN ST., C. HOL- 
LAND, SECRETARY. 



is i 



®Ett fflKGWS 






HALL & HURLBURT, 

Cor. Adams and Hamilton Sts., 
PEORIA, ILL. 



Peters Wm., steam engines and machinery. 

Pettingill M., hardware and dry goods. 

Phelps & Cockle, real estate and general 
agents. 

PIGGOTT J. J., land agent, opp court house. 

PIKE W. W., JOB PRINTER, WASH- 
INGTON ST. 

PATTHOFF A. & CO., hardware, cutlery, 
10 Main st. 

Pratt L., land agent. 

Proctor E. A. & Co., lumber. 

PULSIFER S. & CO., BANKERS, COR. 
MAIN & ADAMS STS. 

Reed & Sons, booksellers and stationers. 



GEO. W. RANEY, 

Flain and Fancy 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTER, 

And Publisher of the 

DAILY DEMOCRATIC UNION, 

No, 4 Main Street. 



Richmond W. H., watches, clocks and jew- 
elry. 

Ritchie James & Co., chemists and apothe- 
caries, 

Robinson, Dunham & Co., commission, for- 
warding and agricultural implement 
agency. 

Rosenblatt M., watches and jewelry. 

Rugg H. I., drugs, paints, oils, etc. 

RYAN & CROMWELL, silver platers and 
bell hangers, 52 Main st. 

Salomon & Bro., clothing and furnishing 
goods. 

Salomon S., grocer. 

Saul W. H., groceries and provisions. 

Scholey T., Fort Clark Iron and Machine 
Works. 

Schradzki M. & J., clothing. 

Scott G. H., physician. 

SECOR 0. P., gun maker. 

Shelby P. S., drugs, etc. 

Sherk B., clothing. 

Shoaff J. T., engraver. 

Smith & Ballard, lumber. 

Smith Ira, lumber. 

STARBUCK W. C, surgeon, 25 Main st. 



WILLIAM SMITH & CO., 

Distillers and Manufacturers of 
5, 95 and 80 per cent. Alcohol, Camphenr, 
Burning Fluid and Pare Spirits. 
PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



Statten, Marr & Co., manufacturers of 

woolen goods. 
Stettinius George, boots, shoes, etc. 
Stouse B., clothing, etc. 
SWEAT & BILLS, insurance agents. 
Tapping J., crockery, china and glass ware. 
TAYLOR J. B., real estate and loan office, 

12 Levee. 
Telegraph Office, over U. S. Express Office, 

No. 5 North Adams st. 
Thrush W. A. & Co., millers. 
Thurlow Edward, draftsman, and notary 

public. 
Truesdale William, door, sash and blind 

manufactory. 



Wm. Tobey. John Anderson. 

TOBEY & ANDERSON, 

Plow Manufacturers and Dealers in 
Sligo Iron and Steel. 

Water Street, opposite Levee, 
PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



168 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



TUCKER & MANSFIELD, dealers in drugs, 
books and stationery, and manufacturers 
of linseed oil and starch. 

Tyng & Brotherson, produce and commission. 

UNDERWOOD DR., oculist and aurist, 53 
Main st. 

Updike & King, storage, forwarding and 
commission. 

U. S. EXPRESS OFFICE, 5 North Adams 
street. 

Van Court & Gaines, land agents. 

Violand E., tobacconist. 

WAGER, RAY & CO., RECTIFIERS, 
MALTERS AND COMMISSION MER- 
CHANTS, 62 WATER ST. 

WALKER & McILVAINE, hardware, iron, 
cutlery, etc. 

Warner John & Co , clothing, etc. 

WASHINGTON HOUSE, Peterson & Heins, 
Washington st. 

Webster J. V., botanic physician and sur- 
geon. 

Weston & Garrett, crockery and glassware. 

WILLARD WILLIAM A., dry goods and 
notions, 43 Main st. 



PERA STATION, 

A post office of Champaigne county. 
John Lucas, Postmaster. 



PERKIN'S GROVE, 

A post village of Bureau county, 6S miles 
north-north-east from Peoria. 
L. Stanard, Postmaster. 



PEREY COUNTY, 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 420 square miles. It is inter- 
sected by Beaucoup creek, which flows 
southward into the Big Muddy river. The 
county consists partly of prairie and partly 
of timbered lands ; the soil is generally fer- 
tile. Corn, oats, cattle and swine are the 
staples. It contains several fine churches, 
and has about 600 pupils attending public 
schools. The Illinois Central Railroad crosses 
the county near the eastern border. Capital, 
Pinckneyville. Population, 7,500. 



PERRY, 



A most thriving post village of Pike county, 
62 miles west from Springfield. It is situ- 
ated on a fertile prairie. 

John K. Cleveland, Postmaster. 



PERRYTOWN, 

A post village of Mercer county. 
James Gingles, Postmaster. 



PERSIPER, 

A post village of Knox county. 
Chas. Bradford, Postmaster. 



PERU. 



The city of Peru is situated in La Salle coun- 
ty, at the head of navigation on the Illinois 
river, 16 miles from Ottawa, the county seat, 
114 miles from Springfield, 99 miles from 
Chicago, one mile from the junction of the 
Illinois Central railroad with the Illinois and 
Michigan canal, and on the Chicago and 
Rock Island railroad. It received its charter 
as a city in 1851, at which time it only num- 
bered 1,500 inhabitants, but the superior 
advantages offered for manufacturing, and its 
commercial location, has drawn the attention 
of capitalists to it, and made it one of the 
most prominent in the State. The amount 
of steam shipping owned here amounts to 
4,700 tons, and the whole number of arrivals, 
during the year 1857, were 291. The receipts 
of lumber by canal and railroad amounted to 
upward of 10,000,000 feet, while the exports 
were 337,000 bushels of wheat, 625,000 
bushels of corn, 161,000 bushels of oats, 
48,000 barrels of flour (manufactured here), 
28,500 bushels of potatoes, 31,000 bushels of 
barley, 12,000 barrels of malt liquors, 7,000 
hides, besides large quantities of beef, pork, 
etc., of which no accurate amount can be 
given. The principal article of export, how- 
ever, is coal, immense quantities of which is 
annually shipped to the various manufactur- 
ing cities of the West, affording a revenue 
which, judging from present appearances, 
must be lasting. The Peru Coal Mining 
Company, the largest in the city,, is capable 
of turning out 400 tons daily. This coal is 
chiefly used for manufacturing purposes, for 
which it is admirably adapted. Many of the 
Western cities are lighted with gas made 
from it, among which we may name Spring- 
field, Galena, and Dubuque, Iowa. 

The manufacturing interests of Peru are 
well developed, and consist in part of a 
plow factory, a fanning mill and corn sheller 
factory, three large breweries, one large 
steam flouring mill, one match factory, one 
foundry and machine shop, two soap and 
candle factories, one rectifying establishment, 
four saddle and harness factories, three wagon 
factories,- four extensive brick manufactories, 
two lime kilns, two large furniture factories, 
doing a business of $276,000 annually, ten 
blacksmith shops, one saw and planing mill, 
an extensive shipyard, dry dock and marine 
railway, for the repairing of steamboats and 
barges. Considerable trade is done in ice, 
16,000 tons of which is shipped annually to 
southern ports. 

In educational advantages Peru is not be- 
hind other cities of the west, having a high 
school (250 students), a German and English 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



169 



private school, and five district schools. 
There are also six churches, viz. : one Epis- 
copal, one Congregational, two Methodist, 
one Lutheran, and one Catholic, all fine build- 
ings, and adding much to the beauty of the 
city. Besides the above there are three 
weekly papers published here ; a bank, three 
hotels, and other buildings of a public and 
private character. The Chambery House 
was built at an expense of $25,000, and is the 
finest in the city. 

The location of the city is very fine, occu- 
pying as it does a range of table land stretch- 
ing along the margin of the river, where the 
principal manufacturing interests are located. 
The climate is healthy, and scenery delight- 
ful. Separated as Peru is from La Salle by 
only an imaginary line, the interests of the 
two cities would seem to indicate an advan- 
tage were they united. In such an event a 
city would be formed which would be one of 
immense importance to the whole west — the 
immense coal fields by which they are under- 
laid being sufficient to supply an unlimited 
range of country, with small expense and 
ready dispatch. Population, 4,200. 

E. Winslow, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Trades, Professions, Etc. 

BANK OF PERU, THERON D. BREW- 
STER, Prest, FRED. S. DAY, Cashier- 

BARTON JAMES, LUMBER, GRAIN, 
STORAGE AND COMMISSION. 

BEHREND P. K. & CO., BREWERS. 

BIRKENBUEL A., ARCHITECT AND 
STONE MASON. 

BLANCHARD CHAS., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

BREWSTER THERON, PROPRIETOR OF 
PLOW FACTORY. 

BROOKS J. M., LUMBER. 

BROWN HENRY H,, LAND AND INSUR- 
ANCE AGENT. 

BUSHNELL & LANCASTER, LUMBER 
DEALERS, ARCHITCTS AND BUILD- 
ERS. 

CHEESMAN E. T. & CO., DRUGS, OILS, 
PAINTS, ETC., WATER STREET. 

CHUMASERO & ELDRIDGE, ATTOR- 
NEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

CHUMASERO WM., NOTARY PUBLIC 
AND UNITED STATES COMMIS- 
SIONER. 

Cronise & Bro., commission wines and liquors. 

CRUIKSHANKS ALEX., BANKER. 

DALRYMPLE JAMES, PUBLISHER OF 
PERU COMMERCIAL. 

Dalrvmple James, drugs, etc. 

DALRYMPLE JAMES, FURNITURE. 

DAY & ALLEN, GROCERS AND COM- 
MISSION. 

DAY F. S. & CO., BANKERS. 

DAY W. B., GRAIN AND COMMISSION 
MERCHANT. 

Fisher C. W., boot and shoe manufacturer. 



FISHER J. F. & CO., PROPRIETOR PERU 
CITY MILLS. 

HACKMAN NAUB, WOOD DEALER. 

HALLIGAN T. P., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

HARMON M. C, STORAGE, FORWARD- 
ING AND COMMISSION. 

Helbing C, tobacco and cigars. 

Hellman Isaac, clothing, etc. 

HIGGINS E. & CO., IRON AND HARD- 
WARE. 

HINZENF. CH, DISTILLER AND DEAL- 
ER IN WINES, LIQUORS, ETC. 

Hitchcock A. B., produce and commission. 

Hohss Adolph, proprietor Mountain House. 

Hass , brewer. 

HOLMES HIRAM, LAND AGENT. 

HUNTOON C. H., GROCERIES, PROVI- 
SIONS, ETC. 

ILLINOIS RIVER HOUSE, A. SCHNEI- 
DER, PROPRIETOR. 

JONES HENRY, JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

KAMER & DENNY, STOVES, TIN, COP- 
PER, AND SHEET IRON WARE. 

KEISER FREDERICK, BREWER. 

KELLY CHARLES, PROPRIETOR RAIL- 
ROAD HOTEL. 

Kelly Joseph, saddles and harness. 

KOEING F., BOOT AND SHOE MAKER. 

Knies P. & Co., saddles and harness. 

LADD GEO. D., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

LAUBER & LOEFFLER, FURNITURE 
MANUFACTURERS. 

LEAVITT GEORGE, CORN SHELLING 
AND FANNING MILLS. 

Lerch Adam, proprietor William Tell House. 

Liebich I., baker and confectioner. 

LINLXGER & BROTHER, DRY GOODS 
AND GROCERIES. 

LININGER B. S. & G. W., STOVES, TIN, 
SHEET IRON AND COPPER WARE. 

McMillan & co., dry goods, cloth- 
ing, ETC. 

Mattocks & Brother, livery and sale stables. 

MAZE & BROTHER, LUMBER. 

MOORE'S HOTEL, P. T. MOORE, PROPRI- 
ETOR. 

Morrison William, boot and shoe maker. 

MUNGER C. W., RAILROAD TICKET 
AGENT. 

MURRAY R & A. D., DRY GOODS, ETC. 

NADLER J., GUNS AND SPORTING 
APPARATUS. 

National Hotel, Joseph DuPlain, proprietor. 

Nussbaum L., clothing, etc. 

PERU COMMERCIAL, J. DALRYMPLE, 
PUBLISHER. 

Pendergast Richard, dry goods, etc. 

REAM E.. GROCERIES, WINES, LI- 
QUORS AND CIGARS. 

KING & STRAOSE, CLOTHING. 

Sapp E., saddles and harness. 

Scherzer Wm., watches and jewelry. 

SCHMALDT A. W., DAGUERREIAN 
ARTIST. 

Smith A., baker and confectioner. 

SMITH S. G, AGENT, DRUGS, MEDI- 
CINES, ETC. 



170 



G. W. HAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 



STEDMAN C. & CO., PROPRIETORS OF 

PATENT SLIP. 
UTHOFF WILLIAM, TOBACCO, SNUFF 

AND CIGARS. 
WAGENKNECHT C. T., FORWARDING 

AND COMMISSION. 
WHITE J. B., DRY GOODS, BOOTS, 

SHOES, ETC. 
WINSLOW E., DRUGS, MEDICINES, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 
Winslow E , postmaster. 
WINSTON R. A., ICE MERCHANT. 
WINSTON R. L., IRON AND HARD- 
WARE, LININGER'S BLOCK. 
YOUNG NASSON, LUMBER. 
5IES1NG H., PHYSICIAN AND DEALER 

IN DRUGS, MEDICINES, ETC. 



PESOTUM, 



A post office of Champaign county. 
H. Thompson, Postmaster. 



PETERSBURG, 

A thriving post village, capital of Menard 
county, on the Sangamon river, 22 miles 
northwest from Springfield. The river is 
navigable for small boats to this place. 
Jacob Gakbeu, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

^ETNA INSURANCE COMPANY, A. P. 
WRIGHT, AGENT. 

ALEX. C. WOOD, DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL STORE. 

AMES & BROTHER, BOOKS AND FANCY 
NOTION DEALERS. 

Bale & Hill, wool dealers. 

BEAN K. H. & L. T., HOUSE AND SIGN 
PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

BELL JAMES W., MANUFACTURER OF 
BEEHIVES. 

Brooks A. J., attorney at law. 

Brown D. C, drugs and medicines. 

Carey L. H., clocks and time pieces. 

CLAY H. L, PUBLISHER OF THE MEN- 
ARD INDEX, PETERSBURG. 

Congill W. M. & Son, dry goods, clothing, 
hats, caps, and family groceries. 

Dawson W. C, saddle and harness. 

Harris & Green, attorneys at law. 

Hutchinson William T., manufacturer of 
shingles. 

Levering & Campbell, dry goods and clothing. 

McAlister W. F., botanic physician. 

Marenberg J., M.D. 

Osburn T. B., drugs and medicines. 

PHILLIPS DR. JOHN, ILLINOIS EYE 
INFIRMARY. 

Rainey A. F., physician. 

Riker & Co., saddle and harness manufac- 
tory. 



SALEM LODGE, No. 123 (I. 0. 0. F.), 
meets every Tuesday evening, at Ma- 
sonic Hall. W. S. Robbins, N. G. 

SEAMS & CLEMENS, proprietors North 
American House, north-east corner of 
public scmare. 

Stephenson & Grey, physicians and surgeons. 

Walker Albert, stoves and tinware. 

WARNSING J. W., READY MADE 
CLOTHING. 

WOOD ALEX. C, DRY GOODS, HATS k 
CAPS. 

Wright A. D. & Co,, general merchants. 

White A. K., livery stable. 



PETTY'S, 



A post office of Lawrence county. 
Robert A. Durline, Postmaster. 



PHILLIPSTOWN, 

A post village of White county, 165 miles 
southeast from Springfield. 
T. McMahon, Postmaster. 



PIASA, 

A post village of Macoupin county. 
H. G. Tally, Postmaster. 



PIATT COUNTY 

Is situated in the east central part of the 
state, and has an area of 270 square miles. 
It is intersected by the north fork of Sanga- 
mon river, which flows in a south-west direc- 
tion. The surface is nearly level, and the 
soil fertile. The county consists of prairie 
and timbered land, the former being the most 
predominant. Corn, wheat, oats and pork, 
are the staples. It contains a number of 
churches, and has about 50 pupils attending 
public schools. 

The Great Western railroad intersects the 
state, and has added much to its importance. 
Capital, Monticello. Population, 4,800. 



COUNTY OFFICERS: 

Comity Judge and Master in Chancery, 
Alex. Geo. Boter. 

Associate Judges, John Mosgrove, Jas. 
Ater. 

County Clerk, Jas. L. Miller. 

Treasurer and Assessor, Wm. T. Foster. 

School Commissioner, Thos. Mulligan. 

County Surveyor, Jas. Brtden. 

Sheriff, Samuel Morain. 

Coroner, Geo. Hickman. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. Lewis J. Bond. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



171 



PICAYUNE, 

A post office of Warren county, 45 miles 
north-east from Nauvoo. 

L. S. Olmstead, Postmaster. 



PIERCE, 

A post village of Will county. 
Wit. Seaver, Postmaster. 



PIERCEVILLE, 

A post office of De Kalb county. 
Moses Hill, Postmaster. 



PIKE COUNTY 

Is situated in the west part of the state, bor- 
dering on Missouri, and has an area of 750 
square miles. It extends from the Illinois 
river, on the east, to the Mississippi, which 
forms its south-western boundary. It is tra- 
versed by a side channel of the Mississippi, 
called Snycartee slough, and also drained 
by McKee's bay and Little Muddy creeks. 
The surface is rolling, and consists of prairies 
and forests, the proportions of which are 
nearly equal. The soil is extremely fertile, 
and extensively cultivated. Corn, wheat, 
oats, potatoes, pork and butter, are the sta- 
ples. It contains about 25 churches, several 
newspaper offices, and has about 4,000 pu- 
pils attending public schools. Stone coal is 
abundant, and the rivers afford excellent 
facilities for exporting the various articles of 
produce to northern and southern markets. 
An extension of the Great Western railroad 
is being built, which will change materially 
the appearance of the county. Capital, 
Pittsfield. Population, about 28,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, A. Grubb. 
County Clerk, S. Grigsby. 
Treasurer, D. D. Hicks. 
Surveyor, H. P. Buchanan. 
School Commissioner, J. J. Topliff. 
Coroner, A. StJohn. 



PILOT, 

A post village of Vermilion county, about 42 
miles north by west from Paris. 
A. W. Brittingham, Postmaster. 



PILOT GROVE, 

A post office of Hancock county. 
Nelson Andrews, Postmaster. 



PILOT HILL, 

A post office of Mason county. 
John Pemberton, Postmaster. 



PINKNEYVILLE, 

A post village, capital of Perry county, on 
Big Beaucoup creek, 134 miles south from 
Springfield. It contains, beside the county 
buildings, several stores. 

Alex. D. Gosney, Postmaster. 



PINGREE GROVE, 

A post office of Kane county. 
Andrew Pingree, Postmaster. 



PINK PRAIRIE, 



A post office of Henry county. 
Nathan H. Anderson, Postmaster. 



PIN OAK, 



A post office of Wayne county. 
Jas. B. Manahan, Postmaster. 



PISGAT, 

A post office of Greene county. 
Jas. Irwin, Postmaster. 



PITMAN, 

A post office of A.dams county. 
Robt. Moore, Postmaster. 



PITTSFIELD, 

A neat thriving post village, capital of Pike 
county, on a prairie, 70 miles west by south 
from Springfield. It is surrounded by a 
rich farming country, diversified by prairies 
and timbered lands. 

It contains a court house, several churches, 
and two newspaper offices. Population, 
about 1,200. 

S. L. Crane, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

ATLAS HOTEL, THOMAS THOMSON, 
PROPRIETOR. 

Barker & Kerman, dry goods, tailoring and 
clothing, etc. 

BENNETT L., BOOTS, SHOES, CLOTH- 
ING, ETC. 

CANNON J. A. & CO., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, & CROCKERY. 



172 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



CLAYTON W. H, STOVE & TIN WARE 

DEALER. 
CUNNINGHAM F. M., PUBLISHER OF 

PIKE COUNTY FREE PRESS. 
DRAKE W., stoves and tin ware. 
Fish Benjamin F., house, sign, and ornamen- 
tal painter. 
Gilmer & Weed, attorneys at law. 
Grimshaw William A., attorney at law. 
HESCHELE GEORGE, PLOW & WAGON 

SHOP. 
Hirschelmer Samuel, ready made clothing. 
JOHNSTON & HUBBARD, DRY GOODS, 

BOOTS & SHOES. 
Johnston & Hubbard, dry goods, hats, caps, 

fine goods, etc. 
KENNEY J. A., DRY GOODS. 
Lame Charles R., undertaker. 
MAIN C. W., CLOCK & WATCH MAKER, 

WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 
MATTHEWS A. C, attorney at law and 

solicitor. 
PENNINGTON J., LIVERY STABLE. 
Petty James, saddle and harness maker. 
SCANLAND R. W., ATTORNEY AT LAW 

& JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 
Sims J., daguerreian artist. 
WELLS, GRAY & CO., DRY GOODS, 

READY MADE CLOTHING. 



PLAINFTELD, 

A post village of Will county, 155 miles 
north-east by north from Springfield. 
King J. Hammond, Postmaster. 



PLAINVIEW, 



A post village of Macoupin county. 
David Gore, Postmaster. 



PLANO 

Is a thriving post village of Kendall county, 
on the line of the Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy railroad, 10 miles from Oswego, the 
county seat, and 44 miles from Chicago. Big 
Rock and Little Rock creeks respectively 
form its south-western, western, and north- 
eastern boundaries. The streams emyty into 
the Fox river about one mile and a half below 
the village, and afford excellent water power, 
the first named being fed by living springs, 
and its waters never freezing. 

In point of commerce, Piano is the most 
important town in the county, having ship- 
ped during the past year over 100,000 bush- 
els of wheat, and 77,994 bushels of corn. Its 
growth has been rapid, having been laid out 
in 1854, and now containing a church, a 
large academy, two fine flour mills, two saw- 
mills, and an extensive sash and blind facto- 
ry, and a mill for shelling corn and grinding 
feed on a large scale. All these manufacto- 



ries are operated by steam power. There 
are also here two mammoth warehouses, ca- 
pable of holding 70,000 bushels of grain ; ten 
stores, and a good public house, called the 
Eagle Hotel. 

The plain on which the village stands is 
composed of a rich and fertile soil, from two 
to three feet deep, and underlaid with a 
strata of sand and gravel, which drains the 
surface and renders the atmosphere pure and 
healthy. Population, 600. 

G. D. Henning, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BARBER J. C, PROPRIETOR BARBER'S 

EAGLE HOTEL. 
BULLOCK H. E., DRUGS AND GENERAL 

MERCHANT. 
Cass Jacob, produce and commission dealer. 
CASTLE M. B., BANKER & DEALER IN 

EXCHANGE. 
Clark J. D., boarding house. 
Crawford Rev. L. P. 
Eldredge II., merchant, 
Ervin W, justice of the peace. 
Hame J. S., harness manufacturer. 
Henning H. B., dry goods, hats, caps, boots 

and shoes, etc. 
HENNINGS & STEWARD, DRY GOODS, 

HATS, CAPS, BOOTS, ETC. 
Newell C. W., physician. 
NEWELL O. W., M.D., OFFICE ON JOHN 

STREET. 
Steward L., attorney at law. 
STEWARD, HENNING & CO., CMMISSION 

& FORWARDING MERCHANTS, & 

DEALERS IN LIME, SALT, COAL & 

PRODUCE. 
Tripps & Henning, lumber dealers. 
VAN OLINDA J., LIVERY AND SALE 

STABLES. 
Walter Christian, cabinet maker. 
Winslow Rev. A. S. 



PLATO, 

A post village of Iroquois county, on the 
Iroquois river, about 75 miles south by west 
from Chicago. 

John Wilson, Postmaster. 



PLATTEVILLE, 

A post village of Kendall county. 
Daniel Rouse, Postmaster. 



PLEASANT HILL, 

A post village of Pike county, about 80 miles 
west-south-west from Springfield. 
John A. Thomas, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



173 



PLEASANT PLAINS, 
A post office of Sangamon county. 
Thos. Thcrley, Postmaster. 



PLEASANT RIDGE, 

A post village of Rock Island county. 
Jas. Taylor, Postmaster. 



PLEASANT SHALE, 

A post office of Franklin county. 
John Foster Fitzpatrick, Postmaster 



PLEASANT VALE, 

A post village of Pike county, 90 miles west 
by south from Springfield. 

Stephen Shipmax, Postmaster. 



PLEASANT VALLEY, 

A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
Thos. Deeds, Postmaster. 



PLEASANT VIEW, 

A post village of Schuyler county, on the 
road between Rushville and the Illinois river. 
L. M. Hober, Postmaster. 



PLUM, 

A post office of Cook county. 
G. F. Skidder, Postmaster. 



PLUM HILL, 



A post office of Washington county. 
Stephen Green, Postmaster. 



PLTJM RIVER, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, 145 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
Miles Tyrell, Postmaster. 



PLYMOUTH, 

Is a thriving post village, situated in the 
eastern part of Hancock county, on the Chi- 
cago and Quincy railrond, 16 miles from 
Carthage, the county seat, 42 from Quincy, 
and 100 from Springfield. This town is one 
of a good degree of activity, and enjoys a 
very healthy climate ; is in the centre of a 
highly productive farming district, having 



wood, coal and water in abundance, and of 
the best quality. 

Immense shipments of grain and produce 
are made at this point to Chicago, Quincy, 
and other points. The town contains two 
good schools and an academy, where the 
various English branches are taught, free of 
charge ; four brick churches, two steam saw- 
mills, one steam flour mill, two extensive 
brick manufactories, all of which are doing 
an extensive business. There are, also, ex- 
cellent stone quarries in the neighborhood. 
On Crooked creek, a short distance from the 
village, there are two excellent steam mills, 
and also two carding mills. 

The railroad from Springfield to Keokuk 
passes through this place, adding much to its 
business importance. The village contains 
two good hotels, the principal of which is 
the Plymouth House. Population of village 
and township, 2,200. 

Wh. M. King, Jr., Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

BELL & HAMILTON, DRY GOODS AND 
GENERAL MERCHANTS. 

Bell J. W., farmer. 

BID WELL E., PROPRIETOR PLYMOUTH 
PLOW FACTORY. 

Broyles P., proprietor of the Virginia House. 

Cook L. A., farmer. 

DERR W. M., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Eidson B. A., farmer. 

ELLIOTT J., DEALER IN DRY GOODS, 
GROCERIES & PRODUCE. 

Ewing A. M., restaurant and groceries. 

EW1NG A. M., POLICE MAGISTRATE. 

Gatman T. L., wagon maker. 

Hahan A. W., editor and proprietor of the 
Plymouth Locomotive. 

Hayden John, blacksmith. 

Higley David, blacksmith. 

Houton M. M., pbvsician and surgeon. 

KING MRS. M., DEALER IN DRY GOODS 
& GROCERIES. 

King A. M., physician and surgeon. 

Kinsey & Graham, dry goods and general 
merchants. 

Lawton S. H., furniture and agricultural im- 
plements. 

LAWTON J. H., FORWARDING & COM- 
MISSION MERCHANT. 

Linn D. G, physician and surgeon. 

Long D., farmer. 

Lowten J. H., stoves and tinware. 

Madison R. T., farmer. 

Methle Philip, groceries and provisions. 

MILTON WILLIAM, POSTMASTER. 

NEWMAN A. S., DRY GOODS, DRUGS, & 
GENERAL DEALER. 

Newman A. S., hardware and drugs. 

Newman A. S., groceries, boots and shoes. 

Ogden & Moore, livery and sale stables. 

Peacock & Pinnock, proprietors of saw-mill. 

Randolph J. M., dry goods and general mer- 
chant. 



174 



G W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Richie John, farmer. 
Seare C. S., farmer. 
Tewk H., boots and shoes. 
Tillerts Samuel, provision dealer. 
VANDOORN WILLIAM H., WATCH AND 
CLOCK MAKER. 



Walton C. 0., lumber, lath and shingles. 
WILSON O, Proprietor Plymouth House, 

east side public square. (See adv't.) 
Young E. H., farmer. 
Young Harvey, proprietor saw mill. 



C. WILSON, PEOPEIETOE. 
East Side ©f the Public Square, Plymouth, 



GOOD STABLES ARE ATTACHED TO THE HOUSE. 

The House has been newly furnished and refitted, and is not surpassed by any House 
in Hancock County. Stages leave the House daily, at 9 o'clock, A. M., 

FOR CARTHAGE AND KEOKUK. 



Free Carriages to and from all Trains of Cars to the House. 



POCOHONTAS, 



A post village of Bond county, near Shoal 
creek, 10 miles south-west from Greenville. 
It has an academy, a number of stores and 
several saw mills in the immediate vicinity. 
Wm. Watkins, Postmaster. 



POINT PLEASANT, 

A post village of Champaign county. 
Thos. Lotxs, Postmaster. 



Polo boasts one of the spiciest country pa- 
pers in the West — the Transcript, under 
the management of Charles Meigs jr., whose 
efforts are being crowned with that success 
which his earnest endeavors to please his 
patrons warrant. This town is noted in its 
immediate vicinity as being the residence of 
the celebrated dog " Moreover" for occa- 
sional anecdotes in regard to whose astonish- 
ing ability refer to the local columns of the 
"Transcript." The town was named in honor 
of Marco Polo, an Italian, celebrated for his 
researches in the Chinese empire and Island 
of Japan. Population, 1,500. 
Geo. D. Reid, Postmaster. 



POLO 

Is a thriving, energetic village of Ogle county 
in the midst of a country early settled and at 
the present time advanced to prominent posi- 
tion among the new sections of the West. 
It was located and laid out in the spring of 
1S54, since which time it has grown with 
rapidity and now presents the appearance of 
a town, at least five times the number of 
years which have passed since its settlement. 
It has a larger area of country to support it 
than any other town in northern Illinois, its 
beauty and healthiness being unsurpassed. 
Within the past, year improvements have 
been constantly going on, and the present 
year will witness a marked change for the 
better. The Illinois Central railroad passes 
through this place and has tended greatly to 
an advancement of the interests of the town. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams R. L., dealer in boots and shoes. 
AUSTIN CURTIN, Jr., & CO., BOOTS, 

HATS, CAPS, GLOVES, ETC. 
BARBER, FRISBEE & CO., BANKERS 

AND EXCHANGE OFFICE. 
BARBERS L. N., DRY GOODS, CLOTH- 
ING, BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS 

AND CAPS. 
Benedict T. B., watchmaker and jeweler. 
BOGUE V. A., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 

OFFICE OVER BURNS & WARREN'S 

DRUG STORE. 
Burns & Warren, druggists. 
BUCKS DANIEL, DRY GOODS, BOOTS 

AND SHOES. 
BURWELL WILLIAM B., HARDWARE, 

STOVES, ETC. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



175 



BURBANK J. C, M. D., HOMEOPATHIC 
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

BUSH G. H., AUCTION AND COMMIS- 
SION MERCHANT. 

Campbell & Carpenter, attorneys and coun- 
selors at law. 

Cooper Geo. W., saddle, harness and trunk 
maker. 

EMPIRE HOUSE, W. RUSSEL, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Grimm M. & Co., dealers in ready made 
clothing. 

Hotchkiss E. A. Mrs., millinery and dress- 
maker. 

Hill E., attorney at law. 

Meacham N. D., attorney and counselor. 

MEIGS CHARLES, jr„ EDITOR AND PRO- 
PRIETOR OF THE "POLO TRAN- 
SCRIPT." 

MOORE J. H., DRUGS AND MEDICINES. 

MURRAY H. N., GROCERIES, BOOTS 
AND SHOES. 

Norton & Preston, dealers in thrashing ma- 
chines and wagons. 

"POLO TRANSCRIPT, 1 ' published by Chas. 
Meigs, jr. 

RYON N. H, ATTORNEY AT LAW AND 
NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Webster V. B., furniture dealer. 

Woodruff Newton, druggist. 



PONTIAC, 

A flourishing post village, capital of Living- 
ston county, on Vermilion river and on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago rail- 
road, 110 miles north-east from Springfield. 
Ben. W. Gray, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BEATTIE CHARLES J., ATTORNEY AT 

LAW. 
BOYER G. W., DEALER IN CABINET 

WARE. 
Brown & Co., general groceries. 
Brown F. C, Agent for the ./Etna Insurance 

Co. 
Bettelheim Dr., physician and surgeon. 
Buck, Nelson & Co., surveyors. 
Cowan & Lee, dry goods and variety store. 
Dehner John & Co., lumber merchants. 
Dehner John & Co., general merchant. 
DUFF & HARDING, ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW, SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY, 

LAND AGENTS, ETC. 
Fisher & Lyons, carpenters and joiners. 
Franklin Saloon, Nicholas & Bro., proprietors. 
Frost S. L., jr., painter and glazier. 
Gillet, Yansaum & Co., dealers in pork, etc. 
Glen A. P., dealer in fruit and ornamental 

trees, flowers, etc. 
Gimsul & Maples, builders. 
Hulsey J. B., physician and surgeon. 
I. 0. of G. T., second story of Cassidy & 

Ladd's store. 



Jones H. T., merchant tailor. 

Johnson D., M. D., physician and mrgeon. 

McNichol James, manufacturer of coots and 

shoes. 
Martin & Sellman, steam planing mill. 
Miller W. T., blacksmith. 
Meyers & Peck butchers. 
Perry & Norton, physicians and surgeons. 
Phelps B. T., dry goods, queensware, and 

general merchant. 
ROLLINGS PHILIP, JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 
RENOE M. A., PROPRIETOR OF THE 

"LIVINGSTON COUNTY NEWS," 
Saul Catherine Mrs., milliner, etc. 
Scott Alex., harness and saddle manufacturer. 
Spencer B. & G., livery stables. 
Streamer Jacob, justice of the peace. 
Strevell & Kinsell, hardware. 
Sweet & Stewart, phvsicians and surgeons, 
VANSAUN ALEX.', JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 

PONTOOSUC, 

A thriving post village of Hancock county, 
on the Mississippi river, 215 miles above St. 
Louis. The country adjacent is very produc- 
tive and rapidly improving. This town har 
grown up since 1846. 

Henry Walker, Postmaster. 



POPE COUNTY 

Is situated in the south part of the state, and 
has an area of 370 square miles. The Ohio 
river, which separates it from Kentucky, 
forms the south-east boundary. The county 
is also drained by Lusk and Big Bay creeks. 
The surface is rolling, and the soil in many 
parts is very fertile. Corn, oats, grass, cat- 
tle and swine are the staples. It contains 
about 40 churches and has a large number 
of pupils attending public schools. Mineral 
springs, also lead and iron, exist to a great 
extent throughout the county. The Vin- 
cennes and Paducah railroad, just finished, 
crosses the state. Capital, Golconda. Pop- 
ulation, about "7,000. 



POPE CREEK, 



A post office of Mercer county. 
Henry Bridger, Postmaster. 



POPLAR GROVE, 

A post office of Boone county. 
Henry Johnson, Postmaster. 



PORT BYRON, 



A post office of Rock Island county. 
J. H. Lyford, Postmaster. 



176 



G. W. HAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 



PORT CLINTON, 

A post oj&ce of Lake county. 
Jacob C. Bloom, Postmaster. 



PORTLAND, 

A post village of Whiteside county, on Rock 
river, 140 miles north by west from Spring- 
field. 

Soloxon M. Seely, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE BIRD, 



A post office of Shelby county. 
A Y. Harper, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE CITY, 

A thriving post village of McDonough county, 
on the line of the Northern Cross railroad, six 
miles south-east from Galesburg. 
Alonzo Barnes, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades. Etc- 

Emos Wm. W., house, sign and ornamental 
painter. 

BARNES & FISHER, DRY GOODS, CAR- 
PETS, GROCERIES, ETC. 

BROWN & RODGERS, HARDWARE, 
STOYES AND TIN WARE. 

Bradbury L. H., furniture and cabinet ware 

COOPER HOUSE, CORNER CENTRE 
AND MAIN STREETS, J. C. CAN- 
FIELD, PROPRIETOR. 

CHAPMAN J. M., DRY GOODS. GROCE- 
RIES AND HARDWARE. 

"CHRONICLER" PRINTING OFFICE, 
Ben. W. Seton, proprietor. 

DRAKE JOSEPH, STAPLE AND FANCY 
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, HARD- 
WARE, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 

FAIRMAN & SEIBER, BAKERY AND 
CONFECTIONERY. 

Folsom S. Y., designer and builder. 

HAMILTON JOSEPH A., boots and shoes, 
manufactory, Main st. 

Hamilton James M., lumber and shingles. 

Hardy E. M., clothing store. 

Kimber Dr. A. L., physician and surgeon. 

Kimber E. S., watchmaker and jeweler, 
Main st. 

Kreider H. W. & W. L,, physicians and sur- 
geons. 

Luper David, coal dealer. 

McCaskill A., attorney and counselor at law. 

Metcalf D. P., forwarding and commission 
merchant. 

OLDISSA DRAKE, GENERAL MER- 
CHANT. 

Parker James R., attorney at law. 

Sanford & Babcoek, staple and fancy dry 
goods. 



SEATON B W., EDITOR & PUBLISHER 
OF THE "PRAIRIE CITY CHRON- 
ICLER." 

Slack W. G., surgeon and dentist. 

SPARKS & SHOUP, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, HARDWARE AND READY 
MADE CLOTHING. 

Turpin & Briukerhoff, general merchants. 

Yanduvne A., land agent. 

WASHBURN L. P., DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES, BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



PRAIRIE CREEK, 

A post office of Logan county. 
H. B. Stephens, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE DE LONG, 

A post office of St. Clair county. 
Geo. H. Carr, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE DU ROCHER, 

A post office of Randolph county, 14 miles 
north-west from Kaskaskia. The name is 
derived from a rocky bluff which rises be- 
hind the village. 
Wm. Henry, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE HILL, 

A post office of Williamson county. 
P. F. Corder, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIE MOUND, 

A post office of Fayette county. 
E. Pope, Postmaster. 



PRAIRIEVILLE, 

A post village of Rock Island county. 
J as. A. Donaldson, Postmaster. 



PREEMPTON, 



A post village of Mercer county, 155 miles 
north-north-west from Springfield. 
Geo. W. Wright, Postmaster. 



PRESTON, 



A post village of Randolph county, 
R. Clinton Mann, Postmaster. 



PRINCETON, 



A thriving post village, capital of Bureau 
county, on the fine of the Chicago, Burling- 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTOEY. 



m 



ton and Quincy railroad, 65 miles north from 
Peoria. It is situated in a fertile prairie, one 
or two miles east from Bureau creek. Two 
newspapers are printed here. 
C. N. Pink, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ALLEN A. E., ATTORNEY AT LAW AND 
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, H. H. PIKE, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Anthony W C, physician and surgeon. 

Apthorp D. J., saloon. 

Austin H., physician and surgeon. 

BACON & WHITE, dealers in stoves, sheet 
iron, tin and copper ware. 

Bieekel G. W., professor of German. 

Brainard D. & G., dentists. 

Broadly A. R., physician and surgeon. 

Chapman E. C. & A. S., hardware, etc. 

Crittenden F., general merchant, 

Delano & Burr, crockery and variety store. 

Fagercrantz P., dealer in watches and jew- 
elry. 

Fisher Brown, fancy dry goods. 

Foster & Jansen, booksellers and stationers. 

Gardiner E. M. Mrs., teacher of German 
language. 

GRIMES JOHN M., ATTORNEY AT 
LAW AND LAND AGENT. 

Griffiths A. E., M.D., physician and surgeon. 

Hatch George W., tannery. 

HATCH G. W., PATENTEE OF A NEW 
AND QUICK MODE OF TANNING, 
SUPERIOR TO ANY. 

Masters W. H., ambrotype artist, etc. 

Newell P. N. Mrs., teacher of music. 

O'Hare & Hyde, bakery. 

OSBORNE S. & CO., PRINCETON MAR- 
BLE WORKS. 

PADDOCK & SEAMAN, HARDWARE 
AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLE- 
MENTS. 

Paddock George L., notary public. 

PRIESTLY & CARPENTER, LUMBER 
MERCHANTS. 

Shugart & Crossley, drugs, medicines, etc. 

STOWELL & CO., MANUFACTURERS 
SADDLES AND HARNESS, AND 
DEALERS IN CARRIAGE TRIM- 
MINGS, ETC. 

WARREN WM, WHOLESALE AND RE- 
TAIL DEALER IN LIME, CEMENT, 
LUMBER, ETC. 

WEBSTER E., DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, 
HARDWARE, CUTLERY AND GEN- 
ERAL MERCHANT. 

WILLIAMS JOSEPH S., ATTORNEY AT 
LAW. 

ZEARING W. M., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW AND SOLI- 
CITOR IN CHANCERY. 

12 



PRINCEVILLE, 

A thriving post village of Peoria county, 20 
miles north-west from Peoria. 
Peter Sweat, Postmaster. 



PROPHETSTOWN, 

A post village of Whiteside county, on Rock 
river, 1 5 miles from its mouth. It has a fine 
water power under improvement. 
N. Thompson, Postmaster. 



PROSPECT, 



A post village of Lee county. 
R. Trowbridge, Postmaster. 



PROVIDENCE, 

A post village of Bureau county, 42 miles 
north from Peoria. 

Daniel Williams, Postmaster. 



PROVISO, 



A post office of Cook county. 
Augustus Porter, Postmaster. 



PULASKI COUNTY, 

Is situated in the southern part of the state, 
and contains about 180 square miles. The 
Ohio river, which separates it from Kentucky, 
forms its boundary on the south-east, and 
Cash river on the north-west. The surface 
is partly covered with forest, and the soil of 
the river bottoms is fertile. Corn, oats cat- 
tle and pork are the staples. It contains 
several churches, and has about 300 pupils 
attending public schools. It is intersected 
by the Illinois Central Railroad. Capital, 
Caledonia. Population, 5,700. 



PULASKI, 

A post village of Hancock county, 85 miles 
north-west from Springfield. 
P. P. Newcomb, Postmaster. 

GORDON GEORGE, FARMER, (lives in 
Adams county). 



PUTNAM COUNTY, 

Is situated in the north central part of the 
state, and has an area of 200 square miles 
It is intersected by the Illinois river, navig- 
able by steam boats. The surface is undul- 
ating, the soil productive and easily culti- 
vated. The county contains extensive prairies 



178 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



and is well supplied with timber. Corn, 
wheat, grass and pork are the staples. It 
contains about 15 churches, and has over 
1,000 pupils attending public schools. Stone 
coal is found in the county. The county- 
is intersected by the Illinois Central and 
Bureau Valley Railroad. Capital, Hennepin. 
Population, 6,800. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Joseph D. McCarthy. 

County Clerk, Amos T. Puryiance. 

Circuit Clerk, Geo. Dent. 

Sheriff, Jeff. Durley. 

School Commissioner, Chas. Cross. 



QUINCY, 

Is a nourishing city, capital of Adams county, 
beautifully situated on the Mississippi river, 
160 miles above St. Louis, 110 north of west 
from Springfield, and 268 south-west from 
Chicago, at the western terminus of the line 
of railroad connecting it with the latter place. 
It is the central market for a country unsur- 
passed for fertility and productiveness, still 
enjoying extraordinary facilities for manu- 
facturing, mechanical and mercantile pur- 
suits. Abundance of coal is found in close 
proximity to it, and an unlimited supply of 
pine and other lumber easily attainable from 
the upper waters of the Mississippi, arrivals 
of which are of daily occurrance. Immense 
forests of walnut, oak, maple and other hard 
wood, cover the islands of the river at this 
point and on the opposite shore, with every 
facility for its ready manufacture and use. 
The bluffs are of limestone, admirably adapt- 
ed for building purposes, and lime and brick 
are manufactured on an extensive scale. 
The beauty of the location, the healthiness 
of the climate, and the cheapness of living 
have had a tendency to attract to this point 
large numbers of mechanics and men of 
once limited means, who are now among the 
most wealthy of her citizens. 

Quincy was selected as a town site in 1821, 
by the Hon. John Wood, now Lieutenant 
Governor of the state, who, in the fall of 
1824, applied for and obtained an act for the 
establishment of Adams county, the limits 
being the same as at present exists. During 
the years from 1825 to 18-34, the city grew 
but slowly. In the latter year an act of 
incorporation was granted, at which time it 
changed for the better, and has since ad- 
vanced with a rapidity and permanence 
which has marked but few of our western 
cities. In 1835 the population amounted to 
700, and in 1837 it had increased to 1,653. 
In the same year a large number of fine 
buildings were erected, among which were 
the Quincy House and the court house. In 
1841 the number of inhabitants was 2,686, 



and the sales of produce were 275,000 bush- 
els of wheat, 95,000 bushels corn, 50,000 
bushels of oats, 12,000 packed hogs, and the 
number of steamboat arrivais 1,000. Com- 
ing still further down to the year 1849, the 
population had increased to 5,500, and the 
city contained 126 stores, hotels and public 
buildings. The annual increase in popula- 
tion from 1849 to 1857 has been about 1,600. 
In 1853, Quincy was made a port of entry 
under the collection of New Orleans, and is 
the only point on the Mississippi where 
steamers of heavy draft can land at low 
stages of water. On the opening of the 
Chicago and Quincy railroad to this place, a 
new impetus was given to trade and com- 
merce, and a large section of country made 
tributary, from many points of which large 
quantities of grain and produce are annually 
brought here for shipment. 

Several lines of railroad are in contem- 
plation, and will soon be built, with a view 
to add still more to the commercial interests 
of the city, the most important of which is 
the Quincy and Toledo line. The amount 
contributed towards this road by the citizens 
of Quincy and the towns through which it 
will pass, now reaches $300,000, two-thirds 
of which was subscribed in this city. $150,- 
000 has also been subscribed towards the 
road uniting Quincy with various important 
points in Missouri, by way of the Hannibal 
and St. Joseph Railroad, connecting at 
Palmyra. The manufacturing interests of 
Quincy are of no inconsiderable amount, 
comprising six large flouring mills, viz. : 
the Castle, City, Centre, Eagle, Star and the 
Alto, capable of grinding 660,000 bushels of 
wheat ; two corn and feed mills, grinding 
135,000 bushels, and four saw mills in the 
city and its immediate vicinity, producing 
19,500,000 feet of lumber annually. Four 
machine shops have constant business, mak- 
ing sales throughout Illinois, Missouri and 
Iowa, the value of whose manufactures 
amounts to $195,000. Quincy contains the 
largest stove foundry on the Mississippi, em- 
ploying fome 60 hands ; besides this there 
are four other large foundries, all doing a 
very heavy business. In addition to the 
above, eight firms, who combine manufactur- 
ing and selling stoves and tinware, do a 
business of $185,000. Two firms engaged in 
copper and sheet iron working turn out 
$25,000 worth of work annually ; four furni- 
ture factories, employing 175 hands, produce 
$207,000 worth annually ; nine wagon fac- 
tories, which in the last ten months of 1857 
produced 1,435 wagons, valued at $107,625 ; 
one plow factory, making 1,100 plows annu- 
ally ; two carriage factories, producing 
$83,000 worth annually ; an agricultural im- 
plement establishment, doing a business of 
$25,250 per annum ; thirteen cooperages or 
barrel factories, doing a business of $200,000 
annually; eight extensive brick yards, em- 
ploying 119 hands, and producing annually 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



179 



56,310,000 bricks, worth $160,000; three 
lime kilns, producing $45,000 annually; two 
marble working establishments, doing busi- 
ness to the amount of $27,000 annually ; a 
wooden ware factory, turning out manufac- 
tured articles to the amount of $15,000 
annually ; two boiler factories, producing 
$47,000 worth of work annually ; six planing 
mills, whose business amounts to $126,000 
annually ; eight distilleries, producing annu- 
ally $600,000 worth of liquors ; five brew- 
eries, doing a business of $40,000 annually ; 
two soda water manufactories, doing business 
to the amount of $35,000 (these are in oper- 
ation only during the summer months); one 
vinegar and one rope manufactory ; two soap 
and candle factories ; three book binderies ; 
ten saddle and harness factories; fourteen 
confectionery manufactories, the amount of 
whose business cannot be correctly ascer- 
tained. The packing of provisions is carried 
on to the extent of about 10,000 barrels 
annually. 

There are here five newspaper offices, hav- 
ing daily and weekly issues, viz.: Herald, 
Whir/, Republiean,Tribunc and Courier; three 
banks, four good hotels, the principal of 
which is the Quincy House (see advt.), and 
twenty-one churches. A most excellent 
literary assciation is in existence, the library 
of which contains about 3,000 volumes. The 
educational advantages of Quincy are good, 
consisting of one college or seminary (Eng- 
lish and German, see advt.), in which are 
taught all the branches as in a collegiate 
course, and accessible for males and females; 
three first class public schools, and many 
others of a private character. In the three 
public schools are taught all the principal 
branches of higher English literature. The 
teachers are paid by the city, and the books 
furnished to students on application, free of 
cost. 

As a city, Quincy stands prominent among 
the monuments of the indomitable energy 
and will of those who have made the state 
what it is, one of the proudest in the Union. 

Austin Brooks, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Adams George, grocer. 

Achlumann C., tobacconist. 

Adams James, general produce dealer and 

packer. 
Allen J. G. & Co., paper hangers. 
Amtzen L., dry goods and general merchant. 
Anderson J. D., doctor. 
Anderson W. S. M., dry goods and groceries. 
Andrews C. C, painter and glaizer. 
Asthem Jame3 & Co., proprietors Phcenix 

saw mills. 
AVISE, BROOKS & PARISH, proprietors 

of Quincy Herald. 
Avise W. M. & Co., city printers. 
AVISE WM. M., justice of the peace. 



Bader W. A., dry goods and groceries. 

BAGBY, BURNS & WOOD, manufacturers 
of Castle Mills XXX family flour. 

BAKER JAMES T., wholesale and retail 
dealer in groceries and willow ware, 
liquors, etc., Public square. 

Baker M., A. M., principal, Quincy High 
School. 

BANK OF QUINCY, COR. MAIN AND 
FOURTH STS., JOHN McGINNIS, Jr., 
Pres't; MAITLAND BOON, Cashier. 

Barnard Arutzer, attorney at law. 

Basse & Hulsman, watchmaker. 

BASSETT MOSES F., M.D., physician and 
surgeon. 

BATTELL, BOYD & WOODRUFF, manu- 
facturers of agricultural machines, Bat- 
tell steel plows, corn planter, wheat 
drills, etc. 

Bennison & Co., lumber merchant. 

Bennison & Marsh, attorneys at law. 

Benaverson T. C, assistant engineer. 

Benkert & Kreitz, groceries and dry goods. 

BENNETT JOHN B., grain and produce 
dealer, cor Main and Front sts. 

BENNETT J. B., packer of beef and pork, 
bet Main and Hampshire sts. 

BENNETT J. B., proprietor of the Star 
livery stables, No. 73 Main st. 

Benning J., groceries and provisions. 

Benson R. S., gas company. 

Bernard & Lockwood, harness makers. 

Bert J. P., tailor. 

Bellteston H, stove and tinware. 

BEVENBROCK FRED., dry goods, grocer- 
ies and general merchant, No. 67 
Seventh cor of York st. 

BLAKESLEY A. M., city clerk, school com- 
missioner and notary public. 

Blackford M., bonnet maker. 

BLACKFORD MRS. S. A. M., milliner and 
dressmaker, No. 28 Fifth st. 

BORBECK JOHN, dry goods, groceries, 
drugs, medicines, etc., Hampshire st. 

Bortlett S. M., city sexton. 

BRADFORD J. M., SADDLE AND HAR- 
NESS MAKER, NO. 81 HAMPSHIRE 
STREET. 

Bradford J. M. & Co., proprietors Quincy 
House 

Bradford J M., livery stables. 

Brocksmidt Joseph, watch maker. 

Brohn J., clothier. 

BROUGHAM T. H., AUCTION AND COM- 
MISSION. 

BROWN & PENFIELD, PROPRIETORS 
STAR MILLS, COR SPRING AND 
FRONT STS. 

Brown C. Jr., boot and shoe store. 

BROWN, DIMMOCK & CO., PROPRIETORS 
CITY FOUNDRY. 

Brown, Dimmock & Co., dry goods, etc. 

BROWN J. W., DEALER IN WATCHES 
CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

Brown William, baker. 

BUCKLEY & DELANO, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW. 



180 



G-. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



BUDDEE A. & L., rectifiers, importers and 
dealers in wines, liquors, tobacco, 
cigars, etc. 

BULL L. & C. A., HARDWARE, CAR- 
RIAGE MATERIALS AND TRIM- 
MINGS, BELTING, ETC. 

CADOGAN JOHN, SHERIFF OF ADAMS 
COUNTY. 

Carr Charles, confectionery. 

Cass B. Cook, auction rooms. 

Castle Edward G., M. D., physician and sur- 
geon. 

CATHER MRS S., PROPRIETOR OF THE 
FARMERS HOUSE, NO. 19 FIFTH 
STREET. 

Chapney A. Miss, principal Jefferson school. 

Chatten B. J., civil engineer of city. 

Childs E. W. & Co , patent roofing. 

CHURCH C. B., GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS, FIFTH ST. 

Cleveland John, wagon maker. 

COATS R. P. & CO., general produce, for- 
warding and commission merchants, and 
general steamboat agents, cor of Main 
and Front sts. 

Comstock & Co., stoves and tinware. 

Cook Fred., cigar manufactory. 

Cother W. H., notary public. 

Crawford Mrs. A., milinery and fancy goods, 
No. 100 Hampshire st. 

Culver S. M. & Co., dry goods, carpets, etc. 

Dunn James E., proprietor Vermont House. 

DAVIS E. M., WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
CLOTHING, CLOTHS, CASSIMERES 
AND VESTING, ETC. 

DAVIS H. S., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW, OFFICE COURT 
HOUSE. 

Davis H. S., superintendent of schools. 

Dayton J. R., book store. 

Dean J. P., attorney at law. 

DELABAR ANTON, PROPRIETOR OF 
QUINCY BREWERY, COR OF FRONT 
AND SPRING STS. 

Dibble A., watchmaker. 

Dick & Bro., brewers. 

Dickhut Win., lumber merchant. 

Dorman, Merriman &Co., lumber merchants. 

Dounan, Merian & Co., lumber merchants. 

Doway & Norton, drugs and medicines. 

DUFF W. L., FORWARDING AND COM- 
MISSION AND PRODUCE MER- 
CHANT. 

DWIGHT E. T., AGENT FOR THE AMER- 
ICAN EXPRESS COMPANY. 

Earnest Sim., brass founder. 

EDMONDSON M., PROPRETOR OF THE 
AMERICAN HOUSE, NO. 17 FOURTH 
STREET. 

Egbers B., merchant tailor. 

Eliot Wm. S., agent for sewing machines. 

Epple John, clerk of market. 

Eubank & Co., wood and lumber merchants. 

Everett E., secretary Quincy gas company. 

Fildcamps John, tailor. 

FISHER F. G., BOOKBINDER, No. 88 
MAIN ST. 



Fisher James, dry goods. 

Fisher Mrs. B., milliner. 

Flack John A., police constable. 

FLAGG & SABAGE, BANKERS. 

Fleachs F. & Co., drugs, etc. 

FOSTER R. H., PORK PACKER AND 
PROVISION DEALER, HAMPSHIRE 
BET SECOND AND THIRD STS. 

Fougen E. & Co., liquors and cigars. 

France Lewis, American tavern. 

Fourguet H., proprietor Barnum's Exchange. 

Galbreath Wm., wagon shop. 

GARDENER JAMES, PROPRIETOR AND 
PRINCIPAL OF QUINCY COMMER- 
CIAL COLLEGE. 

GATCHELL ALFRED, IMPORTER AND 
DEALER IN CHINA, GLASS AND 
QUEENSWARE, PLATED BRIT- 
TANIA AND JAPANNED WARE, 
LAMPS, ETC. 

Geiger, Gardener & White, proprietors of 
Franklin printing office. 

Geise H. A., proprietor Barnum Hotel. 

GILPIN & LOWLAND, LAND DEALERS. 

GODFREY C. 0., wholesale and retail dealer 
in boots, shoes and rubbers, public 
square. 

Golm & Rothgeb, groceries and provisions. 

GOODPASTURE H., dry goods, wholesale 
and retail, and groceries of all kinds, 
No. 69 Hampshire st. 

GOULD & ALLEN, proprietors Quincy plan- 
ing mills, solid water pipe manufactory, 
cor Ohio, Fifth and Delaware sts. 

Graves James 0., police magistrate and jus- 
tice of the peace. 

GREAR AMOS, lumber merchant, cor of 
Broadway and Fifth st. 

Grear E., land office. 

Greenleaf M. F., machinest. 

Gtover J. M., notary public. 

Gugel Nicholas, dry groceries, etc. 

HANKE E., dealer in all kinds of smoking 
and chewing tobacco, cigars, snuff, etc. 
west side of public square. 

HAPPEROTH FREDERICK, groceries and 
provisions, No. 229 Main st. 

Harker S. T., plumber. 

Harrison T., proprietor of the Franklin 
House. 

Harris Wm., confectioner and baker. 

Hauser D., Capt., harbor master. 

Hanworth Rencker, carpenter, etc. 

Head H., harness maker. 

Hedges J., pork packer. 

Heimbuch T., liquor store. 

HELLHAKE & HEINE, tobacconists, 102 
Hampshire st. 

Henrrich Francis, dry goods and groceries. 

Herman D., tailor. 

Hess House, A. Hess, proprietor. 

Hinchman & Loomis, land agents. 

Howland & Jones, stoves and grates. 

HOFFMAN H. H., wholesale and retail drug- 
gist and general dealer in chemicals. 

Howland & Wood, builders. 

Howland & Wood, lumber merchants. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



181 



Howland & Wood, patent roofing. 

Hunt & Lutlnes, attorneys at law. 

Hurlbut & Prevost, produce dealers. 

INNIS A., DRY GOODS, 33 FOURTH ST. 

Jacobis M., clothing store. 

Jager, Charles & Son, stoves and tinware. 

Jake Conrad, groceries, etc. 

JANSEN & SMITH, FURNITURE, EAST 

SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 
Jasper Franz, manufacturer of furniture. 
Jasper Thomas, proprietor Quincy distillery. 
Jonas S. & E., dealers in springs and axles, 

etc. 
Each B. & Son, saddlers. 
KALLE A. J., groceries and provision mer- 
chant. 
KAMPMAN FERDINAND, Western Banner, 

cor of Seventh & York sts . 
Karnes Mrs. A., millinery and fancy goods. 
KEENE C, cigar manufacturer, No. 64 Fifth 

street. 
KESSELS JOS. & CO., restaurant, Broadway 

bet Fourth and Fifth sts. 
Kietz A., groceries and provisions. 
Kiman & Tilton, land agents. 
KINKLE JOHN, JR., dealer in dry goods 

and groceries, cor of Fourth street and 

Broadway. 
Kirkpatrick W. A., librarian. ' 
KOCH REV., agent to Seminary. 
Hoechert H. L., books and fancy goods. 
KONANTY A., dry goods, groceries and 

general merchant, No. 31 Fifth st. 
Kull & Ducker, harness makers. 
Lacld C. & C, dry goods. 
LAKE HERMANN, dry goods and general 

merchant, No. 266 Hampshire st. 
Lane N. T., dry goods. 
LAOGE & BARNUM, manufacturer and 

wholesale dealers in hats, caps, furs, etc., 

No. 85 Hampshire st. 
LAOGE & BARNUM, wholesale dealers in 

millinery goods, 87 Hampshire st. 
Leach E. T., city physician. 
LEACH F. B., M. D., city physician, office 

19 Fourth st. 
LESEM SOLOMON J., dealer in dry goods 

and clothing. 
LETTON R. C, piano and music store, No. 92 

Hampshire St. 
Letton R. E., teacher of music. 
Lightfoot A. C, produce, forwarding and 

commission. 
LINDMAN A., ready made clothing, No. 143 

Hampshire st. 
Livingstone & Steward, wood and willow 

ware. 
LOMINO A. C, fancy goods and variety store, 

No. 110 Main st. 
Lubbe A. J., fancy and staple drv goods. 
LUBLIE B., DRY GOODS, GROCERIES 

AND GENERAL MERCHANT, No. 5 

LEVEE BET. BROADWAY AND 

VERMONT ST. 
LYNDS & TRIBLE, HOUSE AND SIGN 

PAINTERS. 
McGuinnis J. Jr., president of bank. 



McLEAN C. E. Mrs., milliner and fancy 
goods, north side of square bet Third 
and Fourth sts. 

McVay M., proprietor grist mill. 

Mathers Massmann, proprietor of the Sun 
Hotel. 

Maxwell S. W., dealer in boots and shoes. 

MEAD C. M., agent Chicago & Quincy R. R. 

Mellen, Sprague & Co., planing mill. 

Metz Wm., drugs and fancy goods. 

Meyer Henrie, merchant tailor. 

Michael L., clothing. 

Mikesell J., lumber merchant. 

MILLER & PASTORIRES, dry goods, gro- 
ceries, and general merchants, cor. of 
Broadway and 12th street. 

Miller Geo. A., bookstore. 

Mitchell F. L., photographic artist. 

Moore, Hollowbush & Co., bankers. 

Morgan J. D., street commissioner. 

Moses Jacobs, clothier. 

Muller T. Mrs., millinery, etc., etc. 

MUMBY H. E., ALBION HOTEL, EAST 
QUINCY. 

Munroe T.. overseer of poor. 

Murphy John, school visitor. 

Neat Thomas, proprietor of Quincy wooden 
mills. 

Norwood J. E., beef and pork packer. 

Obert M., groceries and provisions. 

Osborne John 0., insurance agent. 

Palmer J. C, baker. 

Parker James A., merchant tailor. 

PARSONS MRS., STRAW AND FANCY 
MILLINERY, room over Hoffman's 
drug store, north side of public square. 

Paliet T., groceries and provisions. 

Pearson E. W., watchmaker. 

Pitman J. E., lumber merchant. 

Pitner C. L. Rev., agent Quincy Seminary. 

Pool L. L., clothing. 

Powers & Finlay, clothing. 

QUINCY HOUSE, Floyds, proprietors. See 
adv't, page 183. 

Quincy Insurance Companv, E. Grove, Pres. 

PRENTISS & CO., COMMISSION AND 
FORWARDING MERCHANTS, and 
dealers in Produce and Provisions. 

Ralston J. N., phvsician. 

RAYNOLDS WALTER, BOOK BINDER, 
over the post office. 

Renneberg S. G., shoe maker. 

Rhodes J., constable, Fall Creek. 

BIDDER H. & CO., TIN, COPPER AND 
SHEET IRON WORKERS, ROOFING, 
GUTTERING, ETC. 

Root Henry, silks and fancy dry goods. • 

Rouff Casper, brewers. 

Rowand I. S. & CO., druggists. 

Rudd A. F., M.D., phvsician and surgeon. 

ST. CHARLES HOTEL, D. W. MILLER, 
PROPRIETOR. 

Salinger J. M & Son. 

Sahland Edward, grocer. 

Samuel & Brother, clothing store. 

SAVAGE C. A. & A. E., NOTARIES PUB- 
LIC AND LAND AG'TS, 117 Mainst 



QUINOY 
ENGLISH AND GERMAN MALE AND FEMALE SEMINARY 



QUINCY, ILLINOIS, 




tl.M. KERSHAW. SlttusE£~=£ 

Incorporated by the Legislature of the State with full Collegiate Powers and Privileges. 



REV. JAMES F. JAQUESS, A.M., President, and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 



EV. GEORGE F. W. NILLEY, A.M., 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 



)HN L. STOUT, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 



EV. JOHN M. EULL, A. M., 

Professor of the German Language and 
Literature. 



Professor of Natural Science. 



ARSHALL M. JOHNSON, A. B., 

Principal of the Male Preparatory Depart- 
partmenU 



MRS. SARAH S. JAQUESS, Governess, 
And Teacher of Rhetoric and History. 



MISS LOUISA E. VANCE, 

Teacher of Collegiate Studies. 



MISS ELIZABETH S. REIGORT, 

Teacher of Drawing and Painting. 



MISS MARY BROCK WAY, 

Teacher of Piano Music. 



MISS MINERVA E. MASTERS, 

Teacher of Guitar Music and Preceptress in 
the Female Preparatory Department. 



MRS. HANNAH S. NILLEY, 

Teacher of Ornamental Needle Work. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



188 



QUINCY HOUS 




OPPOSITE SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SOTARE, CORNER 

MAIN AND FOURTH STREETS. 
WM. H. FLOYD, [PUMIItill®] GEO. P. FLOYD, 

Offices of Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, American Express Co., 
and Stages running to cifferent points, are in the same building. 



Sawyer, Graves & Co., staple and fancy dry 
goods. 

Schardon Geo., boiler maker. 

Schupering & Co., stoves and tin ware. 

Schlag Rench, tin and stoves. 

Schmidt, notary public. 

Schonemann John C, dry goods and gro- 
ceries. 

Schroer Hermann, railroad saloon. 

Schulthus G., wood and willow ware. 

SEATON JOSEPH, BOOT AND SHOE 
MANUFACTURER, No. Ill HAMP- 
SHIRE STREET. 

Svlvester John, blacksmith. 

SHIELDS D., SUPERINTENDANT OF 
THE HAMPSHIRE STREET PLAN- 
ING MILL, No. 191 HAMPSHIRE ST. 

Simmons H. L., city gauger. 

Singer & Lewarence, dealers in furniture. 

SLACK, B. F., WAGON MAKER AND 
BLACKSMITH, Vermont and 6th sts. 

SMITH JOHN, GROCERIES AND PROVI- 
SIONS, 21 South st. 

Smith, Lock & Co., butchers. 

SMITH MERRY W. & SON, wholesale and 
retail dealers in groceries, liquors and 
provisions, No. 61 Hampshire st. 

Snow & Wiltberger, hardware merchants. 

STEWART R., BLACKSMITH AND 
HORSE SHOEING. 



STONE E. K. & CO., WHOLESALE DEAL- 
ER IN BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUB- 
BERS. 

STUTTE A., WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
DEALER IN DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC. * 

SULLIVAN H. V. & CO., QUINCY RE- 
PUBLICAN. 

Tellson J., notary public. 

Thayer & Brother, millers and distillers. 

Thompson A. E., produce and commission. 

TIMOTHY ROGERS, WAGON AND PLOW 
MANUFACTURER. 

Tobin & Smith, watchmakers. 

Tohin & Smith, music store. 

Trowbridge & Co., teamsters. 

Van Buren J. S., hardware store. 

VAN DOORN J. K. & CO., DEALERS IN 
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, ETC., 
Front street. 

Van Dovern J., notary public. 

VERMONT MARBLE WORKS, ANDER- 
SON & ROBERTS, dealers in monu- 
ments, tombs, head stones, table tops, 
etc. etc. ' 

VIRGINIA ' HOUSE, F. B. WALKER, 
proprietor. 

Voglprole John, dry goods and groceries. 

WARDEN & WEBER, DYERS AND 
SCOURERS, No. 84 Main street. 



184 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



Ward L. L., groceries, etc. 

Warner F., dry goods. 

Warren A. O, notary public. 

Warrington U., groceries. 

Washington Brewery, Gustavus Thies, prop'r. 

Watson L., M.D., physician and surgeon. 

Weat & Grover, attorneys at law. 

WEAVER & MILLER, CARRIAGE MAN- 
UFACTORY, 6th st. between Moline 
and Jersey sts. 

WELLING J. M., No 131 Hampshire street. 

WELLINGTON S. LEE, ATTORNEY AT 
LAW, OFFICE OVER BROADWAY'S 
JEWELRY STORE. 

Wintworth B. R., notary public. 

Whalen M., lieutenant of police. 

Wheat E. A, city attorney. 

WHITEBREAD JOHN JR., WHOLESALE 
AND RETAIL PROVISION DEALER, 
No. 31 Hampshire street. 

WILCOX L. H. & E. C. KNIGHT, homeo- 
pathic physicians and surgeons. 

Williams, Grimshaw & Williams, attorneys 
at law. 

Williams J., coppersmith. 

Williams J. II., notary public. 

Wills Joseph, engraver. 

Wilson J. T., M.D. 

WINANS G. W., BOOKS AND STATION- 
ERY, WEST SIDE OF PUBLIC 
SQUARE. 

WOODS C. M., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND MAGISTRATE. 

Woodruff James, president of omnibus line. 

WERSENBERG ED., groceries and provi- 
sions, 75 Hampshire street, Quincy. 

ZIMMERMAN C. A. W., M.D., physician 
and surgeon. 



QUIVER, 



A post office of Mason county. 
Freeman Marshall, Postmaster. 



RACOON, 

A post office of Marion county. 
J. R. Parkinson, Postmaster. 



RALEIGH, 

A post village, capital of Saline county, on 
the middle fork of Saline creek, 175 miles 
south-south-east from Springfield 

Willis A. Spiller, Postmaster. 



RAMSEY, 



A post village of Fayette county. 
S. Washburn, Postmaster. 



RANDOLPH COUNTY 

Is situated in the south-west part of the state, 
bordering on Missouri, and has an area of 600 
square miles. It is bounded on the south- 
west by the Mississippi, and intersected by 
the Kaskaskia river, which enters the first 
named stream on the southern border of the 
county. 

The surface is undulating and hilly; the 
soil is fertile and well timbered. Corn, oats, 
wheat, cattle and swine, are the staples. It 
contains a large number of churches, several 
newspaper offices, and has about 2,000 pu- 
pils attending public schools. The Belle- 
ville and Murpheysboro railroad intersects 
this county. Fine marble is found in some 
parts of the county. This is among the old- 
est counties in the state, a trading post hav- 
ing been established at Kaskaskia by La 
Salle, in 1673. Capital, Chester. Popula- 
tion, about 13,500. 



RANDOLPH'S GROVE, 

A post office of McLean county. 
Tnos. Kerr, Postmaster. 



RANEYSBURG, 

A post village of Washington county 
Robert Q. West, Postmaster. 



RANTOUL, 

Is a new and flourishing village of Champaign 
county, on the line of the Illinois Central 
railroad (Chicago branch), 14 miles north 
from Urbana. This place is rapidly filling 
up, and will soon become one of the most 
important towns on the line of the road. Be- 
ing one of the finest agricultural districts in 
the state, and settled by enterprising and 
industrious inhabitants, this place offers great 
inducements to those looking for a home in 
the west. The town has only been laid out 
about two years and now contains two dry 
goods stores, groceries, hotels, machine 
shops, lumber yards, etc., giving it the ap- 
pearance of a town of at least five times the 
number of years. 



RATTLESNAKE, 



A post office of White county. 
Thos. Sterling, Postmaster. 



READING, 



A post office of Livingston county. 
Jos. S. Gumm, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND .BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



185 



RECTOR, 

A post office of Hamilton county. 
H. Gregg, Postmaster. 



RED BUD, 



A post office of Randolph county. 
R. D. Dprfee, Postmaster. 



RENAULT, 

A post village of Monroe county, 128 miles 
south by west from Springfield. 
, Postmaster. 



RHOADE'S POINT, 

A post office of Macoupin county. 
F. B. Simpson, Postmaster. 



RICH, 

A post town of Cook county. 
C. Olindorf, Postmaster. 



RICHARDSON, 



A post office of Vermilion county. 
A. J. Richardson, Postmaster. 



RICHFIELD, 



A post township of Adams county. 
Thos. R. Jones, Postmaster. 



RICHLAND COUNTY 

Is situated in the east-south-east part of the 
state, and has an area of about 310 square 
miles. The Little Wabash river touches the 
south-west extremity. Fox creek flows 
through the county, from north to south ; it 
is also drained by Boupas creek. The sur- 
face is undulating, and the soil productive. 
The county contains a large proportion of 
prairie. , 

Corn, wheat, oats, potatoes and pork, are 
the staples. It contains several churches, a 
newspaper office, and has about 450 pupils 
attending public schools. Capital, Olney. 
Population, about 9,000. 



RICHLAND, 



A post village of Sangamon county, 12 miles 
north-west by west from Springfield. 
A. Halcomb, Postmaster. 



RICHLAND GROVE, 

A post village of Mercer county. 
T. R. Morey, Postmaster. 



RICHMOND, 

A post village of Brown county, about three 
miles west from the Illinois river, and 70 
miles west by north from Springfield. 
, Postmaster. 



RICHVIEW, 

A post village of Washington county, eight 
miles north-east from Nashville. 
Wm. M. Phelps, Postmaster. 



RIDGE FARM, 



A post village of Vermilion county, 16 miles 
south from Danville. 
A. Smith, Postmaster. 



RIDGELEY, 



A post village of Madison county, 64 miles 
south by west from Springfield. 
Thos. Waple, Postmaster. 



RIDOTT'S, 

A post village of Stephenson county, 110 
miles north-west by north from Chicago. 
Thos. Hunt, Postmaster. 



RILEY, 

A post village of McHenry county, 65 miles 
north-west by north from Chicago. 
E. Babcock, Postmaster. 



RINGGOLD, 

A post office of Cook county, 33 miles west- 
north-west from Chicago. 
Eli Whitney, Postmaster. 



RINGWOOD, 



A post office of McHenry county. 
H. C. Allen, Postmaster. 



RINOSA, 

A post village of Iroquois county, on the 
Iroquois river, about 60 miles south-south- 
east from Chicago. 
Roswell Nicholes, Postmaster. 



186 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



RIPLEY, 

A post village of Brown county, about eight 
miles north-east from Mt. Sterling. 
S. R. Glenn, Postmaster. 



RISDON, 

A post village of St. Clair county, near Kas- 
kaskia, 115 miles south by west from Spring- 
field. 

A. Moore, Postmaster. 



RISING SUN, 

A post office of Montgomery county. 
, Postmaster. 



ROBIN'S NEST, 
A post office of Peoria county. 
S. Chase, Postmaster. 



ROBINSON, 

A post village of Crawford county, about 14 
miles south-east from Springfield. 
Jas. Laerabee, Postmaster. 



ROBINSON'S MILLS, 

A post office of Menard county. 
John Bonnitt, Postmaster. 



ROCHESTER, 

A post village of Sangamon county, on the 
Sangamon river, six miles south-east from 
Springfield. The river affords fine water 
power for milling purposes. 

Monson Carter, Postmaster. 



ROCHESTER MILLS, 

A post office of Wabash county. 
Geo. Leigh, Postmaster. 



ROCK, 

A post office of Pope county. 
John Ellis, Postmaster. 



ROCKBRIDGE, 



A post village of Green county. 
Wm. J. Gage, Postmaster. 



ROCK CREEK, 

A post village of Carroll county, 45 miles 
south-east from Galena. 
D. Belding, Postmaster. 



ROCKPORD, 

A flourishing post village, capital of Winne- 
bago county, is finely situated on the east 
bank of Rock river, and on the Chicago and 
Galena railrood, 97 miles west-north-west 
from Chicago. 

Rockford is the centre of an active busi- 
ness, and has an abundant water power. It 
has nearly all been built since 1836. Its 
growth was constant and moderate until 
1850, when it began to increase with great 
rapidity This was mainly caused by the 
early completion of the railroad from Chicago 
to this point. It contains several very fine 
churches, a bank, three or four newspaper 
offices, schools, etc., and is largely engaged 
in manufacturing. 

, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc . 

ALVERSON & HARRIS, groceries, provis- 
isons, flour and feed store, State street, 
West Rockford. 

ALLEN G. S., crockery, china, etc. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, E. A. Biglow, propri- 
etor. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS CO., OFFICE UN- 
DER HOLLAND HOUSE, James S. 
Ticknor, agent. 

Andrews & Burns, dry goods and clothing. 

Andrews & Vandrnam, dry goods. 

Backus & Zoller, drugs and perfumery. 

Bacharach Isaac & Co., ready made clothing. 



BAGLEY, GREGORY & CO., 

]VI anu fa cturers 

OF 
ROCKFORD,' ILL. 



BALDWIN M., marble manufacturer. 
Barry R. S., dry goods, clothing, boots and 

shoes. 
Barnard Mrs., straw and fancy milliner. 
Barnes Horace, book binder. 
BARNES G. W., ambrotype gallery, corner 

State and Front streets. 
Bartlett Brothers, clothing. 
BARTLETT, B. J. & CO., fllour, meal and 

feed. See adv't, next page. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



187 



BOCKFORD CORN MIULS. 



B. J. Bartlett &c Co., 

Manufacturers and wholesale & retail 



DEALERS IN 



FLOUR, MEAL AND FEED. 

ORDERS BY MAIL SOLICITED. 



Post Office Box. 961, Roekford. 



Bates F., dry goods, boots, shoes, etc. 

BAUGHERTY E. G., BOOK AND JOB 
PRINTER. 

BARTLETT D. L. & CO., MERCHANT MIL- 
LERS. 

Baker E. H., attorney at law. 

Beath Robert, bakery. 

Bishop J. D., eating house. 

Blakeman B., lumber merchant. 

Boyd Thomas, staple and fancy dry goods. 

Bowles E. A., merchant tailor. 

Boyd & Baxter, dry goods and clothing. 

Bradley William, architect, over Robertson, 
Coleman & Co.'s bank, West Roekford. 

Bronson & Co., hardware. 

BROWN J. W., SHAVING SALOON, OP- 
POSITE THE OLD POST OFFICE. 

BROCKMAN FRANCIS, manufacturer and 
dealer in tobacco and cigars, State street. 

BRIGGS, SPAFFORD & PENFIELD, BAN 
KERS. 

BURNHAM L. M., "Burnham's Commercial 
Institute," Commercial block. 

Burpee E., cabinet and chairs. 

BURNAP FRANCIS, ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 

Butler G. B., merchant tailor. 

Cain Mrs. S. B., millinery and fancy goods. 

CAMMANN F. D, real "estate, loan and in- 
surance broker, over Robertson, Cole- 
man & Co.'s bank, West Roekford. 

Carpenter & Buckbee, groceries. 

Campbell John, eating house. 

Campbell & Brother, candy, oysters, etc. 

CAPWELL HOUSE, N. W. CAPWELL, 
proprietor. 

CAPWELL N. W., PROPRIETOR CAP- 
WELL HOUSE. 

Carter L. P. & Co., grain dealers. 

CENTRAL HOUSE, J. F. MORRILL, pro- 
prietor. 

Cook S. R., groceries and provisions. 

Cook & Hollister, lumber merchant. 

Cooney & Ryther, saddle and harness ma- 
kers. 

COLLIER J. M., livery stable. 

Chick Jame3, lumber merchant. 

Childs E. M., turner. 

CITY HOTEL, A. WADSTEAD, PROPRI- 
ETOR. 

Clark & Swits, groceries and provisions. 

Clarke C. B., shaving saloon. 



COOK H., groceries and provisions, Main st. 
Crosby P. B., dry goods and groceries. 
Dagwell C. H. C. & Co., harness makers. 
Day, Breasted & Co., hardware, stoves and 

cutlery. 
Davis & Boyd, dry goods and clothing. 
Dennett & Peterson, dry goods dealers. 
Dewey S. J., dentist. 
DICKSON D. T. & CO., JOB PRINTERS 

AND PUBLISHERS. 
Dunshee F. K., grocer, State street. 
ROCKFORD CITY MILLS, James T. Dunn, 

proprietor. 
DUNSHEE F. K , ambrotypes, State street, 

West Roekford. 
Dyer J. W., livery stables. 
EAGLE HOTEL. H. B. HARMON, prop'r. 
EDWARDS A. 0, GROCER, MAIN ST. 
Elliott C. H., carpenter and joiner. 
Emerson Henry C, commission merchant. 
ENOCH H. R., COUNTY SURVEYOR, 

COMMISSIONER OF DEEDS AND 

NOTARY PUBLIC, OFFICE AT THE 

COUNTY TREASURER'S OFFICE. 
FOUNTAIN & CO., reapers and mowers. 
Ferriman Geo. & Son, staple and fancy dry 

goods. 
Fist E., blacksmith. 
Fliers J. H., shoemaker. 
FORD D. M., proprietor Hiawatha saloon. 
Forbes D. & Son, proprietors Eagle foundry. 
Fralev John, merchant tailor. 
FUNK & PHELPS, PROPRIETOR THE 

ROCKTON GAZETTE. 
Goodwin A. E., physician and surgeon. 
Goodman N. M., dry goods. 
Gregory E. & Co., lumber merchants. 
Godfrey E. L., grain merchant. 
Gifford A., eating house. 
Grove J. H., lumber dealer. 
HAMBRIGHT G. F., POSTMASTER. 
HAMILTON K. W., M. D., HOMEO- 

PATHIST. 
Hale F. R., physician. 
HARMON H. B., PROPRIETOR EAGLE 

HOTEL. 
Harwood J. W. & Co., boots and shoes. 
Harwood Mrs. C. C, milliner. 
Hartwell Mrs. R., milliner. 
HATHAWAY M. D., attorney at law. 



Hatt aw* nnrnnf 

ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Centrally located — large and commodious— 
The only First Class House in town. 

W. L. PEARCE, 

PROPRIETOR. 



188 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Hettlewell & Ridler, meat market, State st., 
East Rockford. 

Heman Kingsbury, groceries and provisions. 

HOB ART T. J., MANUFACTURER OF 
SASH DOORS AND BLINDS. 

HOLT BENJAMIN, JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Hope & Clow, hardware and stoves. 

Horsman F. A, dry goods. 

G. W. Horn, State street, East Rockford, 111., 
fancy dry goods. 

Rockford Loan Fund Association, over Rob- 
ertson, Coleman & Co's Bank, Rockford, 
111. W. T. Lerow, Prest. Hobart H. 
Hatch, Sec'y. 

HIAWATHA DINING SALOON, D. M. 
FORD, proprietor. 

Hill J. C, wagon maker, etc. 

Holland E., meat market. 

HULIN WILLIAM, NOTARY PUBLIC. 

HULIN WILLIAM, COMMISSIONER OF 
DEEDS. 

Huntington C. A., bookseller and stationer, 
Metropolitan block. 

Hyde 0. P., boot and shoe maker. 

JANES & SARGENT, manufacturers of 
Moor's independent star erasive soap. 

Johnston A. B., grocer. 

Johnston Win., groceries and provisions. 

JOHNSON W. J., DEALER IN CIGARS 
AND TOBACCO. 

Ketcheson & Co., groceries and provisions. 

KETCHEL & LAYTON, BANKING AND 
EXCHANGE. 

LANE, SANFORD & CO., BANKERS. 

LAKE JOHN, lumber and shingles. 

Lathrop & Brown, attorneys at law. 

Lane I., saddle and harness maker. 

LEROY JAMES, ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY. 

Lerow W. T., dealer in produce and coal. 

Little W. & J. H., groceries and provisions. 

Lyon Isaiah, justice peace, office State street, 
opposite court house, 

McKenney B., fancy dry goods. 

MADONEH S., READY MADE CLOTHING. 

Manning W. A., watchmaker and jewelry. 

Marsh Jason, attorney and counselor at law. 

MANLOVE JAMES G, attorney and coun- 
selor. 

Mason Robert, bakery, State street. 

Marshall P. R., furniture and upholsterer. 

Marsh & Spurr, piano fortes, etc. 

Many J. P. & G., druggists. 

Mesler & Boyle, drugs, paints, oils. 

MILLER & TAYLOR, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

MILLER ORREN JR., attorney and coun- 
selor at law. 

Miller & Rising, dentists. 

Miller H, eating house. 

Miles Davis, wagon maker and blacksmith. 

Montague, Savidge & Co., lumber & shingles. 

MORRELL J. F., PROPRIETOR CENTRAL 
HOUSE. 

MANNY JOHN P., MANUFACTURER OF 
SELF RAKING, REAPER AND MOW- 
ER COMBINED, ROCKFORD. 



Norman Wm. hatter, hats, caps and furs. 

Norman Dr., dentist. 

Ogden & Howard, attorneys at law. 

Ogden Wm. H., notary public. 

Osborn, A. S., gunsmith. 

Osborne Daniel S., manufacturer of sash, 

doors, etc. 
Peacock Jonathan, brewery. 
Palmer Charles H, furniture. 
PALMER JAMES J., WATCHES AND 

JEWELRY. 
Paxson A. & C, watches, clocks and jewelry. 
Pettengill J. W., wood turner. 
Penney & Anyor, grocers. 
PENFIELD D. S. & J. G. & CO., REAL ES- 
TATE AND LAND AGENTS. 
Perry & Comston, lumber dealers. 
Phillips Ira, flour and feed store. 
Pittenger Mary A., bakery, etc. 
PLATNER & JARVIS, meat market, State 

street, West Rockford. 
Pollard A. D., shaving saloon. 
POTTER E. H. & CO., bankers and dealers. 
Prunk D. H, M.D., physician and surgeon. 
Randall J. & Sons, staple and fancy dry 

goods. 
RatelhTe E. E. livery stables. 
REEVES & CO., wagon makers. 
Reed Thomas S., insurance agent and notary 

public. 
REGAN & PERRY, REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS, CORNER OF STATE AND 

SECOND STREETS. 
Remington Thomas J. L., county surveyor 

and notary public. 
Reynolds G. W, livery stable. 
ROCKFORD REPUBLICAN OFFICE, E. 

W. & R. P. BLAISDELL. 
ROBERTSON GEO. JAS., portrait and 

landscape painter, room No. 6, commer- 
cial block. 
ROCKFORD GRIST MILL, RODD & 

BROWN, proprietors. 
ROCKFORD IRON WORKS, Carke & Utter, 

proprietors. 
Robertson, Coleman & Co., bankers and 

dealers in exchange. 
ROBERTS & BRO., city bakery. 
Rose Stephen, baker. 
Royce & Boberts, groceries. 
St. John & Co., dealers in groceries. 
Sackett & Clark, painters, etc. 
Sabin Charles, druggist. 
Sanford R. A., fancy dry goods. 
Sargent J. P., groceries and provisions. 
Seaton, Smith & Co., dry goods. 
SEECOMB J. W., bookseller and stationer, 

opposite City Hotel. 
Shaw Bela, justice of peace. 
Sherman H. N., watchmaker and jeweler. 
SHELDON & SHELDON, ATTORNEYS 

AND COUNSELORS, 17 WEST SOUTH 

MAIN STREET. 
Shotwell Joseph, shoemaker. 
Sherrath Thomas, harness. 
Smith R., hats, caps, etc. 
Smith's cash store, dry goods, carpets, etc. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



189 



TMMIRWCO. 



Rockford, Illinois, 




Reaper and Mower as seen in Reaping. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



MPliOWI 



FIRST CLASS MEDAL 

PARIS WORLD'S FAIR, 

AND 

GOLD MEDAL 

FOR BEST COMBINED MACHINE, AT 

THE UNITED STATES SOCIETY 

TRIAL AT SYRACUSE, 

Over 40 other Machines. 



Price, $135. 



Snow Miss E. M., hydropathic physician. 

Spencer J. T., groceries, etc. 

SPAFFORD, CLARK & ELLIS, BANKERS 
AND DEALERS IN EXCHANGE AND 
LAND WARRANTS. 

SPAULDING B. F., ambrotypes, Winne- 
bago Hall. 

Skinner J. B., coal dealer. 

Skinner J. B., manufacturer of wagons, plows, 
and agricultural implements. 

Swits & Anson, groceries and provisions. 

Taylor H. W., attorney at law. 

Thomson E., butcher. 

Tbayer & Austin, painters. 

Thurston J. H., groceries. 

Thompson A. A, groceries and provisions. 

Todd L. H., boot and shoe maker. 

TRUFANT, BOOTS AND SHOES. 

TRAHERN & DALE, manufacturers thresh- 
ing machines, Race street, West Rock- 
ford. 

Upton Charles 0., meat market. 

Vinton H. & Son., groceries and provisions. 

WALLACH DAVID & CO., clothiers and 
merchant tailors. 

WALDO & GILBERT, books and stationerv. 

WARNER BLINN & CO., commission mer- 
chants. 

Warner L. F., attorney at law. 

Wasson Wm., boots, shoes and leather. 

Watson & King, grocers. 

Way A., city bakery. 

Wengate & Palmer, hardware. 

Werner Wm. & Co., cabinet maker and fur- 
niture. 

Wench & Co., confectionery and bakery. 

WHEELER MYRON J., ARCHITECT AND 
BUILDER. 

WHITBECK W. H., groceries and provi- 
sions, Main st., East Rockford. 

Worsley, Troxell & Co., furniture, etc. 

Worthington Wm., drugs and medicines. 

WIGHT J. M., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW, office Main st., over 
Colman & Co's bank. 

WILSON H. C. & CO., grain merchants. 

WILSON ISAAC, RECESS, FARMER'S 
HOME, Main st., East Rockford. 

WILLIAMS C. & SONS, IRON, NAILS, 
STOVES, CUTLERY, TOOLS AND 
HARDWARE. 

WHEELER, COOK & CO., druggists. 

White Miss A. J., milliner. 



ROCKGRVOE, 



A post village of Stephenson county, about 
55 miles east by north from Galena. 
Postmaster. 



ROCK ISLAND COUNTY 

Is situated in the west-north-west part of Illi- 
nois, bordering on the Mississippi, which 
separates it from Iowa, and has an area of 



190 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



350 square miles. It is situated on both 
sides of Rock river, which forms part of the 
south-eastern boundary. It derives its name 
from an island in the channel of the Missis- 
sippi river. The greatest length is about 70 
miles, following the course of the river; the 
breadth varies from 3 to 5 miles. The sur- 
face is diversified ; the soil good. Corn, 
wheat, oats and hay are the staples. There 
are a large number of fine churches, several 
newspaper offices, and numerous pupils at- 
tending public schools. The county con- 
tains an abundance of coal and limestone. 
Rock river furnishes excellent water power 
at its mouth. 

The Chicago and Rock Island railroad has 
its western terminus in this county. Capital, 
Rock Island. Population about 20,000. 



ROCK ISLAND. 

A flourishing city, capital of Rock Island 
county, on the Mississippi river at a point 
where it takes a westerly course, two miles 
above the mouth of Rock river, and 181 
miles west-by-south from Chicago. It is sit- 
uated at the foot of the upper rapids, which 
extend nearly fifteen miles, and is one of the 
most important points in the state. The place 
derives its name from an island, three miles 
in length, the southern extremity of which 
is nearly opposite the town. On this end of 
the island is situated Fort Armstrong, erected 
in 1816 under the direction of Lieut. Colonel 
Wm. Lawrence. In the vicinity of the city, 
the great Indian Chief Black Hawk, and his 
band, lived for many years. Of late this 
place has become quite famous, as being the 
point where the great railroad bridge spans 
the "Father of Waters." Rock Island is 
connected with the east by means of the 
Chicago & Rock Island railroad, and west by 
the Mississippi & Missouri railroad, which is 
now completed as for as Iowa City. For man- 
ufacturing, there is no city in the west offer- 
ing greater advantages than this, having an 
immense water power, near access to coal and 
facilities for the transportation of wares and 
merchandise to and from the various com- 
mercial points of the south and east. A large 
number of foundries, factories, flouring mills, 
etc., are in successful operation. The city 
contains a number of churches, which, in 
point of artistic beauty, are rarely exceled. 
The principal ones are the First Presbyterian, 
O. S., Second Presbyterian, N. S., Methodist 
Episcopal and Catholic. The schools are 
conducted on the union principal, which, 
since its introduction, has proved entirely 
sucessful. Several fine brick buildings have 
recently been erected for school purposes. 
There are two newspaper offices, the Islander 
and Argus and the Advertiser ; the first issu- 
ing daily the latter weekly. Directly opposite 
Rock Island, on the Iowa side of the river, 
is Davenport, one of the most flourishing 



cities of Iowa. The stranger, who may visit 
this city for pleasure, will find many objects 
of interest, such as Black Hawk's Watch- 
tower, Chippiannock Cemetery, Fort Arm- 
strong, etc., and will be forced to acknowl- 
edge this one of the most interesting points 
in the state. Population, 10,000. 
L. M. Webber, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Asher J. A., candy manufacturer. 

Avery & Weed, grocery. 

Baker & Gilmore, millers and dealers in flour. 

Baker B. F. & Co., dry goods. 

BEARDSLEY & SMITH, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

Bean E. R., attorney at law. 

Bean E. R., police magistrate. 

Biddison J. A. & Co., steam planing mills. 

Bischof & Co., clothing. 

Bliss Francis, confectioner, etc. 

Blythe & Hoddard, carriage and wagon 
makers. 

BROWN DAVID & CO., GROCERIES AND 
PRODUCE DEALERS, COR OF ILLI- 
NOIS AND BUFFALO STS. 

Brackett& Buckley, physicians and surgeons. 

Brown Gilbert B., grocery. 

Brown & Lawrence, dealers in boots and shoes. 

BUCKLEY S. T., manufacturer and dealer in 
boots and shoes, leather and findings. 

Buford & Tate, plow manufacturers. 

Bufford N. B. & Clarke, leather merchants. 

Bufford N. B. & Co., bankers. 

Buford N. B. & T., iron and grocery store. 

Buford I. J. & J. M., Rock Island foundry. 

Carbon Cliff Coal Mines, Lowry, Thomas & 
Co., proprietors. 

CARTER & HATCH, dry goods, carpets, 
boots and shoes, hats and caps. 

City Hotel, D. D. Smith, proprietor. 

Clacius Charles E., druggist. 

Cook Carlos A., chemist and druggist. 

COAL VALLEY MINING COMPANY, S. S. 
Guyer, agent for Rock Island. 

Coal Valley Mining Company, office, levee. 

CONNELLY, SHURLEY & CO , PREMIUM 
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL PRINT- 
ERS. 

CONNELLY, SHURLEY & CO., PUBLISH- 
ERS OF THE DAILY AND WEEKLY 
ISLANDER AND ARGUS. 

Corken Archibald, clock and watch maker. 

CROSS R. D. & CO., staple and fancy dry 
goods, Wilber's block, Illinois street. 

DALY & GAGHAGEN, manufacturers sash 
and blinds, proprietors planing machine 
and builders. 

DART HENRY, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
VISIONS. 

Dorr Robert & Co., groceries. 

Downey E., proprietor Rock Island billiard 
saloon. 

Deitz John & Co., meat market. 

Entrees A-, groceries. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



191 



FAILING N., manufacturer of wagons of 
every description. 

FARNAM HOUSE, A. A. Pond, proprietor. 

Fisli & Lee, insurance agents. 

FISCHEL DR. H., SURGICAL AND ME- 
CHANICAL DENTIST. 

Field H., insurance agent. 

FREESDALE & KNOX, physicians and sur- 
geons. 

Gerrood Joseph, hardware merchant. 

Gimble Moses, clothing store. 

Gifford A. B., ambrotype artist. 

Graham R., stoves and tinware. 

Glorkhof A., tobacconist. 

Gorton & Curtis, land agents. 

Gray & Brother, grocers and commission mer- 
chants. 

GRUT GEO. C, DEALER AND MANU- 
FACTURER IN FURNITURE, MAT- 
TRESSES, ETC. 

HARRIS A. G., DENTAL SURGEON. 

HARPER & STEEL, dealer in hardware, 
building materials, etc. 

Hakes & Riggs, dealers in watches and 
jewelry. 

Hawlev J. B., attorney at law. 

HEINSFURTER J. & CO,, Boston clothing 
store, No. 40 Illinois street. 

Himes & Clippenger, drugs, paints, etc. 

Hills Mrs. T. S., dressmaker. 

Kippler Charles, groceries. 

Housman H., stoves and hardware. 

Hubers J., city brewery. 



C. H. SMITH, PROPRIETOR. 

(smith's block,) 

Corner Jefferson and Illinois Sts. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL- 



This House is located directly opposite the Steamboat 

Landing, and only one square from the Railroad 

Depot. It has been newly furnished and a large 

addition built, including a fine Hall, suitable 

for all first class Concerts and Theatrical 

Performances. 

PASSENGERS CONVEYED TO AND PROM THE HOUSE FREE. 



Island City Rectifying House, Burgower, 
Lowenthal & Co., proprietors. 

Jeannuret Charles, watchmaker. 

Judd & Dickinson, physicians. 

Johnson James, flour and feed. 

Johnston W. A„ boot and shoe maker. 

Kellerstrass & Fries, domestic liquors. 

KIMBALL B. H., WAGON AND CARRIAGE 
MANUFACTURERS. 

KNOX W. A., M. D., PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON. 

Knox & Co., clothing. 



Knox & Wilkinson, attorney and counselor. 

LANGLY J. H. & CO., GENERAL COM- 
MISSION AND FORWARDING MER- 
CHANTS. 

Lee & Williams, crockery store. 

Lee W. M., manufacturer of boots and shoes. 

Leavy F., confectioner. 

Lawrence W., meat market. 

Lincoln C. J., druggist, etc. 

McDANIEL D. S., CARRIAGE, SIGN 
AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTER. 

Marshall R. M., attorney at law. 

Mead, Smith & Marsh, proprietors of saw 
mills, and lumber merchants. 

Meighan Patrick, groceries, liquors, etc. 

Mixter Geo., lumber merchant. 

Moore J M., hardware and cutlery. 

Moss Frederick, fancy dry goods. 

Myers Christian, dealer in hats, caps and furs. 

Murphy E., attorney at law. 

Negus & Herrick, grocers. 

Norris Jacob, furniture store. 

Nordell C. R., merchant tailor. 

OSBORN M. B., k CO., real estate brokers, 
office on Illinois street near Buffalo st. 

OSBORN & CO., land agency for Wisconsin 
and Iowa. 

OSBORN & SON, land agency for Minnesota, 
office at Chatfield. 

Plummer Thos., livery stables. 

Plummer C. S. Dr., office Illinois street. 

Plummer J. B., flour and feed store. 

RAYMONDS T. R,, NEW BOOK AND JOB 
PRINTING HOUSE. 

Rens Louis, baker. 

Requa L. B., watches and jewelry. 

ROCK ISLAND HOUSE, A. Tuxbury, pro- 
prietor. 

ROCK ISLAND MILLS, Richardson, Park- 
hurst & Co., wholesale and retail dealers 
in flour, grain, etc. 

Rock Island Bank, Negus, Osborne & Lee. 

ROCK ISLAND ICE COMPANY, J. G. 
RICHARDSON, OFFICE COR MAIN 
AND WATER STS. 

Rock Island City Mills, Lee, Wallace & Co., 
proprietors. 

Porter H. A. & Bro., booksellers and sta- 
tioners. 

Rosenfield J. & M., dealers in leather and 
findings. 

Sanford Geo. W., blacksmith. 

SAILOR J., manufacturer and dealer in sad- 
dles and harness, horse collars and bridle 
1 outlier etc 

SCOBEY J.'t., & J. E., WHOLESALE AND 
RETAIL, BOOTS, SHOES AND RUB- 
BERS. 

Senter & Grant, St. Julian saloon. 

Sharpe & Cady Drs., physician and surgeons. 

SHADDINGER W. H., cooper, tin and sheet 
iron worker, cor Water and Eagle sts. 

Smith D. D., proprietor City Hotel. 

Smith D., clock and watchmaker. 

Smith J. Currie, agent Rock Island railroad. 

Steven D., carriage, sign and ornamental 
painter. 



192 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



WALTER SCR1BNER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, 

Paints, Oils, Dye-Stuffs, & Varnishes, 

Window Glass and Druggist's Glass-ware, 
Brushes, Perfumery, Etc. 



illinois street, 
hook: isl-a.:n":d, ill. 

Swander Alex F., police magistrate, ex-officio 
justice of the peace. 

Swiler & Reed, stoves and tinware, etc. 

Taylor J. B., carpenter and joiner. 

Turner E., boot and shoemaker. 

Tuxbury A. proprietor Rock Island House. 

Freeman H., meat market. 

Union House, Wm. B. 0., Sketton, proprietor. 

UNION IRON WORKS, WEBBER C. C. & 
CO., steam engines of all descriptions. 

Vansent J. W., boat yard. 

VELIE J. W., SURGEON DENTIST. 

Volke C. G., marble works. 

WAIT & KNOX, WHOLESALE GROCERS 
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

WARNOCK & KELLY, manufacturer ot soap, 
candles and chemical erasive soap. 

WARREN F. H., WHOLESALE BOOK- 
SELLER AND STATIONER. 

Webber L. M. postmaster. 

WEBSTER J. & J., DEALERS IN BOAT 
STORES, GROCERIES AND PRO- 
DUCE. 

WELLS & KIMBALL, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

WHARTER 0. P., EDITOR AND PUB- 
LISHER ROCK ISLAND ADVER- 
TISER. 

Whistcr G. W., grocery. 

Whitaker & Everts, silks and fancy dry 
goods. 

WILMAN JOHN H., DEALER AND 
MANUFACTURER OF CIGARS AND 
TOBACCO. 

WILKINSON E. M. D., HOMEOPATHIC 
PHYSICIAN. 

Wilkinson & Pheasants, attorneys at law. 

Yates C. J., city bakery. 



ROCKPORT, 

A post village of Pike county, on Sny Carter 
Slough, a side channel of the Mississippi 
river, 80 miles west by south from Spring- 
field. 



ROCK RUN, 

A post township of Stephenson county. 



ROCKTON, 

A flourishing post village of Winnebago 
county, is situated both on Rock river and on 
the Racine and Mississippi Railroad, and is 
74 miles from Racine, 12 from Rockford, and 
4 frornBeloit. It is at the he ad of navigation 
of Rock river, and during the past season 
the steamer Rockford has regularly plied 
between this place and Rockford, as a pas- 
senger and freight boat. Via the river, this 
place is 18 miles from Rockford. The river 
at this point makes a bend in the shape of 
an ox bow, and in this bend the village is 
built. Some twenty years ago a canal or 
race was built across this bend by Mr. Tal- 
cott, so that in reality and fact, this village 
has the water of Rock river for three miles 
centered at this point for manufacturing pur- 
poses. It is surrounded by a rich prairie 
farming ground, and, for a wheat growing 
country, the region for ten miles around this 
village, has few superiors. 

It has been settled about twenty two years, 
and has three churches — one Congregational, 
one Baptist and one Methodist. Rev. J. H. 
Perham, Rev. Calvin Seldon, Rev. T. Jessup, 
Rev. M. Cross, Rev. D. B. Purinton, Rev. 
Geo. W. Lawrence, Rev. James Veness are 
clergyman of this village. 

There are three school houses ; one a two 
story stone building, costing some $2,000 ; 
number of scholars, 300. 

It contains 2 paper mills, which, with a capi- 
tal stock of about 1*70,000, turns out 1,780,- 
000 fts. of paper annually, the value of which 
is about $117,000 — forty-one men are em- 
ployed in the two establishments ; one corn 
planter manufactory, capital stock, $10,000, 
employs twenty-five men and turns out 4,000 
planters annually, valued at $40,000; one 
reaper and mower manufactory, capital, $15,- 
000 — three hundred reapers and mowers 
made annually, valued at $33,000, twenty- 
five men employed ; one carriage manufac- 
tory, with a capital of $4,000 and ten men 
employed, manufactures annually sixty car- 
riages, valued at $4,500 ; one plow manufac- 
tory, turns off five hundred annually, valued 
at $7,400; one saw mill, with $8,000 in- 
vested and four men employed, turns out 
300,000 feet of lumber annually, their sales 
are about 76,000 feet, valued at $8,000; one 
wheelbarrow factory, capital, $5,000, with 
five men employed, 3,000 manufactured an- 
nually, valued at $9,000 ; one harness maker, 
doing a large and thriving business; one 
brick factory, with a capital of $10,000, and 
ten men employed, turns out 2,500,000 bricks 
annually, valued at $15,000 ; three lumber 
dealers, capital $16,000, 1,700,000 feet of 
lumber constantly on hand, sales, 235,000 
feet annually, for which they receive $162,000, 
fifteen men employed ; one planing mill, with 
a capital of $3,000, and four men employed ; 
one shingle factory, capital, $5,000, manu- 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



193 



factures 1,499,000 annually, valued at $42,- 
400, employs five men. 

Nearly all of the wheat raised in this 
locality seeks a market here. There was 
formerly a fine flouring mill here, but it was 
burned down. It had three run of stones, 
cost $20,000, employed ten men, and turned 
out 31,200 barrels of flour annually. 

This village has a lodge of Good Templars 
— Sunbeam Lodge, No. 45. It has 220 
members, which proves that the place is a 
thorough temperance town, and speaks vol- 
umes for morality. Also, a large and flourish- 
ing order of Masons, which are doing good 
every day without bragging about it, and 
that is satisfactory to them. 

An excellent newspaper is published here, 
called the liockton Gazette, and is well sus- 
tained. 

The citizens of this village are mostly 
Yorkers and New Englanders. There are 
but few Germans settled in this locality, and 
not a single German newspaper is taken at 
the Rockton post office. Population, 500. 

George H. Hollister, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
jETNA INSURANCE CO., WELD & 

WOODRUFF, AGENTS. 
Adams & Merrill, storage and commission 

merchant. 
BENTLY C, ATTORNEY AT LAW AND 

SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY. 
Billard B. J., billiard room and restaurant. 
Brown Henry W., physician and surgeon. 
Camfrell Dock, barber. 

Clark Wm. A., M.D., physician and surgeon. 
Clark and Morehouse, horse shoeing. 
Gibson Alex., lumber merchant. 
GRAVES E. L. & CO., LUMBER, LATH 

AND SHINGLES. 
JAMESON, HALLEY & TALCOTT, MANU- 
FACTURERS OF THE FOUNTAIN 

REAPER AND MOWER. 
ISAACS THOMAS, proprietor Rockton stone 

quarry. 
Knight H. D., dentist. 
Knight J. E. Dr., homeopathic physician. 
Moon N. G., confectioner and baker. 
PHffiNIX INSURANCE CO., W. R. WELD, 

AGENT. 
PERHAM J. & CO., lumber merchants and 
dealers in sash, doors and window 
blinds. 
Pritchard Moses P., blacksniithing, etc. 
Rock River Lodge I. O. O. F., No. 159. 
SUNBEAM LODGE I. O. of G. T., No. 45 

ODD FELLOWS' HALL. 
Shelby H., dry goods, boots, shoes, etc. 
Shepard .John W., billiard saloon. 
STANTON E. H. & CO., BANKERS. 
Sims C. F., general groceries. 
Thompson Glover, house and sign painter. 
Thurstoe Leonard, temperance grocer. 
Veness & Son, groceries, patent medicines, 

etc. 

13 



Waite D. V., M.D., physician and surgeon. 
WEBBER W. & J., MANUFACTURERS 
OF WEBBER'S CELEBRATED 
REAPERS 
WEBSTER EDWARD A., professor and 

teacher of music. 
WELD & WOODRUFF, REAL ESTATE 
AND INSURANCE AGENTS. 



ROCKVILLE, 

A post village of Will county, on the Kanka- 
kee river, 162 miles north-east from Spring 
field. 

ROCKWELL, 

A new post village of Bond county, on the 
west branch of the Shoal creek, 70 miles 
south from Springfield. 



ROLAND, 

A post office of White county. 
D. M. Porter, Postmaster. 



ROME, 

A post village of Jefferson county, a few 
miles north from Mount Vernon. 
T. J. Cast, Postmaster. 



ROME FARMS, 



A post office of Peoria county, on the west 
bank of Peoria Lake, 85 miles north by east 
from Springfield. 

Geo. H. Clapp, Postmaster. 



ROMEO, 



A post office of McIIenry county. 
Jonathan Wells, Postmaster. 



ROOK'S CREEK, 

A post village of Livingston county. 
Amos Edwards, Postmaster. 



ROSCOE, 



A post township of Winnebago county. 
James W. Abbott, Postmaster. 



ROSCOE STATION, 

A thriving post village of the above town- 
ship, on the Rock river, 12 miles above Rock- 
ford. It has water power, and contains a 
large woolen factory and several stores. 
R. H. Adams, Postmaster. 



194 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



ROSEBUD, 

A post office of Marshall county. 
H. B. Allen, Postmaster. 



ROSEEIELD, 



A post office of Peoria county. 
B. Miller, Postmaster. 



ROSE HILL, 

A post village of Jasper county, on the 
Embarrass river, 7 miles north by west from 
Newton. 

A. S. Harris, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

BISSELL F. B., lumber. 

Brown George L., farmer. 

DAVIS A. L. & BRO., groceries. 

FELLOWS SIMON, justice of the peace. 

Harmon Walter, farmer. 

Harvey A., farmer. * 

Knox Win., farmer. 

LINCOLN D. K., DRY GOODS. 

LIMENSON J. H., hotel keeper, 

Quinn Patrick, station agent. 

Sanford C. D., farmer. 

Snyder John E., farmer. 



ROSEMOND, 



A post office of Christain county. 
B. E. Warner, Postmaster. 



ROSEVILLE, 



A post office of Warren county. 
Bex. Morford, Postmaster. 



ROSICLAIRE, 

A post village of Hardin county, about one 
mile from the Ohio river and 22 miles south- 
west from Shawucetown. 
Timothy Pell, Postmaster. 



ROSS GROVE, 



A post village of De Kalb county, *70 miles 
west by south from Chicago. 
Wsi. Marks, jr., Postmaster. 



ROUGH AND READY, 

A post village of Hancock county, S3 miles 
north-north-east from Quincy. 
Nicholas Wren, Postmaster. 



ROUND GROVE, 

A post office of Whiteside county, 119 miles 
from Chicago, and 400 from St. Louis. 



ROUND GROVE, 

A post village of Whiteside county, on the 
Dixon Air Line Railroad, 119 miles from 
Chicago, and 400 from St. Louis. Popula- 
tion, about 150. 
D. K. Lincoln, Postmaster. 



RUARK, 



A small post village of Lawrence county. 
John C. Ruark, Postmaster. 



RUMA, 

A post village of Randolph county, 14 miles 
north from Kaskaskia. 

Fritz Henne, Postmaster. 



RURAL RETREAT, 

A post office of Coles county. 
John Cooper, Postmaster. 



RUSH, 

A post village of Jo Daviess county, 150 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
James Burtwick, Postmaster. 



RUSHAWAY, 



A post office of Menard county. 
James W. Simpson, Postmaster. 



RUSHVILLE, 



A thriving post village, capital of Schuyler 
county, is pleasantly situated on the border 
of a prairie, 60 miles west-north-west from 
Springfield, and 10 miles north-west from the 
Illinois river. It is the centre of active 
trade. 
Joseph Haskell, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
Burton J., of Wells, Burton & Co. 
CAMPBELL PETER L., county treasurer. 
ELLIS WM., school commissioner. 
Erwin Alex. M. & L. D., general dealers. 
ERWIN L. D., representative. 
HORNEY LEONIDAS, county surveyor. 
JOHNSTON D. W. O, county judge. 
LAWLER JOHN H., sheriff. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



195 



Leach E. D., of Little, Ray & Co. 

LITTLE, RAY & CO., general merchants. 

McCoskvy James, of Nelson R. & Co. 

Manlove J. D., farmer. 

Metz G. W., general merchant. 

Montgomery & Erwin, general merchants. 

MONTGOMERY JOSEPH, circuit clerk. 

NEILS CHAS., county clerk. 

Nelson, Robertson & Co., general dealers. 

Nelson George, of N. Robertson & Co. 

PARROTT & CO., general merchants. 

Price Lee, general dealer. 

Scott Walter, general dealer. 

Wells E. D., farmer. 

Wells, Burton & Co., general merchants. 

Wells W. W., of W. B. & Co. 

Wells G. M., of W. B. & Co. 

WILSON THOMAS, general dealer. 



RUSSELLVILLE, 

A post village of Lawrence county, on the 
Wabash river. 

Wm. Twalt, Postmaster. 



RUTHSVILLE, 

A post office of Montgomery county. 
W. S. Flemming, Postmaster. 



RUTLAND, 

A post village of Kane county. 
John B. Eakin, Postmaster. 



SACTON, 

A post office of Clarke county. 
Jasper Draper, Postmaster. 



SAGONE, 

A post office of Du Page county. 
Smith D. Peirce, Postmaster. 



ST. ALBANS, 

A post village in Hancock county, 100 miles 
south-west by west from Springfield, and 
about 15 miles from the Mississippi river. 
Henry Bucklv, Postmaster. 



ST. ATJGTJSTIN, 

A small post village of Fulton county, 42 
miles west from Peoria. 

Henry Buckley, Postmaster. 



ST. ANNE, 
A post office of Kankakee county. 
John R. L. Lemoine, Postmaster. 



ST. CHARLES, 

A handsome and flourishing post village, in 
the above township, on Fox river, 42 miles 
west from Chicago. It is pleasantly situated 
on the inclined planes which rise gently from 
each side of the river. The latter is a 
beautiful and rapid stream with a prairie on 
the west side and woodlands on the other. 
This is the largest village in the county, and 
is a place of rapid growth. One or two news- 
papers are published here. A branch rail- 
road connects this place with the Galena 
and Chicago Railroad. Since the completion 
of this road, St. Charles commands the trade 
of the country between the Fox and Rock 
rivers. The route of the Air Line Railroad 
from Chicago to the Mississippi river passes 
through St. Charles. The extensive water 
power of the river gives motion to numerous 
paper mills, flouring mills and other manufac- 
tories which line the banks for the space of 
about half a mile. Laid out in 1836. 
Albert Hayden, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
ANDREWS JOHN H., painter, Second st., 

bet Indiana and Oak sts. 
ADAMS WILLIAM, harness maker, Second 

cor Walnut st. 
BUCK WILLIAM, mason, bet Third and 

Fourth sts. 
BURHANS JAMES G., principal public 

school, Illinois near Fifth st. 
BRETT WILLIAM, cabinet maker, First, 

bet Main and Cedar sts. 
BROWN J. A., SADDLER AND HARNESS 

MAKER. 
BREWER MRS., dressmaker, Walnut st. 
BROWNELL B., boarding house. 
BROWN J B., grocer, Sixth cor Walnut 

street. 
BROOKS C. A., merchant, Main cor Fifth. 
BOWMAN & LLOYD, hardware, stoves and 

iron, Main cor First st. 
BOGUE DANIEL, plow manufacturer. 
BOGUE LEVI, blacksmith, Seventh cor 

Walnut st. 
BLODGETT GEORGE, tinner, opp St. 

Charles hotel. 
CLARK PRENTISS, tinsmith, Indiana bet 

Fifth and Sixth sts. 
BLANCHARD Z. A., miller, Indiana cor 

Third st. 
Bently Samuel, brickmaker, Second bet Wal- 
nut and Illinois sts. 
Benedict Almon, painter. 
BURLEY J. H., carpenter. 
CORNFIELD DANIEL, principal public 

school, west side bet Main and Sixth sts. 



196 



G. W. HA WES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Bancroft Horace, blacksmith. 

CAIRN MARTIN, tailor. 

Baird Orange, carpenter, Third bet Indiana 

and Oak. 
Baker Timothy, nurseryman, Main & Twelfth. 
BARRY WILLIAMS" D., LAWYER AND 

COUNTY JUDGE. 
Barry Alonzo, lawyer and agent Etna Insur- 
ance Co. 

Barry Alouzo, lawyer, Third cor State. 

Barnum I., painter, Third cor State. 

Barnum Austin, drover, Fifth bet Walnut 
and Illinois sts. 

Barnes Lambert, paper maker, Fourth cor 
South st. 

Barnes John, harness maker, bet Main and 
Walnut sts. 

Balch M. P., watchmaker and jeweler, Main 
strpf t 

CHRISTIAN J. S., TAILOR. 

CLARK HENRY M., deputy sheriff, Walnut 
cor Sixth street 

Concert Hall, cor Second and Main streets. 

COLSON NORMAN, PROFESSOR OF IN- 
STRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

COLSON W. F., MUSICIAN. 

COE DR. M.D., homeopathic physician, Sec- 
ond cor Illinois street. 

COLLINS T. IL, TAILOR, Second between 
Main and Cedar streets. 

COLSON S. B., musician, between Main and 
Sixth streets. 

CONKLIN W. G., PROPRIETOR OF ST. 
CHARLES MILL, EAST SIDE RIVER, 
SIXTH COR. SOUTH FIRST STREET. 

Connelly James, Walnut street. 

COOK LOUIS, wagon maker. 

CORY HIRAM, SALOON KEEPER, Main, 
cor Second street. 

Gostin W. R , mason, Indiana cor Eighth st. 

CRAWFORD JOHN G, harness maker, 
Main cor Third street. 

CRAWFORD DR. H. M., physician, Cedar 
between Fourth and Sixth streets. 

Daly Patrick, grocer, Main between Second 
and Third streets. 

DEARBORN & FLINT, STEAM PLANING 
MILL, MACHINISTS, ETC., Second 
cor Main street. Worth Dearborn & 
S. B. Flint. 

DEARBORN N. H., JUSTICE OF PEACE, 
Main cor Second street. 

DEWITT A. T., mechanic. 

DE WOLF DR. A. B., DRUGS, GROCE- 
RIES, ETC., Main between Third and 
Fourth streets. 

DICKENSON ALFRED E., broom maker, 
Illinois cor Fifth street. 

DOBELL WILLIAM, JR., HARNESS MA- 
KER, boards Third cor Indiana. 

Dovle Edward, blacksmith. 

DOYLE THOMAS, blacksmith, First bet 
Main and Cedar streets. 

Eastman D. L., lawyer, Main between First 
and Second streets, up stairs. 

EATON ITHIEL, BRICKMAKER, Fourth 
cor Illinois street. 



FERGUSON J. H., LAWYER. 

FERRY WILLIAM, BROOM MAKER, 
boards Sixth cor Walnut street. 

FERRY A. D., BROOM MAKER, boards 
Sixth cor Walnut street. 

FERSON ROBERT, general merchant, bet 
Third and Fourth streets. 

FOSS JOHN F., BILLIARD SALOON, 

FLINT JOSEPH, CARPENTER, between 
Main and Eleventh streets. 

FOSTER WILLIAM, BAKER, Main street. 

FRENCH CHARLES REV., EPISCOPAL 
MINISTER. 

FULLER BENJAMIN, LUMBERMAN, 
Fifth cor Main street. 

FULLER JOSEPH, wagon maker. 

FURNALD J. P., MERCHANT TAILOR 
AND CLOTHIER. 

GILES HENRY, merchant in Chicago, Third 
cor. State street. 

GIBBS H. T., CLERK, St. Charles Hotel. 

GOLDSCHMIDT, MORRIS & CO., merchant 
tailors. 

Green Edward, blacksmith. 

Habord Edward, harness maker. 

HAINES R. J., MILLER AT EXCELSIOR 
MILLS. 

Hayden A., postmaster. 

Hazelton Asa, pedlar. 

HARRICK MISS E. E., MILLINER AND 
DRESSMAKER. 

Hills J. B.. writing master. 

HILLS RICHARD E., groceries and provi- 
sions. 

HOFLE & BILGER, CIGAR MANUFAC- 
TORY. 

Hunt B. T., harness maker and saddler. 

JOHNSON M. W., ARCHITECT, boards at 
St. Charles Hotel. 

JONES S. S., PRESIDENT IOWA CEN- 
TRAL AIR LINE RAILROAD. 

KNIGHT JOB, BLACKSMITH. 

Kinner Archibald K, painter. 

KINGSBURY O, HOMEOPATHIC PHY- 
SICIAN. 

KILBURN J. G., merchant. 

KERWIN FRANCIS M., BANKER, East 
Main cor Second street. 

KANE COUNTY CARRIAGE MANUFAC- 
TORY, STEVEN MARSH, proprietor, 
Main nr Second street. 

LONG M. P., saddler. 

LOOMIS & TYLER, MERCHANTS. 

L. LOYD, WHITTAKER & BRANTON, 
REAPER MANUFACTURERS AND 
GENERAL FOUNDRY. 

LANE JEREMIAH, CARPENTER. 

McCall Archibald C, cooper. 

McCormick Robert, tinsmith. 

McCRACKEN HENRY, moulder. 

McCURDY F. T., daguerreian artist. 

McWAYNE A. R., JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

McWILLIAMS JAMES, NURSERYMAN. 

MANSION HOUSE, D. MARVIN, proprietor. 

March Stephen, wagon maker. 

Marrden & Metcalf, boots and shoes. 

MARVIN DANIEL, MANSION HOUSE. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



197 



Marvin Jackson, blacksmith. 

Marvin Seth, wagon maker and farmer. 

Mattison Thomas, daguerreian and ambrotype 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, Rev. 
Charles French, minister. 

Miller Alexander, millwright. 

Miller James, blacksmith. 

Miller Dr. William R., physician, Fourth cor 
Walnut street. 

MINARD IRA, MONEY LOAXER. 

Minard & Osgood, merchants. 

Minium & Metcalf, carpenters. 

MORIX PATRICK, GROCER. 

Morrison Marcus, paper maker. 

Morrison Oscar, paper maker. 

Morse William, carpenter. 

Xesbit Robert, cabinet maker. 

Xiffin A. P., wagon maker. 

Nil George, station master. 

O'Dwyerren Patrick, Catholic priest, Fourth 
cor Main street. 

O'Maley Peter, grocer. 

Oliver John, carpenter. 

Osborn E., paper maker. 

Pay Robert, music teacher. 

Pearce Jacob, wagon maker. 

Pettingall John G., tailor. 

PIERCE C. E. & S. S., marble works. 

PITWOOD L. N. & CO., DRY GOODS. 

Pratt D. C, daguerreian and ambrotype. 

Prescot R. S., lumber dealer in Chicago. 

Ponsonby P., cooper. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 7, east 
side Sixth cor Illinois. Size, 50 by 75 ; 
main room 47 feet square ; cost $10,000; 
seated with Boston single seats. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL, Illinois cor Fifth, west 
side ; Daniel Canfield, principal ; Miss 
Allen M. Woodward, principal of pri- 
mary department; Miss Louisa Cornell, 
assistant teacher. 

Putnam J., carpenter. 

RUTAN PETER, PROFESSOR OF MUSIC. 

Roche W. T., general grocer. 

Riggs C. W., painter. 

Randall Valentine, shoemaker. 

RANDALL JOHN JAMES, shoemaker. 

bT. CHARLES ARGUS, STITT & MADI- 
SON, PROPRIETORS. 

ST. CHARLES HOTEL, P. J. BURCHELL, 

PROPRIETOR. 
ST. CHARLES RAILROAD DEPOT, cor. 

Walnut and Eighth streets. 
St. Charles Philharmonic Society, meets in 
Concert Hall, cor Second and Main sts. 
St. Charles Mills, W. G. Conklin. 
St. Charles Bank, E. Freeman & Co. 
ST. CHARLES HOTEL, Bell Howard (of 

Buttes Farm) & Co., proprietors. 
Sargent A. J., butcher. 
Sargent R. A., butcher. 
SILL GEORGE, GUNSMITH. 
Simmonds Nicholas, grocer. 
Stone John, butcher. 
STEVENS HENRY, general merchant. 
Stirling B., grocer. 



TURNER WILLIAM, carpenter, Walnut 

bet First and Second streets. 
TERBUT MRS., GROCER. 
Thomas John, miller. 
Universalist Church, Rev. William Sias, 

minister. 
VAN PATHEN J. S. & CO., drugs and 

groceries. 
VAN VORST A. S., deputy postmaster. 
Wadham David, painter. 
Way William F., lime burner. 
WAITE DR. D. D., physician. 
West Thomas, blacksmith. 
WEBSTER A. C, LIVERY STABLE 

KEEPER. 
Wheeler Adam, lumber merchant. 
Windsor G. H., boots and shoes. 
WILKINS DAVID, BOOT AND SHOE 

MAKER. 
WILKIE JOHN J., BAND AND SQUARE 

BOX MANUFACTURER. 
WINSLOW GEO. E., CARRIAGE MAKER. 
Wright John F., grocer. 
Yates J. II., wagon maker. 
ZIMMERMAN M. HARNESS MAKER. 



ST. FRANCISVILLE, 

A post village of Lawrence county, on the 
Wabash river, about 170 miles south-east 
from Springfield. 

Jessie Frakcisville, Postmaster. 



ST. JOHN'S, 

A small post village in Lake county, on the 
west shore of Lake Michigan, twenty-six 
miles north-west from Chicago. 



ST. JACOB, 



A post office of Madison county. 
Jacob Scheoth, Postmaster. 



ST. JOSEPH, 



A post office of Champaign county. 
Jgseph P. Rieley, Postmaster. _ 



ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

A county in the south-west part of Illinois, 
bordering on Missonri, has an area of 630 
square miles. It is situated on the Mississippi 
river opposite St. Louis, and intersected in 
the south-east part by Kaskaskia river, and 
in the north-west part by Cohokia creek. It 
is also drained by Silver and Richland 
creeks. The surface is undulating and in 
some places level, consisting partly of prairie 
and partly of timber land. The soil is ex- 
cellent and generally cultivated. Indian 
corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, hay, cattle, pork 



198 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



and butter are the staples. Large quantities 
of provisions are raised in the county for 
the St. Louis market. It contains twenty 
churches and four newspaper offices. The 
line of the Cincinnatti and St. Louis railroad 
passes through the county. Coal miles are 
numerous and are extensively worked, par- 
ticularly along the Mississippi river. A large 
part of the population consists of Germans. 
Named in honor of General Arthur St. Clair, 
governor of Ohio when it was a territory. 
Capital, Belleville. Population, about 25,000. 



ST. MARIE, 

A small post village of Jasper county, sit 
uated on the Embarrass river, 1 20 miles south- 
east by east from Springfield. 
Joseph Schiffertstein, Postmaster. 



ST. MARY'S, 

A post office of Hancock county. 
John Fields, Postmaster. 



SALEM, 

The county seat of Marion county, is cen- 
trally situated in that part of the state called 
Egypt, on the line of the Ohio and Mississippi 
railroad, 70 miles east from St. Louis and 220 
from Chicago. It is a thriving place, and 
contains one court house and jail, one semi- 
nary and a union school house, three churches, 
three flouring mills, three saw mills, fifteen 
dry good stores, one book and stationery 
store, three drug stores, two clothing stores, 
two boot and shoe stores, three grocery stores, 
two bakeries, two merchant tailoring estab- 
lishments, two tin and stove stores, two 
furniture stores, one painter and glazier shop, 
five blacksmith shops, four carpenter shops, 
four hotels, two printing offices, two watch 
and jewelry stores, one daguerreian gallery, 
one cabinet shop, three wagon manufactories, 
tomb stone and marble yard, two lumber 
yards, one cooper shop, two butcher shops, 
two livery stables, one saddlery and har- 
ness manufactory, two land agencies, two 
insurance agencies, seven lawyers, one 
dentist and oculist, and other depart- 
ments not named. This place presents 
many advantages to persons who are desiring 
a home in the west, and who desire to locate 
in a quiet, sober and industrious place, as 
there is not a place within the corporation 
where ardent drink is vended. Is surrounded 
with a vast scope of land of the best quality, 
with no waste or barrens, with about an equal 
amount of prairie and timber land, and plenty 
of coal within three miles of Salem. Popu- 
lation, 1,600. 

Samuel Hull, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ANDERSON L. R., PROPRIETOR ANDER- 
SON HOUSE. 

BEACH DR. O., ECLECTIC PHYSICIAN, 
OFFICE AT WM. BACKS' STORE. 

BLACK W. H., DRY GOODS AND GRO- 
CERIES, GENERAL MERCHANT. 

BROWNFIELD "WM., JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

CARKE A., proprietor Salem Hotel. 

Cunningham & Bro., general merchants. 

Chapine O. H., civil engineer. 

CLARKE T. C. & J. BUTLER, AMBRO- 
TYPE AND PHOTOGRAPHISTS. 

Corrington W. H., school teacher. 

Cunningham J. & Co., groceries, etc. 

Day Thos. & Son, dry goods, etc. 

DEVENPORT J. A., M. D., PHYSICIAN 
AND SURGEON. 

Devenport & Nelims, druggists. 

DEVORE E. C, ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW AND GENERAL 
LAND AGENT. 

DUNCAN C. C. & Co., DEALERS IN ITAL- 
IAN AND AMERICAN MARBLE 
MONUMENTS, GRAVE AND TOMB 
STONES. 

Dwer James F., grist mill proprietor. 

Eagan II. W., circuit clerk. 

Ehninger Geo., surveyor and engineer. 

Elliott W. M., physician and surgeon. 

Finly J. H., livery stable. 

Finly J. R., drv goods, boots and shoes, etc. 

GREEN DANIEL K., M. D., PHYSICIAN 
AND SURGEON. 

Hainie J. N. attorney at law. 

Hamilton P. P., attorney. 

HARRIS S. & BROTHER, CLOTHIERS 
AND VARIETY STORE. 

HILL WM., M. D., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

Howe J. D., stoves and tinware. 

Hull Samuel, postmaster. 

Laseter S. A., dry goods, etc. 

Ledwige R., grist mill. 

LONG W. D., DRY GOODS, GROCERIES 
AND GENERAL MERCHANT. 

McMackin W. E., dry goods and general 
merchant. 

Martin J. S., county clerk. 

MARTIN ELIJAH, JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE. 

MARSHALL W. A., DRY GOODS GRO- 
CERIES, HARDWARE AND GEN- 
ERAL MERCHANT. 

MASON W. H , GENERAL GROCER AND 
PROVISION MERCHANT. 

MERRILL N. C, DRY GOODS, CLOTHING 
AND GENERAL MERCHANT. 

MERRITT J. D. & E. L., PUBLISHERS OF 
SALEM ADVERTISER. 

MEYERS & BRO., STOVES AND TIN- 
WARE. 

Moore Henry, merchant tailor. 

Pace G. W. & Son, clothing store. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



199 



PATTERSON, BUNGARDNER & CO., 
MANUFACTURER OF BOOTS AND 
SHOES AND DEALERS IN GENERAL 
GROCERIES. 

Prior Thos.. harness maker. 

Fanchier & Elder, drugs and medicines. 

SMITH & COSTOLO, DRY GOODS, HARD- 
WARE AND GENERAL MER- 
CHANTS. 

SKILLING L. D., BOOKSELLER AND 
STATIONER. 

WILLARD & WILSON, AGENTS FOR 
THE SALE OF CENARAL R. R. 
LANDS, AND GENERAL LAND AND 
COLLECTING AGENTS. 

WILLARD W. W., ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR AT LAW. 



SALINE COUNTY. 

A county in the south-east part of Illinois, 
bordering on Indiana and Kentucky. Has an 
area of about 370 square miles. It is bounded 
on the east by the Ohio and Wabash rivers, 
and intersected by Saline creek, from which 
its name is derived. The county is well 
timbered and the soil is fertile. Indian corn, 
oats, cattle, horses, swine and lumber are the 
chief articles of export. It contains fifteen 
churches, and six hundred pupils attending 
public schools. Salt is procured from springs 
on Saline creek, near the west border. Form- 
ed a few years ago out of part of Galatin. 
Capital, Shawneetown. Population, 6,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Moses P. McGehee. 
Associate Justices, James Strickland, Wm. 
Watkins. 

Sheriff, Wm. Rourk. 

Circuit Cleric, Hiram Burnett. 

Treasurer, John M. Bond. 

School Commissioner, V. Rathbone. 

County Clerk, R. N. Warfield. 



SALINE, 



A township in Saline county, 
about 1,176. 



Population, 



SALISBURY, 



A small village of Jersey county, near the 
east bank of the Illinois river. 



SALISBURY, 



A township of Coles county, 
about 1,500. 



Population, 



SALINE MILLS, 

A post office of Galatin county, situate on 
Gallatin creek. 
Wm. N. Warford, Postmaster. 



SAMMON'S POINT, 

A post office of Kankakee county. 
S. Palmer, Postmaster. 



SAND CREEK, 



A small post village of Shelby county. 
John F. Robinson, Postmaster. 



SANDOVAL, 



A post village of Marion county, advan- 
tageously situated on the Illinois Central 
railroad. The Ohio and Missouri railroad 
intersects the Illinois Central at this point. 
This town, now aged but three years, sees 
from day to day, more transit, bustle and 
business than half of the cities of the Union 
can boast of individually. Here east meets 
west, and north meets south in the thunder- 
ing conflict of propulsive motion, energy and 
speed. From this point the four great iron arms 
of communication extend to Chicago, to 
Cairo, to St. Louis, to Cincinnati and to New 
Albany, on the Ohio, opposite Louisville. 
This place is situated sixty miles from St. 
Louis, 230 miles from Chicago. Population, 
500. 

McClemans, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

AMERICAN HOTEL, C. W. STEARNS, 
PROPRIETOR. 

Bell W. B. & Co., dry goods. 

CRAWFORD HOUSE, . CRAWFORD, 

PROPRIETOR 

McCLEMENS, POSTMASTER. 

Martin W., groceries and general store. 

Newland L., groceries and dry goods. 

PILKINGTON B., LUMBER AND COMMIS- 
SION MERCHANT. 

PULLIN & McCLIMANS, dry goods and gen- 
eral merchants. 

PRIMER J. W., justice of the peace. 

UNION HOUSE, E. Woodward, proprietor. 

WOODWARD E., proprietor of Union House. 



SANDWICH, 



This young and enterprising village, is pleas- 
antly situated in the town of Somonauk, in 
T. 37, R. 5 east of 3d P. M., in the south-east 
corner of DeKalb county, sixty-one miles 
south-westerly from Chicago, on the Chicago, 



20(r 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Burlington & Quiucy railroad, upon an undu- 
lating prairie, surrounded by a farming coun- 
try, which, for beauty, salubrity of climate 
.and richness of soil, is unsurpassed in the 
northwest. On the west the prairie is skirted 
by the Somonauk timber belt, on the east 
by the Little Rock timber, to the north there 
is an uninterrupted expanse of prairie, to the 
south, six miles distant, lies the smiling and 
fertile valley of Fox river, presenting an area 
of farming lands and "farm views," unex- 
celed by any other portion of the state. The 
village received its first impulse in 1855, and 
its growth has been a steady per centum of 
increase, now containing a population of 800 
souls, made up of go-ahead New Yorkers, 
calculating New Englanders, the former pre- 
dominating, with a modicum of natives of 
this state. There is a newspaper published 
here, the " People's Press," a spicy indepen- 
dent, having a circulation of 1,000. There 
are four churches, viz : one Baptist, one Meth- 
odist, one Congregational and a Presbyterian. 
There are three schools, one public and two 
select, instructing 250 pupils. There are 
four physicians, one lawyer and six officiating 
clergymen. There is one hotel, the " Abel 
House," conducted entirely on temperance 
principles. There are forty-six business firms, 
including produce dealers, who are permanent, 
and mechanic firms. There are sixteen stores, 
four dry goods, four clothing, two drug and 
two furniture stores, one hardware, one tin 
and stove store, and two groceries. There 
is one large steam grist and flouring mill, 
with ample storage attached, which ground, 
during the past year, 40,000 bushels of grain ; 
there are also two other mills for grinding 
feed, a large grain warehouse and elevator, 
having capacity for storing 40,000 bushels of 
grain; a foundry, machine shop and planing 
mill, which will give employment to thirty 
hands when fully expanded; two lumber yards, 
which sell each, annually, over a million feet 
of lumber ; four coal dealers, who sell each 
year nearly three thousand tons of coal ; one 
livery stable, two blacksmith shops, two 
wagon shops, two tailor shops, two shoe 
shops, two harness shops, one meat market, 
one bakery, one jeweler, one photographic 
artist, post office, express office, two milliner 
shops, two tin shops, three joiner shops, one 
barber shop, one gunsmith shop. Shipments 
of grain from this station, from Dec. 1, 1856, 
to Dec. 1, 1857, a period of one year, 114,347 
bushels of wheat, 174,178 bushels of corn, 
24,621 bushels of oats,an aggregate of 313,140 
bushels. In addition to the grain shipped,there 
has been 1,527 hogs, also a large quantity of 
flour shipped by S. Fuller & Co., and a large 
amount of grass seed, of which no account 
could be obtained. The village of Sandwich 
has only had an existence of three years, and 
is one of the many towns that has sprung 
into existance, through the great spirit of 
progress in the north-west, along the Chicago, 
Burlington and Quincy railroad. The amount 



of business, aside from the grain operations, 
amounts to over $200,000. Many enterprises, 
manufacturing, etc., are only in their infancy, 
which, when fully expanded, will greatly 
swell the amount of business before stated. 
The town has decidedly a moral cast, and 
exhibits each year, a reliable expansion in 
business and increase in population. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

ABEL JONATHAN, PROPRIETOR ABEL 
HOUSE. 

ADAMS A. & CO., FOUNDRY. 

Ballair W. E., physician. 

Bassett W. M., clergyman, Baptist. 

Bassett Mrs. A., photographic artist. 

Boyd David, painter and glazier. 

BOUB C, BAKER. 

BUCHART & COLLETT, FURNITURE 
DEALERS. 

Burt J. B., barber and hair dresser. 

Burt & Bark, grocers. 

Brecher G., shoemaker. 

BYERS k BEXTZ, painters. 

Culver & Bro., dry goods. 

CASTLE M. B., LUMBER DEALER. 

CASTLE M. B., BANKER & LUMBER 
DEALER. 

Carr & Walker, produce and corn merchant. 

Carpenter & Wilcox, blacksmith. 

CARR J. H., DRY GOODS MERCHANT. 

Culver & Patten, commission merchants. 

CULVER & BRO., DRY GOODS MER- 
CHANTS. 

DEAN T. A., SADDLER. 

DEMPSTER W. L., PUBLISHER PEO- 
PLES PRESS. 

Denny Green, mason. 

Dobbin J., cooper. 

Dobbin J. W., clothing. 

Doolittle Marcus, mason. 

Elza P., wagon maker. 

FAIRBANKS A., livery stable. 

FALLANSBEE GELBERT, forwarding and 
commission merchant. 

FALLANSBEE G., COAL DEALER. 

Frick A. C, station and express agent. 

Fuller S., commission merchant. 

FULLER & CO., PROPRIETORS OF 
STEAM MILL. 

Gifford James, mason. 

Ismon A. L., painter. 

Ismon G. L. & Co., hardware. 

Harrison C. B., blacksmith. 

Hay G. P., tailor. 

Hay G. P., clothing. 

Howard M. P., produce and commission mer- 
chant. 

Hicks Mrs. J., millinery. 

HIGLAND & SHEPARD, LUMBER AND 
LATH DEALERS. 

HOLLENBACK G. B., DRY GOODS AND 
GROCERIES. 

Hoft J., shoemaker. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



201 



HUMISTON S. D. & L. S., DEALERS IN 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS. 

Johnson E., jeweler. 

Lansing & Williams, wagon makers. 

Laird & Sanders, tinners. 

Lester Elijah, mason. 

LOWE E. H. & J. II., PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

Morris G. W. & Co., saddlers. 

Norton 0. B., mason. 

OrrT. W. & Co., joiners. 

Roberts H., butchery. 

SANDERS C. M., gunsmith. 

SCOTT WALTER, painter and glazier. 

Serrine G. W. mason. 

SIMMONS W. L. PRODUCE AND COM- 
MISSION MERCHANT. 

Sibley John, painter and glazier. 

Sly Joseph, farrier. 

STONE P. & CO., GROCERS AND CON- 
FECTIONERY. 

Stinson S. B., lawyer and notary public. 

Stewart D. B., merchant tailor. 

SMITH S. J., DRUGS, MEDICINES, 
BOOKS, ETC. 

Tracy C, mason. 

Tummel F., clothing. 

Thomas A. J., coal and lime dealer. 

White A., lumber dealer. 

WINANS & STRATTON, furniture dealers. 

Winslow A. D., clergyman (Methodist). 

WINCHESTER H. F., coal dealer. 

WINCHESTER & ABEL, coal dealers. 

WOODRUFF WM., MASON. 

Wormwood, produce and commission mer- 
chant. 



SANDY RIDGE, 



A new post village of Grundy county. 
Nancy L. Radall, Postmistress. 



SANGAMON COUNTY, 

A county in the south-west central part of 
Illinois, and has an area of 750 square miles ; 
it. is intersected by Sangamon river, from 
which the name is derived, it is also drained 
by the south fork of that river and by 
Sugar, Lick, Bush and Spring creeks. The 
general surface is level, diversified with ex- 
tensive and beautiful prairies and forests of 
good timber. Indian corn, wheat, oats, wool, 
pork, beef and butter are the staples. Wool 
is produced here in greater quantities than in 
any other one county of the state. It con- 
tains forty churches, seven newspaper offices 
and about 3,500 pupils are attending public 
schools. Bituminous coal is abundant. The 
county is intersected by the Chicago and 
Mississippi railroad, and the Sangamon and 
Morgan railroad connects the county seat 
with the Illinois river. Sangamon county is 
one of the most populous in the interior of 



the state. Seat of justice, Springfield, which 
is also the capital of the State. Population, 
about 23,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Wm. D. Power. 

County Clerk, N. W. Matheny. 

Circuit Clerk, Presco Wright. 

Sheriff, John Cook. 

School Commissioner f Francis Springer. 

Assessor and Treasurer, Wm. T. Barrett. 



SANGAMON, 



A new post office of Macon county. 
S. Chappell, Postmaster. 



SANGAMON RIVER. 

This river is in the west central part of the 
state and is formed by the union of two 
branches, termed the north and the south, 
which unite in Sangamon county. Its gen- 
eral course is ; first, north-west, then north, 
and lastly west ; it falls into the Illinois river, 
about 10 miles above Beardstown. It is nav- 
igable, in high water, for small steamboats. 
Length, about 200 miles. 



SANTA ANNA, 

A post village of De Witt county, 10 miles 
north-east from Springfield. 
E. L. Waller, Postmaster. 



SANTA PE, 



A post office of Alexander county, on the 
Mississippi river, about 220 miles south from 
Springfield. 

Clark Jones, Postmaster. 



SARAHVILLE, 



A small village of Williamson county. 
Elijah Cross, Postmaster. 



SAVANNA, 



A flourishing post village of Carroll county, 
on the Mississippi river, 33 miles below Ga- 
lena. It has a good landing and is a depot 
for produce. A branch railroad is projected 
to Freeport. Population, 900. 
Daniel P. Holt, Postmaster. 



SAXON, 



A new post office of Carroll county. 
, Postmaster. 



202 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



SCALES MOUND, 

A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
H. Maupin, Postmaster. 



SCOTT COUNTY, 

A county in the west part of Illinois. It has 
an area of 255 square miles, bounded on the 
north by the Illinois river navigable bv steam- 
boats, and intersected by Plum, Sandy and 
Moveptar (Mauvaisterre) creeks. The sur- 
face is nearly level and partly covered with 
forests of good timber. The soil is exceed- 
ingly rich, and is well cultivated. Indian 
corn, wheat, oats, hay and pork are the 
staples. It contains fifteen churches, one 
newspaper office, and about 2000 pupils are 
attending public schools. It has also 100 
academies or other schools. Stone coal and 
good lime stone are abundant, Sandy creek 
furnishes valuable water power at the coun- 
ty seat. Capital, Winchester. Population, 
S,000. 



SCHUYLER COUNTY, 

A county in the west central part of Illinois, 
it has an area of 420 square miles. The Illi- 
nois river forms the south-east boundary of 
the county which is intersected by Crooked 
creek. The surface is undulating, and con- 
sists partly of prairie and partly of timbered 
land. The soil is excellent and a large part 
of it is under cultivation. Indian corn, 
wheat, oats hay, potatoes and pork are the 
staples. The Illinois river is navigable by 
steamboats on the border. The Central 
Military Tract railroad passes through the 
county. Capital, Eushville. Population, 
12,000, 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, D. W. C. Johnston. 
County Clerk, Charles Neill. 
Circuit Clerk, Joseph Montgomery. 
Sheriff, John H. Lawler. 
County Treasurer, Peter L. Campbell. 
School Commissioner, William Ellis. 
County Surveyor, Leonidas Hornet. 
Representative, L. D. Irwin. 



SCOTT, 



A post office of Lasalle county. 
Geo. S. Maxon, Postmaster. 



SCOTTVILLE, 

A post village of Macoupin county, about 
78 miles south-east from Galena. 
, Postmaster. 



SELPRIDGEVILLE, 

A post office of Will county. 

William S. Gobble, Postmaster. 



SHAWNEET0WN, 

A thriving post town of Gallatin county, on 
the Ohio river, 9 miles below the mouth of 
the Wabash, and 260 below Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. It derives its name from the Shaw- 
nee tribe of Indians who once occupied this 
site. The landing for steamboats is good, 
and large quantities of provisions and pro- 
duce are shipped from this place, which is 
one of the most commercial importance in 
the south-eastpart of the state. It was once 
the county seat. A newspaper is published 
here. 

L. M. Healy, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

./Etna Insurance Co., J. G. Rearden, presi- 
dent, 

Baker Adam, general groceries. 

Barger Joseph B., justice of the peace. 

Brady Preston, ferry proprietor. 

Beck & Kopp, dealer in liquors, groceries, 
etc. 

Docker W. A., dry goods, boots, shoes and 
general merchant. 

Docker Samuel N., florist. 

EDWARD & SON, EDITORS AND PROP- 
RIETORS SOUTHERN ILLINOIS- 
IAN. 

Feehrar Alex., clothing merchant. 

Freeman N. L., attorney at law. 

Karcher & Scantland, cabinet makers and 
carpenters. 

Iloltz Frederick, watchmaker and jeweler. 

Mc Allen & Kirtham, dry goods and general 
merchants. 

Phoenix Insurance Co., James S. Reirdan, 
president. 

Selby & Welsh, manufacturers and dealers in 
boots and shoes, leather, etc. 



SELMA, 



A post office of McLean county. 
Harrison Foster, Postmaster. 



SERENA, 

A post office of La Salle county. 
Daniel Blake, Postmaster. 



SENEX, 

A post office of McLean county. 
S. A. Walton, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



203 



SEWARD, 

A post office of Kendall county. 
J. R. Fletcher, Postmaster. 



SEWARD, 

A township in Winnebago county, popula- 
tion, 400. 



SEWARD'S POINT, 

A post village of Montgomery county, 50 
miles south from Springfield. 
Joseph II. Scott, Postmaster. 



SHABONAIS GROVE, 

A post village of De Kalb county, near the 
central part. The land on which the village 
is situated was reserved by treaty with gov- 
ernment for the use of the old Indian chief, 
Shabona, after whom the place is named, 
but by some mismanagement it was recorded 
as six square miles instead of six miles 
square, and even this has long been lost to 
him. The old veteran is now about 83 years 
of age, and resides about 15 miles from 
Ottawa, between that place and Morris, the 
people of the former place having donated 
20 acres of land for his use. To his personal 
exertions many of the old settlers of the 
state owe their preservation. The manner 
in which the old chief has been treated by 
our government is shameful in the exterme, 
and should bring a blush upon every cheek 
among those who have so much reason to 
feel themselves indebted to him. 
Wji. Marks, Postmaster. 



commanding a fine view of the surrounding 
country. Bureau county is considered one of 
the finest counties in the state, and the lands 
around Sheffield are among the finest por- 
tions of it. The growth of the town has 
been steady and rapid, benig settled scarcely 
three years ago. Part of the town plat and 
the lands adjoining, to the amount of 1,500 
acres, are owned by the Sheffield Mining and 
Transportation Company — a stock company, 
regularly chartered by the state, possessing 
a capital of 8150,000, organized for the pur- 
pose of mining and transporting coal. This 
company pursues a most liberal spirit in the 
disposition of their lands, renting and selling 
them at low rates. They carry on an exten- 
sive coal business, shipping to Chicago and 
other points on the Chicago and Rock Island 
and Mississippi and Missouri Railroads to the 
amount of 40,000 tons per annum. The 
business men of this flourishing town are 
prompt and energetic in their transactions, 
but are hardly competent to transact the 
business that is flowing to this natural point 
from all quarters. A line of road has been 
surveyed from this place to Fulton city, on 
the Mississippi river, a distance of about 60 
miles. This road, when built, will greatly 
add to the importance of this flourishing 
town. Population, 1,500. 
J. R. Miller, Postmaster. 



SHARON, 

A post village of Whiteside county, 
miles north by west from Springfield. 
J. H. Johnson, Postmaster. 



135 



SHAUMBURGH, 

A post office of Cook county. 



SHAW'S POINT, 



A post office of Macoupin county. 
Clisby Sims, Postmaster. 



SHEFFIELD, 



A post village of Bureau county, is located 
on the line of the Chicago and Rock Island 
Railroad, 137 miles west of Chicago, and 45 
east of Rock Island, on a high rolling prairie, 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Austin A. S., Austin House. 

Betts E. D., merchant. 

Bovden C. H,, hardware. 

BRADSHAW & PIERCE, cabinet makers. 

CLARK J. L. & E., grocers. 

Craig R. L., grocery. 

Everson W. H., grocer. 

Gunkel George, merchant. 

McXally G. P., grocer. 

MASON S. R., DRUGGIST. 



SHEFFIELD 

MINING & TRANSPORTATION CO. 



Coal Mines on the Chicago and Rock 
Island Railroad, one quarter of a mile 
west of Sheffield. 



Office in the Sheffield House. 



H. C. PORTER, Agent. 

SHEFFIELD, - - - - ILLINOIS. 



204 



G. W. IIAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Morgan J. L., physician. 

Petterson J. H., merchant. 

PULSIFER E. F. & CO., DRY GOODS. 
CLOTHING, HARDWARE, ETC. 

Stevenson & Fool, clothing. 

STEVENS D. E., PROPRIETOR SHEF- 
FIELD HOUSE. 

SWEAT E. M., Chicago and Rock Island 
Railroad. 

Whipple Wm. M., grocer. 



SHELBURN, 

A post village of Lee county. 
F. R. Dptciier, Postmaster. 



SHELDON'S GROVE, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
Daniel Sheldon, Postmaster. 



SHELBY STATION, 

A post of office of Bureau county. 
H. White, Postmaster. 



SHELBY COUNTY, 

A county in the south-east central part of 111., 
has an area of 1 90 square miles. It is intersect- 
by the Kaskaskia river, dividing it into nearly 
equal parts, and also drained by the Little 
Wabash and by the south fork of Sangamon 
rivers. The surface is moderately undulating 
and diversified by prairie and forests. The 
soil is fertile, well watered and easily culti- 
vated. A portion of the Grand Prairie is 
included in this county. The timber is mostly 
distributed along the rivers and creeks. 
Indian corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, pork and 
butter are the staples. It contains twelve 
churches and 869 pupils attending public 
schools. The line of the Illinois Central 
railroad and the Alton and Terre Haute rail- 
road run through the county. Capital, 
Shelbyville. Population, about 8,000. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, . 

Clerk of County Court, B. Roberts. 
Clerk of Circuit Court, J. V. Lee. 
Treasurer, B. F. Frazer. 
Sheriff, Samuel Herod. 



SHELBYVILLE, 

A post village, capital of Shelby county, on 
the Kaskaskia river, at the crossing of the 
Terra Haute and Alton railroad, 60 miles 
south-east from Springfield. It contains a 
brick court house and several stores. 
B. B. Wheeller, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Hannaman & Smith, surgeon dentists. 

Harris Thos. W., county clerk. 

Headen Wm. Dr., physician and surgeon. 

Johnson & Co., meat market. 

JOHNSON D. W., DR., eclectic physician 
and surgeon. 

Keller Jacob R., harness maker. 

McWILLIAM R., ATTORNEY AT LAW 
AND GENERAL LAND AGENT. 

Martin Douthit, dry goods and general mer- 
chant. 

Meyers S., boot and shoe maker. 

Pen well E. S. & Bro., physicians and surgeons. 

Scovil C. C, proprietor of grist mills. 

SHUTT P. L., PROPRIETOR SHELBY- 
VILLE BANNER. 

Smith Letten, coal agent. 

Wendling John, groceries. 

Wren Miss E. A., milliner and dressmaker. 

Zurek Henry, leather manufacturer. 



SHERBURNEVILLE, 

A post village of Will county. 
David Brittoon, Postmaster. 



SHIPMAN, 

A thriving post village of Macoupin county, 
on the line of the St. Louis, Alton and 
Chicago railroad, 241 miles from Chicago. 
The village is only a few years old, but con- 
tains all the requisites to become cne of con- 
siderable importance. It contains a large 
building, occupied as a store, church and 
hall for Masonic purposes, numerous fine 
private residences, two large grain ware- 
houses, etc. 

Robert Meatyard, Postmaster. 



SH0K0KON, 



A post office of Henderson county. 
Robert W. Crane, Postmaster. 



SIDNEY, 

A post village of Champaign county, on the 
Salt Fork of Vermilion river, about 10 miles 
south-east from Urbana. 
O. W. Upp, Postmaster. 



SILVER CREEK, 



A post township of Stephenson county. 
Erastus Torrt, Postmaster. 



SIM0DA, 



A post office of Kankakee county. 
James W. Bukgiss, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



205 



SLACKWATER, 

A post office of Stark county. 
David Whiffer, Postmaster. 



SMITHTON, 



A post office of St. Clair county. 
B. J. Smith, Postmaster. 



SMITHVILLE, 



A post village of Peoria county. 
Thomas P. Smith, Postmaster. 



SMOOT'S POINT, 

A post village of Menard county. 
W. C. Smoot, Postmaster. 



S0D0N, 



A post office of Champaign county. 
Thomas Dickson, Postmaster. 



SODERUS. 



A post office of Champaign county. 
J. P. Tfnbrook, Postmaster. 



SOLEN MILLS, 



A post village of McHenry county, 55 miles 
north-west by west from Chicago. 
S. Abrich, Postmaster. 



SOMERSET, 



A post village of Saline county. 
Wm. Mathews, Postmaster. 



S0M0NAUK, 

A post village of De Kalb county, on Somo- 
nauk creek, 55 miles west by south from 
Chicago. 

Lyman Bacon, Postmaster. 



SOUTH AMERICA, 

A post office of Saline county. 
Uriah Carson, Postmaster. 



SOUTH GROVE, 



A post village of De Kalb county, about 70 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
Henry Safford, Postmaster. 



SOUTH HAMPTON, 

A post village of Gallatin county. 
David Kester, Postmaster. 



SOUTHAMPTON, 



A post office of Peoria county. 
Alanson Hakes, Postmaster. 



SOUTH NORTHEIELD, 

A post office of Cook county. 
John Shamnack, Postmaster. 



S0UTHP0RT, 



A post village of Peoria county. 
E. W. Gibbs, Postmaster. 



SPARTA, 

A thriving post village of Randolph county, 
on the line of the Illinoistown and Massac 
railroad, 113 miles south from Springfield. 
Joseph Farnan, Postmaster. 



SPENCER, 

A post village of Will county. 



SPRING BAY, 

A post village of Woodford county, on the 
east shore of Peoria lake, about 12 miles 
above Peoria. It has a good steamboat land- 
ing and an active business in shipping pro- 
duce. 

R. C. Dement, Postmaster. 



SPRING CREEK, 

A post office of McDonough county. 



SPRINGFIELD. 

This city, the county seat of Sangamon 
county, and the capital of the state, is beau- 
tifully situated on an undulating prairie, 
skirted on two sides by forests. It is acces- 
sible from all directions, by the Chicago and 
St. Louis, and the Great Western and Toledo 
railroads, which cross each other at nearly 
right angles. 

It is distant from Chicago 18S miles, and 
from St. Louis 97 miles. The county of 
Sangamon was organized in 1820, and the 
first sale of lots in Springfield was made in 
1823. In 1836, the seat of government was 
removed from Vandalia, and was permanent- 
ly located at Springfield. 



206 



G. W. JIAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



Its growth during the last few years has 
been very rapid, and of a permanent charac- 
ter. Springfield is the point of shipment for 
the surplus agricultural productions of the 
county, and the centre of its trade, and is 
destined to be the great central city of the 
state. The streets and squares are beautiful- 
ly arranged, and compactly built up. The 
houses display much architectural skill, while 
the thrifty trees and shrubbery which skirt 
the streets and fill up the areas, make it a 
most delightful place. 

The public buildings are fine, and the cap- 
ital square is highly ornamanted. The State 
House is much admired for its just propor- 
tions and symmetrical appearance. Springfield 
has many manufacturing establishments, 
mills, foundries, machine shops, churches of 
various denominations, four banking houses, 
four large hotels, two newspaper establish- 
ments — the Illinois State Journal, and the 
Illinois State Register. The Illinois Farmer 
is also issued from the Journal office. The 
society of Springfield is refined, and is a 
desirable place of residence. 

Besides five public free schools, it is the 
seat of the Illinois State University, a most 
flourishing institution. 

During the past year, a system of sewerage 
was inaugurated, which, when fully complet- 
ed, will effectually drain the city of surface 
water and all impurities, and the water 
works company are now engaged in the en- 
terprise of boring, in order to secure a con- 
stant supply of pure water. 

The most of the improvements made the 
last two years have been of a permanent and 
substantial character, such as would do 
credit to any city in the land ; and a few 
years of growth like the two last, will give 
the "Flower City" a proud preeminence 
among the half dozen or more rivals now 
contending for the mastery in our state. 
Springfield was incorporated as a city in 
1840, at which time the number of inhabi- 
tants was 2,579. In 1848, it was 3,912; in 
1850, 5,106; in 1854, 6,218; in 1855, 7,250; 
since which no census has been taken. The 
valuation of real and personal property for 
the year 1857, was $4,451,907. 

Among the many elegant residences that 
have been erected during the past year, none 
is more worthy of mention than that of ex- 
Gov. Matteson, on the corner of Fourth and 
Jackson streets. The extreme length of the 
building, exclusive of the portico, is 83 feet; 
and breadth, 68 feet; two stories in height, 
beside basement and attic. The foundations 
are of heavy stone, and the superstructure of 
pressed brick, of beautiful appearance. The 
architect, J. M. Van Osdel, of Chicago, 
adopted the old Eoman style of architecture, 
with pointed slate roof, laid in diamond 
shapes, and its angular shape and handsome 
proportions render it an object of interest to 
all. The new church built by theUniversal- 
ist society, is situated just south of the gov- 



ernor's mansion. This is a fine structure of 
brick, and cost about £8,000. 

Altogether, this city may be considered as 
one of the finest in the state, possessing all 
the requisites of wealth and comfort, and its 
citizens manifesting that energetic spirit 
which is soindispensible to the advancement 
of our western country. 

The present population is estimated at 
about 12,000. 

Isaac R. Diller, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Adams R. E. W., dentist. 

Adams J. II., hats and caps, south side of 

Adams, L. B. See Advertisement, 
public square. 

ALSOP THOMAS, PROPRIETOR OF THE 
ILLINOIS MILLS. 

Aldrich Fenner, proprietor St. Nicholas Ho- 
tel. 

Armstrong H. M. & Co., woollen manufac- 
torv. 



L. B. ADAMS, 

NOTARY PUBLIC, JUSTICE OF PEACE, 

AND 
SPRINGFIELD, ILX. 



Baithache & Baker, proprietors of Illinois 

State Journal. 
Barret William T., assessor and treasurer. 
Beach R H, clothing, Fifth street. 
Bishop William, guns, pistols, etc., north 

Fifth street. 
Brady Thomas, restaurant. 
BROADWELL & BAIL, ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW. 
Broadwell & Lindsay, groceries, north-east 

corner public square. 
Broadwell & Lindsay, grocers, north-west 

corner public square. 
BUTLER P., DAGUERREOTYPE ARTIST. 
BUNN J., BANKER. 
Burkhardt J. M., grocers 
Camperon & Richisson, engine buiiders. 
Camp Amos, harness maker. 
Canedy & Johnson, druggists, west side pub- 
lic square. 
Carmoody J., clothing and groceries. 
Chapman, dry goods, west side square. 
Chatterton G. W., jeweler. 
Chenery W. D. & Son., proprietors Chenery 

House., corner Fourth and Washington 

streets. 
Clinton F., grocer. 

COON R. & BRO., BOOTS & SHOES. 
Cook T., agent of the Flag newspaper. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



207 



THOMAS LEWIS. 



L. B. ADAMS. 



LEWIS & ADAMS, 

2ittornei}0 & (JToimaelors 

A T L AW. 
REAL ESTATE & GENERAL AGENTS 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

» 

Prompt attention paid to Collecting in the 

United States and other Courts, and 

in Central Illinois. 



Cook John, sheriff. 

COE & VAN DUYN, HARNESS & SHOE 

LEATUER, SIXTH STREET. 
Conkling James C, land agent. 
CONKLING W. J., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 
Condell Stockdale, dry goods, Metropolitan. 
Converse & Co., groceries, etc. 
Corneau & Diller, druggists, east side public 

square. 
Curran Isaac R, jeweler, south side. 
DUBOCE A., AMBROTYFE & SILPHTYPE 

ARTIST, WEST SIDE OF SQUARE. 
Edmonds C. & C. H, hardware. 
Ellis A. Y., dry goods, under St. Nicholas 

Hotel. 
Elder & Bro., hardware, north side of the 

square. 
FISHER S. B., DRY GOODS & GENERAL 

MERCHANT. 
Fox B. F., hardware. 
Friebel William, jeweler. 
FRENCH & LOl'D, dentists, west side of 

square. 
French A. W., dentist, 
FRANCIS J., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 

LAND AGENT, AND COLLECTOR, 

JOURNAL BUILDINGS. 
FRANCIS & BARRELL, AGRICULTURAL 

IMPLEMENTS. 
Gookins S. D., fine art gallery, Fifth street. 
GRANT & HUNT, house, sign and ornament- 
al painters 
Hall J. G, groceries. 
Hammersbough & Bro., clothing, north side 

public square. 
HARTMANN G., MANUFACTURER OF 

SEGARS AND TOBACCO. 
HAWLEY E. B. & CO., dry goods, etc. 
HAY M., attorney at law. 
Helm M., phvsician. 
HARPER j/D., PHYSICLVN, SURGEON 

AND OCCULIST. 
HOUGH J. A., FURNITURE & CARPET- 
ING, SOUTH FIFTB STREET. 
GREEBLE L., CLOTHING. 
GRIMSLEY W. P., PROPRIETOR PH(E- 

NIX MILLS. 
Hunt N. V. & Co., dry goods, groceries, etc., 

north-east corner of square. 



A. M. WILLIAMS, 

QUtorncg axih Counselor 

A T L A W. 



Office on North Sixth street, one door north 

of CondelTs Store (up stairs), 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



Huntington George L., lumber dealer, oppo- 
site the Great Western depot. 

Ingles J. J., saddles and harness, No. 9 Union 
Row. 

Ives John G. & Co., .Etna Mills. 

JACOBY H. & CO., GENERAL PACKERS. 

Jackson Ralph, hat and cap manufacturer: 

JOHNSON & BRADFORD, BOOK BIND- 
ERY. 

JOHNSON & McCAGUE, PROPRIETORS 
FLOURING MILL, 

Johnson & Vendier, dry goods. 

KING, BERRIMAN & RIPPON, IRON & 
BRASS FOUNDRY. 

KLAHOLT & CLAUS, DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES & CLOTHING. 

Kreigh Elie K., hardware. 

Kuehn Jacob, hats and caps, Fifth street. 

Lanphier & Conner, pub. 111. State Register 

Lamb J. C, ^Etna foundry. 

LEGGOTH & BRITT, plain and ornamental 
plasterers. 

LEMAN J. C. k W. S., agricultural ware- 
Lewis & Adams. See Advertisement. 

LINCOLN & HERINDON, ATTORNEYS 
AND COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

Linsley S. M., lumber merchant. 

Little F. S., clothing, south side public 
square, 

Lvndsay Isaac assessor and collector. 

Long Samuel, physician. 

LORD & FOWLER, PHYSICIANS, opposite 
the Chenery House. 

McCandlass J. & Co., wholesale grocers. 

McClernand & Herndon, attorneys at law. 

Macey John C, auction and commission 
merchant. 

Matheny C. W. & Co., merchants, east side 
public square. 

MACK DAVID, ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

MANNING G. S., boarding house. 

MASON J. A., FURNITURE. 

Matheny J. H., attorney at law. 

Mathers Thomas, boots and shoes. 

Matherrv A. W., county clerk. 

MATHER T. S., LAND AND INSURANCE 
AGENT. 

Middin & Brothers, dry goods and groceries. 

Myers II. C. & Co., confectioners, No. 1, 
north side of square. 

LAVELY WILLIAM, GROCERIES & PRO- 
VISIONS, WEST SIDE OF PUBLIC 
SQUARE. 



208 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



WILLIAM M'CA-BE, 

Importer and wholesale and retail dealer in 

FRENCH CHINA, CROCKERY, AND GLASS WARE- 

Britania, Silver Plated, Japanned, Wooden and Willow Ware, 

AND HOUSE KEEPING GOODS GENERALLY. 

■IB I !.!»>-»<»»■ 

On tlie East Side of the Public Square, 
SPRINGFIELD, 1 JL Is . 



POST C. R., COMMISSION & FORWARD- 
ING MERCHANT, AND DEALER IN 
GRAIN OF ALL KINDS. 

PEASE E. B. & BROTHER, HARDWARE 
AND CUTLERY. 

Pease & Webb, painters, two doors orth of 
Third Church. 

Pheasant D. , auction and commission mer- 
chant. 

PHELPS C. C. DEALER IN FURNITURE 

Power William D., county judge. 

RICHARDS & SMITH, "JOB PRINTERS, 
WEST SIDE OF CAPITOL SQUARE. 

REISCH & HELMB, DRY GOODS & GRO- 
CERIES. 

REYBURN JAMES, merchant tailor. 

Reinbald & Marschutz, hardware, Sixth st. 

Reaves & Ayers, dry goods, north-east corner 
public square. 

Richardson & Co., boots and shoes, 3 Enter- 
prise building. 

Ridgely N. II., banking house, 

ROCH C. F., EDITOR OF THE FLAG 
NEWSPAPER. 

Roe Robert, cigar manufacturer. 

Rosette John E., attorney at law. 

Ruth R. F., saddle and harness shop. 

Russel R. G., groceries. 

Ryan Charles, physician. 

NUTT & McMURTRY, groceries and provis- 
ions, two doors west of Chenerv House. 

OWENS E., DRUGGIST & BOOKSELLER. 

Saunders & Son, dry goods and grorcries. 
house, Washington st. 

Sides Wm., engineer, etc. 

STEWART J. G., ambrotvpe artist. 

SMITH, EDWARDS & CO., DRY GOODS, 
WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 

SMITH WM. T., TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

Spath George, general merchant. 

Spare J., clothing store. 

Springer Francis, school commissioner. 

Suton & Bro., architects and builders. 

TEUSLEY S. M., LIME, LATH, SHIN- 
' GLES, PLASTER, ETC. 

THAYER JOSEPH & CO., DRY GOODS, 
CLOTHING, ETC. 

THOMPSON & ZANE, ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 



Ulrieh E. R. & Co., lumber. 

Van Deusen M. M., drug store, west side of 
square. 

VAN NESS JOHN Q., INSURANCE, REAL 
ESTATE, AND GENERAL AGENCY. 

Ward W. D., watchmaker. 

Warner Moses, proprietor National Hotel. 

WARNER L. S., PRODUCE AND COM- 
MISSION MERCHANT, OPPOSITE 
THE ALTON AND ST. LOUIS DE- 
POT. 

Watson N. W. & Son, confectioners, south 
side public square. 

Wendall Wm., lumber merchant. 

Wilson & Curry, grocers. 

WILLARD & ZIMMERMAN, PAINTERS 
AND PAPER HANGERS, ADAMS, 
NEAR FOURTH ST. 

WILLIAMS JOHN & CO., DEALERS IN 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS. 

Wright Presco, circuit clerk. 

Wheelock, Paine & Co., booksellers and 
binders, east side of square, 

Williams & Link, cabinet rooms. 

Wood George, merchant tailor. 



SPRING GARDEN, 

A post village of Jefferson county, 145 miles 
south by east from Springfield. 
A. P. Wiiitton t , Postmaster. 



SPRING GROVE, 



A post office of Warren county. 
J. H. CARMicnAEL, Postmaster. 



SPRING HILL, 

A post village of Whitside county, about C5 
miles south-south-east from Galena. 
Levi Fuller, Postmaster. 



SPRING LAKE, 

A post village of Tazewell county. 
James F. Brown, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



209 



SPRING VALLEY, 

A post office of Carroll county. 
L. M. Healy, Postmaster. 



SPRINGVILLE, 



A post village of Coles county, about 10 miles 
south-west, from Charlestown. 

Henry Clay Worthaii, Postmaster. 



SQUAW GROVE, 



A post township of De Kalb county. 
Henry Safford, Postmaster. 



STARK COUNTY, 

A county in the north-west central part of 
Illinois. It has an area of 290 square miles, 
and is intersected by Spoon river, an affluent 
of the Illinois. The county is divided be- 
tween prairie and timber land, and the soil is 
good. Indian corn, wheat, oats and hay are 
the staples. It was named in honor of Gen. 
Stark of :he Revolutionary war. Population, 
about 4,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, John Finley. 

Sheriff, Henry Brees. 

County Clerk, Miles A. Fuller. 

Cleric of Circuit Court, Jefeerson Kixn. 

County Treasurer, Denis Louman. 



STARPIELD, 

A post office of Peoria county. 
Thomas J. Moore, Postmaster. 



STAUNTON, 

A post village of Macoupin county, '26 miles 
from the Mississippi river at Alton. 
Henry C aldwell, Postmaster. 



STEELE'S MILLS, 



A post office of Randolph county. 
Seneca Parker, Postmaster. 



STEPHENSON COUNTY 

Is situated in the northern tier of counties, 
next to the Wisconsin line, with Winnebago 
on the east, and Jo Daviess on the west. As 
a farming district, it has no superior in the 
state. The soil is deep and strong, the sur- 

14 



face undulating enough to make it picturesque 
and healthy, while water — good spring wa- 
ter — is abundant, and timber is near at 
hand. A part of the county is prairie — 
as rich prairie, too, as the sun ever shone 
upon — while the balance is mingled prairie 
and "openings," with spots along the streams 
and river heavily timbered. Everywhere, 
the quality of the soil is excellent, as the 
abundant crops raised by the enterprising- 
farmers can testify. Some of the largest 
yields ever known in the world have given 
Stephenson county's soil a name and fame 
abroad that is well deserved. The amount 
of farm products annually exported from this 
county at Freeport city, and other railroad sta- 
tions isenormous, and with such a ready cash 
market, at fair prices, close at their firesides, 
and with land so fertile and so cheap, is it 
any wonder that the farmers are growing 
wealthy with a rapidity that would astonish 
their down-east friends? Not at all. The 
country they inhabit is a rich and beautiful 
one. Its soil is equal in almost any portion 
of it to that of the gardens of New England 
and New York, and its resources are as yet 
but half developed. In the language of the 
History of Stephenson county, "as the travel- 
er comes west from Chicago, he will find but 
little in the appearance of the country on the 
line of the road that is inviting, until he 
approaches Elgin, on Fox river. When he 
approaches Marengo, and is conveyed through 
the center of Garden Prairie, he begins to 
see some of the loveliest portions of the 
western county ; and as he passes by the 
flourishing town of Belvidere, in Boone 
county, and the city of Rockford, on Rock 
river, his admiration of "Prairie Land" will 
in no wise be diminished. The face of the 
country is a little more uneven, and the soil 
is generally allowed to be richer between 
Rock river and the Mississippi than in the 
counties lying in the direction of Lake Michi- 
gan. Throughout the county the land is 
sufficiently rolling to make the prospect di- 
versified without being detrimental to agri- 
culture. 

"The soil seems well adapted for almost 
every kind of grain or fruit which usually 
grows in these northern latitudes." 

. No portion of the country, east or west, is 
more healthy than is this section of Northern 
Illinois. The facts show that in the city of 
Freeport itself the mortality during the year 
1856, was but one per cent. — a rate as low 
as in any city in the Union — and the coun- 
try around is remarkable for the healthful- 
ness of the people. Consumption, that grim 
destroyer that makes such havoc among the 
people of many of the eastern and middle 
states, is almost unknown here, while cases 
of fever and that class of diseases are no 
more common than they are there. When 
the country was first settled there was more 
or less of fever and ague, just as there is now 
in Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, and Nebraska ; 



210 



a W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



but the period of its existence here is almost 
passed — it is fading away, and is thought of 
as among the things that were and are not. 
Emigrants, therefore, who conclude to take 
up their abode upon the beautiful and fer- 
tile rolling prairies of Stephenson county, 
need have no fears of this unpleasant visitor. 
They will find here broad acres of as rich 
soil as the earth can show, acres of gently 
rolling prairie, well interspersed with beauti- 
ful groves of timber, and well watered with 
fine running streams, all of which can be 
bought at prices which will enable them at 
once to reap a rich interest, and ensure them 
large profits upon their investments. They 
would find themselves surrounded, without 
delay, by a large share of the comforts they 
enjoyed in their eastern homes — comforts 
with which they would be compelled to dis- 
pense, if they chose to cross the Father of 
of Waters, and try their fortune in newer 
lands. 



STERLING, 



A flourishing post village, capital of White- 
side county, is delightfully situated on the 
rapids of Rock river, in the centre of as fine 
a country as the valley of that stream can 
boast, the Chicago, Fulton and Iowa Air 
Line nrilroad passes through the city, at a 
distance of 110 miles from Chicago and 25 
miles from the Mississippi river. The Sterling 
and Rock Island railroad, 55 miles in length, 
now under construction, will terminate here 
when completed, supplying the city and 
vicinity with coal from the extensive beds 
of Rock Island county, while at a distance 
of 12 miles to the east passes the Illinois 
Central railroad, affording direct communica- 
tion with the northern and southern portions 
of the state. The city is remarkable for its 
recent rapid growth; the population in 1855, 
being only 614, which result is attributable 
mainly to the development of the magnifi- 
cent water power at this point, probably the 
most extensive in the north west. Rock 
river, with its unfailing supply of water, here 
falls 12 feet in a distance of three fourths of 
a mile. In 1855, this power was improved 
by the construction of a substantial stone 
dam, and is rapidly being brought into use 
by the erection of manufacturing establish- 
ments, such as flouring mills, planing mills, 
founderies, tanneries, etc. Two newspapers, 
the Gazette and the Republican, both week- 
lies, are published here and receive a liberal 
support. The city has five good hotels, the 
principal of which is the Wallace House, a 
fine building, kept in a superior manner, and 
enjoying the good favor of its guests. There 
are also eight religious societies in the place, 
and an abundance of good school facilities. 
Population, 3,000 

J. Hutchinson, Postmaster. 



CITY OFFICERS. 

Mayor, Lorenzo Hapgood. 

Aid. -1st. Ward, \ f R ' £• Emmons ' 
' t Jno. Pettigrew. 

Aid. -2d. Ward, \ JJenry Bush, 

' ( Daniel R. Beck. 



Aid — 3d. Ward, 



j { James Galt, 
1 I B. G. Wheeler. 

Police Justice, L. K. Hawthorne. 

Street Commissioner, J. S. Stager. 

City Treasurer, W. A. Sanborn. 

City Attorney, E. N. Kirk. 

City Clerk, L. K. Hawthorne. 

City Marshall, J. D. Herrick. 

City Surveyor, W. S. Wilkinson. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AKINS BROTHERS, GENERAL GRO- 
CERIES AND PRODUCE MER- 
CHANT. 

ALEXANDER & BARRETT, GROCERIES. 

Anthony Dr., physician and surgeon. 

Bachman S. F., tailor. 

BAKER W., proprietor Pennsylvania House. 

Beck Mrs. D. R., fancy millinery. 

Bagley A., M.D., physician and surgeon. 

Beli J. R., boots and shoes. 

BARRETT ALEX., groceries and provisions, 
ovsters, cider, etc., Third st. 

BISSELL F. B., DEALER IN GRAIN 
AND LUMBER. 

BOYNTON J. H., dry goods, hardware, 
crockery and general merchant. 

BOWMAN EDMUND, watchmaker and 
dealer in clocks and jeweler, Third st. 

Brookfield Isaac, boot and shoe maker. 

Bressler J. M., furniture dealer. 

BUSH H. & Co., dealers in books and 
stationery. 

CAFFREY WM., card printer and publisher 
of Sterling Rcjrublican. 

Clinton A., homeopathic physician. 

Chriev & Snow, dealers in liquors. 

COBLENTZ B. C, attorney at law and 
notary public. 

Coblentz B. C, agent for the yEtna Insur- 
ance Company. 

Facy T. R., engineer and machinist. 

Fluelling B., dealer in lumber. 

GALT CRAWFORD & CO., wholesale and 
retail dealers in hardware and agricul- 
tural implements. 

GALT T. A. & CO., manufacturers of Ran- 
dall's sowing harrow. 

Graves & Dinsmore, attorneys at law. 

GRATTAN H. G., EDITOR AND PROP- 
RIETOR STERLING WEEKLY 
GAZETTE. 

GRATTAN H. G., card bill, and pamphlet 
printing. 

Hudson A. S, M.D., phvsician and surgeon. 

II AGE Y & SON, dealers in watches and 
jewelery. 

HARVY J. I., apothecary and druggist, old 
Bank block, Third st. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



211 



Harphin John, harness maker. 

Harden & Wheeler, milliners. 

HARVY & PRICE, attorneys and counselors 
at law, office, over bank. 

Hawthorn L. K., justice of the peace. 

Henry M. S. & Co., bankers and dealers in 
exchange. 

HENRY M. S. & CO., BANKERS AND 
DEALERS IN EXCHANGE, LAND 
AND GENERAL AGENTS. 

HENRY & PRICE, attorneys at law. 

HINSDALE & JOHNSON, dealers in drugs, 
medicines, etc. 

Hibbard F. B., dealer in agricultural imple- 
ments. 

JOHNSON A. J., manufacturer and dealer 
in boots and shoes. 

Kannaly Michael, grocer. 

Keller Z. P., proprietor Central House. 

Kelgour W. M., attorney at law. 

KEILEY T. J., merchant tailor. 

KLINE HOUSE, John Kline, proprietor. 

Kirk & Haskill, attorneys at law. 

LEAVITT DAVID, civil engiueer, office, 
Wsllncf block 

McKINNY WILLIAMS & CO., dry goods, 
groceries, hats, caps, etc. 

MANAHAN & BLAKESLEY, dealers in 
hardware, stoves, tinware, etc. 

Miller Jacob, bakery. 

Miles Samuel, blacksmith. 

Mooney Win, dealer in liqnors. 

MERCHANTILE COLLEGE, A. Crouch, 
professor of bookkeeping. 

MUNSON H. A., Western Union Insurance 
Company. 

Nelson Maxon, wagons and carriages. 

OAKS N. D., clothing, hats and caps, 3 doors 
east of Wallace's block. 

Osgood W. F. & Co., dry goods. 

OSMER S. T., brewer XXX cream and am- 
ber ale, porter and lager beer. 

Page James G., produce and commission 
merchant. 

Patterson, Witmcrs & Gait, dry goods groc- 
eries etc. 

PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE, WM. BAKER. 

POTTS JAMES, wholesale and retail dealer 
in clothing, Boyington block. 

Prairie mills, Lukens & High. 

RANDOLPH E. & R. F. general grocers. 

Richards D. & Co., hardware and stoves. 

ROBINSON L. L., dealers in groceries, etc., 
oposite the Wallace House. 

Rover M. M., physician and surgeon. 

QUIRK BOTSFORD & CO., dealers in 
grain and lumber. 

Sackett & Ware, attorneys at law. 

SANGSTON JOHN A., manufacturer of sad- 
dles and harness. 

Sanders Joseph, meat market. 

SANBORN W. A., dealer in all kinds of 
coal, agricultural implements, etc. 

SANBORN W. A., agent for the American 
Express Co., office, near railroad depot. 

Seller John, carpenter and joiner. 

SheneM'ind F., tobacco and cigars. 



SHEPHERD & KING, foreign and commis- 
sion merchants and dealers in all kinds 
of produce. 

SHERMAN N. & J. A., wholesale dealers in 
foreign and domestic liquors. 

Smith J., carpenter. 

Smith A. S. & Co., produce and commission 
merchants. 

Smith A. P., teacher of music. 

Stow David, dealer in cabinet ware. 

Teats & Windom, ambrotype artists. 

Teats J. C, dentist. 

Thomas E., carpenter. 

Tuttle J. A., architect and builder. 

Trvon W. C, dealer in guns, pistols, etc. 

TURNER G. H., DEALER IN LUMBER, 
LATH, SHINGLES, ETC. 

Valentine Slacker, tailor. 

WALLACE HOUSE, WM. McCUNE, 
PROPRIETOR, near railroad depot. 

WELLS & EMMONS, dealers in furniture, 
in all its various branches. 

Webster & Elder, grocers. 

Wheeler B. G. & Co., bankers. 

WINDOM JONAS, grocery and provisions. 

Wilson R. L., general land agent. 

WISEWELL M. W., clothing, hats, cap3, 
boots, shoes, etc. 



STEUBEN, 



A post office of Marshall county. 
Aaron C. Fosdick, Postmaster. 



STIPLESVILLE, 

A post office of Crawford county. 
C. Stifles, Postmaster. 



STOCKTON, 

A post office of Jo Daivess county. 
F. L. Tucker, Postmaster. 



STONE'S PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Adams county. 
John Delaplain, Postmaster. 



STONINGTON, 

A post village of Christian county. 
C. T. Chapman, Postmaster. 



STOUT'S GROVE, 

A post office of McLean county. 
J. W. Hall, Postmaster. 



STRASBURGH, 



A post office of Cook county. 
E. P. Swain, Postmaster. 



212 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



STRINGTOWN, 

A post office of Richland county. 
John Ballard, Postmaster. 



SUBLETTE, 

A post office of Lee county. 
A. L. Wilder, Postmaster. 



SUGAR CREEK, 

A post office of Williamson county 
Joel Norris, Postmaster. 



SUGAR GROVE, 



A post village of Kane county. 
L. Benjamin, Postmaster. 



SULLIVAN, 

A post village of Moultrie county, about 10 
miles west by north from Auburn. 
Joseph E. Eden, Postmaster. 



SULPHUR SPRINGS, 

A post office of Williamson county. 
C. J. Cash, Postmaster. 



SUMMERFIELD, 

. post office of St. Clair county. 
Samuel S. Casad, Postmaster. 



SUMMER HILL, 

A post office of Pike county. 
Jonathan Wood, Postmaster. 



SUMMERVILLE, 



A post village of Peoria county. 
W. 0. Hard, Postmaster. 



SUMMUM, 



A post office of Fulton county. 
John Schenck, Postmaster. 



SUMNER, 



A post office of Lawrence county. 
Nicholas Shawn, Postmaster. 



SUNBEAM, 



A post office of Mercer county. 
Samuel Dehel, Postmaster. 



SUNBURY, 

A post village of Livingston county, 110 
miles north-east by north from Springfield. 
R. F. Norton, Postmaster. 



SUTTEN'S POINT, 

A post village of Clay county. 
E. Sutton, Postmaster. 



SWAN CREEK, 

A post village of Warren county, about 25 
miles south-east from Quincy, 
Geo. W. Worden, Postmaster. 



SWEET WATER, 



A post office of Menard county. 
John D. Alkie, Postmaster. 



SYCAMORE, 

A post village, capital of De Kalb county, 
208 miles north by east from Springfield. It 
is situated on a fertile prairie, near Sycamore 
creek. The Chicago, Fulton and Iowa rail- 
road passes within a few miles of the place. 
Wm. P. Dutton, Postmaster. 



SYLVA, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
Levi Lusk, Postmaster. 



SYLVAN DALE, 



A post office of Hancock county. 
Joseph T. McCall, Postmaster. 



TABLE GROVE, 



A post office of Fulton county. 
Wm. Lovell, Postmaster. 



TACUSHA, 



A post office of Christian county. 
G. W. Hillabrant, Postmaster. 



TALCOTT'S PERRY, 

A nevf post office of Rock Island county. 
Edwin S. Talcott, Postmaster. 



TAMAROA, 

A post office of Perry county. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



213 



TAYLOR, 

A small post village of Ogle county, 112 
miles north by east from Springfield. 



TAYLORSVILLE, 

A thriving post village, capital of Chirstian 
county, on the south fork of the Sangamon 
river, 26 miles south-east from Springfield. 
The adjacent country is fertile and contains 
extensive beds of coal. Population, about 
100. 
D. D. Wight, Postmaster. 



TAZEWELL COUNTY, 

Is situated a little north-west from the centre 
of the state : has an area of 550 spuare miles. 
The Mackinaw creek flows through it from east 
to west until it enters the Illinois river, which 
forms the entire north-west boundary. The 
surface is nearly level and the soil fertile. 
The county contains large prairies, which are 
mostly under cultivation. Indiun corn, 
wheat, oats, hay, pork and butter are the 
staples. It contains about 20 churches and 
about 2,950 pupils attending public schools. 
There is a railroad laid out through the 
county from Peoria to Bloomington. Capi- 
tal, Tremont. Population, 11,311. 



TEN MILE GROVE, 

A post office of Vermilion county. 



TENNESSEE, 
A new post office of McDonough county. 
Ayerill Allen, Postmaster. 



TENTAPOLIS, 

A post office of Effingham county. 
Clemens Uptmer, Postmaster. 



TEXAS, 



A post office of Randolph county. 
Frederick Reuphe, Postmaster. 



THEBES, 

A post village, capital of Alexander county, 
on the Mississippi river, 160 miles below St. 
Louis, from Chicago, 400 miles. It has a 
fine landing, and during the summer season 
does a fine business. Population, 300. 
John Dollman, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc 

Atherton F. D., farmer. 

Barkhausen H. C,, physician and surgeon. 



BARKHAUSEN HENRY C, JUSTICE OF 
THE PEACE. 

Braker William, farmer. 

Braker William, clergyman. 

Bumgard George, farmer. 

Brown John H., farmer. 

Clapp William, farmer. 

COLE C. C, sheriff. 

Erwin George, farmer. 

Garner G. P., farmer. 

Harmon John Q., clerk of common pleas. 

HODGES ALEXANDER C, associate jus- 
tice. 

HODGES JOHN, MERCHANT. 

LIGHTNER LEVI L., county judge. 

LISCUBEE SAML. B., justice of the peace. 

Massy William C, merchant. 

McCRITE JAMES E., associate justice. 

McClure Thomas, general merchant. 

McClure T, J., farmer. 

McClure M., M. D., farmer. 

Massey Wm. C, surveyor and county trea- 
surer. 

Martin Jefferson, farmer. 

Smith W. R., physician and surgeon. 

Stewart Warren, farmer. 

Thompson Ransom, justice of the peace. 

VAN CAUFINE WILLIAM, MINISTER. 

YOST W. J., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

YOST W. P., ATTORNEY AT LAW AND 
COUNTY CLERK. 



THORNTON, 

A small post village of Cook county, about 
25 miles south from Chicago. 
Lyman B. Babcock, Postmaster. 



THORNTON STATION, 

A post office and station, situated in Cook 
county, on the line of the Illinois Central 
Branch railroad, about 15 miles from Chi- 
cago. 

Henry Simmer, Postmaster. 



TIMBER, 

A post village of Peoria county, about 15 
miles west-south-west from Peoria. 
Guy Campbell, Postmaster. 



TIME, 

A post office of Pike county. 
Adam Fulerbaug, Postmaster. 



TISKILWA, 



A post village of Bureau county, about 45 
miles north by east from Peoria. Population, 
500. 
Joseph T. Cook, Postmaster. 



214 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



TIVOLA, 

post office of Peoria county. 
Charles Robinson, Postmaster. 



TOLEDO, 



A post village of Union county, 144 miles 
south from Springfield. 

Elizabeth Farkill, Postmaster. 



TOLONO, 

A small post village of Champaign county, 
situated on the line of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, at the crossing of the Great West- 
ern Railroad. This place, two years ago, 
was a wild prairie ; it now contains some 50 
places of business. It is located 25 miles 
from inexhaustible coal mines, with a railroad 
leading there direct. Population, over 400. 



TOLUCA, 



A post office of Madison county. 
James Pearce, Postmaster. 



TQNICA. 



Tonica is situated on the Illinois Central 
Railroad, nine miles south of the Illinois 
river, in La Salle county. It has a most beau- 
tiful location in the midst of a very prosper- 
ous community, and is destined to be the 
center of a large business. The country is 
well settled all around it. There is not a 
better point for mercantile or manufacturing 
business. An excellent quality of coal is 
delivered here at |2.50 per ton, about fifty 
tons of which are shipped dally. It has about 
550 inhabitants. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Bullock J. T., tanner. 

Copeland Calvin, jr. 

Dakin G. M., physician and surgeon. 

Evans French, farmer. 

Evans Win., farmer. 

Kingsley H., general merchant. 

Foote D. K., lumber dealer. 

Howe Peter, farmer. 

Hold ridge Asa, farmer. 

Moore S. S., farmer. 

Sewall Y. A., physician and surgeon. 

Swain , farmer. 

Swift J. D., farmer. 

Wood E. W, physician and surgeon. 

WEST A. J., POSTMASTER. 



TOULON, 

A post village, capital of Stark county, about 
35 miles north-west from Peoria, and 230 



from St. Louis, and 150 miles from Chicago. 
Population 1,000. 

B. Turner, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Atherton J. R., farmer. 

Bockmeister T., homeopathic physician. 

Bradley & Lee, grocers. 

Culberstin & Ogle, general merchants. 

Chamberlin W., druggist. 

Chamberlin Wm., physician and surgeon. 

CLIFFORD G. A., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Dewey & Nolan, merchants. 

Dugan Thos., farmer. 

Emery E. L., grocer. 

Fuller & Lowmen, land agents. 

Hall Thos., physician and surgeon. 

HENDERSON T. J., ATTORNEY AT 

LAW. 
Henderson & Whittaker, land agents. 
Jamison Jacob, farmer, and president of 

Starch co. 
Jones U., grocery. 
Morton L., grocery. 
Rhod Hugh, farmer. 
Rockwell S., grocery. 
SHALLENBERGER M., ATTORNEY AT 

LAW. 
Shime Job, general merchant. 
Slerrett & Vixon, general store. 
Wright Wm., farmer. 
Wright Thos., general store. 



TOWANDA, 

A post office of McLean county. 
Thos. Y. Laney, Postmaster. 



TOWEETOWN, 
A post office of Cumberland county. 



TEEMONT, 

A thriving post village, capital of Tazewell 
county, is pleasantly situated on a prairie 57 
miles north by east from Springfield. It 
contains a fine court house, several churches 
and a number of stores of different branches, 
all doing a good business. 
David Roberts, Postmaster. 



TRENTON, 



A small village of Knox county, on Spoon 
river, 90 miles north-north-west from Spring- 
field. 



TRENTON, 

A post office of Clinton county. 
J. W. Buckman, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



215 



TROY, 

A small village of Fulton county, on Spoon 
river, 44 miles west from Peoria. It has a 
fine water power. 

Stephen F. Robins, Postmaster. 



TROY, 

A post village of Madison county, situated 
in the south part, 15 miles from Mississippi 
river. 
James A. Henderson, Postmaster. 



TROY GROVE, 

A post village of La Salle county, about 
west-south-west from Chicago. 
M. Masterman, Postmaster. 



TROY MILLS, 



A post office of Fulton county. 
Stephen F. Robbins, Postmaster. 



TRURO, 

A post office of Knox county. 
J. W. Temple, Postmaster. 



TRUXTON, 
A post village of Bureau county, about 70 
miles west-south-west from Chicago. 
Allen S. Lathrop, Postmaster 



TUNBRIDGE, 

A post office of De Witt county. 
J. W. Armstrong, Postmaster. 



TURNER, 

Du Page county, 111. This is a post town of 
promise, having the advantages of four rail- 
roads uniting in it. The Galena and Chicago 
Union running from this place to Galena, 111., 
and to Dubuque, Iowa; the Chicago, Burling- 
ton and Quincy Railroad running to Quincy, 
111., and to Burlington, Iowa; the Chicago, 
Iowa and Nebraska Railroad running direct 
to Nebraska, and crossing the Mississippi 
river at Fulton, 111., and Clinton, Iowa; and 
the St. Charles Railroad running to St. 
Charles, 111. 

This promising town is in a most healthy 
county, SO miles west from Chicago, and 6 
miles east from Batavia, in the center of a 
rich fertile plain, gently undulating, and 
beautifully interspersed with luxuriant groves 
and verdant prairies. Turner contains one 
church (Congregational), one high school, un- 
der the able management of Professor J. 



Haight, and able assistants ; one good hotel, 
one machine shop, belonging to the railroad 
company, an extensive lumber yard, and, 
though the village plat was not recorded 
until 1857, it now numbers 500 inhabitants. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ATCHESON U. S. & CO., WHOLESALE 
DEALERS IN BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Champlin, Rev. S. M. 

HAND M., POSTMASTER. 

LOCKWOOD S., TRUSTEE, ILLINOIS 
CENTRAL RAILROAD LANDS. 

McConnell J., physician. 

Mcdonald j., general dealer. 

Watkins Rev. R. A. 

Williams & West, general dealers. 



TYLER, 

A post village of Winabago county, about 65 
miles east from Galena. 
Asher Beach, Postmaster. 



UBA, 

A post office in Piatt county. 
Richard B. Monroe, Postmaster. 



UDINA, 



A post office of Kane county. 
John Runsted, Postmaster. 



ULLIN, 



A post office of Pulaski county. 
James B. Carlton, Postmaster. 



UNION", 



A small village of Mc nenry county, situated 
on the line of the Galena & Chicago Union 
Railroad, 62 miles north-west from Chicago. 
Frederick M. Mead, Postmaster. 



UNION, 



A township in Fulton county. 
over 1,000. 



Population 



UNION GROVE, 

A small post village of Whiteside county. 
John Bennett, Postmaster. 



UNION COUNTY, 

A county near the southern extremity of the 
state, has an area of about 320 square miles. 



216 



G. W. IIAWES 1 ILLIISTOIS STATE 



The Mississippi river forms its western boun- 
dary, and the county is drained by Clear 
creek. The surface is diversified, and in 
some hilly parts the soil is fertile. Indian 
corn, wheat, oats, cattle and pork are the 
staples. It contains twenty seven churches, 
one newspaper office, and about 1,400 pupils 
attending public schools. This county is 
rich in minerals, among which are iron, lead, 
stone, coal, chalk, porcelain clay, alum and 
copperas. Saltpetre caves are numerous. 
The lead mines have not been explored ; the 
beds of coal and porcelain are extensive. The 
route of the Central Railroad passes through 
the county. Capital, Jonesborough. Popu- 
lation, 10,106. 



UNION" TOWN, 

A post village of Knox county, on the line 
of the Peoria & Oquawka Kailroad, 26 miles 
west from Peoria. 
Chari.es M. Siiaw, Postmaster. 



UNITY, 



A post office of Alexander county. 
HuGn P. Craig, Postmaster. 



UPPER EMBAREAS, 

A post office of Coles county. 
Wit. H. Lamb, Postmaster. 



WEST URBANA, 

A thriving town on the 111. Cen. Railroad, 12 
miles south of Chicago. Population, 1,309 ; 
value of improvements made during the year 
1857, $65,425. This place is contiguous to 
Bi<* Grove, a fine body of timber, contain- 
ing about 12,000 acres. It is situated about 
the center of Champaign county, in the midst 
of one of the finest agricultural districts in 
the state. The farming district which is tri- 
butary to this place extends about 40 miles 
east and west, and 20 miles north and south, 
making an area of about 800 square miles. 
The shipment of 102,000 bushels of wheat, 
12,000 pounds of wool, $1,500 worth of hides, 
and many other articles too numerous to men- 
tion, was done by two commission houses ; 
three churches, three schools, one of which 
is a seminary, one bank, two newspapers, 
Central Illinois Gazette and Urbana Union, 
six lumber yards, and one mill, all doing a 
heavy business. 
John Mills, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Angle J. H. & L. W., general merchants. 
Angle & Stone, manufacturers of boots and 
shoes. 



Baddely J. W. & Co., dry good and general 
merchant. 

BACON J., FORWARDING AND COM. 
MERCHANT, AND DEALER IN 
FLOUR, SALT, LIME, COAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

BARRETT W. C. & CO., STORAGE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, DEAL- 
ERS IN GRAIN, FLOUR, LIME, 
SALT, ETC., ETC. 

Barrett W. C. & Co., storage and commission 
merchants. 

Benedict L., lumber merchant. 

BOUTWELL J. N., DEALER IN AGRI- 
CULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

RRADLEY & CHISHOLM, DEALERS IN 
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, ETC. 

CATTLE BANK, E. ATER, PRESIDENT, 
C. M. SHERLY, CASHIER. 



CATTLE BANK, 

WEST UI1BAM, ILLINOIS. 



E. ATEE, Pres't. 



C. M. SHEELY, Cash. 



CENTRAL ILLINOIS GAZETTE, J. W. 

Scroggs, proprietor. 
CLOCK A. J., dry goods, groceries, etc., etc. 
COSGROVE THOS., Teller of Cattle Bank. 
CUNNINGHAM & FLYNN, Publishers of 

the Urbana Union. 
CLARK & GREENE, GENERAL REAL 

ESTATE AGENTS. Will buy and sell 

real estate, pay taxes, etc. 
CENTRAL HOUSE BOARDING AND 

LODGING. E. L. Field, proprietor. 
DUNLAP M. L., PROPRIETOR OF UR- 
BANA NURSERY. 
DUNHAM J. R., DEALER IN WATCHES, 

CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. (See 

advertisement.) 



J R. 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, 

JEWELRY, SILVER, 

AND 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 

GOLD PENS, FANCY ARTICLES, 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, ETC., ETC. 

P. S. Particular attention paid to repairing 
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, etc., etc. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



217 



DOAN nOUSE, CAMPBELL & HOWARD, 
proprietors. 

Dox Charles T., stove and tinware. 

EADS L. T., REAL ESTATE AGENT AND 
DEPUTY COUiSTY SURVEYOR. 

ELDREDS & BALCOM, MANUFACTUR- 
ERS AND DEALERS IN GREEN 
BAY GANG-SAWED LUMBER, office 
at the railroad crossing. 

Fleming & Doan, carpenters and joiners. 

EIELD E. L., PROPRIETOR OF CENT- 
RAL HOUSE, boarding and lodging. 

Hahen Henry, clothing and furnishing goods. 

GAUCH J. P., JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

HESSEL G., MANUFACTURER AND 
DEALER IN SADDLES, HARNESS, 
TRUNKS, VALISES, ETC., ETC. 

Hodges George J., liquor merchant. 

Holland W., physician and surgeon. 

JEFFERSON H. & SON, DEALERS IN 
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, BOOTS 
AND SHOES, HATS, CAPS, CLO- 
THING, ETC. 

JOHNSON BENJAMIN F., farmer. 

Kenny & Campbell, proprietors of grist mill. 

Lancaster L., hardware and groceries. 

MARSHALL D. W., DRY GOODS, 
QUEENSWARE, GROCERIES, ETC. 

MeCorkle Joseph, hardware. 

McCANN E. T., DEALER IN LUMBER, 
SHINGLES AND LATH. 

McKINLEY & JONES, ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

Mills C. H., physician and surgeon. 

iNATIONAL HOTEL, J. W. Tremble, pro- 
prietor. 

Neal House, S. Dean, proprietor. 

MILLS JOHN, POSTMASTER. 

Oder P. B. & Co., clothing. 

Pratt & Bro., lumber 

QUIGG D., ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR 
AT LAW. 

Sexton & Stokes, dry goods and groceries. 

SHERLY CHALMERS M., CASHIER OF 
CATTLE BANK, NOTARY PUBLIC 
AND INSURANCE AGENT. 

SMITH R. B., WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
DRUGGIST, DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES, PAINTS, OILS, DYE STUFFS, 
ETC. 

Smith & Hill, clothing. 

SUTTON J. J., WHOLESALE AND RE- 
TAIL DEALER IN HARDWARE, 
STOVES, TINNER'S STOCK, PUMPS, 
FTC 

WALKER F. T. & CO., DEALERS IN ALL 
KINDS OF FURNITURE. 

WOODWORTH MRS. A. 0., DEALER IN 
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, 
MILLINERY, ETC. 

WOODWORTH A. 0., DEALER IN DRY 
GOODS, GROCERIES, FURNITURE, 
CLOTHING, BANKING AND EX- 
CHANGE. 

WHITNEY A. M., & CO., GENERAL REAL 
ESTATE AND INSURANCE AGENTS 
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



WHITNEY H. C, ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

YOUNG A. H., DRY GOODS AND GEN- 
ERAL MERCHANT. 



URBANA, 

A thriving post village, capital of Champaign 
county, on the Salt fork of Vermilion river, 
and is situated one and three-quarter miles 
east of the Chicago branch of the Illinois 
Central railroad ; 190 miles from St. Louis, 
and 128 miles from Chicago. Population, 
1,500. 
John Gore, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 
A. M. & H. W. AYERS, 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 



XT IR IB -A. 1ST .A. , 
CHAMPAIGN CO., ILLINOIS. 



H. W. AYERS, 

NOTARY PUBLIC AND COMMISSIONER OF PEEDS. 



AYERS A. M. & H. W., ATTORNEYS AT 
LAW. 

AYERS II. W., notary public and commis- 
sioner of deeds. 

BERSTEIN S., CLOTHING AND GENTLE- 
MENS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

BROOKS J. C. & T. H., DEALERS IN 
CLOTHING, FURNISHING GOODS, 
HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS, NOTIONS, 
ETC. 

Cain J. & H., shoe makers. 

Chenowith C. M., proprietor Chenowith 
House. 

CHENOWITH HOUSE, C. M. CHENOWITH 
PROPRIETOR. 

CHAMPAIGN HOUSE, A. C. WYATT, 
PROPRIETOR. 

Clapp & Gere, dry goods and hardware. 

Conklin J. E., painter. 

COLER, SIM & SHELDON, ATTORNEYS 
AND COUNSELORS AT LAW. 

Cunningham A. P., notary public and con- 
veyancer. 

Dake & Bick, dealers in boots and shoes. 

DUNLAP J. M. & CO., DEALERS IN DRY 

DRAKE MANNING, J. P. 

GOODS, GROCERIES, HARDWARE, 
QUEENSWARE, WOODENWARE, 
BOOTS, SHOES AND NOTIONS. 

Gere John, postmaster. 



218 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



GRAND PRAIRIE BANK, W. N. COLER, 

PRESIDENT, T. S. HUBBARD, 

CASHIER. 
Halberstad E., grocer. 
HOOK & SHAY, MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES AND WAGONS AND 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHING. 
HOLMES G.W., CARRIAGE AND WAGON 

MANUFACTURERS. 
HUNT, SIM & CO., DEALERS IN DRUGS, 

MEDICINES, BOOKS, STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, ETC. 
Hill Andrew, watchmaker and jeweler. 
INGERSOLL & CUTCHEON, DRY GOODS 

AND GROCERIES, AND GENERAL 

MERCHANTS. 
JARVIS DANIEL, JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 
JAQUITH & MILLER, DRUGGISTS AND 

APOTHECARIES. 
KERR E. M., PROPRIETOR UNION 

HOUSE. 
LINDLY M., M. D., PHYSICIAN AND 

SURGEON. 
LEAL THOS. R., SCHOOL COMMIS- 
SIONER. 
Lyons Alonzo, dealer in hardware. 
McCL ALLEN D. C, DEALER IN ALL 

KINDS OF PROVISIONS, CONFEC- 
TIONERY, ETC. 
MANNING DRAKE, JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE. 
MILLER JOSEPH T., M. D., PHYSICIAN 

AND SURGEON. 
Morris D. C, doctor. 
Mulliken C, bookkeeper. 
Packard & Cutchen, dealers in chain pumps 

and lightning rods. 
Rae Thos., blasksmith. 
Reed & Garman, merchant tailors. 
RUSSELL H. M., WHOLESALE AND 

RETAIL GROCER. 
Schweezer F., clothing, etc. 
SHERFY C. M., ASSISTANT CASHIER. 
Somers John W., assistant recorder. 
Somers W. H., clerk circuit court. 



JAMES W. SOMERS, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY AND 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 



URBANA, ILLINOIS. 



Will give prompt attention to collecting 
claims, and remitting money. 



SOMERS J.W. & W. D., ATTORNEYS AND 
COUNSELORS AT LAW, SOLICI- 
TORS IN CHANCERY 



SUTTON ROYAL A.,DE ALER IN STOVES, 
TINWARE, PUMPS AND ALL KINDS 
OF KITCHEN FURNITURE. 

THOMSON M. B., M. D., PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON. 

Steward S., M. D. 

UNION HOUSE, E. M. KERR, PROPRIE- 
TOR. 

URBANA UNION, CUNNINGHAM AND 
FLYNN, PUBLISHERS. 

Urbana Mills, Parks & Co., proprietors. 

WALTER & HISKY, AMBROTYPE AND 
PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTISTS. 

WHITCOMB & TALBCT, DEALERS IN 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC DRY 
GOODS, NOTIONS, HARDWARE, 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 

WILSON JAMES D., MANUFACTURER 
AND DEALER IN SADDLES AND 
HARNESS, TRUNKS, VALISES, ETC. 

Wilkison & Robinson, foundry and machine 
shop. 

Wilkison J., daguerreian artist. 

Winston Somers, physician and surgeon. 

WYATT A. C, PROPRIETOR CHAM- 
PAIGN HOUSE. 

ZIMMERMAN & RICHARDS, PUBLISH- 
ERS OF "THE CONSTITUTION." 



URBANE, 



A post village of Jackson county, formerly 
the county seat. 

Urbane E. Robertson, Postmaster. 



URSA, 

A small post village of Adams county, 114 
miles west from Springfield. 

Wm. H. McClement, Postmaster. 



UTICA, 

A village of La Salle county, on the Illinois 
river and canal, nine or ten miles west from 
Ottawa. This place has a good landing and 
does a large shipping business. 
James Clark, Postmaster. 



USTTCK, 

A post office of Whiteside county. 
John Hollinshead, Postmaster. 



UTAH, 



A post office of Warren county. 
John P. Terpening, Postmaster. 



VALLEY FORGE, 

A post office of Pulaski county. 
Asa C. Atherton, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



219 



VAN BUREN, 

A post office of DeKalb county. 
Jeremiah Mulford, Postmaster. 



VANDALIA, 



A. post village, capital of Fayette county, 
and the former capital of the state. It is 
situated on the Kaskaskia river, where it is 
crossed by the National road 80 miles south- 
south-east from Springfield. It was laid out 
in 1818, and remained the seat of govern- 
ment until 1836, during which period it con- 
tinued to flourish and the population increased 
to 2,000. After the removal of the seat of 
goverment to Springfield, the property of 
Vandalia, declined and the number of inhab- 
itants was reduced to 500 or less, within four 
or five years. However, an improvement 
has taken place in the condition and pros- 
pects of the village, and property has risen 
in value nearly fifty per cent. At this point 
the Illinois Central railroad intersects the 
Atlantic and Mississippi railroad, which, 
when completed, will make vast improve- 
ments to the town. A newspaper is pub- 
lished here, called the "Vandalia Observer." 
Gratehouse, publisher, Population, about 
2,000. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, J. F. MITCHELL, 
PROPRIETOR. 

BLACKWELL R., DEALER IN DRY 
GOODS, GROCERIES, HARDWARE, 
QUEENSWARE, BOOTS, SHOES, 
HATS, CAPS, ETC. 

CATOR JAMES, PROPRIETOR CITY 
HOTEL. 

CAPPS E. & CO., GENERAL MER- 
CHANTS. 

CHENNEY E. & CO., r DRY GOODS AND 
QUEENSWARE, AND GENERAL 
MERCHANTS. 

DIECKMANN A. H, WHOLESALE AND 
RETAIL DEALER IN STAPLE AND 
FANCY DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 
HARDWARE, ETC. 

DIECKMANN G. H, DEALER IN DRUGS 
AND MEDICINES, PERFUMERY, 
ETC. 

Feheron M., general merchant. 

Gereds F., watchmaker. 

Goode H. W., county clerk. 

Gohren Louis, deputy county clerk. 

GREATHOUSE T., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

HALLER F. B., M. D., PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON. 

HATH WAY B. F., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Hamkins Wm., circuit clerk and recorder. 

Jackson Geo. L., physician. 

JENKS C. W., PHYSICIAN AND SUR- 
GEON. 

JOHNSON D. & CO., PROPRIETORS 
STAR MILLS. 



Klung F., gunsmith. 

LABOYTAUX J. F., DRY GOODS AND 
CENERAL GROCERIES. 

Lewis R. O, attorney at law. 

LYNCH M., DEALER IN PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION BUSINESS. 

McCORD J. N. & BRO., DEALERS IN 
DRUGS AND MEDICINES, NOTIONS, 
ETC. 

Perkins & Jennings, stoves and tinware. 

Remann F., dry goods. 

ROSS J. W., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW AND SOLICITOR 
IN CHANCERY. 

Solomon C, cabinet maker. 

Stearns A. D., physician. 

SMITH L. M., ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
SELOR AT LAW. 

Winas David H. & Co., marble factory. 

WILKINS T., M. D., PHYSICIAN* SUR- 
GEON AND ACCOUCHEUR. 



VANCEBURG, 



A post village of Winnebago county, near 
the Chicago and Galena railroad, about 15 
miles west from Rockford. 



VENICE, 

A post village of Madison county on the 
banks of the Mississippi river, six miles above 
St. Louis. 
William Wilrich, Postmaster. 



VEKDEN, 



A post village in Macoupin county, on the 
line of the St. Louis, Alton & Chicago rail- 
road. It is a thriving village, containing sev- 
eral good stores, two grist mills, hotel, etc. 
Seventy miles north-west of St. Louis and 
twenty-two miles south of Springfield. Pop- 
ulation, 1,000. 

Simeon Haggard, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

AUSTIN HENRY, SHOE STORE. 

Cowen Matthew, grist mill. 

DEAN WM. C, LUMBER. 

DUGGER & HIGLER, GENERAL MER- 
CHANTS. 

Emmerson Wm, wagon factory. 

EVANS, FORTUNE & CO., DRY GOODS, 
ETC. 

French C. P., physician and surgeon. 

Hord A., drugs and medicines. 

Huntley W. & W. F., harness shop. 

MORRELL JOHN L., REAL ESTATE 
AGENT. 

Siloway P., proprietor Siloway House. 

Stud Wm., merchant tailor. 

VAN NOTE WM., DRUGS AND MEDI- 
CINES. 



220 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



West W. M., dry goods, queensware, etc. 
Whiting R. H., cabinet shop. 
Wilcox & Turner, groceries. 
WILLIAMS JOHN, MERCHANT TAILOR. 



VERGENNES, 

A post village of Jackson county, about 10 
miles north from Murphysboro. 
Moses H. Ross, Postmaster. 



VERMILION RIVER. 

Vermilion river, of Illinois and Indiana, is 
formed by three branches, the north, middle 
and south, which meet near Danville, Illinois. 
It then flows south-eastward, and enters the 
Wabash about eight miles below Perrysville, 
in Indiana. It is navigable to Danville, a 
distance of 30 miles. The Little Wabash 
river enters the Wabash four or five miles 
below. 



VERMILION COUNTY, 

A county in the east part of the state, bor- 
dering on Indiana , has an area estimated at 
1.200 square miles. It is drained by the 
Vermilion river, an affluent of the Wabash, 
and by its branches, the south, middle and 
north forks, which unite near the middle of 
the county. The Little Vermilion river flows 
through the southerly part. 

The surface is generally level ; the soil is 
deep, fertile and durable. The county con- 
tains a large proportion of prairie, with plen- 
ty of timber distributed along the streams. 

Indian corn, wheat, oats, wool, butter, po- 
tatoes and pork, are the staples. It contains 
30 churches, two newspaper offices, 100 pu- 
pils attending public schools, and over 200 
attending an academy. A plank road con- 
nects Danville with the Wabash river and 
canal. Vermilion river affords valuable wa- 
ter power. Stone coal is found in abund- 
ance on the bank of the river. Capital, 
Danville. Population, 11,500. 



VERMILIONVILLE, 

A small post village in the south-west part of 
La Salle county. 
John W. Wood, Postmaster. 



VERMONT, 

A thriving post village of Fulton county, 
about 60 miles north-west from Springfield. 
Moses C. Matthews, Postmaster. 



VERMONT, 



A post township in Fulton county, 
tion, about 1,564. 



Popula- 



VERMONT, 

A post village of Will county, 36 miles south- 
west from Chicago. 



VERNON, 

A post office of Crawford county. 
Renick Heath, Postmaster. 



VERSAILLES, 



A post village in Brown county, 60 miles 
west by north from Sppringfield. 
Jef-thah Willson, Postmaster. 



VICTORIA, 

A small post village of Knox county, about 
45 miles north-west from Peoria. 
Giles Cook, Postmaster. 



VIENNA, 



A post village, capital of Johnson county, 190 
miles south by east from Springfield. Pop- 
ulation, about 300. 



VIENNA, 



A township in Grundy county, 
about 400. 



Population) 



VIETTA, 



A post office of Grundy county. 
Daniel Marsh, Postmaster. 



VIRDIN, 



A small post village of Macoupin county, sit" 
uated on the line of the Chicago and Missis" 
sippi railroad, 50 miles north-north-east from 
Alton. 



VIRGIL, 

A post village of Fulton county, about 50 
miles west by south from Peoria. 
David J. Austin, Postmaster. 



VIRGIL, 



A township in Kane county, 
about 800. 



Population, 



VIRGINIA, 



A small post village of Cass county, 13 miles 
east by south from Beardstown. 
Samuel W. Nealy, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



221 



WABASH COUNTY, 

A county in the east-south-east part of the 
state, bordering on Indiana, is among the 
smallest counties of the state.. It has an 
area of 1 10 square miles. The Wabash river, 
from which its name is derived, forms its 
boundary on the east and south, and Barba 
creek flows along the western border, until it 
enters that river. 

The county contains some prairie, and is 
partly covered with forests. The soil is 
good. Indian corn, wheat, oats, grass and 
pork, are the staples. 

It contains several churches. There are 
about 800 pupils attending public schools. 
The rapids of the Wabash river afford abun- 
dant water power near Mount Carrnel, the 
county seat. Population, about 7,000. 



WABASH, 



A township in Coles county, 
about 800. 



Population, 



WABASH, 



A township in Cumberland county, 
tion, over 200. 



Popula- 



WABASH, 

A post village of Wayne county, on the Little 
Wabash river, about 70 miles south-east from 
Vandalia. 
Lewis A. Harper, Postmaster. 



WABASH VALLEY, 

A post office of Clark county. 
Elijah Stephens, Postmaster. 



WADDAM'S GROVE, 

A small post village of Stephenson county. 
Pells Manny, Postmaster. 



WAKEFIELD, 

A post office of Richland county. 
Thos. Wakefield, Postmaster. 



WALDEN, 



A township in Stephenson countv. 
tion, 1,200. 



Fopula- 



WALES, 



A small post village of Ogle county. 
John Light, Postmaster. 



WALKER'S GROVE, 

A post office of Mason county. 
Wji. Waenock, Postmaster. 



WALKER'S NECK, 

A post office of Brown county, about 75 mile3 
west by south from Springfield. 
Wji. Lee, Postmaster. 



WALLINGFQRD, 

A post village of Will county, about 160 
miles north-east from Springfield. 
Samuel G. Nelson, Postmaster. 



WALLRIDGE, 

A post office of Pulaski county. 
A. A. Parley, Postmaster. 



WALNUT, 

A post office of Bureau county. 
Elijah McXitt, Postmaster. 



WALNUT GROVE, 

A post office of Knox county, about 45 miles 
north-west from Peoria. 
Amos Ward, Postmaster. 



WALNUT HILL, 

A post village of Marion county, on the road 
from Salem to Chester, 12 miles from the 
former place. It has about 300 inhabitants. 
Geo. J. Baltsell, Postmaster. 



WALNUT SHADE, 

A post office of Pope county. 

Burton W. Hollow ay, Postmaster. 



WALSHVILLE, 



A post office of Montgomery countv. 
Michael Walsh, Postmaster. 



WALTHAM, 



A post office of La Salle county. 
Ira Sanborn, Postmaster. 



WAPANSEE, 



A township in Grundv county, 
about 300. 



Population, 



222 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



WAPELLA, 

A pfcst office of De Witt county. 
Daniel Thompson, Postmaster. 



WARD'S GROVE, 

A post village in Jo Daviess county, 140 
miles north-west by west from Chicago. 
Thos. B. Carter, Postmaster, 



WARREN COUNTY, 

A county in the west part of the state, has 
an area of 550 square miles. It is traversed 
by the Henderson river, and is also drained 
by Ellison and Swan creeks. The surface is 
nearly level, and the soil highly productive. 
The county contains prairie, and is liberally 
supplied with timber. 

Indian corn, wheat, oats, hay, wool and 
pork, are the staples. 

It contains several churches, and has 500 
pupils attending public schools. Stone coal 
and lime stone are the most valuable mine- 
rals of the county. It is intersected by the 
Military Tract railroad, and by the Peoria 
and Oquawka railroad. Capital, Monmouth. 
Population, about 9,000. 



WARREN, 



A thriving post village of Henderson county, 
about 120 miles north-west from Springfield. 
It is the terminus of a plank road leading to 
Burlington. 



WARREN, 

A township of Lake county. Population, 
about 1,100. 



WARREN, 



Warren is situated in the north-east part 
of Jo Daviess county. Its settlement com- 
menced over 30 years ago. It is surrounded 
by a fine farming country. The soil is well 
watered, is of a rich black loam, deep and 
enduring, and surpassed by none in the west. 
Forty bushels of wheat to the acre have been 
raised at various places in the surrounding 
country. 

Warren wag incorporated a city by act of 
incorporation, in 1856. Extensive improve- 
ments are contemplated by the corporation 
and citizens. 

In 1850, there were but four houses in 
Warren. Now there are more than 200. 
There are two church edifices here, one 
Methodist Episcopal, and one Free Will 
Baptist, and meetings arc constantly held 
by members of other denominations. 



There are three good schools and acade- 
mies, two hotels, twenty stores, grain ware- 
houses, lumber, coal, and railroad depots. 

Warren is an important railroad centre. 
The great Illinois Central railroad, the Mine- 
ral Point railroad, connecting with the city 
of Mineral Point, the centre of the great 
mining district of Wisconsin, and the south- 
western branch of the Milwaukee railroad, 
soon to be finished, all connect at Warren, 
the last two terminating here. 

Warren lies west from Chicago 146 miles, 
by railroad, only distant eight hours' ride, 
and from Milwaukee about 125 miles, and 
but a few miles of railroad yet unfinished, 
when the connection between Warren and 
the two largest and most flourishing lake 
shore cities in the west will be completed. 

Galena is distant 25 miles, with which 
flourishing city it is connected by the Illinois 
Central railroad. 

With these advantages, Warren bids fair 
to become a place of great business import- 
ance in a short time. 

Matthew Marvin, Postmaster. 



WARRENSVILLE, 

A post village of Du Page county, 30 miles 
west by south from Chicago. 
Julius M. Warren, Postmaster. 



WARRENTON, 

A post office of Lake county. 
Collins Gowdt, Postmaster. 



WARSAW, 

A flourishing village of Hancock county is 
finely situated on the Mississippi river, at the 
foot of the lower rapids, 115 miles west- 
north-west from Springfield. The site of the 
town is high and beautiful, and its position 
is favorable for trade. The largest steamers 
ascend the river to the lower rapids. War- 
saw does a large exporting and importing 
business, and is rapidly increasing in popula- 
tion. It is the western terminus of the La 
Fayette and Warsaw railroad. Plank roads 
are being extended into various parts of the 
county. 

One newspaper is published here. Popu- 
ation, about 3,000. 

Geo. W. Thatcher, Fostmaster. 



WASHBURN, 



A post office of Marshall county. 
W. E. Buckingham, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



223 



WASHINGTON" COUNTY, 

A county in the south part of the state, has 
an area of 505 square miles. The Kaskaskia 
river washes its north-west border, and the 
county is drained by Elk, Beaucoup and 
Crooked creeks. The surface is nearly level, 
and consists partly of prairie and partly of 
timbered land. The soil, in some parts, is 
productive. Indian corn, wheat, oats, cattle 
and swine, are the staples. 

It contains several good churches, and has 
over 1,000 pupils attending public schools. 
The line of the Illinois Central railroad runs 
through the county. Capital, Nashville. 
Population, about S,000. 



WASHINGTON, 

A post village in Tazewell county, situated on 
the line of the Peoria and Oquawka railroad, 
71 miles north from Springfield. 
Robert W. Burtox, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc- 

Andrews, Miles & Co., dry goods, groceries, 

hardware, etc. 
Anthony & Ross, stoves and tin ware. 
ALLEN ROBERT G., PHYSICIEN AND 

SURGEON. 
Barton R. M., drug store. 
Berkelt Thomas, blacksmith. 
Bunkv John, barber. 
CAUCH A. A., EDITOR AND HROPRI- 

ETOR OF THE WASHINGTON IN- 
VESTIGATOR, 
CARPENTER WILLIAM, JEWELER. 
Coons & McGuirier, harness makers. 
Cross G. W., physician. 
Danforth H. H., "real estate. 
Danforth A. H. & Co., Prairie State Bank. 
DAVIDSON M. E. & CO., DRY GOODS, 

GROCERIES, ETC., 
ELLWOOD ISAAC, TAZEWELL HOUSE, 

MAIN STREET. 
Esty & Co., proprietors of hotel. 
Fenner & Tasdall, eating house. 
Fish Thomas, boots aud shoes. 
Fleager W. B., agent. 

Flenneken G. W., dry goods, groceries, etc. 
Hadley James M., saddle and harness maker. 
Hadan & Kingsbury, dry goods. 
Lynch M., boarding house. 
Miles, Andrews & Co., steam flour mill. 
Mitchell J. B., grocer. 
Robinson William, proprietor of Washinton 

House. 
Solomon W. & Co., clothing. 
Tobias & Heflin, manufacturers of plows, etc 
Wesser S. Y., boot and shoemaker. 



WATAGA, 

A post office of Knox county, on the line of 



the Chicago and Burlinton railroad, 
tance from Chicago, 160 miles. 
Joseph M. Holtoke, Postmaster. 



Dis- 



WATERFORD, 

A village of Fulton county, situated on 
Spoon river, about 50 miles north-west from 
Springfield. 



WATERLOO. 



A po3t village, capital of Monroe county, 
about 22 miles south from St. Louis. It 
contains a court house, and several good 
stores. There is a newspaper published here. 
William L. Adelseerger, Postmaster. 



WAUKEGAN, 

Waukegan, formerly called Littleport, a 
flourishing post village, capital of Lake coun- 
ty, on the west shore of lake Michigan, and 
on the line of the Chicago and Milwaukee 
railroad, 44 miles north by west from Chica- 
go, and 56 miles south from Milwaukee. The 
lake is about 80 miles wide opposite this 
place. The principal part of the village is 
built on a bluff which rises rather abruptly to 
the height of 50 feet, from which extensive 
views of water scenery may be obtained. 
Between the bluff and the shore there is a 
flat tract of ground about 400 yards wide, 
which is occupied by gardens, dwellings, and 
warehouses. Waukegan is a place of active 
trade, and is rapidly increasidg in extent and 
business. During the summer, steamboats 
make regular passages from this town to 
Chicago and other ports on the lake. It 
contains two newspaper offices, and about 
75 stores of different kinds. Population, 
5,000. 
Henry W. Doksett, Postmaster. 



Alphabetical List of Professions. Trades, Etc, 

Adams & Boalcb, meat market. 

BACHELDOR E. & CO., MANUFACTUR- 
ERS OF BOOTS, SHOES, AND 
LEATHER. 

Barker William C, homeopathic physician. 

BANK OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS, C D. 
Bickford, Cashier. 

Bell Alexander,merchant tailor. 

Besley William, brewer. 

Bloweney B. G., saddle and harness maker. 

Blodgett A., ticket and freight agent, Chi- 
co and Milwaukee railroad. 

Blodgett, Uton & Kelly, attorneys at law. 

Brewister D., saddles and harnesses. 

Brecht A., daguerreian artist. 

Brodgdin & Co., wagon makers. 

Buttork John, physician and surgeon. 



224 



G. W. HA WES ILLINOIS STATE 



CAMBERLTN HOUSE, Simon Camberlin, 

proprietor. 
Case W. M., general dealer. 
Casy Hugh, clothing store. 
Cassidy James, dealer in liquors. 
CLARKINSON R. W., DENTIST. 
CLARKSON JOHN E., JUSTICE OF 

PEACE. 
CLARKE J. L., attorney at law, and notary 

public. 
CLAYTON THOMAS, EMPIRE SALOON. 
Coolahan J. W., architect and builder. 
COLGAN E. D., dealer in wines, liquors, 

and cordials, Washington street. 
Cohrine William, wagon maker. 
CORYB. S. & SON, DRUGGISTS AND 

APPOTHECARIES. 
Corv & Evans, druggists. 
CRABTREE & HOLLOWELL, MANU- 
FACTURERS OF CARRIAGES AND 

BUGGIES. 
CITY HOTEL, MICHAEL DULANTZ, 

PROPRIETOR. 
Deacon E. C. & Co., general merchants. 
Dennis & White, livery stable. 
DICKINSON D. 0., AGENT AMERICAN 

EXPRESS COMPANY. 
Dickinson D. 0., proprietor of Dickinson 

mills. 
DICKINSON AND WRIGHT, STORAGE, 

FORWARDING, AND COMMISSION ; 

MERCHANTS, MIDDLE PIER. 
Dodge W. B., hardware. 
Donalty J., blacksmith. 
DORSETT HENRY W., postmaster. 
Dowist Samuel M., real estate and insurance 

agent. 
Doyon J. R., general dealer. 
EARLL & REEVES, dealers in provisions, 

fruit, groceries, etc. 
EDWARDS P. W., watchmaker and jew- 
eler. 
Ferny & Williams, attorneys at law. 
Ferguson A. B., grocer. 
Farnsworth H. W, broom factory. 
FRAZER & CLARK, ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW, ETC. 
FREDRICKS & CO., dealers in paints and 

glass, and paper hangers, Madison at. 
FULTZ & CLARKSON'S FURNITURE 

ROOMS, cor Genessee and Madison sts. 
Gage & Warren, grocers. 
GAZETTE FRINTING OFFICE, JAMES 

Y. COVY. 
George C. B., eating saloon, railroad station. 
Gilbert M. D., eclectic physician. 
Gorton James B., general dealer. 
GREENLEAF S. S. & CO., manufacturers 

and dealers in boots, shoes, leather and 

findings. 
Hills W. H., dry goods and groceries. 
Haines E. II., attorney at law and solicitor 

in chancery. 
Hook Richard, meat market. 
HOWE & WHEELER, books, stationery, 

fancy goods and musical instruments. 
Hutchinson & Peck, variety store. 



INGALLS E. T., attorney and counselor at 
law, notary public and general agent, 
office, No. 8 Westerman's block. 

Jones L., restaurant. 

JONES & PATTEN, horse shoeing and car- 
riage repairing. 

JOURDAN C, upholster and carriage trim- 
mer, shop, east side of Genessee st. 

KINGSBERRY E. B. & CO., planing mill, 
sash, doors and blinds 

Ladd & Thomson, lumber merchants. 

Lewis A., physician and surgeon. 

Leurenson, Wiseman & Co., lumber mer- 
chants. 

McCaul Thomas, dry goods and groceries. 

Marr D., cabinet maker. 

Walford J., wagon maker. 

Matton Joseph, sailor. 

MELLEN D. P., boots and shoes, Washing- 
ton St. 

Mills & Kirk, lumber and lath. 

Mitch Franks, boots and shoes. 

Morse E., gunsmith. 

Peane W. T., drugs and medicines. 

Peterman John, clothing store. 

PETERS & BUCKS, meat market. 

PARKS & HAINES, attorneys at law. 

Pinder Henry, horse shoeing, etc, 

POOLER & KRILE, publishers of the North 
Western Exeehior and job printers. 

Porter William L., stoves and hardware. 

PETERS V., bakery and confectionery, 
Washington street. 

PORTER & BROTHERS, dealers in furni- 
ture, mattresses, looking glasses?, etc. 

Rowley & Arnold, lumber merchants. 

Raliski M., clothing, etc. 

Reeley John, grocery. 

Rogers Roberts, harness maker. 

Southerwick J. C, insurance agent. 

Stafford W. S., boot and shoe maker. 

STAFFORD D. H. & CO., groceries and 
provisions. 

Scarls W. S., attorney at law. 

Smith , physician. 

Smith H. P., attorney at law. 

STEELE R. & CO., dry goods, groceries, etc. 

Steele Charles R., notary public and insurance 
agent. 

Taylor W. W., carpenter and builder. 

Thomson Ranson, wooden bowl manufactory. 

Thurston E. Q., daguerreian. 

Shute J. M., grocer. 

Tiernan J., baker and confectioner. 

TRAVELERS' HOME, THOS. HENESSY. 

TIFFANY & LUCAS, stoves, hardware, 
nails, glass and hollow ware, Washing- 
ton St. 

TRANSIT HOUSE, F. Converse, proprietor. 

TRUESDELL J. M., dry goods, groceries, 
boots, shoes, etc. 

Waterman A. L., attorney and police magis- 
trate. 

WATERMAN A. S., dealer in books, 
watches, jewelry, etc. 

Waukegan IronWorks, MorganWerden & Co. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



225 



WAUKEGAN HOUSE, 

T. H. MOSHER, Proprietor. 

CORNER GENESEE AND NADISON STTEETS, 

WAUKEGAN, ILL. 



Guests conveyed to and from the cars free. 



WAUKEGAN HOUSE, T. II. Hosmer, pro- 
prietor. 

WAUKEGAN MILLS, Roberts, Berry & Co., 
proprietors. 

West LL, watchmaker. 

Wilbur J., provisions. 

Yard A. P., clothing store. 



WAULONDA, 

A post office of Lake county. 
Jerome H. Hall, Postmaster. 



WAVERLY, 

A post village in a township of the same 
name of Morgan county 2 SO miles from 
Chicago and 80 miles from St. Louis. Pop- 
ulation of village, 1,000; township, 2,000. 
P. C. Arnett, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

ARNETT P. C, justice of the peace. 

ARNETT P. C, POSTMASTER. 

Brown J. II., M. D., physician and surgeon. 

Caldwell J. W., general merchant. 

Carter George, farmer. 

Challen J. H. 

Crain J. W., general merchant. 

Curtiss A. A., farmer. 

Deatherage George, farmer. 

Deatherage W. W., general dealer. 

Dennison A. G., clergyman. 

Duncan S. S., general dealer. 

Funk J. L., general dealer. 

Graham W. L., M. D., physician and surgeon. 

Hutchinson W. A., general merchant. 

Holliday William M., physician and surgeon. 

Jenney Elisha, clergyman. 

Inglish W. H., general merchant. 

Kellogg Borden, general dealer. 

Kennedy Stephen, general merchant. 

Knapp George, general merchant. 

Lindly Ulysus, farmer. 

McCoy J. C, attorney at law. 

Manson J. W., general dealer. 

Meacham E. D., general merchant. 

Meacham W. L. T., general merchant. 

Meacham J. W., general dealer. 

15 



Meacham T. C, general dealer. 
Meredith W. H., general dealer. 
Metcalf J. M., physician and surgeon. 
Miner Elisha, general dealer. 
Montgomery Joseph, clergyman. , 
Morehouse G. G., general dealer. 
Morris Jonathan, general dealer. 
Nichols S. W., general dealer. 
Pulliam Benjamin, general dealer. 
Rhodes William, merchant. 
RICE W. W., justice of the peace. 
Kennedy Stephen. 
Ross J. W., general merchant. 
Sackett C. C, farmer. 
Salter G. J., farmer. 
Sands W. D., clergyman. 
Shearer Jester, general merchant. 
Sims Austin, clergyman. 
Thayer Ashel, general merchant. 
Thasher J. M., merchant. 
Williamson J. W. 
Woods M. T., farmer. 



WAVERLY STATION, 

A post office and station of La Salle county, 
situated on the line of the Chicago and Bur- 
lington railroad, 11 miles from Chicago. 
James H. Pearce. Postmaster. 



WAY LAND, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
Isaac T. Morgan, Postmaster. 



WAYNE COUNTY, 

A county in the south-east part of the state 
— has an area of 670 square miles. It is 
intersected in the east part by the Little Wa- 
bash river, in the south-west part by the 
Skillet fork of that river, and also drained by 
Elm creek. The county is extensively cover- 
ed with forests, and contains prairies of 
moderate size. The soil is productive. 
Indian corn, oats, potatoes, cattle, pork and 
butter are the staples. It contains twenty- 
one churches. Population, about 7,500. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Circuit Clerk, R. B. Slocumb. 
County Clerk, J. W. Bamhill. 
/Sheriff, C. L. Carter. 
Treasurer, Amos Phelps. 



WAYNE, 
A township in Stephenson countv. 
tion, 500. 



Popula- 



WAYNE CENTER, 

A post office of Du Page county. 
Albert Gild, Postmaster. 



226 



G. W. HAWES ILLINOIS STATE 



WAYNESVILLE, 

A post village of De Witt county, near the 
Chicago and Mississippi railroad, 12 miles 
north-west of Clinton. It has ten or fifteen 
stores. Population, 500. 
J. W. Wells, Postmaster. 



WEBB'S PRAIRIE, 

A post office of Franklin county. 
Wm. L. Britton, Postmaster. 



WEBSTER, 



A small post village of Hancock county. 
Joel Hand, Postmaster. 



WELLINGTON, 

A post office of Lake county. 
Andrew Rice, Postmaster. 



WENONA STATION, 

A post office and station of Marshall county. 
John L. Yan Allen, Postmaster. 



WENTWORTH, 

A post office of Lake county. 
Erastus Rudd, Postmaster. 



WESLEY CITY, 

A post village of Tazewell county, on the 
left bank of the Illinois river, 4 miles below 
Peoria. It is considerable of a shipping port, 
there being a good landing. Produce ship- 
ped in 1856, estimated at |160,000. 
Charles Pattimann, Postmaster. 



WESTERN SARATOGA, 

A post village of Union county, 142 miles 
south from Springfield — owes its rise to a 
medicinal spring, which attracts numerous 
visitors in the warm season. 

James L. Wallace, Postmaster. 



WESTFIELD, 



A small post village of Clark county. 
Richard F. Williams, Postmaster. 



WEST HEBRON, 



A post office of McHenry county. 
John Adams, Postmaster. 



WEST HENNEPIN, 

A small village of Bureau county, situated 
on the Illinois river, nearly opposite Hen- 
nepin. 



WEST JERSEY, 



A post office of Stark county. 
Charles W. Young, Postmaster. 



WESTMINSTER, 

A post office of Shelby county. 

Thomas W. Craddick, Postmaster. 



WEST NORTHFIELD, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Milo Winchell, Postmaster. 



WESTON, 



A post office of Jo Daviess county. 
Wm. Goldthrop, Postmaster. 



WEST SALEM, 



A post office of Edwards county. 
Stephen S. Gun, Postmaster. 



WEST POINT, 



A township in the west part of Stephenson 
county. It is intersected by the Illinois 
Central Railroad. Population, from 300 to 
400. 



WEST WHEELING, 

A post office of Cook county. 
Wm. C. King, Postmaster. 



WEST WOOD, 



A small post village of Woodford county, 
about 33 miles from Peoria. 



WETHERSFIELD, 

A post village in Henry county, near the 
Central Military Track railroad, 110 miles 
north by west from Springfield. 
Caleb J. T. Little, Postmaster. 



WET WEATHER, 



A post office of Jasper county. 
Andrew Fisher, Postmaster. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



227 



WHEATLAND, 

A township in the north-west part of Will 
county, intersected by Des Plaines river and 
the Illinois and Michigan canal. Population, 
800. 
Wm. S. Allen, Postmaster. 



WHEATON, 

A post village of Du Page county, on the 
Galena and Chicago Railroad, 25 miles west 
from Chicago. 
Frederick C. Hageman, Postmaster. 



WHEELING, 

A small post village of Cook county, situated 
on the Des Plaines river, about 25 miles 
south-west from Chicago. 
John M. Schafer, Postmaster. 



WHITEFIELD, 



A post office of Marshall county. 
Francis M. Johnson, Postmaster. 



WHITE COUNTY, 

A county in the south-east part of the state, 
bordering on Indiana, has an area of about 
500 square miles. It is bounded on the east 
by the Wabash river, intersected by the 
Little Wabash, and also drained by Skillet 
fork of the Wabash. The county is well 
timbered and has several small prairies. 
The soil is excellent. Wheat, oats, tobacco, 
cattle and pork are among the staples. It 
contains several churches, and over 1,000 
pupils attending public schools. The Wa- 
bash river is navigable by steamboats on the 
border. The Little Wabash affords valuable 
water power. At Carmi it is traversed by 
the line of the Wabash Valley railroad. A 
plank road extends from Graysville to Albion, 
named in honer of Colonel White, who 
formerly resided in this section of the state. 
Population, about 1,000. 



WHITESIDE COUNTY. 

A county in the west-north-west part of the 
state. Has an area of about 700 square 
miles. It is bounded on the west by the 
Mississippi river, which separates it from 
Iowa. It is intersected by Rock creek. 
The county contains extensive prairies among 
which groves of timber are distributed. 
The soil is very productive. Indian corn, 
wheat, oats and hay are the staples. It con- 
tains several churches, and about 140 pupils 
attendiug public schools. Rock river fur- 
nishes valuable water power. The line of 



Mississippi and Rock River Junction railroad 
passes through the county. It was organized 
in 1839, and named in honor of Gen. Samuel 
Whiteside, who was distinguished as a cap- 
tain of Rangers in the war of 1812. Capi- 
tal, Sterling. Population, about *7,000. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Wm. M. Buckley. 
County Clerk, David H. Sunderland. 
Treasurer, Wm. S. Grav. 
Coroner, Bissel Belknap. 
Sheriff, J. W. Shaffer. 
Justice of the Pence, John Coates. 
Cliairman Board of Supervisors, W. P. 
Hunt. 

Clerk of Circuit Court, L. W. Guiteau. 
Surveyor, Benj. Dornblaser. 
Representative, Legislature, John A. Davis. 
School Commissioner, Henry Freeman. 
Prosecuting Attorney, U. D. Meacham. 
Senator, Legislature, John H. Adams. 



WHITE HALL, 



A thriving village of Green county, is situ- 
ated on a prairie of its own name. About 
sixty miles west-south-west from Springfield. 
John N. Israel, Postmaster. 



WHITE OAK GROVE, 

A small village of 0<rle county. 



WHITE OAK SPRINGS, 

A small post village of Brown county. 
Arthur Martin, Postmaster. 



WHITE ROCK, 



A small post village of Ogle county, 90 miles 
west by north from Chicago. 
Annis Lucas, Postmaster. 



WHITELY POINT, 

A small village of Cumberland county. 



WICKLIFFE, 



A post office of Cook county. 
W. F. Johnson, Postmaster. 



WILL COUNTY. 

A county in the east-north-east part of the 
state, bordering on Indiana, Has an area of 
1,236 square miles. It is intersected by the 
Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers, branches 



228 



G. W. HAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 



of tbe Illinois. The surface is generally 
level and destitute of timber, excepting 
small groves. The soil is very fertile and 
much of it is under cultivation. The soil of 
the prairie is a deep sandy loam, adapted to 
Indian corn and grass. It coutains 15 or 18 
churches, three newspaper offices, about 
3,500 pupils attending public schools, and 
250 attending other schools. Quarries of 
building stone are worked near the county 
seat. The Des Plaines river furnishes water 
power. The county is intersected by the 
Illinois and Michigan canal, by the Chicago 
Branch of the Central railroad, the Chicago 
and Mississippi and by the Chicago and Rock 
Island railroad. Named in honor cf Conrad 
Will, for many years a member of the Illi- 
nois legislature. Capital, Joliet. Population, 
about 19,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

County Judge, Oscar L. Hawley. 

County Clerk, Wn. Tonner. 

Recorder, Alex. McIntosh. 

County Surveyor, A. J. Mathewsox. 

Sheriff, Geo. R. Dyer. 

County Treasurer, Chas. H. Weeks. 

Prosecuting Attorney, F. A. Bartleson. 



WILCOXVILLE, 

A post village in Schuyler county, near the 
Illinois river, 55 miles north-west by west 
from Springfield. 



WILKSBORQUG-H, 

A post village in McLean county, 60 miles 
north-east by west from Springfield. 
James O. Barney, Postmaster. 



WILLI A SSBTJRG, 

A post village in DeKalb county, about 60 
miles west by north from Chicago. 
John F. Snow, Postmaster. 



WILLIAMSVILLE, 

A post office of Sangamon county. 
John W. George, Postmaster. 



WILLMINGTON. 

Wilmington is beautifully situated on the 
Chicago, Alton and St. Louis railroad, where 
it crosses the Kankakee river. It is fifty-six 
miles from Chicago and sixteen from Joliet, 
and is in the centre of what is rightly named 
the " Garden of the West." It contains 
about two thousand inhabitants, and has one 



of the finest, if not the finest, water power in 
the state, and has at present in operation 
upon it two flouring mills, which supply a 
large proportion of the inhabitants of this 
and the adjoining counties with flour ; one 
saw mill, one sash and door factory, three 
wagon, carriage and farming utensil-shops, 
and one turning lathe. It has two churches, 
and another in process of erection, a com- 
modious two story brick school house, two 
hotels, such as but few interior towns can 
boast of, some fifteen dry goods and grocery 
stores, one extensive hardware store, one 
drug store, one jewelry store, one clothing 
store, three millinery stores, two cabinet 
stores, two lumber yards, with a full supply 
of blacksmiths, harness makers, tailors, shoe- 
makers, carpenters, masons, etc. It has 
four practicing physicians. There are five 
attorneys, three justices of the peace and 
three constables. The Willmington Herald, 
a seven column newspaper, is published in 
the village. It is .well supported, having 
about 500 subscribers, and a good job and 
advertising patronage. There are five real 
estate agencies here, and considerable opera- 
tions. The real estate agents are S. W. 
Munn, J. W. Richerson, James L. Young, H. 
R. Whipple and James Falden. The country 
around Willmington is magnificent, and is 
rapidly filling up with the first class of farm- 
ers. On every side may be seen well culti- 
vated fields, good and commodious houses 
and barns; and many of the farms are orna- 
mented by thriving orchards and shrubbery. 
The country is well watered by the majestic 
Kankakee and its numerous tributaries, and 
is well timbered by the lovely groves in the 
vicinity, and by the belts of noble timber 
which girt the streams. Real estate, in both 
town and county, is held low, but is rapidly 
rising. 

John D. Henderson, Postmaster. 



Alphabstical List of Professions, Trades, Etc, 

^ETNA INSURANCE, D. U. Cobb, agent. 

Baker J. W. & Co., grocery and provision 
store. 

BAXTER JAMES, proprietor of Kennet coal 
mines. 

Burt & Hammond, livery and sale stable. 

Bond S., fruit, confectionery and groceries. 

Brummer W. F., city meat market. 

Cody Thomas, merchant tailor. 

COPLIN A. & CO., ambrotype and daguer- 
reian artists. 

DEIBOS EDMOND J., produce and commis- 
sion merchant. 

HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COM- 
PANY, D. U. Cobb agent. 

HARBOTTLE WM., dealer in cabinet ware. 

HENDERSON & STEWART, dry goods 
and general merchants. 

HEWITT WM. P. Mrs., daguerreian artist. 

HEWITT W. P., sash, door and window 
frame manufacturers. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



229 



JESSUP BROTHERS (NEW FIRM), HARD- 
WARE, STOVES, TINWARE, CAR- 
PENTERS' TOOLS, ETC. 

Johnson & Gardner, harness makers. 

King & Co., general merchants. 

King & Co., New York clothing store. 

Laman Samuel, dealer in drugs and medi- 
cines. 

Lorch Louis, clothing store. 

Mcintosh Wrri., general merchant. 

Massy J., dealer in drugs and medicines. 

MUNN S. W., attorney and counselor at 
law, notary, public land agent, etc., etc. 

Monsell S. L., watchmaker and jeweler. 

Nelson W. T. & Co., general grocery mer- 
chants. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE IN- 
SURANCE CO., John H. Daniels, agent 
for Wilmington. 

Robinson J. W., manufacturer of boots and 
shoes. 

KRAUSE A., cabinet ware rooms. 

Schoonmaker Jenny Miss, milliner and dress- 
maker. 

Tracv & Hovt, carpenters and joiners. 

FULLER, HALL & CO., dry goods and gen- 
eral merchants. 

White Cloud Mills, H. 0. Alden, jr., pro- 
prietor. 

WHITE C. B., agent for U. S. Express Co., 
and European & American Express. 

WHITE C. B., dealer in pine lumber, shin- 
gles, doors, windows, salt, coarse and 
fine, etc., etc. 

Willard & McKay, physicians and surgeons. 

WILMINGTON MARBLE WORKS, Noble 
& Wurts, proprietors. 

YOUNG & DANIELS, plain and ornamental 
printing, and publishers of Wilmington 
Herald. 



WILLOW CREEK, 

A post office of Lee county. 
James A. Harp, Postmaster. 



WILLOW HILL, 

Wit H. Eldson, Postmaster. 



WINEIELD 

(Or Fredericksburg), is a small post village 
situated in Du Page county, 111., on the Galena 
& Chicago Union railroad, ti\ miles west 
from Chicago and 8 miles from the county 
seat. It contains 150 inhabitants, three 
stores, a school house, brewery, blacksmith 
and wagon maker shop, and an extensive 
lumber yard. 



Benjamin W. F., daguerrian artist. 

Bishop Samuel, general merchant. 

VAN DEUSEN'aNDREW, POSTMASTER 

and general dealer. 
Nail & Stark, general merchants. 



WINNESHICK, 



WINCHESTER, 

A thriving post village, capital of Scott 
county, situated on Sandy creek, 51 miles 
west by south from Springfield. The inhabit- 
ants are chiefly employed in manafactures, 
for which the creek affords motive power. 
Good lime stone, stone coal, and potters' clay 
are found at this place. It contains a num- 
ber of flour mills, saw mills, tanneries, and 
potteries. Population estimated at 1,100. 
John Argus, Postmaster. 



A post office of Stephenson county. 
Wsi. B. Mitchell, Postmaster. 



WINNEBAGO COUNTY, 

A county in the north part of the state, bor 
dering on Wisconsin, has an area of 500' 
square miles. Rock river flows through the 
county from north to south, receiving in its 
passage the Pecatonica from the west and 
the Kishwaukee from the east. The surface 
is undulating, and presents a succession of 
beautiful prairies and woodlands. The prai- 
ries are highly productive, and mostly under 
cultivation. Wheat, Indian corn, oats, pork 
and hay are the staples. It contains twelve 
churches, one newspaper office, and about 
2,000 pupils attending public schools. Lime 
stone of good quality is abundant along the 
banks of Rock river. The county is liberally 
supplied with water power, which is employ- 
ed in mills and factories. It is intersected 
by the Galena & Chicago railroad, and by a 
branch of that road leading to Beloit, Wis- 
consin. Named from the Winnebago tribe 
of Indians. Capital, Rockford. Population 
about 1,200. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Judge of the Circuit Court, Hon. B. R. 
Shelden. 

Clerk of Circuit Court and Recorder, Mor- 
ris B. Derrick. 

Dejruty, 0. A. Penxoyer. 

Prosecuting Attorney, U. D. Meachitm. 

Master in Chancery, William Leathrop. 

Judge of County Court, Anson S. Meiller. 

Cleric of County Court, William Hulin. 

County Clerk, Eben S. Gaylord. 

County Treasurer, Hiram R. Enoch. 

County Sun'eyor, Thomas J. L. Reming- 
ton. 

County School Commissioner, Hiram H. 
Waldo. 



230 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



County Justices of the Peace, William R. 
Weld, of Rockton, James A. Wilson, of 
Roscoe. 

/Sheriff. Samuel J. Church. 



WINNEBAGO, 

A post office of Bureau county. 



WINSLOW, 



A post township forming the north-west ex- 
tremity of Stephenson county. Population 
about 500. 



WINSLOW, 



A post village of the above township, 135 
miles west-north-west from Chicago. 
Richardson Patekson, Postmaster. 



WINTHQRP. 



i A post office of Kane county. 
Samuel S.Ingham, Postmaster. 



WIONA, 



A post office of Bureau county. 
Allen B. Isaac, Postmaster. 



WOODSBOROUGH, 

A small post village of Montgomery county. 
William Wood, Postmaster. 



WOODBURN, 



A thriving post village of Macoupin county, 
on the road from Alton to Springfield, 15 
miles from Alton. 

Samuel Smaly, Postmaster. 



WOODBURY, 



A post township of Cumberland county. 
Population, loQ. 



WOODBURY, 

A post village of Cumberland, on one of the 
head branches of Embarras river, and on the 
National road, about 100 miles south-east by 
east from Springfield. 

David T. Wisnek, Postmaster. 



WOODFORD COUNTY, 

A county in the north central part of Illinois, 
has an area of 500 square miles. It is boun- 
ded on the west by the Peoria lake, an ex- 
pansion of Illinois river, and drained by the 
Mackinaw and Crow creeks. The surface 
presents no great inequalities. The soil is 
fertile ; the prairies are said to be more 
extensive than the forest. Indian corn, 
wheat, oats, potatoes and pork are the sta- 
ples. It contains numerous churches, and 
about 800 pupils attending public schools. 
Stone coal is found. The Illinois river is 
navigable along the border. The Central 
railroad passes through the county. County 
capital, Metamora. Population, about S,000. 



WOODFORD, 



A post village of Woodford county, 80 miles 
north by east from Springfield. 
Benjamin P. Kelly, Postmaster. 



WOODLAND, 

A post office of Schuyler county. 
Samuel Purdum, Postmaster. 



WOODSIDE, 



A post office of Sangamon county. 
Silas E. Hurd, Postmaster. 



WOOSUNG, 

A small post village of Ogle county, situated 
on the line of the Illinois Central Railroad. 
Woosung is pleasantly located, about 6 miles 
west of Dixon. 

Wm. Brimblecom, Postmaster. 



WOODSTOCK. 



Woodstock, county seat of Mc Henry 
county, is situated on the Chicago, St. Paul 
& Fond du Lac railroad, 48 miles from Chi- 
cago, has several steam manufacturing estab- 
lishments, several churches, flourishing public 
schools, two commodious hotels, two weekly 
newspapers, the Sentinel and Democrat. 
Population, 2,500. 

Orvis S. Johnson, Postmaster. 

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc. 

Austin G. A., attorney at law. 

Austin F. D., editor of Democrat. 

Baldwin M. B., dealer in drugs and medicines. 

Brink John, county surveyor. 

Brown Alvin, school commissioner. 

Bunker John, hardware. 

Burton H. B., general merchant. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



231 



Carter B., merchant tailor. 

CHURCH & KERR, ATTORNEYS AT 

LAW. 
CHURCH L., PROPRIETOR OF WAVER- 

LY HOUSE. 
Dake & Quinlan, steam flour mills. 

Davis L. H., M. D., physician and surgeon. 

Donnelly James, groceries and general store. 

Durfee C. B., cashier, Fuller, Johnson & 
Co's Bank. 

DONNELLY NEILL, DRY GOODS, CLOTH- 
_ ING, BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Dwight Josiah, editor Woodstock Sentinel. 

Eddy John, sheriff. 

Enos & Slavin, attorneys at law. 

Evans S. S., carriage manufacturer. 

Exchange hotel, H. H. Hildreth, proprietor 

FRANKS J. W. & SON, PUBLISHERS OF 
THE WOODSTOCK SENTINEL. 

Fulliner J., watch and clock maker. 

Fuller Johnson & Co., bankers. 

Greenleaf George D., cabinet furniture. 

Gudd W. S., livery stable. 

Hamilton J. F., M. D. phvsician and surgeon. 

HANCHETT H. S., ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

HARSON GEORGE T., recorder and circuit 
clerk. 

Harper & Passon, millinery goods. 

Harper & Son, groceries. ♦ 

Hale & Young, marble factory. 

HILDRETH H., PROPRIETOR OF EX- 
CHANGE HOTEL. 

Hoyt — , groceries. 

HUNT & FULLER, SASH AND BLINDS, 
SHINGLES, AND GENERAL LUM- 
BER MERCHANT. 

JOHNSON J. H. & M. C, COUNSELORS 
AT LAW. 

Irwin M. T., M. D., physician and surgeon. 

JOHNSON DR., POSTMASTER. 

Joslyn M. L., attorney at law. 

Lyon & Sherwood, dry goods, etc. 

Lyon & Fuller, storage, forwarding, and com- 
mission merchants. 

McMAHON JOHN, GROCERIES, AND 
LIQUOR STORE. 

McMAHON JAMES, GROCERIES AND 
LIQUORS. 

McCAHILL M. H., LUMBER, LATH, 
AND SHINGLES. 

McCahill James, boot and shoe store. 

MANSFIELD F. J., STOVES, TIN AND 
HARDWARE. 

Merritt A. D , M. D., physician and surgeon. 

MILLS & DODGE, GOLD AND SILVER 
WARE. 

Murphy Hon. Theodore D., county judge. 

MURPHY JOHN J., DRY GOODS, GRO- 
CERIES, CLOTHING, ETC. 

Murphy T. D. & F. S., attorneys at law. 

MURPHY P. W. DR., SURGEON DENTIST. 

Newitter S., dry goods, etc. 

PATTY B. S. PROPRIETOR OF WOOD- 
STOCK HOUSE. 

Petru J. N., groceries. 

Petters F., grocer, etc. 

Richardson Samuel, county treasurer. 



Rose W. E., manufacturer of harnesses, etc 

Sherwood Levi, justice of the peace. 

Smith Asa W., attorney at law. 

Smith Enos W., attorney at law, and justice 
of the peace. 

Stewart William H., county clerk. 

Stilver John, harness maker. 

Tappier A. W. & Co., dry goods merchants. 

Toles Job, flour and feed store. 

Trobridge J. C, boots, shoes, and clothing. 

Van Wichle F., attorney at law. 

WAVERLY HOUSE, L. CHURCH, PRO- 
PRIETOR. 

Woodstock Democrat, by F. D. Austin. 

Woodstock House, B. S. Patty, proprietor. 



WOODSTOCK HOUSE, 
B. S, PATTY, PROPRIETOR, 

VAN BUREN STREET, 
FRONTING THE PUBLIC SQUARE, 

PHCENIX BLOCK. 



COMMODIOUS STABLES ATTACHED TO THE 
HOUSE. 



BAGGAGE TAKEN TO AND FROM THE CARS 
FREE. 



WHEELER H. P., AMBROTYPIST. 
Willard Charles M., attorney at law. 
WOODSTOCK SENTINEL, BY J. W. 

FRANKS & SON. 



WOODVILLE, 



A post village of Adams, 95 miles west-north- 
west from Springfield. 

James F. Owen, Postmaster. 



WORTH, 



A post office of Cook county. 

Ferdinand Schapper, Postmaster. 



232 



G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



WOETHINGTON, 

A post office of Jackson county, 
William H. Wourthin, Postmaster. 



WYONET, 



A post office of Bureau county. 
Samuel Miles Knox, Postmaster. 



WYOMING, 



A post village in Stark county, on Spoon 
river, 92 miles north by we3t from Spring- 
field. 
James M. Thomas, Postmaster. 



WYOMING, 



A township of Lake county, 
timated at 900. 



Population es- 



WYTHE, 



A post office of Hancock county. 
Michael G. Rush, Postmaster. 



WYSOT, 



A township in the south-east part of Carrol 
county. Population estimated at 700. 



XENIA, 



A post village and station in Clay county, 
situated on the line of the Ohio and Missis- 
sippi railroad, 26 miles east of Sandoval. 
Population, 115. 
Richard C. Junkins, Postmaster. 



YELLOW CREEK, 

A post office in Stephenson county. 
Albert Butts, Postmaster. 



YELLOWHEAD GROVE, 

A small post village of Will county. 
F. S. Campbell, Postmaster. 



YORK, 

A post village of Crawford county, on the 
Wabash river, 142 miles east-south-east from 
Springfield. 
Benjamin F. Robinson, Postmaster. 



YORK CENTRE, 



A post office in Du Page county. 
George Fuller, Postmaster. 



YORK TOWN, 



A post office in Bureau county. 
Rufus E. Sheldon, Postmaster. 



YOUNG, 

A post office of McDonough county. 
John Patrick, Postmaster. 



YOUNG AMERICA, 

A post village in Warren county, and a sta- 
tion on the Chicago and Burlington railroad, 
191 miles from the former, and 19 miles from 
the latter place. 
William W. Gilmour, Postmaster. 



ZABRISKIE, 

A post office in DeWitt county. 
Walter Karr, Postmaster. 



ZANESVILLE, 

A post village, situated in the north-west 
corner of Montgomery county, 35 miles from 
Springfield. 
William McIver, Postmaster. 



ZIP, 

A post office in Wayne county. 
Jordan C. Patterson, Postmaster. 



ZION, 

A post office in Morgan county. 
James M. Gunn, Postmaster. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 




This new Constitution was adopted by convention, on the 21st day of 
August, 1847, and took effect on and after the 1st day of April, 1848. 

PREAMBLE. 

We, the people of the State of Illinois, grateful to Almighty God for the 
civil, political, and religious liberty, which He has so long permitted 
us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to 
secure and transmit the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, 
in order to form a more perfect government, establish justice, ensure 
domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the 
general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and 
our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution for the State of 
Illinois. 



ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. The boundaries and jurisdiction of the state shall be as 
follows, to wit : Beginuing at the mouth of the Wabash river, thence up 
the same, and with the line of Indiana, to the north-west corner of said 
state ; thence east, with the line of the same state, to the middle of Lake 
Michigan; thence north, along the middle of said lake, to north latitude 
forty-two degrees and thirty minutes ; thence west to the middle of the 
Mississippi river, and thence down, along the middle of that river, to its 
confluence with the Ohio river ; and thence up the latter river, along its 
north-western shore, to the place of beginning : JProvided, That this state 
shall exercise such jurisdiction upon the Ohio river as she is now entitled 



234 

to, or such as may hereafter be agreed upon by this state and the State of 
Kentucky. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section 1. The powers of the government of the State of Illinois shall 
be divided into three distinct departments, and each of them be confided 
to a separate body of magistracy, to wit : Those which are legislative, to 
one ; those which are executive, to another ; and those which are 
judicial, to another. 

Sec. 2. No person, or collection of persons, being one of these depart- 
ments, shall exercise any power properly belonging to either of the others, 
except as hereinafter expressly directed or permitted ; and all acts in 
contravention of this section shall be void. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1. The legislative authority of this state shall be vested in a 
general assembly, which shall consist of a senate and house of representa- 
tives, both to be elected by the people. 

Sec. 2. The first election for senators and representatives shall be held 
on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty -eight; and thereafter, elections for members of the 
general assembly shall be held once in two years, on the Tuesday next 
after the first Monday in November, in each and every county, at such 
places therein as may be provided by law. 

Sec. 3. No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained 
the age of twenty -five years ; who shall not be a citizen of the United 
States, and three years an inhabitant of this state ; who shall not have 
resided within the limits of the county or district in which he shall be 
chosen twelve months next preceding his election, if such county or 
district shall have been so long erected ; but if not, then within the limits 
of the county or counties, district or districts, out of which the same shall 
have been taken, unless he shall have been absent on the public business 
of the United States, or of this state; and who, moreover, shall not have 
paid a state or county tax. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained the 
age of thirty years ; who shall not be a citizen of the United States, five 
years an inhabitant of this state, and one year in the county or district 
in which he shall be chosen immediately preceding his election, if such 
county or district shall have been so long erected; but if not, then 
within the limits of the county or counties, district or districts, out of 
which the same shall have been taken, unless he shall have been absent 
on the public business of the United States, or of this state, and shall not, 
moreover, have paid a state or county tax. 

Sec. 5. The senators at their first session herein provided for shall be 
divided by lot, as near as can be, into two classes. The seats of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, and those of 
the second class at the expiration of the fourth year ; so that one-half 
thereof, as near as possible, may be biennially chosen forever thereafter. 

Sec. 6. The senate shall consist of twenty -five members, and the house 
of representatives shall consist of seventy -five members, until the popu- 
lation of the state shall amount to one million of souls, when five members 
may be added to the house, and five additional members for every five 
hundred thousand inhabitants thereafter, until the whole number of 
representatives shall amount to one hundred ; after which the number 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIEECTOEY. 235 

shall neither be increased nor diminished ; to be apportioned among the 
several counties according to the number of white inhabitants. In all 
future apportionments, where more than one county shall be thrown into 
a representative district, all the representatives to which the said counties 
may be entitled shall be elected by the entire district. 

Sec. 7. No person elected to the general assembly shall receive any 
civil appointment within this state, or to the senate of the United States, 
from the governor, the governor and senate, or from the general assem- 
bly, during the term for which he shall have been elected ; and all such 
appointments, and all votes given for any such member for any such 
office or appointment, shall be void ; nor shall any member of the general 
assembly be interested, either directly or indirectly, in any contract with 
the state, or any county thereof, authorized by any law passed during the 
time for which he shall have been elected, or during one year after the 
expiration thereof. 

Sec. 8. In the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, and 
every tenth year thereafter, an enumeration of the inhabitants of this 
state shall be made, in such manner as shall be directed by law ; and in 
the year eighteen hundred and fifty, and every tenth year thereafter, the 
census taken by authority of the government of the United States shall 
be adopted by the general assembly as the enumeration of this state ; and 
the number of senators and representatives shall, at the first regular 
session holden after the returns herein provided for are made, be appor- 
tioned among the several counties or districts to be established by law, 
according to the number of white inhabitants. 

Sec. 9. Senatorial and representative districts shall be composed of 
contiguous territory bounded by county lines ; and only one senator 
allowed to each senatorial, and not more than three representative to 
any representative district: Provided, That cities and towns containing 
the requisite popidation may be erected into separate districts. 

Sec. 10. In forming senatorial and representative districts, counties 
containing a population of not more than one-fourth over the existing 
ratio, shall form separate districts, and the excess shall be given to the 
nearest county or counties not having a senator or representative, as the 
case may be, which has the largest white population. 

Sec. 11. The first session of the general assembly shall commence on 
the first Monday of January, one thousand eight hundred and forty-nine ; 
and forever after, the general assembly shall meet on the first Monday of 
January next ensuing the election of the members thereof, and at no 
other period, unless as provided by this constitution. 

Sec. 12. The senate and house of representatives, when assembled, 
shall each choose a speaker and other officers (the speaker of the senate 
excepted). Each house shall judge of the qualifications and election of 
its members, and sit upon its own adjournments. Two-thirds of each 
house shall constitute a quorum ; but a smaller number may adjourn 
from day to day, and compel the attendance of absent members. 

Sec. 13. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and pub- 
lish them. The. yeas and nays of the members on any question shall, at 
the desire of any two of them, be entered on the journal. 

Sec. 14. Any two members of either house shall have liberty to dissent 
and protest against any act or resolution which they may think injurious 
to the public, or to any individual, and have the reasons of their dissent 
entered on the journals. 

Sec. 15. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of 



236 G. W. II AWES' ILLINOIS STATE 

two-thirds of all the members elected, expel a member, but not a second 
time for the same cause ; and the reason for such expulsion shall be 
entered upon the journal, with the names of the members voting upon 
the question. 

Sec. 16. When vacancies shall happen in either house, the governor, 
or the person exercising the powers of governor, shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

Sec. 17. Senators and representatives shall in all cases, except for trea- 
son, felony, or breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during the ses- 
sion of the general assembly, and in going and returning from the same ; 
and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned 
in any other place. 

Sec. 18. Each house may punish, by imprisonment during its session, 
any person not a member, who shall be guilty of disrespect to the house, 
by any disorderly or contemptuous behavior in their presence : Pro- 
vided, Such imprisonment shall not, at any one time, exceed twenty-four 
hours. 

Sec. 19. The doors of each house, and of committees of the whole, 
shall be kept open, except in such cases as in the opinion of the house 
require secrecy. Neither house shall, without consent of the other, 
adjourn for more than two days, nor to any other place than that in which 
the two houses shall be sitting. 

Sec. 20. The style of the laws of this state shall be : "Be it enacted by 
the people of the State of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly." 

Sec. 21. Bills may originate in either house, but may be altered, 
amended, or rejected by the other ; and on the final passage of all bills, 
the vote shall be by ayes and noes, and shall be entered on the journal ; 
and no bill shall become a law without a concurrence of a majority of all 
the members elect in each house. 

Sec. 22. Bills making appropriations for the pay of the members and 
officers of the general assembly, and for the salaries of the officers of 
the government, shall not contain any provision on any other subject. 

Sec. 23. Every bill shall be read on three different days in each house, 
unless, in case of urgency, three-fourths of the house, where such bill is 
so depending, shall deem it expedient to dispense with this rule ; and 
every bill having passed both houses shall be signed by the speakers of 
their respective houses ; and no private or local law which may be passed 
by the general assembly, shall embrace more than one subject, and that 
shall be expressed in the title. And no public act of the general assem- 
bly shall take e fleet or be in force until the expiration of sixty days from 
the end of the session at which the same may be passed, unless in case of 
emergency the general assembly shall otherwise direct. 

Sec. 24. The sum of two dollars per day, for the first forty-two days' 
attendance, and one dollar per day for each day's attendance thereafter, 
and ten cents for each necessary mile's travel going to and returning from 
the seat of government, shall be allowed to the members of the general 
assembly, as a compensation for their services, and no more. The speaker 
of the house of representatives shall be allowed the sum of one dollar 
per day, in addition to his per diem as a member. 

Sec. 25. The per diem and mileage allowed to each member of the 
general assembly, shall be certified by the speakers of their respective 
houses, and entered on the journal and published at the close of each 
session. 

Sec. 26. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law ; and an accurate statement of 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 23*7 

the receipts and expenditures of the public moneys shall be attached to, 
and published with, the laws, at the rising of each session of the general 
assembly. And no person, who has been or may be a collector or holder 
of the public moneys, shall be eligible to a seat in either house of the 
general assembly, nor be eligible to any office of profit or trust in this 
state, until such person shall have accounted for and paid into the treasury, 
all sums for which he may be accountable. 

Sec. 27. The house of representatives shall have the sole power of 
impeaching; but a majority of all the members elected must concur in 
an impeachment. All impeachments shall be tried by the senate; and 
when sitting for that purpose, the senators shall be upon oath or affirma- 
tion, to do justice according to law and evidence. No person shall be 
convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the senators elected. 

Sec. 28. The governor and other civil officers under this state, shall 
be liable to impeachment for any misdemeanor in office ; but judgment 
in such cases shall not extend further than to removal from office, and 
disqualification to hold any office of honor, profit, or trust, under this 
state. The party, whether convicted or acquitted, shall, nevertheless, 
be liable to indictment, trial, judgment and punisment, according to law. 

Sec. 29. No judge of any court of law or equity, secretary of state, 
attorney general, attorney for the state, recorder, clerk of any court of 
record, sheriff or collector, member of either house of congress, or 
person holding any lucrative office under the United States or of this 
state ; provided that appointments in the militia^ or justices of the peace, 
shall not be considered lucrative offices ; shall have a seat hi the general 
assembly; nor shall any person, holding any office of honor or profit 
under the government of the United States, hold any office of honor or 
profit under the authority of this state. 

Sec. 30. Every person who shall be chosen or appointed to any office 
of trust or profit, shall, before entering upon the duties thereof, take an 
oath to support the constitution of the United States, and of this state, 
and also an oath of office. 

Sec 31. The general assembly shall have full power to exclude from 
the privilege of electing or being elected, any person convicted of bribery, 
perjury, or other infamous crime. 

Sec 32. The general assembly shall have no power to grant divorces, 
but may authorize the courts of justice to grant them for such cause as 
may be specified by law : Provided, That such laws be general and 
uniform in their operation. 

Sec 33. The general assembly shall never grant or authorize extra 
compensation to any public officer, agent, servant or contractor, after the 
service shall have been rendered, or the contract entered into. 

Sec 34. The general assembly shall direct by law in what manner suits 
may be brought against the state. 

Sec 35. The general assembly shall have no power to authorize lot- 
teries for any purpose, nor to revive or extend the charter of the State 
Bank, or the charter of any other bank heretofore existing in this state, 
and shall pass laws to prohibit the sale of lottery tickets in this state. 

Sec 36. The general assembly shall have no power to authorize, by 
pi'ivate or special law, the sale of any lands, or other real estate, 
belonging, in whole or in part, to any individual or individuals. 

Sec 37. Each general assembly shall provide for all the appropriations 
necessary for the ordinary and contingent expenses of the government 
until the adjournment of the next regular session, the aggregate amount 
of which shall not be increased without a vote of two-thirds of each 



238 g. w. 

house, nor exceed the amount of revenue authorized by law to be raised 
in such time : Provided, The state may, to meet casual deficits or failures 
in revenue, contract debts, never to exceed in the aggregate fifty thou- 
sand dollars ; and the moneys thus borrowed shall be applied to the 
purpose for which they were obtained, or to repay the debts thus made, 
and to no other purpose ; and no other debt, except for the purpose of 
repelling invasion, suppressing insurrection or defending the state in war 
(for payment of which the faith of the state shall be pledged), shall be 
contracted, unless the law authorizing the same, shall, at a general elec- 
tion, have been submitted to the people, and have received a majority of 
all the votes cast for members of the general assembly at such election. 
The general assembly shall provide for the publication of said law for 
three months at least, before the vote of the people shall be taken upon 
the same ; and provision shall be made at the time for the payment of the 
interest annually, as it shall accrue, by a tax levied for the purpose, or 
from other sources of revenue ; which law, providing for the payment of 
such interest by such tax, shall be irrepealable until such debt be paid : 
And provided, further ', That the law levying the tax shall be submitted 
to the people with the law authorizing the debt to be contracted. 

Sec. 38. The credit of the state shall not, in any manner, be given to 
or in aid of, any individual, association or corporation. 

Sec. 39. The general assembly shall provide by law, that the fuel and 
stationery furnished for the use of the state, the copying, printing, bind- 
ing and distributing the laws and journals, and all other printing ordered 
by the general assembly, shall be let by contract to the lowest responsible 
bidder ; and that no member of the general assembly, or other officer of 
the state, shall be interested, cither directly or indirectly, in any such 
contract: Provided, That the general assembly may fix a maximum 
price. 

Sec. 40. Until there shall be a new apportionment of senators and 
representatives, the senate shall be divided into senatorial and representa- 
tive districts, and the senators and representatives shall be apportioned 
among the several districts as follows, viz.: 

[This apportionment is omitted because it is superseded by a new one.\ 
Sec. 41. Until the general assembly shall otherwise provide, the clerks 
of the county commissioners 1 courts in each of the aforesaid senatorial 
districts, and in such of the representative districts as may be composed of 
more than one county, shall meet at the county seat of the oldest county 
in said district, within thirty days next after any election for senator or 
representative therein, for the purpose of comparing and canvassing the 
votes given at such election ; and the said clerks shall in all other 
respects conform to the laws on the subject in force at the time of the 
adoption of this constitution. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. The executive power of the state shall be vested in a 
governor. 

Sec. 2. The first election of governor shall be held on Tuesday next 
after the first Monday in November, A. D. 1848; and the next election 
shall be held on Tuesday next after the first Monday of November, A. D. 
1852 ; and thei-eafter an election for governor shall be held once in four 
years, on Tuesday next after the first Monday of November. The gov- 
ernor shall be chosen by the electors of the members of the general 
assembly, at the same places and in the same manner, that they shall 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 239 

respectively vote for members thereof. The returns for every election of 
governor, shall be sealed up and transmitted to the seat of government 
by the returning officers, directed to the speaker of the house of repre- 
sentatives, who shall open and publish them in the presence of a majority 
of the members of each house of the general assembly. The person 
having the highest number of votes shall be governor; but if two or 
more be equal and highest in votes, then one of them shall be chosen 
governor by joint ballot of both houses of the general assembly. Con- 
tested elections shall be determined by both houses of the general 
assembly, in such manner as shall be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. The first governor shall enter upon the duties of his office the 
second Monday of January, A. D. 1849, and shall hold his office until the 
second Monday of January, A. D. 1853, and until his successor shall 
have been elected and qualified ; and thereafter the governor shall hold 
his office for the term of" four years, and until his successor shall have 
been elected and qualified ; but he shall not be eligible to such office 
more than four years in any term of eight years, nor to any other office, 
until after the expiration of the term for which he was elected. 

Sec. 4. No person except a citizen of the United States shall be 
eligible to the office of governor ; nor shall any person be eligible to that 
office who shall not have attained the age of thirty-five years, and been 
ten years a resident of this state, and fourteen years a citizen of the 
United States. 

Sec. 5. The governor shall reside at the seat of government, and 
receive a salary of fifteen hundred dollars per annum, which shall not be 
increased or diminished ; and he shall not, during the time for which he 
shall have been elected, receive any emolument from the United States, 
or either of them. 

Sec. 6. Before he enters upon the duties of his office he shall take the 
following oath or affirmation, to wit: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm), 
that I will faithfully execute the duties appertaining to the office of gov- 
ernor of the state of Illinois ; and will, to the best of my ability, preserve, 
pi-otect and defend the constitution of this state, and will also support the 
constitution of the United States." 

Sec 7. He shall, from time to time, give the general assembly 
information of the state of the government, and reccommend to their 
consideration such measures as he shall deem expedient. 

Sec 8. The governor shall have power to grant reprieves, commuta- 
tions and pardons, after conviction, for all offenses, except treason and 
cases of impeachment, upon such conditions and with such restrictions 
and limitations as he may think proper, subject to such regulations as 
may be provided by law relative to the manner of applying for pardons. 
Upon conviction for treason, he shall have power to suspend the execu- 
tion of the sentence until the case shall be reported to the general 
assembly at its next meeting, when the general assembly shall pardon 
the convict, commute the sentence, direct the execution thereof or grant 
a further reprieve. He shall, biennially, communicate to the general 
assembly each case of reprieve, commutation or pardon granted, stating 
the name of the convict, the crime for which he was convicted, the 
sentence and its date, and the date of commutation, jjardon or reprieve. 

Sec 9. He may require information in writing from the officers in the 
executive departments upon any subject relating to the duties of their 
respective offices, and shall take care that the laws be faithfuly executed. 

Sec 10. He may, on extraordinary occasions, convene the general 
assembly by proclamation, and shall state in said proclamation the pur- 



240 G. W. IIAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 

pose for which they are to convene ; and the general assembly shall enter 
on no legislative business except that for which they were specially 
called together. 

Sec. 11. He shall be commander-in-chief of the army and navy of this 
state, and of the militia, except when they shall be called into the service 
of the United States. 

Sec. 12. The governor shall nominate, and, by and with the advice 
and consent of the senate (a majority of all the senators concurring), 
appoint all officers whose offices are established by this constitution, or 
which may be created by law, and whose appointments are not other- 
wise provided for ; and no such officer shall be appointed or elected by 
the general assembly. 

Sec. 13. In case of disagreement between the two houses with respect 
to the time of adjournment, the governor shall have power to adjourn 
the general assembly to such time as he thinks proper : Provided, It be 
not to a period beyond the next constitutional meeting of the same. 

Sec. 14. A lieutenant governor shall be chosen at every election of 
governor, in the same manner, continue in office for the same time, and 
possess the same qualifications. In voting for governor and lieutenant 
governor, the electors shall distinguish whom they vote for as governor 
and whom as lieutenant governor. 

Sec. 15. The lieutenant governor shall, by virtue of his office, be 
speaker of the senate ; have a right, when in committee of the whole, to 
debate and vote on all subjects, and whenever the senate are equally 
divided, to give the casting vote. 

Sec 16. Whenever the government shall be administered by the 
lieutenant governor, or he shall be unable to attend as speaker of the 
senate, the senators shall elect one of their own number as speaker for 
that occasion ; and if, during the vacancy of the office of governor, the 
lieutenant governor shall be impeached, removed from office, refuse to 
qualify, or resign or die, or be absent from the state, the speaker of the 
senate shall, in like manner, administer the government. 

Sec 17. The lieutenant governor, while he acts as speaker of the 
senate, shall receive for his services the same compensation which shall, 
for the same period, be allowed to the speaker of the house of representa- 
tives, and no more. 

Sec 18. If the lieutenant governor shall be called upon to administer 
the government, and shall, while in such administration resign, die, or be 
absent from the state, during the recess of the general assembly, it shall 
be the duty of the secretary of state, for the time being, to convene the 
senate for the purpose of choosing a speaker. 

Sec 19. In case of impeachment of the governor, his absence from 
the state, or inability to discharge the duties of his office, the powers, 
duties and emoluments of the office shall devolve upon the lieutenant 
governor ; and in case of his death, resignation or removal, then upon 
the speaker of the senate for the time being, until the governor, absent 
or impeached, shall return or be acquitted ; or until the disqualification 
or inability shall cease ; or until a new governor shall be elected and 
qualified. 

Sec 20. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor, for any other 
cause than those herein enumerated, or in case of the death of the 
governor elect before he is qualified, the powers, duties and emoluments 
of the office shall devolve upon the lieutenant governor or speaker of the 
senate, as above provided, until a new governor be elected and qualified. 

Sec 21. Every bill which shall have passed the senate and house of 



GAZETTEER, AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 241 

representatives shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the gov- 
ernor ; if he approve, he shall sign it, but if not, he shall return it, with 
his objections, to the house in which it shall have originated ; and the 
said house shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and pro- 
ceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, a majority of the 
members elected shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together 
with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be 
reconsidered; and if approved by a majority of the members elected, 
it shall become a law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor ; 
but in all such cases, the votes of both houses shall be determined by 
ayes and nays, to be entered on the journal of each house, respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor within ten days (Sun- 
days excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall 
be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the general assem- 
bly shall, by their adjournment, prevent its return ; in which case, the 
said bill shall be returned on the first day of the meeting of the general 
assembly after the expiration of said ten days, or be a law. 

Sec. 22. There shall be elected, by the qualified electors of this state, 
at the same time of the election for governor, a secretary of state, whose 
term of office shall be the same as that of the governor, who shall keep 
a fair register of the official acts of the governor, and, when required, 
shall lay the same, and all papers, minutes and vouchers relative thereto, 
before either branch of the general assembly, and shall perform such 
other duties as shall be assigned him by law, and shall receive a salary 
of eight hundred dollars per annum, and no more, except fees : Provided 
That if the office of secretary of state should be vacated by death, resign- 
ation, or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the governor to appoint 
another, who shall hold his office until another secretary shall be elected 
and qualified. 

Sec. 23. There shall be chosen, by the qualified electors throughout 
the state, an auditor of public accounts, who shall hold his office for the 
term of four years, and until his successor is qualified, and whose duties 
shall be regulated by law, and who shall receive a salary, exclusive of 
clerk hire, of one thousand dollars per annum for his services, and no 
more. 

Sec. 24. There shall be elected, by the qualified electors throughout 
the state, a state treasurer, who shall hold his office for two years, and 
until his successor is qualified ; whose duties may be regulated by law, 
and who shall receive a salary of eight hundred dollars per annum, and 
no more. 

Sec. 25. All grants and commissions shall be sealed with the great 
seal of state, signed by the governor or person administering the govern- 
ment, and countersigned by the secretary of state. 

Sec. 26. The governor and all other civil officers shall be liable to 
impeachment for misdemeanor in office, during their continuance in office, 
and for two years thereafter. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section 1. The judicial power of this state shall be and is hereby 
vested in one supreme court, in circuit courts, in county courts, and in 
justices of the peace : Provided, That inferior local courts, of civil and 
criminal jurisdiction, may be established by the general assembly in the 
cities of this state, but such courts shall have a uniform organization and 
jurisdiction in such cities. 
16 



242 G. W. HAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 



Sec. 2. The supreme court shall consist of three judges, two of whom 
shall form a quorum; and the concurrence of two of said judges shall 
in all cases be necessary to a decision. 

Sec. 3. The state shall be divided into three grand divisions, as nearly- 
equal as may be, and the qualified electors of each division shall elect 
one of the said judges for the term of nine years : Provided, That after 
the first election of such judges, the general assembly may have the 
power to provide by law for their election by the whole state, or by 
divisions, as they may deem most expedient. 

Sec. 4. The office of one of said judges shall be vacated, after the first 
election held under this article, in three years, of one in six years, and of 
one in nine years; to be decided by lot, so that one of said judges shall 
be elected once in every three years. The judge having the longest 
term to serve shall be the first chief justice ; after which, the judge 
having the oldest commission shall be chief justice. 

Sec. 5. The supreme court may have original jurisdiction in cases rela- 
tive to the revenue, in cases of mandamus, habeas corpus, and in such 
cases of impeachment as may be by law directed to be tried before it, 
and shall have appellate jurisdiction in all other cases. 

Sec. 6. The supreme court shall hold one term annually in each of the 
aforesaid grand divisions, at such time and place, in each of said divisions, 
as may be provided for by law. 

Sec. 7. The state shall be divided into nine judicial districts ; in each 
of which one circuit judge shall be elected by the qualified electors 
thereof, who shall hold his office for the term of six years, and until his 
seccessor shall be commissioned and qualified: Provided, That the 
general assembly may increase the number of circuits to meet the future 
exigencies of the state. 

Sec. 8. There shall be two or more terms of the circuit court held 
annually in each county of this state, at such times as shall be provided 
by law ; and said courts shall have jurisdiction in all cases at law and 
equity, and in all cases of appeals from all inferior courts. 

Sec. 9. All vacancies in the supreme and circuit courts shall be filled 
by the election as aforesaid : Provided, however, That if the unexpired 
term does not exceed one year, such vacancy may be filled by executive 
appointment. 

Sec. 10. The judges of the supreme court shall receive a salary of 
twelve hundred dollars per annum, payable quarterly, and no more. The 
judges of the circuit courts shall receive a salary of one thousand dollars 
per annum, payable quarterly, and no more. The judges of the supreme 
and circuit courts shall not be eligible to any other office, or public trust, 
of profit, in this state or the United States, during the term for which 
they are elected, nor for one year thereafter. All votes for either of them 
for any elective office (except that of judge of the supreme or circuit 
courts), given by the general assembly, or the people, shall be void. 

Sec. 11. No person shall be eligible to the office of judge of any court 
of this state who is not a citizen of the United States, and who shall 
not have resided in this state five years next preceding his election, and 
who shall not for two years next preceding his election have resided in 
the division, circuit or county in which he shall be elected ; nor shall 
any person be elected judge of the supreme court who shall be, at the 
time of his election, under the age of thirty-five years ; and no person 
shall be eligible to the office of judge of the circuit court until he shall 
have attained the age of thirty years. 

Sec. 12. For any reasonalbe cause, to be entered on the journals of 



C4AZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 243 

each house, which shall not be a sufficient ground for impeachment, both 
justices of the supreme court, and judges of the circuit court, shall be 
removed from office, on a vote of two-thirds of the members elected to 
each branch of the general assembly : Provided, always, That no mem- 
ber of either house of the general assembly shall be eligible to fill the 
vacancy occasioned by such removal : Provided, also, That no removal 
shall be made unless the justice or judge complained of shall have been 
served with a copy of the complaint against him, and shall have an 
opportunity of being heard in his defense. 

Sec. 13. The first election for justices of the supreme court and judges 
of the circuit courts shall be held on the first Monday of September, 
1848. 

Sec. 14. The second election for one justice of the supreme court shall 
be held on the first Monday of June, 1852 ; and every three years there- 
after an election shall be held for one justice of the supreme court* 

Sec. 15. On the first Monday of June, 1855, and every sixth year 
thereafter, an election shall be held for judges of the circuit courts : Pro- 
vided, Whenever an additional circuit is created, such provision may be 
made as to hold the second election of such additional judge at the 
regular elections herein provided. 

Sec. 16. There shall be in each county a court, to be called a county 
court. 

Sec. 17. One county judge shall be elected by the qualified voters of 
each county, who shall hold his office for four years, and until his suc- 
cessor is elected and qualified. 

Sec. 18. The jurisdiction of said court shall extend to all probate and 
such other jurisdiction as the general assembly may confer in civil cases, 
and such criminal cases as may be prescribed by law, where the punish- 
ment is by fine only, not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

Sec. 19. The county judge, with such justices of the peace in each 
county as may be designated by law, shall hold terms for the transaction 
of county business, and shall perform such other duties as the general 
assembly shall prescribe : Provided, The general assembly may require 
that two justices, to be chosen by the qualified electors of each county, 
shall sit with the county judge in all cases; and there shall be elected 
quadrennially, in each county, a clerk of the county court, who shall be 
ex officio recorder, whose compensation shall be fees: Provided, The 
general assembly may, by law, make the clerk of the circuit court ex 
officio recorder, in lieu of the county clerk. 

Sec 20. The general assembly shall provide for the compensation of 
the county judge. 

Sec 21. The clerks of the supreme and circuit courts, and state's 
attorneys, shall be elected at the first special election for judges. The 
second election for clerks of the supreme court shall be held on the first 
Monday of June, 1855, and every sixth year thereaftei*. The second 
election for clerks of the circuit courts, and state's attorneys, shall be 
held on Tuesday next after the first Monday of November, 1852, and 
every fourth year thereafter. 

Sec 22. All judges and state's attorneys shall be commissioned by the 
governor. 

Sec 23. The election of all officers, and the filling of all vacancies 
that may happen by death, resignation, or removal, not otherwise directed 
or provided for by this constitution, shall be made in such a manner as 
the general assembly shall direct : Provided, That no such officer shall 
be elected by the general assembly. 



244 G. W. IIAWES' ILLINOIS STATE 

Sec. 24. The general assembly may authorize the judgments, decrees 
and decisions of any local inferior court of record, of original, civil, or 
criminal jurisdiction established in a city, to be removed for revision 
directly into the supreme court. 

Sec. 25. County judges, clerks, sheriffs and other county officers, for 
willful neglect of duty, or misdemeanor in office, shall be liable to present- 
ment or indictment by a grand jury, and trial by a petit jury, and, upon 
conviction, shall be removed from office. 

Sec. 26. All process, writs and other proceeding shall run in the name 
of % The people of the State of Illinois." All prosecutions shall be 
carried on "In the name and by the authority of the people of the State 
of Illinois,'''' and conclude, "Against the peace and dignity of the 
same.'''' 

Sec. 27. There shall be elected in each county in this state, in such 
district as the general assembly may direct, by the qualified electors 
thereof, a competent number of justices of the peace, who shall hold 
their offices for the term of four years, and until their successors shall 
have been elected and qualified, and who shall perform such duties, 
receive such compensation, and exercise such jurisdiction as may be 
prescribed by law. 

Sec. 28. There shall be elected in each of the judicial circuits of this 
state, by the qualified electors thereof, one state's attorney, who shall 
hold his office for the term of four years, and until his successor shall be 
commissioned and qualified ; Avho shall perform such duties and receive 
such compensation as may be prescribed by law : Provided, That the 
general assembly may hereafter provide by law for the election, by the 
qualified voters of each county in this state, of one county attorney for 
each county, in lieu of the state's attorneys, provided for in this section ; 
the term of office, duties and compensation of which county attorneys 
shall be regulated by law. 

Sec. 29. The qualified electors of each county in this state shall elect 
a clerk of the circuit court, who shall hold his office for the term of four 
years, and until his successor shall have been elected and qualified; who 
shall perform such duties and receive such compensation as may be pre- 
scribed by law. The clerks of the supreme court shall be elected, in 
each division, by the qualified electors thereof, for the term of six years, 
and until their successors shall have been elected and qualified ; whose 
duties and compensation shall be provided by law. 

Sec. 30. The first grand division, for the election of judges of the 
supreme court, shall consist of the counties of Alexander, Pulaski, Massac, 
Pope, Hardin, Gallatin, Saline, Williamson, Johnson, Union, Jackson, 
Randolph, Perry, Franklin, Hamilton, White, Wabash, Edwards, Wayne, 
Jefferson, Washington, Monroe, Saint Clair, Clinton, Marion, Clay, Rich- 
land, Lawrence, Crawford, Jasper, Effingham, Fayette, Bond, Madison, 
Jersey and Calhoun. 

The second grand division shall consist of the counties of Edgar, 
Coles, Moultrie, Shelby, Montgomery, Macoupin, Greene, Pike, Adams, 
Highland, Hancock, McDonough, Schuyler, Brown, Fulton, Mason, Cass, 
Morgan, Scott, Sangamon, Christian, Macon, Piatt, Champaign, Ver- 
milion, De Witt, Logan, Menard, Cumberland and Clark. 

The third grand division shall consist of the counties of Henderson, 
Warren, Knox, Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford, McLean, Livingston, Iro- 
quois, Will, Grundy, Kendall, La Salle, Putnam, Marshall, Stark, Bureau, 
Henry, Mercer, Rock Island, Whiteside, Lee, Carroll, Jo Daviess, 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 245 

Stephenson, Winnebago, Ogle, De Kalb, Boone, Kane, McIIenry, Lake, 
Cook and Du Page. 

Sec. 31. The terms of the supreme court for the first division shall be 
held at Mount Vernon, in Jefferson county ; for the second division, at 
Springfield, in Sangamon county ; for the third division, at Ottawa, in 
La Salle county, until some other place in either division is fixed by law. 

Sec. 32. Appeals and writs of error may be taken from the circuit 
court of any county to the supreme court held in the division which 
includes such count) r , or, with the consent of all the parties in the cause, 
to the supreme court in the next adjoining division. 

Sec 33. The foregoing districts may, after the taking of each census 
by the state, be altered, if necessary, to equalize the said districts in 
population ; but such alteration shall be made by adding to such district 
such adjacent county or counties as will make said district nearest equal 
in population : Provided, No such alteration shall affect the office of any 
judge then in office. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Section 1. In all elections, every white male citizen above the age of 
twenty-one years, having resided in the state one year next preceding 
any election, shall be entitled to vote at such election ; and every white 
male inhabitant of the age aforesaid, who may be a resident of the state 
at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall have the right of 
voting as aforesaid ; but no such citizen or inhabitant shall be entitled to 
vote, except in the district or county in which he shall actually reside at 
the time of such election. 

Sec 2. All votes shall be given by ballot. 

Sec 3. Electors shall, in all cases, except treason, felony, or breach of 
the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at elections, 
and in going to and returning from the same. 

Sec 4. No elector shall be obliged to do militia duty on the days of 
election, except in time of war or public danger. 

Sec 5. No elector shall be deemed to have lost his residence in this 
state by reason of his absence on the business of the United States, or of 
this state. 

Sec 6. No soldier, seaman, or marine, in the army or navy of the 
United States, shall be deemed a resident of this state in consequence of 
being stationed at any military or naval place within the same. 

Sec 7. No person shall be elected or appointed to any office in this 
state, civil or military, who is not a citizen of the United States, and who 
shall not have resided in this state one year next before the election or 
appointment. 

Sec 8. The general assembly shall have full power to pass laws 
excluding from the right of suffrage persons convicted of infamous 
crimes. 

Sec 9. The general elections shall be held on the Tuesday next after 
the first Monday in November, biennially, until otherwise provided by 
Jaw. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Section 1. No new county shall be formed or established by the gen- 
eral assembly, which will reduce the county or counties, or either of 
them, from which it shall be taken to less contents that four hundred 
square miles; nor shall any county be formed of less contents ; nor shall 



246 

any line thereof pass within less than ten miles of any county seat of the 
county or counties proposed to be divided. 

Sec. 2. No county shall be divided, or have any part stricken there- 
from, without submitting the question to a vote of the people of the 
county, nor unless a majority of all the legal voters of the county voting 
on the question shall vote for the same. 

Sec. 3. All territory which has been or may be stricken off by legisla- 
tive enactment from any organized county or counties, for the purpose of 
forming a new county, and which shall remain unorganized after the 
period provided for such organization, shall be and remain a part of the 
county or counties from which it was originally taken, for all purposes of 
county and state government, until otherwise provided by law. 

Sec. 4. There shall be no territory stricken from any county unless a 
majority of the voters living in such territory shall petition for such divi- 
sion ; and no territory shall be added to any county without the consent 
of a majority of the voters of the county to which it is proposed to be 
added. 

Sec 5. No county seat shall be removed until the point to which it is 
proposed to be removed shall be fixed by law, and a majority of the 
voters of the county shall have voted in favor of its removal to such 
point. 

Sec. 6. The general assembly shall provide, by a general law, for a 
township organization, under which any county may organize whenever 
a majority of the voters of such county, at any general election, shall so 
determine ; and whenever any county shall adopt a township organization, 
so much of this constitution as provides for the management of the fiscal 
concerns of the said county by the county court may be dispensed with, 
and the affairs of said county may be transacted in. such manner as the 
general assembly may provide. 

Sec 7. There shall be elected in each county in this state, by the quali- 
fied electors thereof, a sheriff, who shall hold his office for the term of 
two years, and until his successor shall have been elected and qualified: 
Provided, No person shall be eligible to the said office more than once 
in four years. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Section 1. The militia of the State of Illinois shall consist of all free 
male able-bodied persons (negroes, mulattoes, and Indians excepted) 
resident of the state, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, 
except such persons as now or hereafter may be exempted by the laws 
of the United States or of this state, and shall be armed, equipped, and 
trained, as the general assembly may provide by law. 

Sec 2. No person or persons, conscientiously scrupulous of bearing 
arms, shall be compelled to do militia duty in time of peace : Provided, 
Such person or persons shall pay an equivalent for such exemption. 

Sec 3. Company, battalion, and regimental officers, staff officers ex- 
cepted, shall be elected by the persons composing their several compa- 
nies, battalions, and regiments. 

Sec 4. Brigadier and major generals shall be elected by the officers of 
their brigades and divisions, respectively. 

Sec 5. All militia officers shall be commissioned by the governor, and 
may hold their commissions for such time as the legislature may provide.*' 

Sec 6. The militia shall in all cases, except treason, felony, or breach 
of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance c.t mus- 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 24*7 

ters and election of officers, and in going to and returning from the 
same. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Section 1. The general assembly may, "whenever they shall deem it 
necessary, cause to he collected from all able-bodied free white male 
inhabitants of this state, over the age of twenty-one years and under the 
age of sixty years, who are entitled to the right of suffrage, a capitation 
tax of not less than fifty cents, nor more than one dollar each. 

Sec. 2. The general assembly shall provide for levying a tax by valua- 
tion, so that every person and corporation shall pay a tax in proportion to 
the value of his or her property ; such value to be ascertained by some 
person or persons to be elected or appointed in such manner as the gene- 
ral assembly shall direct, and not otherwise ; but the general assembly 
shall have power to tax peddlers, auctioneers, brokers, hawkers, mer- 
chants, commission merchants, showmen, jugglers, inn-keepers, grocery 
keepers, toll-bridges and ferries, and persons using and exercising fran- 
chises and privileges, in such manner as they shall from time to time 
direct. 

Sec. 3. The property of the state and counties, both real and personal, 
and such other property as the general assembly may deem necessary, 
for school, religious and charitable purposes, may be exempt from 
taxation. 

Sec. 4. Hereafter no purchaser of any land or town lot, at any sale of 
lands or town lots for taxes due either to this state or any county, or 
incorporated town or city within the same, or at any sale for taxes or 
levies authorized by the laws of this state, shall be entitled to a deed for 
the lands or town lots so purchased until he or she shall have complied 
with the following conditions, to wit: Such purchaser shall serve, or 
cause to be served, a written notice of such purchase on every person in 
possession of such land or town lot, three months before the expiration 
of the time of redemption on such sale ; in which notice he shall state 
when he purchased the land or town lot, the description of the land or 
lot he has purchased, and when the time of redemption will expire. In 
like manner he shall serve on the person or persons in whose name or 
names such land or lot is taxed, a similar written notice, if such person 
or persons shall reside in the county where such land or lot shall be situ- 
ated ; and in the event that the person or persons in Avhose name or 
names the land or lot is taxed do not reside in the county, such purchaser 
shall publish such notice in some newspaper printed in such county ; and 
if no newspaper is printed in the county, then in the nearest newspaper 
that is published in this state to the county in which such lot or land is 
situated ; which notice shall be inserted three times, the last time not less 
than three months before the time of redemption shall expire. Every 
such purchaser, by himself or agent, shall, before he shall be entitled to 
a deed, make an affidavit of having complied with the conditions of this 
section, stating particularly the facts relied on as such compliance; which 
affidavit shall be delivered to the person authorized by law to execute 
such tax deed, and which shall by him be filed with the officer having 
custody of the records of lands and lots sold for taxes, and entries of 
redemption in the county where such land or lot shall lie, to be by such 
officer entered on the records of his office, and carefully preserved among 
the files of his office ; and which record or affidavit shall be prima facie, 
evidence that such notice has been given. Any person swearing falsely 



248 G. W. IIAWEs' ILLINOIS STATE 

in such affidavit shall be deemed guilty of perjury, and punished accord- 
ingly. In case any person shall be compelled under this section to 
publish a notice in a newspaper, then, before any person who may have 
a right to redeem such land or lot from such tax sale shall be permitted 
to redeem, he or she shall pay the officer or person who by law is author- 
ized to receive such redemption money, the printer's fee for publishing 
such notice, and the expenses of swearing or affirming to the affidavit, 
and filing the same. 

Sec. 5. The corporate authorities of counties, townships, school dis- 
tricts, cities, towns and villages, may be vested with power to assess and 
collect taxes for corporate purposes : such taxes to be uniform in respect 
to persons and property within the jurisdiction of the body imposing the 
same. And the general assembly shall require that all the property 
within the limits of municipal corporations, belonging to individuals, 
shall be taxed for the payment of debts contracted under authority of 
law. 

Sec. 6. The specifications of the objects and subjects of taxation shall 
not deprive the general assembly of the power to require other objects 
or subjects to be taxed, in such manner as may be consistent with the 
principles of taxation fixed in this constitution. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section 1. Corporations not possessing banking powers or privileges 
may be formed under general laws, but shall not be created by special 
acts, except for municipal purposes, and in cases where, in the judgment 
of the general assembly, the objects of the corporation cannot be enter- 
tained under general laws. 

Sec. 2. Dues from corporations, not possessing banking powers or 
privileges, shall be secured by such individual liabilities of the corpora- 
tors or other means as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. No state bank shall hereafter be created, nor shall the state 
own or be liable for any stock in any corporation or joint stock associa- 
tion for banking purposes, to be hereafter created. 

Sec. 4. The stockholders in every corporation or joint stock associa- 
tion for banking purposes, issuing bank notes, or any kind of paper credits 
to circulate as money, shall be individually responsible, to the amount of 
their respective share or shares of stock in such corporation or associa- 
tion, for all its debts and liabilities of every kind. 

Sec 5. No act of the general assembly authorizing corporations or 
associations with banking powers shall go into effect, or in any manner 
be in force, unless the same shall be submitted to the people at the gene- 
ral election next succeeding the passage of the same, and be approved 
by a majority of all the votes cast at such election for and against such 
law. 

Sec 6. The general assembly shall encourage internal improvements, 
by passing liberal laws of incorporation for that purpose. 

ARTICLE XL 

All lands which have been granted as a " common" to the inhabitants 
of any town, hamlet, village or corporation, by any person, body politic 
or corporate, or by any government having power to make such grant, 
shall forever remain common to the inhabitants of such town, hamlet, 
village or corporation ; but the said commons, or any of them, or any 
part thereof, may be divided, leased or granted in such manner as may 



GAZETTEER AET> BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 249 

hereafter be provided by law, on petition of a majority of the qualified 
voters interested in such common, or any of them. 

ARTICLE XII. 

Section 1. Whenever two-thirds of all the members elected to each 
branch of the general assembly shall think it necessary to alter or amend 
this constitution, they shall recommend to the electors, at the next elec- 
tion of members of the general assembly, to vote for or against a con- 
vention, and if it shall appear that a majority of all the electors of the 
state voting for representatives have voted for a convention, the general 
assembly shall, at their next session, call a convention, to consist of as 
many members as the house of representatives at the time of making said 
call, to be chosen in the same manner, at the same place, and by the same 
electors, in the same districts that chose the members of the house of 
representatives ; and which convention shall meet within three months 
after the said election, for the purpose of revising, altering or amending 
this constitution. 

Sec. 2. Any amendment or amendments to this constitution may be 
proposed in either branch of the general assembly ; and if the same shall 
be agreed to by two-thirds of all the members elect in each of the two 
houses, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be referred to 
the next regular session of the general assembly, and shall be published 
at least three months previous to the time of holding the next election 
for members of the house of representatives ; and if, at the next regular 
session of the general assembly after said election a majority of all the 
members elect in each branch of the general assembly shall agree to 
said amendment or amendments, then it shall be their duty to submit the 
same to the people at the next general election, for then- adoption or 
rejection, in such manner as may be prescribed by law; and if a majority 
of all the electors voting at such election for members of the house of 
representatives shall vote for such amendment or amendments, the same 
shall become a part of the constitution. But the general assembly shall 
not have power to propose an amendment or amendments to more than 
one article of the constitution at the same session. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

That the general, great and essential principles of liberty and free gov- 
ernment may be recognized and unalterably established, we declare : 
Section- 1. That all men are born equally free and independent, and 
have certain inherent and indefeasible rights, among which are those of 
enjoying and defending life and liberty, and of acquiring, possessing and 
protecting property and reputation, and of pursuing their own happiness. 
Sec 2. That all power is inherent in the people, and all free govern- 
ments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety 
and happiness. 

Sec 3. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship 
Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences ; that 
no man can of right be compelled to attend, erect or support any place 
of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent; that no 
human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the 
rights of conscience : and that no preference shall ever be given by law 
to any religious establishments or modes of Avorship. 

Sec 4. That no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification 
to any office or public trust under this state. 



250 G. W. H AWES' ILLINOIS STATE 

Sec. 5. That all elections shall be free and equal. 

Sec. 6. That the right of trial by jury shall remain inviolate, and shall 
extend to all cases at law, without regard to the amount in controversy. 

Sec 7. That the people shall be secure in their persons, houses, papers, 
and possessions, from unreasonable searches and seizures ; and that gen- 
eral warrants, whereby an officer may be commanded to search suspected 
places without evidence of the fact committed, or to seize any person or 
persons not named, whose offenses are not particularly described and 
supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty, and ought not to be 
granted. 

Sec 8. That no freeman shall be imprisoned or disseized of his free- 
hold, liberties or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner 
deprived of his life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his 
peers, or the law of the land. 

Sec 9. That in all criminal prosecutions the accused hath a right to 
be heard by himself and counsel ; to demand the nature and cause of 
the accusation against him ; to meet the witnesses face to face ; to have 
compulsory process to compel the attendance of witnesses in his favor ; 
and in prosecutions by indictment or information, a speedy public trial 
by an impartial jury of the county or district wherein the offense shall 
be committed, which county or district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and that he shall not be compelled to give evidence 
against himself. 

Sec 10. No person shall be held to answer for a criminal offense unless 
on the presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases of 
impeachment, or in cases cognizable by justices of the peace, or arising 
in the army or navy, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of 
war or public danger: .Provided, That justices of the peace shall try no 
person, except as a court of inquiry, for any offense punishable with 
imprisonment or death, or fine above one hundred dollars. 

Sec 11. No person shall, for the same offense, be twice put in 
jeopardy of his life or limb ; nor shall any man's property be taken 
or applied to public use without the consent of his representatives 
in the general assembly, nor without just compensation being made 
to him. 

Sec 12. Every person within this state ought to find a certain rem- 
edy in the laws for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his 
person, property, or character ; he ought to obtain right and justice 
freely, and without being obliged to purchase it, completely and without 
denial, promptly and without delay, conformably to the laws. 

Sec 13. That all persons shall be bailable by sufficient sureties, unless 
for capital offenses where the proof is evident or the presumption great ; 
and the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, 
unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may 
require it. 

Sec 14. All penalties shall be proportioned to the nature of the 
offense ; the true design of all punishment being to reform, not to 
exterminate mankind. 

Sec 15. No person shall be imprisoned for debt unless upon refusal 
to deliver up his estate for the benefit of his creditors, in such manner as 
shall be prescribed by law, or in cases where there is strong presumption 
of fraud. 

Sec 16. There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in 
this state, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have 
been duly convicted. 



GAZETTEEK AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 251 



Sec. 17. No ex post facto law, nor any law impairing the obligation of 
contracts, shall ever be made ; and no conviction shall work corruption 
of blood or forfeiture of estate. 

Sec. 18. That no person shall be liable to be transported out of this 
state for any offense committed within the same. 

Sec 19. That a frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles 
of civil government is absolutely necessary to preserve the blessings 
of liberty. 

Sec. 20. The military shall be in strict subordination to the civil 
power. 

Sec 21. That the people have a right to assemble together in a 
peaceable manner to consult for their common good, to instruct their 
representatives, and to apply to the general assembly for redress of 
grievances. 

Sec 22. No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner ; nor in time of war, except in manner 
prescribed by law. 

Sec 23. The printing presses shall be free to every person who 
undertakes to examine the proceeedings of the general assembly, or any 
branch of government, and no law shall ever be made to restrain the 
right thereof. The free communication of thoughts and opinions is one 
of the invaluable rights of man, and every citizen may freely speak, 
write, and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that 
liberty. 

Sec 24. In prosecutions for the publication of papers investigating 
the official conduct of officers, or of men acting in a public capacity, or 
Avhen the matter published is proper for public information, the truth 
thereof may be given in evidence, and in all indictments for libels, the 
jury shall have the right of determining both the law and the fact, under 
the direction of the court, as in other cases. 

Sec 25. Any person who shall, after the adoption of this constitution, 
fight a duel, or send or accept a challenge for that purpose, or be aider 
or abettor in fighting a duel, shall be deprived of the right of holding 
any office of honor or profit in this state, and shall be punished otherwise, 
in such manner, as is or may be prescribed by law. 

Sec 26. That froni and after the adoption of this constitution, every 
person who shall be elected or appointed to any office of profit, trust, or 
emolument, civil or military, legislative, executive, or judicial, under the 
government of this state, shall, before he enters upon the duties of his 
office, in addition to the oath prescribed in this constitution, take the 
following oath: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm, as the case maybe), 
that I have not fought a duel, nor sent or accepted a challenge to fight 
a duel, the probable issue of which might have been the death of either 
party, nor been a second to either party, nor in any manner aided or 
assisted in such duel, nor been knowingly the bearer of such challenge 
or acceptance, since the adoption of the constitution, and that I will not 
be so engaged or concerned, directly or indirectly, in or about any such 
duel, during my continuance hi office. So help me God." 

ARTICLE XIV. 

The general assembly shall, at its first session under the amended con- 
stitution, pass such laws as will effectually prohibit free persons of color 
from immigrating to and settling in this state ; and to effectually prevent 
the owners of slaves from bringing them into this state, for the purpose 
of setting them free. 



252 



ARTICLE XV. 



There shall be annually assessed and collected, in the same manner as 
other state revenue may be assessed and collected, a tax of two mills 
upon each dollar's worth of taxable property, in addition to all other 
taxes, to be applied as follows, to wit: The fund so created shall be 
kept separate, and shall annually, on the first day of January, be 
apportioned and paid over pro rata upon all such state indebtedness, 
other than the Canal and School indebtedness as may for that purpose 
be presented by the holders of the same, to be entered as credits 
upon, and to that intent, in extinguishment of the principal of said 
indebtedness. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 253 



GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



President — James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania. 
Vice-President — John C. Breckenridge, of Kentucky. 
Secretary of State — Lewis Cass, of Michigan. 
Secretary of the Treasury — Howell Cobb, of Georgia. 
Secretary of the Navy — Isaac Toucey, of Connecticut. 
Secretary of War — John B. Floyd, of Virginia. 
Secretary of the Interior — Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi. 
Postmaster General — Aaron V. Brown, of Tennessee. 
Attorney- General — Jeremiah S. Black, of Pennsylvania. 

UNITED STATES SENATORS FROM ILLINOIS. 

Stephen A. Douglas. Lyman Trumbull. 

MEMBEES OF CONGRESS FROM ILLINOIS. 



District 1. 


E. B. Washburn. 


District 6. 


Thomas L. Harris. 


" 2. 


J. F. Farnsworth. 


" 7. 


A. Shaw. 


" 3. 


Owen Lovejoy. 


" 8. 


Robert Smith. 


" 4. 


William Kellogg. 


" 9. 


Samuel A. Marshall 


" 5. 


Isaac N. Morris. 







ILLINOIS STATE GOVERNMENT. 



Governor — William H. Bissell, of St. Clair county. 
Lieutenant-Governor — John Wood, of Adams county. 
Secretary of State — Ozias M. Hatch, of Pike county. 
Auditor of Public Accounts — Jesse K. Dubois, of Lawrence county. 
Treasurer — James Miller, of McLean county. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction — William H. Powell, of Peoria 
county. 

STATE SENATORS. 

District 1. Cook county — N. B. Judd. 

District 2. Lake and McHenry counties — George Gage. 

District 3. Winnebago, Ogle and Carroll counties — W. Talcott. 

District i. Jo Daviess and Stephenson counties — J. H. Adams. 



254 

District 5. Kane, De Kalb, Lee and Whiteside counties — A. Adams. 
District 6. Will, Du Page, Kendall, Iroquois and Kankakee counties 
— G. D. H. Parks. 

District 7. La Salle, Grundy, Livingston and Bureau counties — E. 

C. Cook. 

District 8. Peoria, Marshall, Woodford and Putnam counties — J. D. 
Arnold. 

District 9. Knox, Warren, Mercer, Rock Island, Henry and Stark 
counties — T. G. Henderson. 

District 10. Fulton and McDonough counties — W. C. Goudy. 

District 11. Schuyler, Henderson and Hancock counties — H. Rose. 

District 12. Adams and Brown counties — W. II. Carlin. 

District 13. Pike, Calhoun and Scott counties — II. L. Sutphin. 

District 14. Greene, Macoupin and Jersey counties — L. E. Worcester. 

District 15. Sangamon and Morgan counties — C. W. Vanderin. 

District 16. Champaign, De Witt, Piatt, Macon, Christian, Moultrie, 
Shelby and McLean counties — S. Post. 

District 17. Cass, Minard, Logan, Mason and Tazewell counties — 
S. W. Fuller. 

District 18. — Vermilion, Coles, Cumberland and Edgar counties — W. 

D. Watson. 

District 19. Clark, Fayette, Effingham, Jasper, Lawrence and Craw- 
ford counties — M. O. Kean. 

District 20. Jefferson, Wayne, Edwards, Wabash, Marion, Clay and 
Richland counties — S. L. Bryan. 

District 21. Madison, Bond and Montgomery counties — Joseph 
Gillespie. 

District 22. Monroe and St. Clair counties — W. H. Underwood. 

District 23. Williamson, Hamilton, Franklin, White and Saline counties 
— S. II. Martin. 

District 24. Randolph, Washington, Clinton, Perry and Jackson 
counties — E. C. Coffey. 

District 25. Alexander, Johnson, Union, Pulaski, Massac, Oak, Har- 
din and Gallatin counties — A. J. Kuykendall. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

District 1. Alexander, Pulaski and Union counties — John Dougherty. 

District 2. Pope, Hardin and Massac counties — Westley Sloan. 

District 3. Williamson and Johnson counties — Thomas Jones. 

District 4. Gallatin and Saline counties — E. C. Ingersoll. 

District 5. Franklin and Jackson counties — John Logan. 

District 6. Randolph county — James H. Watt. 

District 7. Washington and Perry counties — H. S. Osborn. 

District 8. Jefferson, Marion and Perry counties — I. A. Wilson and 
W. B. Anderson. 

District 9. Wabash and White counties — John E. Whiting. 

District 10. Wayne and Edwards counties — C. P. Burns. 

District 11. Monroe county — William R. Morrison. 

District 12. St. Clair county — W. W Roman and Vital Jarrot. 

District 13. Clinton and Bond counties — W. A. J. Sparks. 

District 14. Madison county — Aaron P. Mason and Lewis Ricks. 

District 15. Fayette and Effingham counties — Daniel Gregory. 

District 16. Clay, Richland and Jasper counties — F. D. Preston. 

District 17. Lawrence and Crawford counties — Isaac Wilkins. 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



255 



District 18. 

District 19. 

District 20. 

District 21. 

District 22. 

District 23. 

District 24. 

District 25. 

District 26. 

District 27. 

District 28. 
Kerley. 

District 29. 

District 30. 

District 31. 

District 32. 

District 33. 

District 34. 

District 35. 

District 36. 
Gorin. 

District 37. 

District 38. 

District 39. 

District 40. 

District 41. 
Shellenberger 

District 42. 

District 43. 



Clark county — Nathan Willard. 
Cumberland and Shelby counties — S. W. Moulton. 
Montgomery and Christian counties — Calvin Goudy. 
Macoupin county — H. T. Burke. 
Jersey and Calhoun counties — Wright Casey. 
Greene county — John W. Hudtt. 
Edgar county — Samuel Connelly. 
Coles and Moultrie counties — James C. Wycke. 
Sangamon county — S. M. Cullom and J. J. Magredy. 
Morgan and Scott counties — C. Epler and E. BT Hitt. 
Pike and Brown counties — John L. Grimes and King- 
Adams county — Samuel Holmes and M. M. Bane. 
Schuyler county — L. D. Erwin. 
Hancock county — William Tyner. 
McDonough county— George Hire. 
Fulton county — Joseph Dyckes and James H. Stipp. 
Cass and Menard counties — Samuel Christy. 
Mason and Logan counties — Alexander W. Morgan. 
Macon, DeWitt, Piatt and Champaign counties — J. R. 

Vermilion county — O. L. Davis. 

McLean county — John H. Wickizer. 

Tazewell county — Daniel Trail. 

Henderson and Warren counties — A. V. T. Gilbert. 

Peoria and Stark counties — John T. Lindsay and R. M. 



Marshall, Woodford and Putnam counties — Robert Beal. 
La Salle, Livingston and Grundy counties — Elmer Bald- 
win and James N. Reading. 

District 44. Kendall county — J. M. Crothers. 

District 45. Iroquois, Will, Du Page and Kankakee counties — Tru- 
man W. Smith, W. A. Chatfield and Franklin Blades. 

District 46. Kane and De Kalb counties — David M. Kelsey and 
William R. Parker. 

District 47. Bureau county — George W. Redcliffe. 

Mercer, Henry and Rock Island counties — H. G. Little. 

Lee and Whiteside counties — John V. Eustace. 

Ogle county — D. V. Pinkney. 

Carroll and Jo Daviess counties — C. B. Denio and R. 



District 48. 

District 49. 

District 50. 

District 51. 
Wheeler. 

District 52. 

District 53. 

District 54. 
Lawrence. 

District 55. 

District 56. 



Stephenson county — John Davis. 

Winnebago county — William Lathrop. 

Boone and McIIenry counties — L. W. Church and L. W. 



Lake county — W. M. Burbank. 

Towns of South Chicago, Lyons, Lake, Lamont, Pales, 
Orland, Bremen, Worth, Rich, Thornton and Bloom, in Cook countv — 
J. H. Dunham and G. W. Morris. 

District 57. Towns of West Chicago, North Chicago, Jefferson, Ley- 
den, Ridgeville, Niles, Maine, Elk Grove, Hanover, Palantine, Shaumberg, 
New Trier, Northfield, Barrington, Wheeling and Proviso, in Cook 
county — I. N. Arnold and A. F. C. Mueller. 
District 58. Knox county — D. H. Frisbie. 



256 



SPECIAL LAWS OF ILLINOIS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



When any notice or advertisement shall be required by law, or the 
order of any court, to be published in any newspaper, the certificate of 
the printer or publisher, with a written or printed copy of such notice or 
advertisement annexed, stating the number of times which the same shall 
have been published, and the dates of the first and last papers containing 
the same, shall be sufficient evidence of the publication therein set forth. 

When any notice or advertisement relating to any cause, matter or 
thing depending in any court of record, shall have been duly published, 
the same may be paid for by the party at whose instance the same was 
published, who may present his account therefor to the proper court, 
which account, or so much thereof as shall be deemed reasonable, may 
be taxed as costs, or otherwise allowed in the course of the proceedings 
to which such notice or advertisement shall relate. 

When any notice or advertisement shall be published by a public 
officer, in pursuance of law, the reasonable expense thereof shall be 
aUowed and paid out of the state or county treasury, as the case may 
require. 

In all cases in which by law, or order of court, any advertisement 
shall be directed to be published, and the number of publications shall 
not be specified, it shall be taken and intended that such advertisement 
shall be published three times for three successive weeks. 

ALIENS. 

That all aliens may take, by deed, will or otherwise, lands and tene- 
ments, and any interest therein, and alienate, sell, assign and transmit the 
same to their heirs, or any other persons, whether such hens or other 
persons be citizens of the United States or not, in the same manner as 
natural born citizens of the United States, or of this state, might do ; and 
upon the decease of any person having title to, or interest in, any lands 
or tenements, such lands and tenements shall pass and descend in the 
seme manner as if such alien were a citizen of the United States, and it 
shall be no objection to any person having an interest in such estate that 
they are not citizens of the United States, but all such persons shall have 
the same rights and remedies, and in all things be placed upon the same 
footing, as natural born citizens and actual residents of the United 
States. 

The personal estate of an alien, dying intestate, shall be distributed in 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 25*7 

the same manner as the estates of natural born citizens, and all persons 
.interested in such estate shall be entitled to proper distributive shares 
thereof, under the laws of this state, whether they are aliens or not. 

BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

It shall be the duty of the clerk of the county commissioners' court, in 
each county of this state, to provide himself with a well-bound book, 
wherein he shall record the births and deaths of all persons coming to his 
knowledge, in the manner hereinafter provided. 

The father of a child or children, or mother of any child or children, in 
case the father be dead, out of the state, or otherwise prevented, or in 
case of an illegitimate child or children, may appear before the clerk of 
the county commissioners' court of his or her respective county, and 
make an affidavit in writing before such clerk, setting forth the birth or 
births of his or her child or children, stating therein the day and year 
when, and the justice's precinct wherein such birth or births happened, 
and the christian and surname of said child or children. In case such 
father or mother fail or neglect to make an affidavit as aforesaid, within 
sixty days after such birth or births, any householder may make the same 
concerning every birth hapj)ening in his house. 

The eldest person next of kin may make affidavit before the clerk 
aforesaid, of his or her respective county, of the death of his or her kin- 
dred, and in case the next of kin neglects to make such an affidavit for 
the space of twenty days, the administrator or executor of such deceased 
person may make such affidavit as aforesaid ; and any householder may 
make the like affidavit before said clerk concerning any death happening 
in his house. Affidavits made under the provisions of this section, shall 
state the name and age of the person deceased, according to the best of 
his or her knowledge and belief, and shall also state the justice's precinct 
where such death happened. If any person shall come to his death, and 
a coroner's inquest be held over his or her body, or if any person die 
while confined in any penitentiary, jail, workhouse, poorhouse or hospi- 
tal, within this state, the respective wardens, jailors, or keepers of such 
workhouses, poorhouses or hospitals, shall make out a certificate contain- 
ing substantially the same statements concering the name, age, death and 
place of death, required in the affidavit last aforesaid, and within ten days 
after such death happened, file the same with the county commissioners' 
clerk of the proper county. 

The said county commissioners' clerk shall carefully file and number 
such affidavits and certificates in the order they are presented, which 
shall be parts of the records of his office, and said clerk shall make an 
abstract of the material facts set forth in said affidavit or certificate, and 
enter the same in the said record of births and deaths ; which abstract 
shall be in substance as follows : 

ENTRY CONCERNING THE BIRTH OF A PERSON. 

On the day of , A. D. 18 — , A — B — (being the father or mother, or'a house- 
holder, as the case may be), made proof of the birth of C — D — , which took place on the 
day of , A. D. IS — , in precinct, county of ; see affidavit on file, No. — . 

ENTRY OF DEATH. 

On the day of , A. D. 18 — , A — B — , of county (being the eldest person 

next of kin, or a householder in whose house the death happened, executor or administrator 
of deceased, coroner, or keeper of a jail, poorhouse, workhouse of hospital, as the case may 
be), made proof of the death of C — D — , aged years, which took place on the 

17 



258 

» 

day f ; A. D. 18 — , in precinct, county; see affidavit (or certificate) on file 

No. — . 

The clerk shall keep a correct alphabetical index to said record, show- 
in^ the christian names and surnames of the persons concerning whom 
entries have been made; said index distinguishing between cases of births 
and deaths, and shall upon request of any person, make out a certificate of 
said entry, under his hand and the seal of the county commissioners' 
court ; and such certificate shall be received as prima facie evidence of 
the facts stated therein, in all courts of law and equity in this state. 

For every affidavit taken under this chapter, the said clerk shall be 
entitled to a fee of twelve and a half cents ; for making the entry and 
filino- certificates, to a fee of twelve and a half cents ; and for making 
out a certificate under seal as aforesaid, to a fee of fifty cents: Provided, 
He shall not be entitled to any fee, in case where one of the above 
enumerated officers files a certificate of the death of any person under his 
charge. 

Any person having sworn or made affirmation to any of the affidavits 
above mentioned, who shall swear or affirm willfully, corruptly and 
falsely, in a material point therein set forth, or shall suborn any other 
person to swear or affirm as aforesaid, shall be deemed guily of perjury 
or subornation of perjury, and shall be, upon conviction thereof, punished 
accordingly. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 



TOWX mCOKPORATIONS. 



Whenever the white male residents of lawful age of any town in 
this state, having not less than one hundred and fifty inhabitants, shall 
wish to become incorporated for the better regulation of their internal 
police, it shall be lawful for the said residents, who may have resided 
six months therein, or who shall be the owner of any freehold property 
therein, to assemble themselves together, in public meeting, at the court 
house or other place in said town, and when so assembled, they may 
proceed to choose a president and clerk of the meeting from among their 
number, both of whom shall be sworn, or affirmed, by any person author- 
ized to administer oaths, faithfully to discharge the trust reposed in 
them as president and clerk of said meeting: Provided, however, That 
at least ten days' notice of the time and place of holding such meeting 
shall have been previously given by advertising in some newspaper of 
the town, or by setting up written notices, in at least three of the most 
public places in such town. 

The residents, as aforesaid, of any town, having assembled as directed 
in the first section of this division, may proceed to decide by vote,, viva 
■voce, whether they will be incorporated or not, and the president or 



GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 259 

clerk, after their votes are given in, shall certify under their hands, the 
number of votes in favor of being incorporated and the number against 
being incorporated ; and if it shall appear that two-thirds of the voters 
present are in favor of being incorporated, the president and clerk shall 
deliver a certificate of the state of the polls to the board of trustees, to 
be elected as hereinafter provided. 

Whenever the qualfied voters of any town shall have decided, in the 
manner herein provided, that they wish to be incorporated, it shall be 
the duty of the clerk of the meeting at which they may so decide, to give 
at least five days' previous public notice to said voters, to assemble at 
the court house, or some other public place in such town, on a day to be 
named in such notice, to elect by viva voce vote, five residents and free- 
holders of such town, for trustees of the same, who shall hold their office 
for one year, and until other trustees are chosen and qualified ; at which 
first election, the president and clerk of the first meeting shall preside, 
or in case of the absence of either of them, some suitable person shall be 
appointed by the